A Secret Gift: How One Man's Kindness--and a Trove of Letters--Revealed the Hidden History of the Great Depression Reviews & Opinions


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    A Secret Gift: How One Man's Kindness--and a Trove of Letters--Revealed the Hidden History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    Sam Stone's grandson discovered Sam had been an anonymous donor of five dollar checks to some of the most needy people in Canton, Ohio in 1933. This is a real detective story. This is the exactly right time to tell the agine for a moment working hard, paying bills promptly, and putting cash regularly into the savings bank. Then suddenly you lost your job. There was no unemployment insurance. You go to the bank and search it closed with all your savings gone. There is no FDIC. You test to sell your belongings. Sometimes this will feed the family for a while. Once your furniture is gone, and your house repossessed, and you are living as a whole family without heat or a bed in a room somewhere. Five dollars sometimes gave people enough hope to save them from suicide. Sometimes it meant an orange and a pair of shoes.Ted Gup found descendants of the people his grand father had helped. He even found one still living who could remember the help. He followed up every one of his grandfather's checks, a tremendous task in itself.But equally necessary he learned that his generous life affirming grandfather was an illegal alien who loved his adopted country with fear and is is an elegant book that bring to life early 20th century history. Read it please, and be glad for our safety nets no matter how inadequate they may be. It was once so much worse.

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    A Secret Gift: How One Man's Kindness--and a Trove of Letters--Revealed the Hidden History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    Over a lot of years, I've read a lot of books on the Amazing Depression and the struggles of The Fresh Deal to come to grips with it. Because my family, thankfully, was not impacted by the depression, I realize that it has been hard really to place myself in the shoes of those folk who endured. As time goes by, every reader will be in this mode. This book performs the special service {wrapped in a riveting private story of Ted Gup's grandfather} of giving us a lens into how a amazing a lot of people suffered and what desperate need they were in. This book tells, in the briefest of fashion, how it was for a person to be at the end of their tether. A meager "lifeboat" of $5 was hardly "chump change" to the desperate people who responded to the special advertisement placed by the author's grandfather. In this day and age can we possibly either grasp or empathize with this situation which played out across America? We need to. Read this book.

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    A Secret Gift: How One Man's Kindness--and a Trove of Letters--Revealed the Hidden History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    This book does for the depression what Bob Greene's book about the North Platte Canteen did for Globe Battle II. It puts the best faces of America right where we can see them. About 25 years ago, my husband asked his grandmother about the Depression. She got this faraway look in her eye, and all she could say was, "There was no money. . ." and then she told us more detail. I then went to my father, who was just a bit younger than she, and place the question to him. He got this faraway look in his eye, and all he could say was, "There was no money. . ." and then he started in. To grasp the not good need of the time, you just had to be there, and Ted Gup has done a masterful job of allowing his grandparents and their contemporaries to share about the Christmas season of 1933, when "There was no money. . ." I have read practically nonstop for three days.

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    A Secret Gift: How One Man's Kindness--and a Trove of Letters--Revealed the Hidden History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    An ad in the paper under a fictitious name reaches out to support the most needy of Canton, Ohio in 1933. When the deed is done, the remains of the act of generosity is locked in a suitcase and relegated to a dusty attic. Generations later the suitcase is handed off to a grandson who just happens to be an investigative journalist. In his hands it becomes an illuminating insight into the Amazing Depression. Fascinating!

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    A Secret Gift: How One Man's Kindness--and a Trove of Letters--Revealed the Hidden History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    Ted Gup has written a well-crafted and well-researched book. He has skilfully interwoven his own find for his grandfather, Sam Stone, through the stories of the recipients of Sam's Christmas 1933 gifts. As an amateur genealogist I know first-hand the sheer amount of hard work needed to research historical records, track down descendants and place together a cohesive and readable narrative, and Ted has done this with bells on. He explained some of the records he used, but did it in such a method that it didn't interrupt the thread of the story he was weaving. Whether you wish a glimpse of the Amazing Depression shown in a very private method through the eyes of ordinary people living in extraordinary times; a fascinating genealogical search; or simply a very readable 'feel good' book, I thoroughly recommend this book. I was very happy to see the index and especially glad to see the timeline for Sam Stone. The Final Reflections and Epilogue chapters were an added bonus. One thing I would have liked in an Appendix were some photos of the original hand-written letters. The transcriptions are easier to read, but to actually see photos of original documents is thrilling.

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    A Secret Gift: How One Man's Kindness--and a Trove of Letters--Revealed the Hidden History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    Young children wander along the railroad tracks in find of bits of coal that might have fallen from the trains. A young mother is devastated when two precious eggs roll off the table and break. A valued commodity gone. Ted Gup chooses his photos well and does an even better job of painting them across the page. He picks the small, tender moments that are able to tell the profound effects of the Amazing Depression beyond statistics and o things really struck me about this one. When you study history in school, you're left with this sense that the Depression ended, the battle began, and everyone went back to work. The book tells the story of so a lot of workers that never recovered; never regained any of what they lost. The Amazing Depression was permanent for so a lot of older workers who continued to live in squalor until the end. I couldn't support but think of so a lot of older workers today that are too young to retire but are the hardest hit by the recession and unable to search fresh jobs. Another strong discovery for me was how work ethics, a devotion to helping others, or unflappable hope carried on from generation to generation. A great-grandparents insistence on helping others in times of despair is alive and well as Gup interviews great-grandchildren still with an inclination to support those less fortunate. It created me stop and appreciate just how connected we all are and how my role as a parent will truly impact generations to come. I was left with an even greater sense of honor and responsibility for the role. Thank you Mr. ris BowenAuthor of, "Our Kids: Building Relationships in the Classroom

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    A Secret Gift: How One Man's Kindness--and a Trove of Letters--Revealed the Hidden History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    This is a sweet real story about one man's bonus to others during the depths of the Amazing Depression. The author, the man's grandson, has done a ton of research on his grandfather, as well as on the people he helped and the difference it made. A touching look into what people suffered during this period. I recommend it.

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    A Secret Gift: How One Man's Kindness--and a Trove of Letters--Revealed the Hidden History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    The Amazing Depression in Canton, Ohio: a history of familiesAs the latest people who remember the worst years of the Depressionthat began over eighty years ago fade away, it's necessary for usto listen to them and understand the enormous human costs of thatdisaster. I wasn't happy when my book club selected this book,as it sounded both depressing and sentimental. It is very movingand I'm lucky to have been compelled to read e author is a political investigative reporter who managed to trackdown and interview just about all of the 75 families of those whoreceived at Christmas 1933 a $5 check from his grandfather afterwriting him to tell him of their tragedy and desperation. So we learntheir stories, and what happened to the letter writers and theirfamilies after 1933. But more, we learn the fascinating andmysterious story of the gift-giver, and the forces that brought him, acomfortable but not at that point wealthy Jewish immigrant, to create aChristmas bonus to so a lot of people. All of these stories begin up theHard Times of the Depression and the method that it has determined thelives even of descendants born long after it rhaps I felt particularly connected because as a child, just a fewdecades later, I lived in several locations just an hour or so away fromCanton, a little town which had major industries that mostly closeddown during the Depression, and which was therefore full of recentimmigrants from Europe and the South who had worked in thosefactories. Or maybe it was because my grandparents were raisingfamilies during those years, and suffered through it, or because myparents grew up then, clearly affected throughout their lives bychildhood e author tried to connect up the Amazing Depression with our currenteconomic problems, but the more he tells us about the Amazing One, theless it sounds like our current plight.Anybody interested in the Amazing Depression in the US, American immigration,or the ways that people and families answer to extreme hardship shouldenjoy this very much. It reflects a lot of very hard and perfect workby the author. The book reads very easily; I read it in two days overThanksgiving, which seems quite appropriate.

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    A Secret Gift: How One Man's Kindness--and a Trove of Letters--Revealed the Hidden History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    I live in Canton, Ohio where B. Virdot shared his wealth with needy people. I personally knew some of the families who wrote to him. Those of you who are interested in this book and the story of the Amazing Depression and the life of Sam Stone--there is now more to the ter Ted Gup was here in city to meet descendants of the families his grandfather helped--there was quite a bit of publicity. It stimulated our community to think of trying B. Virdot again for needy families in 2010. Three people from our community seeded the fund with $5000 each. The goal was to support 150 families through our United Way/B. e bonus provided by the letters and Ted Gup's simple to read style of writing will greatly enrich the lives of the people who read this perfect an modernize on the generosity of our community--to date we've raised $45,000 for this modern B. Virdot. Checks to those seeking aid have started to be sent. We understand that the story has taken on nationally and donations have come from across the country.What a amazing tribute to Sam's idea so a lot of years ago!

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    A Secret Gift: How One Man's Kindness--and a Trove of Letters--Revealed the Hidden History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    I enjoyed this book on so a lot of levels. First, because most of my understanding of the Depression came from comments my dad created over the years, and then later I read several books written by economists regarding the Depression. After having read "The Secret Gift" because it contained the texts of a lot of letters written by people directly and then in the grip of the Depression, my understanding of what that must have been like grew exponentially. For me, that one aspect of this book created it invaluable. But this book keeps right on giving, I also valued the opportunity to see into the life of a man that began life with a lot of strikes versus him and he created it, several times, and he did so without losing not only a intact and complete sense of himself, but with all the factory installed accessories, like love for his fellow man with the only requirement for that person's inclusion was membership in the human race. I also enjoyed the sense of adventure the author experienced as he walked in his graddad's footsteps this a lot of years later. I was moved beyond words a lot of times while I read this, and I am grateful that I noticed this book, my life and my understanding of my fellow man, across time was enhanced.

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    The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2017-12-3 18:0

    This book provides a amazing insight on today's wacked-out government ways as viewed through the happenings leading up to the Amazing meone once said "the street to Hell is paved with amazing intentions." This book is a history of numerous of well-meaning actions by government that actually escalated method to the Amazing en and now government leaders have never gotten the essence of the leadership principle that George Patton was known to expound. Leaders need to "Lead, follow or obtain out of the way," The attribute most lacking by well-meaning government leaders is the "get out of the way" part. The free enterprise system will work if left to its own devices.

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    The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2017-12-3 18:0

    Like The Verona Papers, like Whitaker Chambers' "Witness", like Buckley's lifetime of effort, Amity Schlaes' scholarship reveals how Americans influenced by collectivist thought created it their mission to re-make America by abandoning the founding ideals of individualism and liberty. Ignore the slurs from establishment historians--this lady has the goods on those who believed that industrialization changed the android game as far as the role of government in our lives is concerned. And she shows how idealism was a front for absolutism--"we know what's right, the masses can't survive without us, so the rules we create don't have to apply to us." Why don't more Americans see the handwriting on the wall and obtain revved up about the loss of liberty in the latest century? I'm a Social Studies teacher--yes, in a public school--and this book will inform instruction on anything connected to 20th century history that is presented in my classroom.

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    The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2017-12-3 18:0

    This is the classic "Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it." It seems our current set of elected officials are sliding back into the 30's believing huge government is the method to go. Combine this with Atlas Shrugged and you can see our future ... well that is until we collapse under the weight of our own inability to do the right thing. War debt with more debt - nope that won't work, well it will until it doesn't anymore. Will no one stand up for what is right anymore? It seems like this should be simple, but when you write legislation that is 2000 pages long you won't know what you have until you have it and then it's too late. This should be mandatory reading for elected officials, journalists, educators and Paul Krugman.

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    The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2017-12-3 18:0

    amazing

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    The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2017-12-3 18:0

    I thought this book gave a balanced story about a tumultuous time in US history. The times needed bold action and that is what the country got from FDR and his brain trust. I thought the author gave credit where credit was due but did not shy away from calling a spade a spade. Some experiments didn't work. The roots of the huge government we enjoy/suffer today started during this time period. Perfect read if you wish to better understand the amazing depression and the result is has on the country to this day.

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    The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2017-12-3 18:0

    It had a lot of info that I knew already from reading other books but it was informative. If you read my review of "Coolidge" by the same author you'll know I don't really like Amity Shlaes' writing style but the book is still readable. I don't think she's particularly critical enough of FDR in here, everything he did created the amazing depression latest longer, any honest economist will tell you that. But Shlaes is a neo con so she probably admires FDR in some ways, which you can't do if you believe in liberty, but whoever accused neo cons of believing in liberty, they're the ones who brought us the Patriot Act remember?

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    The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2017-12-3 18:0

    I thought I had read the best economy books after Henry Hazlitt's "Economics in One Lesson", and Jude Wannesky's "The Method The Globe Works", but this book explains both economics and politics and how the two e title was taken from an old essay by William Graham Summner,in which "the forgotten man" was the one forced to pay tax to help the unproductive recipients of government largesse. However, FDR re-defined the term to mean the not good recipient himself. Likewise, "liberal" had meant individualism until 1935, when the president's politics changed it to mean "collectivism".They say that history doesn't actually repeat itself, and Obama doesn't even rhyme with Roosevelt, but the way of pitting class versus class in order to garner votes is something we all know about e book gives a month-by-month description of specific happenings and people from the 1920s through the Fresh Deal. It would be best to take notes on this book, as I did, but one method or the other, don't neglect to read it!

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    The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2017-12-3 18:0

    Obviously, a amazing deal of hard work and research went into this book. It is obvious that almost everything FDR & HH did created life miserable for the average American thanks to their elitist tinkering. Neither deserve the kindness history has shown them, especially FDR. It is awesome we won WW11 with the egghead experimenters and Commies surrounding FDR. I would recommend this book to anyone searching for TRUTH in HISTORY.

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    The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2017-12-3 18:0

    Amity Shlaes wrote the story that took put during my childhood, just prior to and during the Franklin Roosevelt years in the Ovel Office. It reflected in adequate detail on most of the problems that took put during that time period, problems that I remember, but had no understanding of at that time. I never thought of Roosevelt as a progressive, or socialist, but he certainly was and set up a lot of of the programs that have been harmful to the country ever since. Amity Shlaes explained most of the political background that took put and this has offered a better understanding of where we are today as a country, politically. It is a follow-on to her book, "Coolidge", which told the story of a very various President and one who we may want to see again in the White House. President Coolidge was a frugal and conservative president, almost to a fault. But he ran the country on a balanced budget basis and set the standard for responsible government. "The Forgotten Man" is a most enlightening book!

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    The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression review [Book]  2017-12-3 18:0

    Amazing book. Superbly written. Amazed how Amity weaves facts and situations into a narrative that not only captivates but enlightens. Worth the read.

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    The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone review [Book]  2017-12-13 18:0

    I have mixed feelings on this book. But overall, I highly recommend it.When I first heard of this book, I was really interested in reading it and pre-ordered it on Amazon – since I like to ready and study the history and development of technology and Silicon Valley. I read The One Device over the course of a few days. No doubt, this boo was released a week before the 10th anniversary of release of the first iPhone - Friday, June 29th, 2007, to generate interest and sales.If you wish *just* a history of the development of the first iPhone, this book may not be for you – except for the latest chapter. If you wish to know more about what created the iPhone possible and everything that lead up to the iPhone in a historical context, then you’ll definitely wish to read this book. I just felt that the book could have been organized with more about Apple than a lot of isolated chapters with some Apple and iPhone history sprinkled in, where the best chapter on the development of the iPhone was saved for last. These lines from the latest chapter succinctly encapsulates the essence of the book and the development of the iPhone:“… The stars aligned. They also aligned with lithium-ion battery technology, and with the compacting of cameras. With the accretion of China’s skilled labor force, and the surfeit of cheaper metals around the world. The list goes on. “It’s not just a question of waking up one morning in 2006 and deciding that you’re going to build the iPhone; it’s a matter of making these nonintuitive investments and failed products and crazy experimentation – and being able to operate on this large timescale … Most companies aren’t able to that. Apple almost wasn’t able to do that.”The One Device tells the story of the development of the iPhone – but much more so, the confluence of ideas and technologies over time that created the iPhone e book starts off with Apple’s “Explore Fresh Rich Interactions” (ENRI) group and initial experimentations of multi-touch before even thinking about the smartphone. Then a chapter into the history of the phone, electronic communications and the smartphone. Then on to a chapter (“Minephones”) on the sources of materials of smartphones. Then to Gorilla Glass. Then a chapter on the origins and work on multitouch over the en back to a chapter on Apple (“Prototyping”).Then back to the history of the battery and lithium battery and the origins of lithium. Then a chapter on Apple’s interest in the camera & photo stabilization. Then a chapter back to the history of sensing motion (gyroscopes, GPS, accelerometers, etc). And onto a chapter on the ARM microprocessor (“Strong-ARMed”). Then a chapter on cellular network en back to Apple (“Enter the iPhone”), describing Apple’s thinking on developing a mobile phone, as iPod was taking off. Then to a side-tracked chapter and history of Siri (along with voice recognition, and artificial intelligence). I say side-tracked, since the original iPhone didn’t have Siri – which came out in the Fall of 2011 with the release of the iPhone en a chapter on Foxconn and the Chinese labor force that assembles the e back to Apple on how secretive it is as well as its marketing prowess (“Sellphone”).Then back to China and description of the Chinese component ecosystem and aftermarket and black shop for en finally the latest chapter of the book – the latest 50 pages or so (out of 380 pages) – “The One Device” - is the meat of what I was looking for – getting more deeply into the info (as much as one could to a general reading audience).Overall, I would describe The One Device as a book ver of the history of the tablet analogous to the 1996 three hour PBS tv documentary about the PC industry titled, “Triumph of the Nerds” – which I often say, is the best three hours of television, or at least documentary television, ever made. If you’re really interested in the history of what created the iPhone possible, this is terrific me other thoughts – this book really also looks at the cost of the iPhone, tablet and consumer electronics in general – the mining material & labor cost, the factory worker & cellular turret worker cost, and the environmental cost.And finally, the cost to the Apple employees who gave their lives for the iPhone:As stated in the book, “His doctor, he says, gave him an ultimatum. Do these two things or risk dying – lose weight and quit [Apple]. Thirty-six people I worked with at Apple have died,” he says. “it is intense.”That intensity is also likely the reason that the squad that built the iPhone has since scattered to the winds. As of 2017, besides Jony Ive, none of the executive staff at Apple was seriously involved in creating the iPhone.”

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    The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone review [Book]  2017-12-13 18:0

    I couldn't place this one down. Merchant takes you on an adventure across the globe and through time to tell the REAL story of the iPhone. After reading, I truly have a fresh perspective on this device that I use every day. I can't believe how much I had taken for granted about the iPhone.

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    The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone review [Book]  2017-12-13 18:0

    Interesting backstory. As an Apple fan, it is cool to see the development of the iPhone. Very detailed book.

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    The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone review [Book]  2017-12-13 18:0

    Interesting, but technical.

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    The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone review [Book]  2017-12-13 18:0

    Solid book that really does give you a complete picture of the iPhone life. It was a great, detailed read.

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    The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone review [Book]  2017-12-13 18:0

    Amazing read. Amazing eye opener to our electronic based life and its impact on our world.

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    The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone review [Book]  2017-12-13 18:0

    We believe in magic. Unobtrusive, short, self explanatory, exhilarating and full of mystery, it titillates the senses and drives imagination. What was built as a imaginative drive of one person was instead a decade long sweatshop inquisitive creative process by those who believed in the art of the technologically impossible - and created that possible.

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    The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone review [Book]  2017-12-13 18:0

    An awesome and insightful look into the history of the iPhone!

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    The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone review [Book]  2017-12-13 18:0

    Amazing read! Dozens of interesting information

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    The One Device: The Secret History of the iPhone review [Book]  2017-12-13 18:0

    It was very interesting reading, I couldn't place the book down.

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    Best Kept Hidden Secrets Revealed Roblox review [App]  2017-11-29 13:6

    You can't even obtain on the application bro.

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    Best Kept Hidden Secrets Revealed Roblox review [App]  2017-11-29 13:6

    STUPID KAZOK APP!! STUPID

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    Best Kept Hidden Secrets Revealed Roblox review [App]  2017-11-29 13:6

    Well I'm just trying it

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    Best Kept Hidden Secrets Revealed Roblox review [App]  2017-11-29 13:6

    I love it

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    Best Kept Hidden Secrets Revealed Roblox review [App]  2017-11-29 13:6

    Okay this isint click bait Its true but... IT IS ONLY FOR PRISON LIFE

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    Best Kept Hidden Secrets Revealed Roblox review [App]  2017-11-29 13:6

    Wow its just a stupid kazok application

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    Best Kept Hidden Secrets Revealed Roblox review [App]  2017-11-29 13:6

    STUPID KAZOK!

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    Marcel's Letters: A Font and the Search for One Man's Fate review [Book]  2018-5-31 18:0

    What started as an initial find for design inspiration for a typeface project (handwritten letters found in an antique store) evolved into a find for the author (Marcel Heuzé) and the story behind the series of 72-year-old hand-written letters he wrote from a forced labor camp near Berlin, is one any lover of design, history or thoughtful storytelling will ughly 6.5 million civilians were forced to work in German labor camps for industrial giants such as Bosch, Daimler-Benz, Philips, Siemens, Volkswagen, Audi and BMW. A lot of of these workcamps were actually subcamps attached to the larger concentration camps like Buchenwald, Dachau and Sachsenhausen. According to John Beyer and Stephen Schneider's "Forced Labour under Third Reich," over a million French civilians were conscripted by French authorities to fulfill the Third Reich's Organization Todt's increasing labor requirements, and provide human resources to work alongside forced slave labor from Eastern Europe. These "guest workers," were labor resources culled from nations considered "friendly," allied or neutral to Germany, but were still forced to provide their skillsets to the Reich's battle rcel Heuzé was one of those estimated 1,100,000 French guest workers.While trying to understand the story of the author of the letters, what happened to him and his family, why wartime letters from a French national would be in a Minnesota antique shop, why he was in a forced labor camp inside Germany in the first place, and how to approach Marcel’s surviving family in present-day France — Carolyn unearths the story of how the French government, in collaboration with their German occupiers enabled and enforced the conscription of French citizens to work for the Third Reich (after the nation's conquer in 1940).It’s a side story of Globe Battle Two that is often overlooked, and she handles it wonderfully, taking us along on a completely engrossing and passionate journey of her own discovery, we’re wide-eyed in amazement with her as she weaves each fresh thread into the tapestry of Marcel’s life — initially a fabric created from the sorrow of wartime forced absence, but brightened into a post-war life of hope and renewal. It’s also the story of a family rediscovering their own past, and reconnecting with each other, in a method that might not have happened had the letters not called to Carolyn to pick them up back in e typeface that started this journey, "Marcel Script" was published by P22 in 2014, and has won four awards including the Certificate for Typographic Excellence from the Fresh York Type Director's Club. It's a masterwork -- it’s the wonderfully personable and expressive typeface that graces the cover of the book's dust jacket.I was once honored to have a Holocaust survivor "bear witness" to me his story of survival, the deaths of his family and his liberation from Buchenwald. I was left in tears when he finished. It's been my duty to pass that story on to others, to remind them of the darkest truths of our history, and the risks of ignoring those olyn's unlikely discovery in the Stillwater antique shop, of Marcel's peaceful words written to his kids from inside Germanyt, is also the story of a survivor bearing witness and passing that truth to a fresh generation to bear the weight -- only this story was told in the graceful dance of thoughtful words in looping handwritten letterforms, on pages of now yellowing, thinning paper.

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    Marcel's Letters: A Font and the Search for One Man's Fate review [Book]  2018-5-31 18:0

    This book creates a bridge between the past and the show in an amazingly special way. It exposes a fascinating and heart wrenching chapter in Globe Battle II history that wasn’t just forgotten, but for a lot of of us was never known! The story is unveiled through the clues in letters found in an antique store because of one woman’s stubborn persistence to search out, versus all odds – did Marcel live? But it all begins with a thoroughly modern task – creating a font. That’s right, a font. Most people don’t realize the hard work and artistic passion that goes into creating the choices we take for granted in documents and messages every day. Who knew there were conventions and awards for such things?There were a lot of points in the story that moved me to tears, both of sadness and joy. (I won’t be a spoiler by saying what they were.) There is also a lot of humor and things fans of the Fargo franchise will have fun – like going on a hike at a resort on a lake - in the middle of winter, in the snow, on purpose!As completely disconnected as letters from Globe Battle II may seem from our modern computerized world, this story brings them together! More importantly, it provides a remarkable tribute to a easy man who is just one out of hundreds of thousands who suffered without recognition. It memorializes his legacy, his life and his love for his family by capturing his handwriting in a attractive font. It may soon become the default font for love letters – to express your love not only with words, but by using P22 Marcel Script!

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    Marcel's Letters: A Font and the Search for One Man's Fate review [Book]  2018-5-31 18:0

    Memoirs can deal with various topics in the author's life. "Love", "family", "history", and, of course, that biggie, "the development of a fresh font". In Carolyn Porter's memoir, "Marcel's Letters", she deals with all those. I'm a font geek - as is Porter - but as it is her business, she's much closer to development than I would ever be. Porter's memoir is a delightful tracing of her find for the man-behind-the-handwriting she hoped to create into a fresh olyn Porter found some letters and a postcard in French for sale in an antique shop about 10 years ago. She was attracted by the handwriting - and it is indeed a lovely, elegant hand - and began the process of making a font, based on the writing. But she also wondered what the card and letters said and to who and from who they were written. The swastika on them, along with the dates, indicated they were mailed from Berlin during WW2. They were mailed to a little city in France, a bit outside Paris. Porter, with some help, translated the material and then began to track down Marcel Heuze, a Frenchman who was sent to work for the Germans in a work factory in Porter's book she eventually finds the story of Marcel and his family. And, her font "Marcel", is a prize winner. The book is fun to read and I'd love to be able to use the attractive font, but I think it's only available commercially.

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    Marcel's Letters: A Font and the Search for One Man's Fate review [Book]  2018-5-31 18:0

    I read Marcel's Letters: A Font and the Find for One Man's Fate in one day (and night!) - once I started it, I couldn't stop reading. Now, 3 days later, I can't stop thinking about it. Carolyn Porter pulls the reader in with multiple story lines - first the story of a childhood dream, creating a fresh computer font (Marcel) based on the handwriting in letters discovered in a Stillwater, MN antique store - then the story described in the letters of a French family torn apart during WWII when the father was a conscripted laborer in Berlin and the family struggled to survive in France - next, the WWII history to explain their story - and latest and most engaging the story of learning what happened to Marcel and to his family as the battle ended, and how the letters ended up half a globe away in a little city antique shop. I found all of it fascinating. Learning some of the terminology and technical aspects of developing a fresh font based on handwriting was amazing for me as a printing hobbyist. (BTW I purchased the fresh font to use in my printing work, and it is attractive and complete - using it to the fullest will be a stretch for me, and require learning some fresh software tools - that's all good!) Learning about WWII and conscripted laborers was fresh to me. Best was the find for Marcel and his family - so a lot of serendipity moments, seemingly random events that support move the find for Marcel along - it reads like fiction - but it's all true. What a story! What a book!

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    Marcel's Letters: A Font and the Search for One Man's Fate review [Book]  2018-5-31 18:0

    I got so engrossed in this book that I read it in a single day. The story is unlike any I've heard before, and Carolyn Porter's telling is compelling: By the end I felt as if I'd been on a journey with her, riding the roller coaster of elation and frustration that marked her find for Marcel. Along the method I also gained a whole fresh appreciation for fonts, learned about a seldom-discussed aspect of Globe Battle II history, and was inspired by the reminder that love can transcend wonderful barriers — even time itself, as Carolyn has shown us.

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    Marcel's Letters: A Font and the Search for One Man's Fate review [Book]  2018-5-31 18:0

    This non-fiction book is at once heart warming and heart rending; an altogether lovely book. I love writing instruments of all kinds and so this book about developing a font caught my eye. I began reading and was hooked immediately. One thing I found most endearing was Carolyn's private writing style; it was as though she were sitting on my couch beside me, and I could hear her voice speaking to me as I read. The more I read, the more it gripped me; when Carolyn was awake at night thinking about Marcel, I was awake; when Carolyn was sad, I was sad; when Carolyn celebrated victories, I celebrated with her. And to think that this happened now, in our time! Needless to say, this book won my heart.

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    Marcel's Letters: A Font and the Search for One Man's Fate review [Book]  2018-5-31 18:0

    Graphic designer Carolyn Porter takes her reader along with her as she searches to search out what happened to the man whose handwriting consumes her. While designing a font from handwritten letters purchased at an antique store, Porter is pulled into WWII and one man’s testaments of love for his family. I couldn't resist the pull either and read this book in three sittings. A very satisfying read that will not be forgotten.

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    Marcel's Letters: A Font and the Search for One Man's Fate review [Book]  2018-5-31 18:0

    I have never read a book so quickly. The story behind Marcel's letters drew me in so quickly and emotionally. I was fully engulfed in emotions throughout the book from tears to laughter to nervousness. The stories from WWII that we never heard about were heart wrenching. Very well written as it pulls in show day to the past.

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    Marcel's Letters: A Font and the Search for One Man's Fate review [Book]  2018-5-31 18:0

    This is the first book in a lot of years that has kept me truly involved past the first few chapters. Very well written. There are a number of unbelievable "inner" stories told here and the author has done a unbelievable job of sharing her obsessions with the reader. Within just a few pages you're caught up in her drive to search out who Marcel was and what became of him.IF you happen to be a lover of typography, that part of the story will really impress and excite you, but even if you're not, it's a unbelievable story of one persons quest for answers to a total strangers life.I also purchased her P22 Marcel font from the website... it is absolutely unbelievable and I'm using it in a number of graphic and web design projects. Amazing for letter writing and emails too. :-)

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    Marcel's Letters: A Font and the Search for One Man's Fate review [Book]  2018-5-31 18:0

    Carolyn has crafted an awesome story - and it's TRUE. "Marcel's Letters" is a fabulous read on three-plus levels: it's amazing for anyone interested in (a) history/WWII, (b) design/art direction/type and/or (c) biographies/true stories!!!! I couldn't place it down once started. Highly recommend.

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    The Infiltrator: The True Story of One Man Against the Biggest Drug Cartel in History review [Book]  2017-11-19 18:0

    It's disheartening to learn that the drug cartels have the enormous power described in this book. Equally disheartening is the shocking lack of concern for the danger faced by undercover agents. Thankfully Senator John Kerry & Senator Charles Schumer tried to address the legitimate concerns of the author. Other politicians don't present as much integrity. And international banks are often complicit in cash laundering, to a staggering degree.

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    The Infiltrator: The True Story of One Man Against the Biggest Drug Cartel in History review [Book]  2017-11-19 18:0

    impressive

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    The Infiltrator: The True Story of One Man Against the Biggest Drug Cartel in History review [Book]  2017-11-19 18:0

    Fascinating at first, and certainly a job that is very various from the what the rest of us do (to say the least). It also provides some insight into how huge amounts of money generated by the drug trade are laundered. However, after a while it turns into a litany of 'went here, met this guy, a ton of cash was involved, met this/that corrupt banker'...etc, etc. It certainly takes a unique type of person to do this, especially considering that he has a family that hardly sees him while he is undercover. Not to mention the true risk of being discovered and murdered. But again, after a while it gets repetitive and I was unable to [email protected]#$%!.Considering the large amounts of cash being created in the drug trade, it's no wonder it has not been simply legalized. Too a lot of people on both sides of the law have their hands in the cookie jar. This is not to take anything away from the job being done by the author, but considering the result that all the cash and manpower spent on the battle on drugs has had (apparently none whatever), I have to wonder if it's worth it.

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    The Infiltrator: The True Story of One Man Against the Biggest Drug Cartel in History review [Book]  2017-11-19 18:0

    This book brings to light the very problem being discussed on the news today: the very common practice by the banking, etc. establishments of cash laundering to hide the proceeds of criminal enterprises. Mazur gives perfect explanations of the web of conspiracies by myriad banks and other institutions and how everything works. Well written.

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    The Infiltrator: The True Story of One Man Against the Biggest Drug Cartel in History review [Book]  2017-11-19 18:0

    My interest was piqued when Escobar was arrested in February. I heard Robert Mazir interviewed on KOMO radio about the arrest and his undercover operation with the Medellin cartel. His book was well written and well organized. I could really feel his stress, anxiety, and the ever-present sense of danger of having his cover blown. I also appreciated his acknowledgement of the sacrifices created by his wife and kids during this two-year period, as well as their love and support. This book is worth reading, to obtain an understanding of what undercover officials go through and the risky circumstances of their jobs.

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    The Infiltrator: The True Story of One Man Against the Biggest Drug Cartel in History review [Book]  2017-11-19 18:0

    It was undoubtedly quite an accomplishment to bring down a huge international bank. Less remarkable, unfortunately, is the fact that all the huge cash center banks were pandering to the drug lords and no doubt still are. A surprise to me was that so a lot of of the bank insiders were Pakistani's. Saudis would not surprise me given their financial resources, but does Pakistan sell that much heroin? Our Character has a serious addiction to all the trappings of the super rich and I can't support wondering what a 3rd party narration would read like. The internecine feuding within Customs was never told from another point of view.

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    The Infiltrator: The True Story of One Man Against the Biggest Drug Cartel in History review [Book]  2017-11-19 18:0

    Amazing read.

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    The Infiltrator: The True Story of One Man Against the Biggest Drug Cartel in History review [Book]  2017-11-19 18:0

    A colleague of mine recommended The Infiltrator to me and said it's the best book ever written about the subject of cash laundering. I was surprised given that the book is marketed as more of a thriller nonfiction but I decided to purchase it anyway because it appears that the theme of 2010 is international banks getting in problem for cash laundering schemes. I breezed through the book in three nights. It reads like fiction, but it actually happened. You can't create up the things that Bob Mazur wrote about in the book. I was also very sad that the poor guys in the book were actually the people who were supposed to help Mr. Mazur in his undercover operation. There are very few books out there that can change a person's life and this is definitely one of them. I was more caught up in the thrill of the book in the first read, but I will read it again for the educational purpose of the book. As somebody that actually worked side by side with cash launderers and drug lords, Mr. Mazur can give you insight that no other cash laundering professional Mazur is an American hero!

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    The Infiltrator: The True Story of One Man Against the Biggest Drug Cartel in History review [Book]  2017-11-19 18:0

    amazing book, keeped me ingaged

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    The Infiltrator: The True Story of One Man Against the Biggest Drug Cartel in History review [Book]  2017-11-19 18:0

    I heard from a mate this book might be created into a movie. I purchased it from Amazon and received it on a Saturday. I truly couldn't place it down, I know that is a cliche, but what a story, and best of all, it is based on a real story. In my opinion, this book ranks right up there with authors Sidney Sheldon & James Patterson. It really shows the issue this country, and world, has with drug traffickers and the cash that flows. To me, it was a true eye opener of what banks and governments, say nothing about people, will do for huge cash & the power it brings. Thank goodness for agents like Mazur who risk everything to create these cases. This should be a best seller.R. Anderson

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    HISTORY: THE MEN WHO CHANGED THE COURSE OF HISTORY - 2nd EDITION: Jesus, Napoleon, Moses, Cesar, St. Paul, Alexander the Great, Gandhi & Muhammad. Lessons from the Great Men that Forged our Society. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:0

    Very clear, Primary bit illuminating series of biograohies of necessary Globe leaders. I bought this for my son but profitted by reading it myself. Not original scholarship but clear,well organized and thoughtful

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    HISTORY: THE MEN WHO CHANGED THE COURSE OF HISTORY - 2nd EDITION: Jesus, Napoleon, Moses, Cesar, St. Paul, Alexander the Great, Gandhi & Muhammad. Lessons from the Great Men that Forged our Society. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:0

    I must admit that I have never been someone who loves history. However, this book did really hold me turning the pages. The author touched base on Muhammad and all the method back to St. Paul! The Author is very insightful and had a lot of references to back up points. This is a amazing book to learn things that others might not necessarily know.

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    HISTORY: THE MEN WHO CHANGED THE COURSE OF HISTORY - 2nd EDITION: Jesus, Napoleon, Moses, Cesar, St. Paul, Alexander the Great, Gandhi & Muhammad. Lessons from the Great Men that Forged our Society. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:0

    Quality good. Cannot recommend the book. Rather dull historical writing.

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    HISTORY: THE MEN WHO CHANGED THE COURSE OF HISTORY - 2nd EDITION: Jesus, Napoleon, Moses, Cesar, St. Paul, Alexander the Great, Gandhi & Muhammad. Lessons from the Great Men that Forged our Society. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:0

    Amazing insight into the lives of some of the greatest men in history.

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    HISTORY: THE MEN WHO CHANGED THE COURSE OF HISTORY - 2nd EDITION: Jesus, Napoleon, Moses, Cesar, St. Paul, Alexander the Great, Gandhi & Muhammad. Lessons from the Great Men that Forged our Society. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:0

    Intersting facts but found it a bit short on depth, for us who have fun history....

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    HISTORY: THE MEN WHO CHANGED THE COURSE OF HISTORY - 2nd EDITION: Jesus, Napoleon, Moses, Cesar, St. Paul, Alexander the Great, Gandhi & Muhammad. Lessons from the Great Men that Forged our Society. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:0

    amazing book quick read interesting

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    HISTORY: THE MEN WHO CHANGED THE COURSE OF HISTORY - 2nd EDITION: Jesus, Napoleon, Moses, Cesar, St. Paul, Alexander the Great, Gandhi & Muhammad. Lessons from the Great Men that Forged our Society. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:0

    It was OK as far as it went. The issue I had with it was likely my own error - I must have missed the part in the description that says it's written at an early middle school reading level. The 3-star rating I gave reflects how the book struck me personally. I would rate it higher, I suppose, for a young reader. It does a beautiful amazing job of giving the reader a primary introduction of historic figures with whom one should at least be familiar.

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    HISTORY: THE MEN WHO CHANGED THE COURSE OF HISTORY - 2nd EDITION: Jesus, Napoleon, Moses, Cesar, St. Paul, Alexander the Great, Gandhi & Muhammad. Lessons from the Great Men that Forged our Society. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:0

    and succinct group of stories that most of us have at least heard about in school, but we were not challenged to think about how one man's life could so dramatically change the lives of millions of other people's of various races, cultures, religions, and methods of government. This short book tells about Jesus, Mohammed, Julios Caesar ,Octavious Julius Ceasar, Mahatma, Ghandhi, Alexander who were indeed some of the most necessary personages since recorded time began. They moved people, they stirred armies, some of them conquered worlds, and let's not forget the religious impact of Jesus Mohammed,and Gandhi. My only issue with this hook is it is written too stylistically. These men stirred the world, but I found the book provoked no debt of

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    HISTORY: THE MEN WHO CHANGED THE COURSE OF HISTORY - 2nd EDITION: Jesus, Napoleon, Moses, Cesar, St. Paul, Alexander the Great, Gandhi & Muhammad. Lessons from the Great Men that Forged our Society. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:0

    This book is an extraordinary source particularly to the individuals who have fun in perusing history and needs to enhance their insight about it. The book includes data about old history including pictures and clear detail to each occasion. This is an amazing book to learn things that others may not as a matter of course know. This was an wonderful aggregation of short life stories of a percentage of the best men who changed history.

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    HISTORY: THE MEN WHO CHANGED THE COURSE OF HISTORY - 2nd EDITION: Jesus, Napoleon, Moses, Cesar, St. Paul, Alexander the Great, Gandhi & Muhammad. Lessons from the Great Men that Forged our Society. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:0

    George Washington was born in 1732, not 1731 as this book indicated. Book error? The method this book is written or the method the sentences are structured makes reading this beautiful confusing as well. I wouldn't recommend this book based on those two things. Fact wise, it's not very informative. You could google any of these historical men and search more info and resources about them than this book offers. I would highly not recommend this book. Look elsewhere.

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    2-at-a-Time Socks: Revealed Inside. . . The Secret of Knitting Two at Once on One Circular Needle; Works for any Sock Pattern! review [Book]  2018-3-5 18:2

    I've knitted single socks on circular needles and was ready to test my hand at the two-at-a-time technique. Compared to several technique videos that I've watched online, I found this way very awkward and confusing. Others may search it perfectly acceptable. The huge difference seems to be that with this technique the socks are divided so that sock A is on one side of the needles and sock B is on the other side with each round completed for each sock individually. The easier technique divides the sock so that you knit sequentially instep A, instep B, heel side A, heel side B. I'm going to have to see if I can rearrange the patterns for the second e other issue I had with the book is that the author chose to illustrate some of the socks with very textured stitch patterns in variegated yarns (I love these yarns, too!), but it created it quite difficult to create out how the stitch pattern looks. That said, there are some very nice patterns--something for everyone.

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    2-at-a-Time Socks: Revealed Inside. . . The Secret of Knitting Two at Once on One Circular Needle; Works for any Sock Pattern! review [Book]  2018-3-5 18:2

    This book is written for what Elizabeth Zimmerman called the "blind follower," which is fine, except that there was not enough info given about the overall construction for an experienced knitter unless she read line by line from the begin and worked out what goes on with every stitch. For example, there are not updates at key points about how a lot of stitches should be on your needles, and there are no schematics given. The designs for particular socks aren't exciting enough to compensate. I rarely sell a knitting book after I've bought it, but I will be getting rid of this one.

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    2-at-a-Time Socks: Revealed Inside. . . The Secret of Knitting Two at Once on One Circular Needle; Works for any Sock Pattern! review [Book]  2018-3-5 18:2

    Well worth the time and sales price if a person is interested in learning to knit both socks of a pair at the same time so both will be alike. I knitted a lot of pairs of socks "one sock at a time" over the years in order to gain the skill to knit socks, a lot of can not do that or at least don't have fun doing it. Once I learned to knit both socks of a pair at one time I no longer knit only one at a time; however I must admit there is some confusion involved in the process. I've been told by some that they prefer doing only one at a time. It's up to the individual which methods they choose to use. Knitting is an art, and each person will choose to do what they like best.

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    2-at-a-Time Socks: Revealed Inside. . . The Secret of Knitting Two at Once on One Circular Needle; Works for any Sock Pattern! review [Book]  2018-3-5 18:2

    I just received this book and, so far, I love it! I considered buying the spiral version, but bought the hard cover to save money. I was surprised to search it has a spiral inside the hard cover and lays begin flat. I've looked through the patterns and they have multiple sizes and the instructional section looks outstanding with pictures - nice dozens of patterns too. The patterns are well organized with section headings also - much easier to search where you left off. Looking forward to begin some socks using this fresh book!

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    2-at-a-Time Socks: Revealed Inside. . . The Secret of Knitting Two at Once on One Circular Needle; Works for any Sock Pattern! review [Book]  2018-3-5 18:2

    Allow me begin off by saying that if you've never knitted a sock before, this book is going to be confusing and useless to you. I've knitted one sock on the magic loop before and I still couldn't figure it e most confusing, difficult part of knitting socks, is turning the heel and picking up stitches for the gusset. I was doing fine until the heel turning and gusset came e author apparently assumes you know exactly what you're doing as she doesn't go into any instructional detail on how to do it. For instance, she tells you to pick up 8 stitches along the side to make the gusset. That's it. No explanation whatsoever on how to pick up these stitches and work them.Turning the heel on the practice toddler socks was just as confusing. Step by step instructions just aren't there and I could not figure it out. Experienced knitters seem to overlook the small info that can create or break a book. They tend to forget that just because they know how to do it, doesn't mean their readers know how to do it. A small more detailed explanation on the heel and gussets would have gone a long method to improving this book.Unfortunately, I ordered the toe up book by this same author and I have a feeling I'm going to regret it.

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    2-at-a-Time Socks: Revealed Inside. . . The Secret of Knitting Two at Once on One Circular Needle; Works for any Sock Pattern! review [Book]  2018-3-5 18:2

    The corrections for this book are available publisher's website. The current ver has all the errata corrected!!! If you have an older ver with printed mistakes, please just create the changes and obtain over it. Yes, it shouldn't have taken 3 versions to iron them all out, but it is well worth the 15 mins I spent correcting my older copy.I was appreciative of the step-by-detailed-step in making 2 socks cuff-down on 1 40" circular needle. However, the casting on instructions were missing some critical bits of info (thank goodness for the pictures!), and between Step 30 & 31 (working the gusset decreases) there are several editing errors and the directions are confusing. I had to take my project and the book to my LYS (local yarn store) and puzzle it out with a mate there. It didn't support that the sample sock colors in the images were not as described in the text. Perhaps this was the fault of the printer rather than the photographer.I also had a minor complaint about the "Sugar Maple" pattern which starts each round with purl stitches. I revised the pattern to start with knit stitches and avoided a large issue with "laddering". The design was unchanged. I could see no reason for beginning with purl stitches and the end product was much me of the patterns are rather intricate and admittedly lovely designs. The cover image is for a child's sock "Emily's Socks", not adult's size as pictured. However a mate who created this pattern said the huge size fits most women's feet. There's a amazing mixture of women's, children's and men's sock patterns as well as varying yarn thicknesses; really something for everyone who is learning to create socks. Plus, the stitches are clearly explained in both words, graphs, and pictures. This alone is a large plus.And for those Magic-loopers who wish toes-up patterns, Melissa's fresh 2-At-A-Time book is coming out in April 2010 and explains the toe-up ly, there is a [...] group specifically for this book and for the upcoming toes-up sequel. Join us there!

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    2-at-a-Time Socks: Revealed Inside. . . The Secret of Knitting Two at Once on One Circular Needle; Works for any Sock Pattern! review [Book]  2018-3-5 18:2

    Amazing small resource! I knitted my first pair at once! I didn't use their pattern, but did use their concept. For this variegated yarn in the photo, create sure you line it up before beginning. You can obtain this pattern free online from the maker.

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    2-at-a-Time Socks: Revealed Inside. . . The Secret of Knitting Two at Once on One Circular Needle; Works for any Sock Pattern! review [Book]  2018-3-5 18:2

    I, too, am a hands on person who has struggled for knitting success via books. But, socks? Forget it. I'd be bored after finishing one on DPNs, which is only amazing for people with one foot. Until now. This book was super helpful for me in managing the two sock on one circular needle technique. Now I'm knitting both socks at once so finishing the second one is no longer an issue. Is it THE excellent sock book? No. I would have liked fewer "stock" patterns and more techniques as mentioned by others: toe-up, short row and variations on the tube sock (in case you don't know what size foot you're knitting for). However, I'm very happy overall with the purchase and would recommend it. It was worth the price just to obtain the technical instructions for the "how to". The spiral binding is amazing for balancing flat in a lap or over a chair arm, as well as "normal" surfaces. I would also like to recommend the circular needles available at [...] The needles are beautiful, well made, reasonably priced and the cable is very flexible, which is crucial for this technique. Sock needles come in 40" and 47" inch lengths. I use the 47" for my sock knitting and have had no issue from the start.

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    2-at-a-Time Socks: Revealed Inside. . . The Secret of Knitting Two at Once on One Circular Needle; Works for any Sock Pattern! review [Book]  2018-3-5 18:2

    I've knit a few pairs of socks and really wanted to test 2 at a time. I did some online research, watched some videos and I just didn't like the other techniques I saw. I considered using 2 circulars, but I really like Magic Loop. I ordered this book - which is specifically for cuff down socks - and it created so much sense. I don't see myself knitting socks any other way. Just a note - I think it would be best if you were very familiar with the Magic Loop technique before attempting two at a time socks on 1 circular.

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    2-at-a-Time Socks: Revealed Inside. . . The Secret of Knitting Two at Once on One Circular Needle; Works for any Sock Pattern! review [Book]  2018-3-5 18:2

    The instructions for knitting socks two at a time- the main reason I purchased this book- are clear and simple to follow. I am glad I purchased it for that reason alone. I have been able to apply the technique to other stuff too, like sweater sleeves. Besides that, I have no complaints about the book, but I was not particularly blown away. The sock patterns are beautiful ordinary and I could search related designs in other books, or even free short, I love the technique, but I haven't picked up the book much since I memorized it.

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    Hidden Secrets review [App]  2017-12-20 21:0

    O jogo é incrivel e desafiador, recomendo pra quem gosta de enigmas

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    How to Listen to Great Music: A Guide to Its History, Culture, and Heart (The Great Courses) review [Book]  2018-5-10 18:0

    A very amazing framework to understand the history of music, primary biographies of main composers, and primary musical vocabulary. It was very helpful and inspiring to learn more and appreciate more the enormous bonuses that we have received from the artists. The author is witty with just excellent amount of cynicism, loved his personality that comes through his approach to music, just lovely, simple to picture him guiding young people into the globe of melody without pretension and stiffness.

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    How to Listen to Great Music: A Guide to Its History, Culture, and Heart (The Great Courses) review [Book]  2018-5-10 18:0

    This books is AMAZING. As a doctoral student in music, I read this for "fun" and it really was! The author does a fabulous job of explaining terms and giving historical context. It was a pleasure to read and I would definitely read it again/recommend it to friends.

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    How to Listen to Great Music: A Guide to Its History, Culture, and Heart (The Great Courses) review [Book]  2018-5-10 18:0

    I've bought Goulding's "Classical music, the 50 greatest composers and their 1,000 greatest works" and Libbey's "The NPR tutorial to building a classical CD collection". I must say they're two amazing books, but if I had to choose THE classical book for starters I would highly recommend the Greenberg's "How to listen to amazing music".It takes you by the hand accross the various eras, analyzing every period, explaining every detail, and decomposing every piece even using musical 's just a pleasure to read this book, it even turns you into a satisfied mood.Obviously, you need to listen to the melody he's explaining, and you may either look it up on youtube, or buy/download a CD.I hope you have fun it as much as I do.

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    How to Listen to Great Music: A Guide to Its History, Culture, and Heart (The Great Courses) review [Book]  2018-5-10 18:0

    I listened to Dr. Greenberg's CDs about listening to amazing music. This is an perfect companion to the CD course - with much more detail than what was provided in the course guide. Dr. Greenberg is truly the "Elvis of classical music." He is informative and entertaining at the same time. I am a huge fan.

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    How to Listen to Great Music: A Guide to Its History, Culture, and Heart (The Great Courses) review [Book]  2018-5-10 18:0

    Greenberg has penned a amazing book here, however, the Kindle edition includes an index with neither page numbers nor active links. It is essentially an alphabetized list at the end of the book. Wish to look up where a term appears in the text? You'll have to thumb through the entire book. Significant flaw when you're learning.

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    How to Listen to Great Music: A Guide to Its History, Culture, and Heart (The Great Courses) review [Book]  2018-5-10 18:0

    Awesome introduction to classical (or "great"!) music. This is a book anybody will have fun reading-be it somebody who is being introduced into this kind of melody or a seasoned conossieur.

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    How to Listen to Great Music: A Guide to Its History, Culture, and Heart (The Great Courses) review [Book]  2018-5-10 18:0

    Very educational. Really grateful to the teacher in is is not only compact and brief, but also gives the social, cultural and economic pecially like the "Music box"es, that tell me what to message about these pieces.

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    How to Listen to Great Music: A Guide to Its History, Culture, and Heart (The Great Courses) review [Book]  2018-5-10 18:0

    Robert Greenberg is a GREAT communicator and he communicates his love and knowledge of classical melody (or concert melody - a term he prefers for reasons you will learn if you read this unbelievable book). I have an extensive background in this field, but I also learned a thing or two which has increased my own love for this awesome art form, which far too few people "get" or appreciate, but you will "get" and "appreciate" this neglected domain of art by reading this book.

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    How to Listen to Great Music: A Guide to Its History, Culture, and Heart (The Great Courses) review [Book]  2018-5-10 18:0

    Treat yourself to this book! I've listened to some of Professor Greenberg's audio courses from The Teaching Company and found them to be absolutely wonderful. I worried about whether his material could be presented as well in written format. It can! The book is packed with fascinating information, is beautifully organized and presented with humor. It's extremely "accessible" and a amazing read. I'll be referencing it often.

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    How to Listen to Great Music: A Guide to Its History, Culture, and Heart (The Great Courses) review [Book]  2018-5-10 18:0

    I found listening to melody is a fresh hobby of mine

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    The Close Encounters Man: How One Man Made the World Believe in UFOs review [Book]  2018-7-18 18:0

    Forty or fifty years ago, J. Allen Hynek was a well known public figure, not so much for his significant workas a professional astronomer and educator but for his involvement with the UFO controversy. This sympatheticbiography covers all of those aspects of Hynek's career, but understandably it is the the problem of UFOsthat dominates, and thus the reader's view of the biography is likely to be colourful by his or her opinionson that subject. The author has clearly done a lot of research, including interviews, and I know of noother source where so much info can be found on Hynek's life. An author is entitled to draw his or herown conclusions, and this author's opinions are worthy of attention. Nevertheless, there were spots where Iwould have liked to have seen more documentation supporting the views expressed, and where my ownconclusions from the material differ from those suggested by the author. However, that may reflect myskeptical approach to the UFO question. The reader should not expect to search fresh explanations for UFOreports in this book, but the reader can gain insight into Hynek's life and into the changing public perceptionof the UFO phenomenon in the 20th century.

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    The Close Encounters Man: How One Man Made the World Believe in UFOs review [Book]  2018-7-18 18:0

    If you remember the movie Close Encounters of The Third Kind from Steven Spielberg.....He got the title for the movie from Dr. J Allen Hynek. Hynek was the first real scientist to study the UFO phenomenon. He was enlisted by the United States Air Force in the late 40s to search out what they e UFO phenomenon had become a nationwide epidemic by 1948. It had started one year earlier on June 24th 1947 when pilot Kenneth Arnold sighted a flight of nine crescent shaped objects flying at about 1200 mph between Mt. Rainier and Mt. Adams. Arnolds sighting became the first publicly acknowledged UFO occurrence. It was an incident in 1948 when an Air Force pilot Capt. Mantell was killed by chasing a UFO that the Air Force decided something required to be done about the issue. They required a scientist! So they brought in Dr. Hynek who was an astronomer by profession. Hynek started off a skeptic to the whole idea of UFOs. He thought the phenomenon was nothing more than natural occurrences, or hoaxes or just misidentified e Air Force place Hynek to work on their succeeding UFO projects. These were project Sign, Grudge and finally Blue Book. But after 20 years of studying the phenomenon Dr. Hynek changed his tune. He found that there really was something to the data he had collected. During his a lot of years of investigations he had spoken to a lot of USAF and commercial pilots and a lot of credible witnesses through the years that had encountered UFOs. Hynek also believed that the Air Force suppressed his investigations. They wanted him to come up with mundane explanations for the phenomenon. Hynek found after years of studying that some of these sightings had no rational explanations. They were real mysteries. This then created him into more of a believer than a skeptic on the subject. Project Blue Book ended in 1969 when the Condon report came out and stated that UFOs were not a national security threat and that there was nothing to them. The Condon report was predetermined to quash the UFO phenomenon once and for all. This ended the Air Forces interest (at least publicly) in the UFO phenomenon. UFOs at that point became more of a tabloid affair than serious science. But the sightings continued!Hynek also had his scientist counterpart….Dr. Carl Sagan. Sagan in several meetings and debates had always ridiculed Hynek’s beliefs that UFOs were real. Sagan believed there was no credible evidence to help that UFOs had or have ever visited Earth. Hynek believed otherwise though. He didn’t come out and say UFOs were from another y that the phenomenon was true and that science required to look at the data. In 1977 Dr. Hynek became an advisor to Steven Spielberg for the movie Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Spielberg even had Hynek in a cameo role towards the end of the film. It’s where Hynek meets the aliens. Dr. Hynek passed away in 1986. He was a pioneer in a topic that is still being ridiculed and full of mystery today. This is a amazing book.....It is time that Dr. Hynek deserves the praise for his contribution to this taboo subject.

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    The Close Encounters Man: How One Man Made the World Believe in UFOs review [Book]  2018-7-18 18:0

    I've been fascinated by the topic of UFOs for years now (ever since reading Leslie Kean's essential book, UFOs: Generals, Pilots, and Government Officials Go on the Record)—and even a brief foray into its history will lead you, time and again, to the central figure of J. Allen Hynek. Hynek, an accomplished astronomer in his own right, served as an Air Force consultant to support debunk UFO cases—but his opinion shifted over what became a lot of decades in the field. For someone as necessary as Hynek, I've always thought it was deeply tragic that there wasn't a definitive biography of the man. Apparently the author felt similarly, and at long latest that injustice has been corrected with a book that goes above-and-beyond in painting a nuanced portrait of this enigmatic figure. The Close Encounters Man captures Hynek's curiosity, his humor, his rigorous analysis, and his complex and evolving views on UFOs—as well as highlighting his a lot of contributions to science during Globe Battle II and the Zone Race.O'Connell's research is incredibly thorough without being dry, and his prose is compelling while still retaining a amazing sense of humor. He accomplishes the almost impossible task of guiding the reader through the life and times of J. Allen Hynek, while also providing an accessible and down-to-earth history of UFOs in the 20th century. O'Connell navigates the high profile hoaxes and charlatans—as well as the genuinely mystifying cases—with Hynek's skeptical eye and common sense.Whether or not you believe UFOs are a true phenomenon, this is certain to be a fascinating read—and this book deserves to become an indispensable volume in ufology.

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    The Close Encounters Man: How One Man Made the World Believe in UFOs review [Book]  2018-7-18 18:0

    I'm always glad to read a non-fiction book that has a clear narrative--the fact that I mainly read fiction means that my forays into real stories are sometimes briefer than they should be because I'm not wired for just facts in sequence. "The Close Encounters Man" was very satisfying in how the reader follows along through Hynek's life, bookended by the appearances of Halley's Comet. While the facts are all there, the book is written with gentle humor and a good-natured acceptance and understanding that everyone has their own opinion on what UFOs really are. There were times I "indulged in a hearty guffaw" while reading the book, just as some of the military-employed UFO researchers/debunkers in the book won't be important for the reader to have a powerful opinion or even any particular knowledge of UFOs to have fun this book. It's the story of a man engaged in interesting work, and deserves to be added to your bookshelf.

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    The Close Encounters Man: How One Man Made the World Believe in UFOs review [Book]  2018-7-18 18:0

    This is a well done biography. I'd recommend it to anyone who is interested in the historical side of the UFO issue or Hynek's life. It doesn't carry an ETH bias, which was appreciated, and does a amazing job of narrating bigger UFO happenings such as the Michigan Swamp Gas event, the Pascagoula, Mississippi incident, and several others that Hynek either directly investigating or of peripheral importance on the field of UFOs. Tag also covers some of the lesser known esoteric interests of Hynek, as well as his academic career and government-contracted is is a amazing text to read before getting into Hynek's actual literature and essays, or as solid background on the author if you've previously read Hynek's work.

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    The Close Encounters Man: How One Man Made the World Believe in UFOs review [Book]  2018-7-18 18:0

    Mr. O'Connell unravels the life and work of a mostly forgotten man who had an undeniable impact on science and American culture. CLOSE ENCOUNTERS OF THE THIRD KIND, and THE X-FILES owe Dr. Hynek a amazing debt, and if you're fan of either, so do you. O'Connell creates a 3D photo of Hynek, and refuses to allow us discount the contributions he created to astronomy, physics, and WWII. Like Hynek, O'Connell does not create leaps in logic or editorialize about UFOs. This is an honest look at a man who researched a ubiquitous phenomenon that remains unexplained and diminished to this day. It is a riveting biography, and deep look into a broad swath of American history. I cannot recommend it more highly.

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    The Close Encounters Man: How One Man Made the World Believe in UFOs review [Book]  2018-7-18 18:0

    I'd like to point out how well pulled together this book is and how entertaining to read -- as a biography, as a pop culture history, as a serious attempt to understand a time and put in the world. It really is a page-turner; the style just flows. I highly recommend it.

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    The Close Encounters Man: How One Man Made the World Believe in UFOs review [Book]  2018-7-18 18:0

    If you're looking for a sensational book about UFOs, this isn't for you. But if you're looking for a book that gives the topic of UFOs serious consideration while charting the life of J. Allen Hynek, the scientist who did more than any other to popularize UFO studies, look no further. By focusing on popular UFO cases through the prism of Hynek's life and work, Tag O'Connell paints a fascinating portrait of a period in our latest history when belief in extra-normal happenings peaked, perhaps because of Hynek's influence. A gifted storyteller, he propels his narrative with clinical descriptions of some of the more popular UFO cases, while charting Hynek's evolution from skepticism to a more open-minded approach to the UFO phenomenon. It's a fine piece of investigative journalism about a man who was, himself, an investigator. If you have an interest in UFOs, you'll have fun this book. Or, if you like underdog stories of academics bucking the establishment, you'll have fun this book. Like some of the incidents O'Connell chronicles, this book abducts you and takes you on a strange, unforgettable journey.

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    The Close Encounters Man: How One Man Made the World Believe in UFOs review [Book]  2018-7-18 18:0

    This was a very well written book about an awesome man. You learn so much about Dr. Hyneck and the early years of UFO investigations. I cannot recommend it enough for all readers.

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    The Close Encounters Man: How One Man Made the World Believe in UFOs review [Book]  2018-7-18 18:0

    An simple and delightful read filled with deep research resulting in a story enriched with fascinating details. If you have any interest in UFOs, then this book is worth reading. It brings not only Hynek, the man, to life but also enriches your knowledge and understanding of what was going on in our skies and what the government was doing about it. Fact-filled, fascinating, and fun to read. Highly recommended.

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    Secret Kindness Agents: How Small Acts of Kindness Really Can Change the World review [Book]  2017-11-26 18:2

    This is a unbelievable read for me as a first year teacher to remind myself of the most necessary parts of teaching. This is a amazing read for anyone!

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    Secret Kindness Agents: How Small Acts of Kindness Really Can Change the World review [Book]  2017-11-26 18:2

    Reminds me of the amazing things in life. Simple read but a amazing read. Makes me wish to write SKA envelopes for strangers. :-)

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