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    1633 []  2020-4-19 18:32

    Eric Flint collaborated with David Weber to produce this perfect continuation of the Alternate History begun in 1632 This sequel is very nearly as amazing as "1632," which is outstanding. If I could give fractional stars, I might rate "1632" 4.99 stars and "1633" 4.98, hardly a significant difference.I would recommend reading "1632" first, then "1633" and Ring of Fire (Assiti Shards) however, read in any they would still be thoroly critic complained that Flint was "preachy." If you wish to avoid that, just skip the "Author's Afterword" (4 pages of "1632") and read only thru page 492. On the other hand, you may even wish to read the Afterword first, because it gives some background info which may support you appreciate the narratives of the series. If you doubt that some blue-collar workers can rise to the level depicted in this series, consider the historical fact that the most brilliant political strategist of the 20th century, Alex Rose, began his career as a member of the Hatters' Union in Fresh York City.A major hero is Rebecca Abrabanel, a fictional member of a prominent historical Jewish family. Seeing the name only in print, I had mispronounced it (to myself) with the first two syllables as in abracadabra. I asked a rabbi, and he told me the correct pronunciation is uh-BRAHV-uh-Nell. Note that the second b, as is often the case in Spanish, is pronounced like most everyone else who has read the three books out so far, I am eagerly awaiting "1634."Note: Since I wrote the above, three 1634 novels and one 1635 have come out, and I highly recommend all of them:1634: The Baltic War,1634: The Ram Rebellion (Assiti Shards),1634: The Galileo Affair (The Ring of Fire),1635: Cannon Law (Ring of Fire);also four collections of shorter stories set in the same universe:Ring of Fire (Assiti Shards)The Grantville Gazette,Grantville Gazette II, andGrantville Gazette IIIand more are on the

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    1633 []  2020-4-19 18:32

    1633 lacks some of what created me love 1632 so much. Mainly, there is much less action and much more politics than in the previous book. The first ~500 pages are spent setting up for a dramatic clash between the forces of Cardinal Richelieu and Emporer Gustavus that only begins to develop at the end of this book (and will be concluded in 1634: the Baltic War). Actually, throughout almost the entire book, none of the characters seem to be in very much danger, instead just pondering and planning for future e majority of 1633 is spent detailing the "up-time" American's efforts to influence the fate of Europe. Diplomatic missions to England, Scotland, and the Netherlands take up much of the book but don't contribute much in the method of action. The beginings of a navy and air force are interesting to read about but don't really influence the story much until the very end (but when they do its excellently intense).1633 is very well-researched and you'll actually learn a lot about 17th century European politics and living conditions. The characters are amazing and the whole idea of a little American city changing the course of history retains its appeal.Overall, while the story is well-writen, fun and interesting, you're left with a very incomplete feeling after finishing. A lot of build-up for very small action and a lot of story still to tell.

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    1633 []  2020-4-19 18:32

    There are very few series I like. The reason being that the author often loses his or her way. There have been some that are wizard and worth re-reading and re-reading. Anything by Andre Norton, Robert Jordan's magnificent series, Birmingham's "Weapons of Choice" series and now this. I am a Historian and the one thing that always fascinates me about alternate histories is the impact of various cultures or technologies on the societies being written about.Flint's 1632 series is magnificent. I have read four of the books, so far, in and I must say that, as a Historian, I search them to be about as interesting as a "real" history book. That may sound like damning with "faint praise" but it isn't.History is alive, it is only created turgid and boring by Historians who cannot write. They publish but the fail to give depth and life to what was a very lively where is this more obvious than with the 30 Years War. And I think I know why Flint chose this time. It was a time of change. It doesn't seem so, if you read current histories, but it was. It was and is the excellent moment for Flint and his co-authors to "sweep" in and throw a wrench into the gear of time. So to speak.I have had to read a lot of books on this period in time and Flint has nailed the ability to convey the mishmash of politics in such a method as to not only create it understandable but fascinating.Kudos, because the entire series, so far, is not about a duck out of water, but creating fresh ponds and fresh ducks, to bring the millennia prior to the time.

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    1633 []  2020-4-19 18:32

    I’ll never look at the Golden Arches again without thinking “Freedom Arches.” Created me smile! On a serious note, I was more moved than I thought I would be by the description of the first flight, the peril of Richelieu’s France gaining in the Fresh World, and the preparation of the boats. I am not a technical thinker, but the implications of flight were so tremendous, I was tearful. So well done.

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    1633 []  2020-4-19 18:32

    This sequel to 1632 is a collaboration teaming David Weber with the series creator Eric Flint. The effect is a knockout. Weber and Flint work together well and it shows the original, a modern West Virginia coal mining city finds itself transported to Germany in the middle of the 30 Years War. As is to be expected, modern technology makes a difference. The issue is that the "modern" level of technology is not sustainable indefinitely with the resources available in 1632. While the locals are scrambling to adapt pieces of modern technology to their own ends, the mining city is racing to "build down" to a level where they can sustain themselves. Having a multi front battle to with at the same time just makes it e city of Grantville allies itself with the Swedish King Gustav Adolph and nobody likes that. Cardinal Richelieu, doesn't like it. The Hapsburgs in Germany don't like it. The Hapsburgs in Spain don't like it. Charles I of England doesn't like it. The only ones who do seem to like it are those living under the American system of justice. All of the adversaries are joining together to stamp out the interlopers while trying to obtain the upper hand themselves. The Americans send embassies to France, the Netherlands, England and Scotland. Political intrigue abounds and things obtain complicated. It is left for Flint and Weber to straighten out the mess. They do so though superior me of the characters from the first book are fleshed out and developed better. Others from the first are mere shadows while fresh characters are more fully developed. This makes sense. It looks like there is a whole fresh globe for the authors' to play in for some time to come.Whoopie!

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    1633 []  2020-4-19 18:32

    I love to admit it, I am a fan of Alternative History. The method that you can imagine the changes if one thing in history was changed is just an amazing thought. Now, think how much could be changed if you have the ability to change a million things in just one day. The Ring of Fire universe is like this and 1633 keeps up the challenge.Mike Sterns and his West Virginia allies are still changing the globe to what they wish to believe is the better. Allies are made, as well as some enemies. Will Europe and the rest of the globe obtain better or worse? You just need to tune in and search out.David Webber adds another level of flavor to this universe with this book. Characters grow and you can feel both their pain and their joy. My joy was reading this unbelievable book. My pain was when the book was eers.

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    1633 []  2020-4-19 18:32

    Loved the first book. This one, while still very enjoyable, didn't quite hit it out of the park. Don't obtain me wrong, I have not regretted buying it and would do so again. It is very fun to see some the people you got to know, like, and even love once more. When I obtain a few more coins in my piggy bank I'll be buying book 3, you can bet on it. The history is in depth without bogging anything down, and the action scenes are imaginative (loved the latest naval battle).Only 1 little complaint. The story has sprawled over nearly all of Europe by now, with several main and secondary characters in or traveling to more than half a dozen cities in as a lot of nations. Some of the second tier folks sometimes seem to obtain lost in the crowd. A couple of times i caught myself asking "OK, is this one of Jeff's friends, or one of the town's amazing ol' boys/rednecks? Did this guy used to be the mine manager, or is he someone else?" This was the only thing that kept it from getting 5 stars.But that's a little quibble. The story is covering a lot of ground, and this is a fun alt/history, not high art. If you liked the first one, don't hesitate to pick this up.

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    1633 []  2020-4-19 18:32

    I thoroughly enjoyed 1632 and was looking forward to seeing the story move forward. The sequel, 1633 had a few passages that I enjoyed. Generally speaking, I enjoyed the sections where the "up-timers"; people from our present-day universe, were working on their manufacturing processes and engaging in conversations or conflicts with people from the past. There were, sadly, FAR too a lot of passages that read like a history text book. Yes, it's all well and amazing to provide context and historical backgrounds for some of the major players and socio-political situations, but when these sections go on for page after page they become quite tiresome.

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    1633 []  2020-4-19 18:32

    I tend to write long reviews, but since much has already been said, here is my own small addition...I search the history interesting and well construed. The what if this then this is great. The people true and three dimensional. I enjoyed the various perspectives & development of existing characters. Not everyone seems to be thrilled with Mike Stearns here without being in outright opposition to CE plot, puts meat into it, things do not just occur, the why & how is given. Hero also grow, & story flows. A most enjoyable read.Once you read 1633 I would recommend reading he Grantville Gazettes I, 2 & 3 beforee going on to "1634 The Baltic War" as there is some background info in them. If you like the historical aspects of this series I think you will have fun the "Gazettes" as they also have articles on the reality of the 1632 low is a reading list taken from Eric Flint's www service to support you navigate this universe.1632 Ring of Fire 1633 1634: The Baltic War(Somewhere along the way, after you’ve finished 1632, read the stories and articles in the first three paper edition volumes of the Gazette.)1634: The Ram Rebellion 1634: The Galileo Affair 1634: The Bavarian Crisis 1635: A Parcel of Rogues(Somewhere along the way, read the stories and articles in the fourth paper edition volume of the Gazette.)Ring of Fire II 1635: The Cannon Law 1635: The Dreeson Incident 1635: The Tangled Web (by Virginia DeMarce)(Somewhere along the way, read the stories in Gazette V.)1635: The Papal Stakes 1635: The Eastern Front 1636: The Saxon Uprising Ring of Fire III 1636: The Kremlin Games(Somewhere along the way, read the stories in Gazette VI.)1636: Commander Cantrell in the West Indies1636: The Cardinal Virtues1635: Melody and Murder (by David Carrico—this is an e-book edition only)1636: The Devil’s Opera1636: Seas of Fortune (by Iver Cooper)1636: The Barbie Consortium (by Gorg Huff and Paula Goodlett—this is an e-book edition only)1636: The Viennese Waltz(Somewhere along the way, read the stories in Gazette VII.)Ring of Fire IV (forthcoming May, 2016)1636: The Chronicles of Dr. Gribbleflotz (forthcoming August, 2016)1636: The Ottoman Onslaught (forthcoming January, 2017)

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    1633 []  2020-4-19 18:32

    One of the issues I have always had with alternate histories is the "deus ex machina" solutions to true technical problems. In 1633, as in the previous volume 1632, Eric Flint and collaborator David Weber provide a slice of reality in an alternate universe. People aren't cardboard, there are no achingly evil villains. There are stupid people, people with warts, intelligent people, normal people...in short, all the people that create up 1633 in Europe. Archvillains Richelieu and Simpson are revealed as men with passions, flaws and virtues. Amazing guys are shown to be short-sighted and venal. What we have here is a fine continuation of Eric Flint's experiment in "reality alternative history." Nobody pulls 2001 technology out of the bag...in fact, the climax leaves you with a clear (and foreboding) picture of the limits of Grantville's technology.We are not reading Grantville uber alles here, nor are we reading a romp through the 17th century by those vastly superior persons, the Americans. We are reading a well thought out dramatic essay on what happens when cultures e subtext of 1633 doesn't obtain in the way, but it is every bit as strong subtext as any "literary" SF novel of the past 30 years. We are seeing through a kaleidoscopic lens what happens when people are faced with heavy change, and when people are forced to achieve beyond their station in life. We are seeing what happens when a society comes into contact with another society with more toys and fancier philosophy. Apply the lens of 1633 to the problem of the Native American, or the Australian Aborigine, and the philosophical subtext remains the same.Flint and Weber do a masterful job of provoking thought from readers of zone opera and action-adventure novels. We are fed enough complex political analysis under the guise of hero introspection that we can see exactly what is happening, and where things are ly, Flint and Weber pull off something extremely critical, and they do it well: they create the indigenous population of the era, not the interlopers from Grantville, the heroes of the piece.And that's the point. Or one of them.Walt Boyes(the Bananaslug at Baen's Bar)

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