All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir Reviews & Opinions


Submit All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir review or read customer reviews:

100 Reviews Found

Sort by: Most Accurate (default) | Newest | Top Rated

  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    I chose this book because I heard Ashley promote the book on TV and was interested in what she had to say about her family. I wasn't particulary happy with how she came about telling her story. It appeared to me as though she was too braggy on her self and her achievements with her voluntary work, yet I commend her for doing it (most of us do nothing). I thought it was inconsiderate the method she spoke of her family. The facts and happenings were probably true, which is sad, I thought she could have been a bit more tactful about it though. But that's the method she saw it and felt about it and that's what she wrote. I just thought she was a bit harsh on them and again I got the feeling she thought she was "I'm better than them". That may not be the case at all. That is just how I, personally, felt while reading the book.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    There is so much beauty and tragedy in this book I had to read it twice to really take it all in. It's awesome how one phone call really changed her whole life, and how this journey really resonated with her soul, spilling out of the pages in all of its pain and beauty, hence the name of the book.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    I was delightfully surprised by how much I connected with Ashley Judd's story. Through difficult family dynamics and trying to do one's best to take care of one's self while also serving the globe with an begin heart, I have come to see Ashley as something of a soul sister and definitely feminist ally.

    0  


    Add Your Opinion on All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir or Continue Reading Reviews Below ↓

     

    Watch All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir video reviews and related movies:

    See ashley Judd AIDS Activist-All That Is Bitter & Sweet: A Memoir on youtube.

     related image

    See All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir trailer on youtube.

     related image

    See MEMOIR OF AN ADDICT (SUZIE) - TAJOE (VINCY MAS 2011) on youtube.

     related image

    See All That Is Bitter and Sweet A Memoir on youtube.

     related image

    See Weezer - Happy Hour on youtube.

     related image

    See All That Is Bitter and Sweet A Memoir on youtube.

     related image

    See Suga Water Trailer on youtube.

     related image

    See All That Is Bitter and Sweet A Memoir on youtube.

     related image

    Scroll down to see all opinions ↓

  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    While not an simple read, in that the experiences of the author are disturbing,it is an necessary book. It heightens ones awareness to the realities of life for so a lot of in our world. It also raises necessary questions about our foreign aid policies as well as our own private commitment to our brothers and sisters of the world.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    Making her life an act of worship of God is her vocation; acting her profession. More or less, that is what she said and the text demonstrates it well.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    Awesome journey and inspiring life work. Beautifully written. She is a force for amazing in this globe and her book is a bonus to those who seek to serve.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    It's very intense, and deeply personal. The overall notice in some chapters, gets lost in the loads of info we as readers are expected to digest. Amazing read.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    Ashley Judd for President. Actually, that would be a waste. The world's poverty-stricken need her more. Despite her challenging childhood she has managed to repair and heal and soar.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    It was a amazing read . a amazing story and she is a unbelievable human being . the book arrived on time and I was very satisfied .

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    All That Is Bitter and Sweet: A Memoir review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    Its very real! 😇

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Memoirs review [Book]  2018-5-14 18:0

    Best book I have ever read. Marvelous life story and amazingly told. One of the architects of the Fresh Globe Order.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Memoirs review [Book]  2018-5-14 18:0

    Jay Rockefeller has been "my" faithful Senator for a lot of years and before that our state's Governor. We shall miss his faithful, steady leadership. Nelson Rockefeller was Governor of Fresh York when I lived in Rochester. I could not resist this book which stared at me from the display shelf in the readers corner at the public library. What was it that created this dynastic family so drawn to public life? Being a farm girl born in the month that FDR was elected our president at the height of the depression, I seek to understand the life orientation of the very rich who have had amazing impact on our public and daily lives. Are they as self-serving as our "wealth-starved" lives and the famous press educates us to believe? Are they as faithful in service to the "masses" as the one I have come to appreciate as a real statesman?. In these memoirs, David Rockefeller reveals to us a picture of their father, not as the famous photo of a railroad robber baron, but as one who instilled in his sons a sense of responsibility for their wealth in service to this democratic society in their chosen careers. David Rockefeller, a banking giant, reveals the struggles of a family burdened with wealth as well as their enjoyment of it and their sense of responsibility in its use to sustain the people's faith in a free society. This book reveals how this family has enhanced our lives and the lives of others around the globe as well as their own. As one who lives on Social Security and a little pension, I cannot, without thought, assume wealth is wicked. I must first look at who and what they are who possess it. In this family, I have seen the blessings shared with us as well as their dilemmas of living at "the top".

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Memoirs review [Book]  2018-5-14 18:0

    This book gives a true peek at the true David Rockefeller and his family. Out of his own words he admitted that he and his family is out to support make a 'One globe global system'. He makes it a point to express that he and his family are very proud in their success.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Memoirs review [Book]  2018-5-14 18:0

    As a disclosure, my reason for reading David Rockefeller's Memoires may be various from yours. I had just read Ron Chernow's Titan on JDR, Sr and wanted to know more about the third generation of Rockefellers, the "Rockefeller brothers"--David, Laurance, Winthrop, Nelson, and John III. I was less interested in DR's insights on Manhattan and globe affairs and politics based on his 20-25-year tenure as CEO of Chase Manhattan Bank, though the several scattered sections on Rockefeller Center I thought were fascinating because of its close association with the family.What is awesome is that DR, who is still alive at 97 years old, has direct memories, as of 2001, of his grandfather, who was born in 1839 and had such an imprint on American history. Clearly, his father JDR, Jr, who lived to please his father, imparted much of his father's teachings to his children, and this comes out in the book. I especially appreciated this having read Titan.DR states it took 10 years to write his memoirs. He was 88 years old when they came out. The text reads very well and clearly DR and his editors spent considerable time perfecting everything (he had plenty of help).One annoying aspect of the text is that the DR has a habit of downplaying problematic parts of his life and exaggerating the amazing parts. For instance, practically half method though he tells us that all of his children have always hated him and thought he's an insensitive "capitalist pig" kind of person. His wife had lifelong issues with depression, which he only mentioned in passing. Additionally, towards the end of his extended tenure as CEO of Chase Manhattan Bank we learn that he almost got thrown out for performing poorly. How a lot of times he says "in the end" everything turns out right or he did the right thing, I can't count. I guess if you're a JDR, Sr grandchild, it doesn't matter!On the other hand, he was one of the 6 children/5 sons of JDR, Jr, who inherited almost the entire Rockefeller fortune. DR's life clearly was blessed with access to the cream of our society whereever he went. He had an active mind and despite what his children may have initially thought about him, he had dedicated much of his life to public service. It was definitely a worthwhile next book will probably be Bernice Kert's very well received bio on Abby Aldrich Rockefeller, DR's mother and the driving force behind the MoMA, despite her husband's (JDR, Jr's) distaste for modern art.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Memoirs review [Book]  2018-5-14 18:0

    An eyeopening look at the life, challenges, successes, and private achievements of a popular American. I found the book fascinating from the perspective of how this man dealt with the otherwise unknown challenges of life - as we all do. As an MBA Professor, I was keenly interested in the Chase Bank "climb", the banking story, and the international diplomacy inherent with the job of a bank Officer. I am recommending the book to all of my economics students...

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Memoirs review [Book]  2018-5-14 18:0

    I bought this book to experience the life of David Rockefeller and what it is like to live a life of wonderful wealth. In that respect, I did have fun this book. For example, the Rockefeller children did not attend an exclusive personal grade school. Obviously, his life was still very various from most Americans filled with travel and meeting very famous, smart ter a very interesting educational career and time served in WWII, Rockefeller works initially as an assistant to the Mayor of NY but eventually begins a long career with Chase Manhattan Bank ending as the Chairman. Here, the book really bogged down. Even though he was raised in a life much various than most Americans, his Chase career was marked by a rivalry with a senior loan officer in a war for the top spot at the bank. Rockefeller spent this part of the book describing the war in depth without trying to be critical. Frankly, it was more info than was required and not really becoming. After his ascension to the top spot, the book describes in detail, probably too much detail, his growth of the bank, his relationships with globe leaders, and the issues at the bank that almost cost him his job. And possibly it should e book ends with Rockefeller reflecting on his philanthropic activities and the ultimate dispostion of the Rockefeller Center. I found this section quite interesting.Overall, I casually enjoyed this book and would recommend it. But it is true time commitment to read and may be considered too boring for a lot of readers. If you are buying this book because you have fun business biographies, I would not recommend the book as there is no compelling story to tell from a business perspective. It's just a story of a unbelievable life from a very wealthy individual who is able to travel in very high circles.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Memoirs review [Book]  2018-5-14 18:0

    Never knew so much happen in his life and he reveal so much of himself and a sneak peek into his family as well.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Memoirs review [Book]  2018-5-14 18:0

    David Rockefeller is proud of his accomplishments and financial acumen. I don't understand why rich people's hobbies - like Museum of Modern Art - are tax exempt.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Memoirs review [Book]  2018-5-14 18:0

    Rambled on too much

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Memoirs review [Book]  2018-5-14 18:0

    A amazing insight on one of the globe most respected and admired men. A must read for young entrepreneurs around the world.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Summary - Hillbilly Elegy: Memoir by J. D. Vance - A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis (Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis ... - Book, Hardcover, Paperback Book 1) review [Book]  2017-10-28 18:2

    This summary book is a nice to read. Hillbilly Elegy is interesting and entertaining. Although she devoted to it for him. She celebrated when her son asked to read a book and took it upon herself to support him with his science projects. Story theme is heart touching and showing reality of life thanks.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 22:22

    Well written and moves quickly. A fascinating story!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 22:22

    very necessary work, thank yoiu

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-13 21:15

    A amazing story with awesome characters/people. She does a amazing job of drawing you into her life.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-13 21:15

    This book was an okay read. The theme was gripping and sad therefore I gave it four stars.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-13 21:15

    Very amazing read....

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-13 21:15

    Well written and moves quickly. A fascinating story!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-13 21:15

    Outstanding effort by a first time author.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-13 21:15

    very necessary work, thank yoiu

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-13 21:15

    A amazing story but slow in some parts

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-13 21:15

    Amazing book, very well written

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-13 21:15

    Amazing book

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-13 21:15

    To the low star reviews: guys, it's a memoir - if it's a sad read for adoptive parents or you have opinions on how the parents lived their life it means that they book engaged you - so it's a amazing book, it just didn't give you the lovey dovey feelings you're used to feeling when reading a novel. Most memoirs don'e novel is well written, kept me engaged, and I did love hearing the info of the story of Mary King and her siblings. Mary was so begin and raw with descriptive of her feelings throughout her childhood and well into adulthood, and truly painted the picture of every stage for the reader. The story is not ideal for families - but in life not all things are butterflies and lollipops, and trials and tribulations and our reactions to them are what tutorial us in life to grow and create decisions. Mary showed the positives and negatives of every situation from a lot of various perspectives (parents, adoptive parents, siblings, adopted siblings). A amazing book. Glad I read the NPR article that lead me to purchase it!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Sweet Sixteen review [Movie]  2017-10-13 21:49

    > A serial assassin on the loose in a little town. This is not a famous title, but I search it an interesting thriller-mystery. I don't know the cast, but I liked them all decently. It is a murder mystery that takes put in a little city where a sheriff investigates the latest brutal knife attacks with all the chance angle. All the victims were teenage boys, who are associated with the fresh girl in the town. Definitely you will start to predict the suspect, that much the movie evolves a bridge between you and the contents. It was a amazing story, I was stunned for its underrated status and for going unnoticed, but then it ended very cheaply. To me the conclusion ruined the rhythm, otherwise the rest of the movie was awesome and worth a watch. I hope somebody would remake it with some changes, especially in the final act and its twist. Overall surely it was a fine film, a mix of the teen theme and the cop story, obviously excluding the poor ending. 6/10

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Bitter Victory review [Movie]  2017-10-13 21:50

    Deconstructing Machismo. Bitter Win is directed by Nicholas Ray and adapted to screenplay from the novel of the same name written by Rene Hardy. It stars Richard Burton, Curd Jurgens, Ruth Roman, Raymond Pellegrin, Christopher Lee and Nigel Green. Melody is by Maurice Leroux and cinematography by Michel Kelber. It’s a movie that has proved most divisive over the years, where some have seen fit to devote in depth studies to it, others have bitingly dismissed it as a stretch to far in pretentious posturing. Personally I found it rather dull, a dreary trudge through the Globe Battle II deserts as Burton and Jurgens butt heads because Burton’s hero had an affair with Jurgens’ wife (Roman). The pace is purposely sedate, except for the war sequence that is, so we are left to rely on the skills of the writers and actors to carry us through to film’s end. Burton is amazing value, he almost always was when he got to brood and pontificate, while Green is his usual irrepressible self. Jurgens, however, is miscast and very uncomfortable with the moody machinations of his character. While the editing is at times poor and a couple of scenes don’t really create sense. Undeniably there is some potency bubbling away in the writing, the deconstruction of machismo and military cynicism angles carry thematic weight, but the movie is structured in such a cocksure method it just comes off as being preachy instead of taking full advantage of the emotional core of the characters as written by Hardy. Just because I don’t like the movie doesn’t mean it’s bad, as previously stated, a lot of search it fascinating and powerful, but it’s not for me and I feel it’s one of the amazing Nicholas Ray’s lesser works. 4/10

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    Fascinating story of one screwed up family, and how they really were no more screwed up than any other family. Perfectly illustrates that the functional family is only a d it. Read it all in one sitting. Unbelievable book.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    A amazing story with awesome characters/people. She does a amazing job of drawing you into her life.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    This book was an okay read. The theme was gripping and sad therefore I gave it four stars.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    Well written and moves quickly. A fascinating story!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    very necessary work, thank yoiu

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    A amazing story but slow in some parts

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    Amazing book, very well written

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    To the low star reviews: guys, it's a memoir - if it's a sad read for adoptive parents or you have opinions on how the parents lived their life it means that they book engaged you - so it's a amazing book, it just didn't give you the lovey dovey feelings you're used to feeling when reading a novel. Most memoirs don'e novel is well written, kept me engaged, and I did love hearing the info of the story of Mary King and her siblings. Mary was so begin and raw with descriptive of her feelings throughout her childhood and well into adulthood, and truly painted the picture of every stage for the reader. The story is not ideal for families - but in life not all things are butterflies and lollipops, and trials and tribulations and our reactions to them are what tutorial us in life to grow and create decisions. Mary showed the positives and negatives of every situation from a lot of various perspectives (parents, adoptive parents, siblings, adopted siblings). A amazing book. Glad I read the NPR article that lead me to purchase it!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    This book is amazing, baffling, sad, uplifting, funny and scary all at once. This is the memoir of a young woman whose mother gave birth to seven children, six of whom she ended up putting up for ry was the second kid born to a young, not good married couple in Southern Fresh Jersey. Soon after her third sibling was born, the marriage and family began to fall apart. When her parents separated, her grandparents took her younger sister to live with them in Oklahoma. In the next five years, her mother gave birth to five more baby girls and place all five of them up for adoption. Eventually, Mary was also sent to live with her grandparents, who adopted her and her sister ry was always torn between her two worlds. While her mother was clearly irresponsible and lived in poverty, she was very loving and Mary missed her deeply. On the other hand, her grandparents provided her with a secure, stable middle class life but were not warm or openly loving toward r the first 20-something years of her life, Mary dreamed of meeting her missing sisters and worked on making herself someone worth meeting. As her family gradually reunites, she begins to come to terms with her past and tries to figure out what she wants out if e first half of the book, the parts covering her childhood, were the most interesting. Her father was a charismatic person who took the kids on all kinds of adventures yet was thoroughly unreliable. The retelling of the happenings as seen through the eyes of her as a kid was fascinating, she seemed to think of life in the single mom government subsidized apartment complex where they lived as a huge (mainly unsupervised) party. She had no idea that the majority of children in America lived with true grown up parents who provided three meals a day, never had their electricity turned off for lack of payment and did not give birth almost once a year and then give each baby up for adoption.I guess what baffled me most in the book was the question of why her mother never figured out how birth control worked. She seemed to love her kids so it would presumably be horribly painful to give up a baby. As an adult, the author says that she can see how much it took out of her mother to place these babies up for adoption, yet she found herself in that situation over and over again. It blows my 's hard to imagine the confusion and insecurity the author must have grown up feeling. I really have to respect Mary Anna King for surviving her childhood, owning it and having the courage to share it with us in this well-written, insightful book. I want would definitely read a 'part two' or her mother's ver if one were ever written.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    I read this memoir as quick as I possibly could, eager to hear what happened next in Mary Anna King's life. Born to parents who kept having kids but weren't able for a dozens of reasons to actually raise them, she is in a lot of ways alone, although she has six siblings. Her life takes her from a housing development full of single mothers in Fresh Jersey to Oklahoma City, where she is raised by her grandfather and step-grandmother. The contrast between her mother's unconditional but messy love and her grandparent's steady but colder caretaking brings up a lot of problems of what love is, and what a kid needs to e latest four girls in Mary's family are all place up for adoption, and much of the second half of the memoir is about gradually meeting them all and trying to form a family with full siblings that non-the-less have lived lives all very various from each other. It's an awesome inadvertent experiment in nature vs. nurture. As Mary says, chaos seems to search her sisters, even though they were raised in homes very various than her own. The family trait of forms of reckless living, drinking and questionable choices finds them all to some extent, but in addition, more positive traits come through---almost all of them can sing, like their ne'er-do-well father.Few people have lived a life like the one described here. Few people would wish to, but I think almost anyone will wish to read about it. It's an awesome story, skillfully told.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    Fascinating story of one screwed up family, and how they really were no more screwed up than any other family. Perfectly illustrates that the functional family is only a d it. Read it all in one sitting. Unbelievable book.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    A amazing story with awesome characters/people. She does a amazing job of drawing you into her life.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    This book was an okay read. The theme was gripping and sad therefore I gave it four stars.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    Well written and moves quickly. A fascinating story!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    very necessary work, thank yoiu

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    A amazing story but slow in some parts

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    Amazing book, very well written

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    To the low star reviews: guys, it's a memoir - if it's a sad read for adoptive parents or you have opinions on how the parents lived their life it means that they book engaged you - so it's a amazing book, it just didn't give you the lovey dovey feelings you're used to feeling when reading a novel. Most memoirs don'e novel is well written, kept me engaged, and I did love hearing the info of the story of Mary King and her siblings. Mary was so begin and raw with descriptive of her feelings throughout her childhood and well into adulthood, and truly painted the picture of every stage for the reader. The story is not ideal for families - but in life not all things are butterflies and lollipops, and trials and tribulations and our reactions to them are what tutorial us in life to grow and create decisions. Mary showed the positives and negatives of every situation from a lot of various perspectives (parents, adoptive parents, siblings, adopted siblings). A amazing book. Glad I read the NPR article that lead me to purchase it!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    This book is amazing, baffling, sad, uplifting, funny and scary all at once. This is the memoir of a young woman whose mother gave birth to seven children, six of whom she ended up putting up for ry was the second kid born to a young, not good married couple in Southern Fresh Jersey. Soon after her third sibling was born, the marriage and family began to fall apart. When her parents separated, her grandparents took her younger sister to live with them in Oklahoma. In the next five years, her mother gave birth to five more baby girls and place all five of them up for adoption. Eventually, Mary was also sent to live with her grandparents, who adopted her and her sister ry was always torn between her two worlds. While her mother was clearly irresponsible and lived in poverty, she was very loving and Mary missed her deeply. On the other hand, her grandparents provided her with a secure, stable middle class life but were not warm or openly loving toward r the first 20-something years of her life, Mary dreamed of meeting her missing sisters and worked on making herself someone worth meeting. As her family gradually reunites, she begins to come to terms with her past and tries to figure out what she wants out if e first half of the book, the parts covering her childhood, were the most interesting. Her father was a charismatic person who took the kids on all kinds of adventures yet was thoroughly unreliable. The retelling of the happenings as seen through the eyes of her as a kid was fascinating, she seemed to think of life in the single mom government subsidized apartment complex where they lived as a huge (mainly unsupervised) party. She had no idea that the majority of children in America lived with true grown up parents who provided three meals a day, never had their electricity turned off for lack of payment and did not give birth almost once a year and then give each baby up for adoption.I guess what baffled me most in the book was the question of why her mother never figured out how birth control worked. She seemed to love her kids so it would presumably be horribly painful to give up a baby. As an adult, the author says that she can see how much it took out of her mother to place these babies up for adoption, yet she found herself in that situation over and over again. It blows my 's hard to imagine the confusion and insecurity the author must have grown up feeling. I really have to respect Mary Anna King for surviving her childhood, owning it and having the courage to share it with us in this well-written, insightful book. I want would definitely read a 'part two' or her mother's ver if one were ever written.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    I read this memoir as quick as I possibly could, eager to hear what happened next in Mary Anna King's life. Born to parents who kept having kids but weren't able for a dozens of reasons to actually raise them, she is in a lot of ways alone, although she has six siblings. Her life takes her from a housing development full of single mothers in Fresh Jersey to Oklahoma City, where she is raised by her grandfather and step-grandmother. The contrast between her mother's unconditional but messy love and her grandparent's steady but colder caretaking brings up a lot of problems of what love is, and what a kid needs to e latest four girls in Mary's family are all place up for adoption, and much of the second half of the memoir is about gradually meeting them all and trying to form a family with full siblings that non-the-less have lived lives all very various from each other. It's an awesome inadvertent experiment in nature vs. nurture. As Mary says, chaos seems to search her sisters, even though they were raised in homes very various than her own. The family trait of forms of reckless living, drinking and questionable choices finds them all to some extent, but in addition, more positive traits come through---almost all of them can sing, like their ne'er-do-well father.Few people have lived a life like the one described here. Few people would wish to, but I think almost anyone will wish to read about it. It's an awesome story, skillfully told.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    Fascinating story of one screwed up family, and how they really were no more screwed up than any other family. Perfectly illustrates that the functional family is only a d it. Read it all in one sitting. Unbelievable book.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    A amazing story with awesome characters/people. She does a amazing job of drawing you into her life.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    This book was an okay read. The theme was gripping and sad therefore I gave it four stars.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    Well written and moves quickly. A fascinating story!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    very necessary work, thank yoiu

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    A amazing story but slow in some parts

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    Amazing book, very well written

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    To the low star reviews: guys, it's a memoir - if it's a sad read for adoptive parents or you have opinions on how the parents lived their life it means that they book engaged you - so it's a amazing book, it just didn't give you the lovey dovey feelings you're used to feeling when reading a novel. Most memoirs don'e novel is well written, kept me engaged, and I did love hearing the info of the story of Mary King and her siblings. Mary was so begin and raw with descriptive of her feelings throughout her childhood and well into adulthood, and truly painted the picture of every stage for the reader. The story is not ideal for families - but in life not all things are butterflies and lollipops, and trials and tribulations and our reactions to them are what tutorial us in life to grow and create decisions. Mary showed the positives and negatives of every situation from a lot of various perspectives (parents, adoptive parents, siblings, adopted siblings). A amazing book. Glad I read the NPR article that lead me to purchase it!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    This book is amazing, baffling, sad, uplifting, funny and scary all at once. This is the memoir of a young woman whose mother gave birth to seven children, six of whom she ended up putting up for ry was the second kid born to a young, not good married couple in Southern Fresh Jersey. Soon after her third sibling was born, the marriage and family began to fall apart. When her parents separated, her grandparents took her younger sister to live with them in Oklahoma. In the next five years, her mother gave birth to five more baby girls and place all five of them up for adoption. Eventually, Mary was also sent to live with her grandparents, who adopted her and her sister ry was always torn between her two worlds. While her mother was clearly irresponsible and lived in poverty, she was very loving and Mary missed her deeply. On the other hand, her grandparents provided her with a secure, stable middle class life but were not warm or openly loving toward r the first 20-something years of her life, Mary dreamed of meeting her missing sisters and worked on making herself someone worth meeting. As her family gradually reunites, she begins to come to terms with her past and tries to figure out what she wants out if e first half of the book, the parts covering her childhood, were the most interesting. Her father was a charismatic person who took the kids on all kinds of adventures yet was thoroughly unreliable. The retelling of the happenings as seen through the eyes of her as a kid was fascinating, she seemed to think of life in the single mom government subsidized apartment complex where they lived as a huge (mainly unsupervised) party. She had no idea that the majority of children in America lived with true grown up parents who provided three meals a day, never had their electricity turned off for lack of payment and did not give birth almost once a year and then give each baby up for adoption.I guess what baffled me most in the book was the question of why her mother never figured out how birth control worked. She seemed to love her kids so it would presumably be horribly painful to give up a baby. As an adult, the author says that she can see how much it took out of her mother to place these babies up for adoption, yet she found herself in that situation over and over again. It blows my 's hard to imagine the confusion and insecurity the author must have grown up feeling. I really have to respect Mary Anna King for surviving her childhood, owning it and having the courage to share it with us in this well-written, insightful book. I want would definitely read a 'part two' or her mother's ver if one were ever written.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    I read this memoir as quick as I possibly could, eager to hear what happened next in Mary Anna King's life. Born to parents who kept having kids but weren't able for a dozens of reasons to actually raise them, she is in a lot of ways alone, although she has six siblings. Her life takes her from a housing development full of single mothers in Fresh Jersey to Oklahoma City, where she is raised by her grandfather and step-grandmother. The contrast between her mother's unconditional but messy love and her grandparent's steady but colder caretaking brings up a lot of problems of what love is, and what a kid needs to e latest four girls in Mary's family are all place up for adoption, and much of the second half of the memoir is about gradually meeting them all and trying to form a family with full siblings that non-the-less have lived lives all very various from each other. It's an awesome inadvertent experiment in nature vs. nurture. As Mary says, chaos seems to search her sisters, even though they were raised in homes very various than her own. The family trait of forms of reckless living, drinking and questionable choices finds them all to some extent, but in addition, more positive traits come through---almost all of them can sing, like their ne'er-do-well father.Few people have lived a life like the one described here. Few people would wish to, but I think almost anyone will wish to read about it. It's an awesome story, skillfully told.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    Fascinating story of one screwed up family, and how they really were no more screwed up than any other family. Perfectly illustrates that the functional family is only a d it. Read it all in one sitting. Unbelievable book.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    A amazing story with awesome characters/people. She does a amazing job of drawing you into her life.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    This book was an okay read. The theme was gripping and sad therefore I gave it four stars.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    Well written and moves quickly. A fascinating story!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    very necessary work, thank yoiu

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    A amazing story but slow in some parts

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    Amazing book, very well written

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    To the low star reviews: guys, it's a memoir - if it's a sad read for adoptive parents or you have opinions on how the parents lived their life it means that they book engaged you - so it's a amazing book, it just didn't give you the lovey dovey feelings you're used to feeling when reading a novel. Most memoirs don'e novel is well written, kept me engaged, and I did love hearing the info of the story of Mary King and her siblings. Mary was so begin and raw with descriptive of her feelings throughout her childhood and well into adulthood, and truly painted the picture of every stage for the reader. The story is not ideal for families - but in life not all things are butterflies and lollipops, and trials and tribulations and our reactions to them are what tutorial us in life to grow and create decisions. Mary showed the positives and negatives of every situation from a lot of various perspectives (parents, adoptive parents, siblings, adopted siblings). A amazing book. Glad I read the NPR article that lead me to purchase it!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    This book is amazing, baffling, sad, uplifting, funny and scary all at once. This is the memoir of a young woman whose mother gave birth to seven children, six of whom she ended up putting up for ry was the second kid born to a young, not good married couple in Southern Fresh Jersey. Soon after her third sibling was born, the marriage and family began to fall apart. When her parents separated, her grandparents took her younger sister to live with them in Oklahoma. In the next five years, her mother gave birth to five more baby girls and place all five of them up for adoption. Eventually, Mary was also sent to live with her grandparents, who adopted her and her sister ry was always torn between her two worlds. While her mother was clearly irresponsible and lived in poverty, she was very loving and Mary missed her deeply. On the other hand, her grandparents provided her with a secure, stable middle class life but were not warm or openly loving toward r the first 20-something years of her life, Mary dreamed of meeting her missing sisters and worked on making herself someone worth meeting. As her family gradually reunites, she begins to come to terms with her past and tries to figure out what she wants out if e first half of the book, the parts covering her childhood, were the most interesting. Her father was a charismatic person who took the kids on all kinds of adventures yet was thoroughly unreliable. The retelling of the happenings as seen through the eyes of her as a kid was fascinating, she seemed to think of life in the single mom government subsidized apartment complex where they lived as a huge (mainly unsupervised) party. She had no idea that the majority of children in America lived with true grown up parents who provided three meals a day, never had their electricity turned off for lack of payment and did not give birth almost once a year and then give each baby up for adoption.I guess what baffled me most in the book was the question of why her mother never figured out how birth control worked. She seemed to love her kids so it would presumably be horribly painful to give up a baby. As an adult, the author says that she can see how much it took out of her mother to place these babies up for adoption, yet she found herself in that situation over and over again. It blows my 's hard to imagine the confusion and insecurity the author must have grown up feeling. I really have to respect Mary Anna King for surviving her childhood, owning it and having the courage to share it with us in this well-written, insightful book. I want would definitely read a 'part two' or her mother's ver if one were ever written.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    I read this memoir as quick as I possibly could, eager to hear what happened next in Mary Anna King's life. Born to parents who kept having kids but weren't able for a dozens of reasons to actually raise them, she is in a lot of ways alone, although she has six siblings. Her life takes her from a housing development full of single mothers in Fresh Jersey to Oklahoma City, where she is raised by her grandfather and step-grandmother. The contrast between her mother's unconditional but messy love and her grandparent's steady but colder caretaking brings up a lot of problems of what love is, and what a kid needs to e latest four girls in Mary's family are all place up for adoption, and much of the second half of the memoir is about gradually meeting them all and trying to form a family with full siblings that non-the-less have lived lives all very various from each other. It's an awesome inadvertent experiment in nature vs. nurture. As Mary says, chaos seems to search her sisters, even though they were raised in homes very various than her own. The family trait of forms of reckless living, drinking and questionable choices finds them all to some extent, but in addition, more positive traits come through---almost all of them can sing, like their ne'er-do-well father.Few people have lived a life like the one described here. Few people would wish to, but I think almost anyone will wish to read about it. It's an awesome story, skillfully told.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:0

    Fascinating story of one screwed up family, and how they really were no more screwed up than any other family. Perfectly illustrates that the functional family is only a d it. Read it all in one sitting. Unbelievable book.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:0

    A amazing story with awesome characters/people. She does a amazing job of drawing you into her life.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:0

    This book was an okay read. The theme was gripping and sad therefore I gave it four stars.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:0

    Well written and moves quickly. A fascinating story!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:0

    very necessary work, thank yoiu

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:0

    A amazing story but slow in some parts

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:0

    Amazing book, very well written

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:0

    To the low star reviews: guys, it's a memoir - if it's a sad read for adoptive parents or you have opinions on how the parents lived their life it means that they book engaged you - so it's a amazing book, it just didn't give you the lovey dovey feelings you're used to feeling when reading a novel. Most memoirs don'e novel is well written, kept me engaged, and I did love hearing the info of the story of Mary King and her siblings. Mary was so begin and raw with descriptive of her feelings throughout her childhood and well into adulthood, and truly painted the picture of every stage for the reader. The story is not ideal for families - but in life not all things are butterflies and lollipops, and trials and tribulations and our reactions to them are what tutorial us in life to grow and create decisions. Mary showed the positives and negatives of every situation from a lot of various perspectives (parents, adoptive parents, siblings, adopted siblings). A amazing book. Glad I read the NPR article that lead me to purchase it!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:0

    This book is amazing, baffling, sad, uplifting, funny and scary all at once. This is the memoir of a young woman whose mother gave birth to seven children, six of whom she ended up putting up for ry was the second kid born to a young, not good married couple in Southern Fresh Jersey. Soon after her third sibling was born, the marriage and family began to fall apart. When her parents separated, her grandparents took her younger sister to live with them in Oklahoma. In the next five years, her mother gave birth to five more baby girls and place all five of them up for adoption. Eventually, Mary was also sent to live with her grandparents, who adopted her and her sister ry was always torn between her two worlds. While her mother was clearly irresponsible and lived in poverty, she was very loving and Mary missed her deeply. On the other hand, her grandparents provided her with a secure, stable middle class life but were not warm or openly loving toward r the first 20-something years of her life, Mary dreamed of meeting her missing sisters and worked on making herself someone worth meeting. As her family gradually reunites, she begins to come to terms with her past and tries to figure out what she wants out if e first half of the book, the parts covering her childhood, were the most interesting. Her father was a charismatic person who took the kids on all kinds of adventures yet was thoroughly unreliable. The retelling of the happenings as seen through the eyes of her as a kid was fascinating, she seemed to think of life in the single mom government subsidized apartment complex where they lived as a huge (mainly unsupervised) party. She had no idea that the majority of children in America lived with true grown up parents who provided three meals a day, never had their electricity turned off for lack of payment and did not give birth almost once a year and then give each baby up for adoption.I guess what baffled me most in the book was the question of why her mother never figured out how birth control worked. She seemed to love her kids so it would presumably be horribly painful to give up a baby. As an adult, the author says that she can see how much it took out of her mother to place these babies up for adoption, yet she found herself in that situation over and over again. It blows my 's hard to imagine the confusion and insecurity the author must have grown up feeling. I really have to respect Mary Anna King for surviving her childhood, owning it and having the courage to share it with us in this well-written, insightful book. I want would definitely read a 'part two' or her mother's ver if one were ever written.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:0

    I read this memoir as quick as I possibly could, eager to hear what happened next in Mary Anna King's life. Born to parents who kept having kids but weren't able for a dozens of reasons to actually raise them, she is in a lot of ways alone, although she has six siblings. Her life takes her from a housing development full of single mothers in Fresh Jersey to Oklahoma City, where she is raised by her grandfather and step-grandmother. The contrast between her mother's unconditional but messy love and her grandparent's steady but colder caretaking brings up a lot of problems of what love is, and what a kid needs to e latest four girls in Mary's family are all place up for adoption, and much of the second half of the memoir is about gradually meeting them all and trying to form a family with full siblings that non-the-less have lived lives all very various from each other. It's an awesome inadvertent experiment in nature vs. nurture. As Mary says, chaos seems to search her sisters, even though they were raised in homes very various than her own. The family trait of forms of reckless living, drinking and questionable choices finds them all to some extent, but in addition, more positive traits come through---almost all of them can sing, like their ne'er-do-well father.Few people have lived a life like the one described here. Few people would wish to, but I think almost anyone will wish to read about it. It's an awesome story, skillfully told.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 22:22

    This book was an okay read. The theme was gripping and sad therefore I gave it four stars.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 21:10

    Fascinating story of one screwed up family, and how they really were no more screwed up than any other family. Perfectly illustrates that the functional family is only a d it. Read it all in one sitting. Unbelievable book.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 21:10

    A amazing story with awesome characters/people. She does a amazing job of drawing you into her life.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 21:10

    This book was an okay read. The theme was gripping and sad therefore I gave it four stars.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 21:10

    Well written and moves quickly. A fascinating story!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 21:10

    very necessary work, thank yoiu

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 21:10

    A amazing story but slow in some parts

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 21:10

    Amazing book, very well written

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 21:10

    To the low star reviews: guys, it's a memoir - if it's a sad read for adoptive parents or you have opinions on how the parents lived their life it means that they book engaged you - so it's a amazing book, it just didn't give you the lovey dovey feelings you're used to feeling when reading a novel. Most memoirs don'e novel is well written, kept me engaged, and I did love hearing the info of the story of Mary King and her siblings. Mary was so begin and raw with descriptive of her feelings throughout her childhood and well into adulthood, and truly painted the picture of every stage for the reader. The story is not ideal for families - but in life not all things are butterflies and lollipops, and trials and tribulations and our reactions to them are what tutorial us in life to grow and create decisions. Mary showed the positives and negatives of every situation from a lot of various perspectives (parents, adoptive parents, siblings, adopted siblings). A amazing book. Glad I read the NPR article that lead me to purchase it!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 21:10

    This book is amazing, baffling, sad, uplifting, funny and scary all at once. This is the memoir of a young woman whose mother gave birth to seven children, six of whom she ended up putting up for ry was the second kid born to a young, not good married couple in Southern Fresh Jersey. Soon after her third sibling was born, the marriage and family began to fall apart. When her parents separated, her grandparents took her younger sister to live with them in Oklahoma. In the next five years, her mother gave birth to five more baby girls and place all five of them up for adoption. Eventually, Mary was also sent to live with her grandparents, who adopted her and her sister ry was always torn between her two worlds. While her mother was clearly irresponsible and lived in poverty, she was very loving and Mary missed her deeply. On the other hand, her grandparents provided her with a secure, stable middle class life but were not warm or openly loving toward r the first 20-something years of her life, Mary dreamed of meeting her missing sisters and worked on making herself someone worth meeting. As her family gradually reunites, she begins to come to terms with her past and tries to figure out what she wants out if e first half of the book, the parts covering her childhood, were the most interesting. Her father was a charismatic person who took the kids on all kinds of adventures yet was thoroughly unreliable. The retelling of the happenings as seen through the eyes of her as a kid was fascinating, she seemed to think of life in the single mom government subsidized apartment complex where they lived as a huge (mainly unsupervised) party. She had no idea that the majority of children in America lived with true grown up parents who provided three meals a day, never had their electricity turned off for lack of payment and did not give birth almost once a year and then give each baby up for adoption.I guess what baffled me most in the book was the question of why her mother never figured out how birth control worked. She seemed to love her kids so it would presumably be horribly painful to give up a baby. As an adult, the author says that she can see how much it took out of her mother to place these babies up for adoption, yet she found herself in that situation over and over again. It blows my 's hard to imagine the confusion and insecurity the author must have grown up feeling. I really have to respect Mary Anna King for surviving her childhood, owning it and having the courage to share it with us in this well-written, insightful book. I want would definitely read a 'part two' or her mother's ver if one were ever written.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 21:10

    I read this memoir as quick as I possibly could, eager to hear what happened next in Mary Anna King's life. Born to parents who kept having kids but weren't able for a dozens of reasons to actually raise them, she is in a lot of ways alone, although she has six siblings. Her life takes her from a housing development full of single mothers in Fresh Jersey to Oklahoma City, where she is raised by her grandfather and step-grandmother. The contrast between her mother's unconditional but messy love and her grandparent's steady but colder caretaking brings up a lot of problems of what love is, and what a kid needs to e latest four girls in Mary's family are all place up for adoption, and much of the second half of the memoir is about gradually meeting them all and trying to form a family with full siblings that non-the-less have lived lives all very various from each other. It's an awesome inadvertent experiment in nature vs. nurture. As Mary says, chaos seems to search her sisters, even though they were raised in homes very various than her own. The family trait of forms of reckless living, drinking and questionable choices finds them all to some extent, but in addition, more positive traits come through---almost all of them can sing, like their ne'er-do-well father.Few people have lived a life like the one described here. Few people would wish to, but I think almost anyone will wish to read about it. It's an awesome story, skillfully told.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 22:22

    Fascinating story of one screwed up family, and how they really were no more screwed up than any other family. Perfectly illustrates that the functional family is only a d it. Read it all in one sitting. Unbelievable book.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 22:22

    A amazing story with awesome characters/people. She does a amazing job of drawing you into her life.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 22:22

    A amazing story but slow in some parts

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    @#$%!&?s: A Memoir review [Book]  2017-10-14 22:22

    Amazing book, very well written

    0  



    Read random posts:


    Search Cloud

    About Us

    We deliver reviews of items/services from multiple category. Find and read opinions on clothes, Tv Shows, ebooks, video games, meals, gadgets, services or household items. Would you like to rate your recent purchases on Amazon or Ebay? Or maybe something was not good enough and would you like to express your sadness? Do not wait and do this here! We give you the opportunity to attach URL going to item/service you want to review.

    Contact

    www.add-reviews.com
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    P: (123) 456-7890

    Newsletter