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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-16 18:0

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-16 18:0

    Just read his essay in Strike. What a tendentious, self happy piece of hot air! A souffle that could have only been cooked by someone with a guaranteed income (Say...a tenured Anthropology professor.) who isn't at risk with most of the vagaries of d writer though.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-20 18:0

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    no specific comments

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-23 18:0

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-23 18:0

    no specific comments

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-23 18:0

    Would liken the experience to finding a puzzle piece in my (probably) vain attempt to understand the professional world/understand how I ended up in one of these so, I wish to thank the author for writing this. Even if the book is complete BS (which I don't think it is), it created me really satisfied to feel that I'm not alone in having a BS job.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-25 18:0

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-25 18:0

    no specific comments

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-25 18:0

    Would liken the experience to finding a puzzle piece in my (probably) vain attempt to understand the professional world/understand how I ended up in one of these so, I wish to thank the author for writing this. Even if the book is complete BS (which I don't think it is), it created me really satisfied to feel that I'm not alone in having a BS job.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-25 18:0

    I used to have a lot of jobs like this. This should be needed reading for a lot of college graduates.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-26 18:0

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

    0  


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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-26 18:0

    John Maynard Keynes had amazing confidence that capitalism will improve not only the wealth but also the well-being of all in society. One of the specific predictions he created that, sadly, did not come true, was that by the end of the twentieth century, the major Western societies would have achieved the fifteen-hour work week because technology would have alleviated hitherto long menial hours. Why has that not happened and instead employees are working longer and longer hours? Graeber blames the creation of what he calls ‘BS jobs’ (I had to shortened the word to pass Amazon censorship rules) and the ‘BSization’ of proper jobs. Graeber’s defines a BS job as ‘a form of paid employment that is so completely pointless, unnecessary, or pernicious that even the employee cannot justify its existence even though, as part of the conditions of employment, the employee feels obliged to pretend that this is not the case’. He also says that ‘Hell is a collection of individuals who are spending the bulk of their time working on a task they don’t like and are not particularly amazing at’. He provides plenty of examples, cabinetmakers compelled to fry fish is one of them. There is the story of a corporate lawyer who went on to become a satisfied singer in an indie rock band when he became disillusioned with his job as a corporate lawyer. He had taken ‘the default choice of a lot of directionless folk: law school’ but has found his job as a lawyer to be ‘utterly meaningless, contributed nothing to the world, and, in his own estimation, should not really exist’. Some such BS jobs are so pointless that no one notices even if the employee vanishes. One case involved a Spanish civil servant who skipped work for six years to study philosophy and became an expert in Spinoza before he was found out. In another case, an employee had been sitting at his desk, dead for four days before his colleagues realised that he had died. BS jobs can also be defined by the scope of work. People who are employed in jobs that exist primarily to create someone else look or feel necessary are known as ‘flunkies’. Doormen are examples in this category. There are also ‘goons’ who exist only because people employ them – soldiers, for example; and ‘duct-tapers’ who are employed to support one part of an organisation communicate with another in the same organisation. In addition to financial consultancy, middle management is where one might search BS jobs aplenty. A sign that you have a job like this is when you are designated to provide ‘strategic leadership’. This is what Graeber has to say in middle management in academia:‘Now, those of us toiling in the academic mills who still like to think of ourselves as teachers and scholars before all else have come to fear the word “strategic”. “Strategic statement” (or even worse, “strategic vision documents”) instil a particular terror, since these are the basic means by which corporate management techniques – setting up quantifiable methods for assessing performance, forcing teachers and scholars to spend more and more of their time assessing and justifying what they do and less and less time actually doing it – are insinuated into academic life’. Graeber interviewed employees from different sectors. From one he quoted, ‘in banking, obviously the entire sector adds no value and is therefore BS’. Then there is the Human Resources Department that sets up intranet and instruct employees to create it ‘into a kind of internal “community”, like Facebook. They set it up; nobody uses it. So they then started to test and bully everyone into using it…Then they tried to entice people in by having HR post a load of touchy-feely crap or people writing “internal blogs” that nobody cared about.’ Graeber argues that the rise of such jobs was not due to economic factors but political and moral ones. He discusses how jobs can truly have value, and how exactly can value be measured. What is clear that we must resist ‘The pressure to value ourselves and others on the basis of how hard we work at something we’d rather not be doing…if you’re not destroying your mind and body via paid work you’re not living right’. The latest part of the book is devoted to answering the question, ‘How have so a lot of humans reached the point where they accept that even miserable, unnecessary work is actually superior to no work at all?’ From there Graeber discusses the modern culture of managerial feudalism and the resentment it generates, yet is itself oblivious to it. If Graeber is right that this is not an economic issue but a political and moral one, then the solution cannot be economic either. Unfortunately, Graeber is loath to create policy recommendations. That keeps us then, in utter suspense – unless workers revolt.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-26 18:0

    You can always search people who are dissatisfied with their jobs and question the value of what they obtain paid to do. Graeber cites a YouGov survey in the UK which reports that 37% of survey respondents feel that way. Unfortunately, Graeber ignores it that You Gov survey respondents are a select group. You have to be a You Gov user to participate in the survey, which creates a built-in selection bias. Graeber views with approval the proposal for a Universal Primary Income in India without noting that this proposal hasn't been tried yet and that it isn't universal, it is means-tested. In his discussion of Universal Primary Income, he argues that "If it (Universal Primary Income) seems implausible to most, it's largely because we've all gronw up with largely false assumptions about what cash really is, how it's produced, what taxes are really for, and a hose of other problems that lie far beyond the scope of this volume." That's begging the question, claiming that doubts about a Universal Primary Income are intellectually false, and then refusing to explain what is false about them. The book is fun to read because most of us have had useless scutwork jobs at some point and some of us still do, but his argument is too short on facts to take it seriously.

    0  


  • 0

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-26 18:0

    no specific comments

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  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-26 18:0

    Would liken the experience to finding a puzzle piece in my (probably) vain attempt to understand the professional world/understand how I ended up in one of these so, I wish to thank the author for writing this. Even if the book is complete BS (which I don't think it is), it created me really satisfied to feel that I'm not alone in having a BS job.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-5-26 18:0

    I used to have a lot of jobs like this. This should be needed reading for a lot of college graduates.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-8 18:2

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-8 18:2

    John Maynard Keynes had amazing confidence that capitalism will improve not only the wealth but also the well-being of all in society. One of the specific predictions he created that, sadly, did not come true, was that by the end of the twentieth century, the major Western societies would have achieved the fifteen-hour work week because technology would have alleviated hitherto long menial hours. Why has that not happened and instead employees are working longer and longer hours? Graeber blames the creation of what he calls ‘BS jobs’ (I had to shortened the word to pass Amazon censorship rules) and the ‘BSization’ of proper jobs. Graeber’s defines a BS job as ‘a form of paid employment that is so completely pointless, unnecessary, or pernicious that even the employee cannot justify its existence even though, as part of the conditions of employment, the employee feels obliged to pretend that this is not the case’. He also says that ‘Hell is a collection of individuals who are spending the bulk of their time working on a task they don’t like and are not particularly amazing at’. He provides plenty of examples, cabinetmakers compelled to fry fish is one of them. There is the story of a corporate lawyer who went on to become a satisfied singer in an indie rock band when he became disillusioned with his job as a corporate lawyer. He had taken ‘the default choice of a lot of directionless folk: law school’ but has found his job as a lawyer to be ‘utterly meaningless, contributed nothing to the world, and, in his own estimation, should not really exist’. Some such BS jobs are so pointless that no one notices even if the employee vanishes. One case involved a Spanish civil servant who skipped work for six years to study philosophy and became an expert in Spinoza before he was found out. In another case, an employee had been sitting at his desk, dead for four days before his colleagues realised that he had died. BS jobs can also be defined by the scope of work. People who are employed in jobs that exist primarily to create someone else look or feel necessary are known as ‘flunkies’. Doormen are examples in this category. There are also ‘goons’ who exist only because people employ them – soldiers, for example; and ‘duct-tapers’ who are employed to support one part of an organisation communicate with another in the same organisation. In addition to financial consultancy, middle management is where one might search BS jobs aplenty. A sign that you have a job like this is when you are designated to provide ‘strategic leadership’. This is what Graeber has to say in middle management in academia:‘Now, those of us toiling in the academic mills who still like to think of ourselves as teachers and scholars before all else have come to fear the word “strategic”. “Strategic statement” (or even worse, “strategic vision documents”) instil a particular terror, since these are the basic means by which corporate management techniques – setting up quantifiable methods for assessing performance, forcing teachers and scholars to spend more and more of their time assessing and justifying what they do and less and less time actually doing it – are insinuated into academic life’. Graeber interviewed employees from different sectors. From one he quoted, ‘in banking, obviously the entire sector adds no value and is therefore BS’. Then there is the Human Resources Department that sets up intranet and instruct employees to create it ‘into a kind of internal “community”, like Facebook. They set it up; nobody uses it. So they then started to test and bully everyone into using it…Then they tried to entice people in by having HR post a load of touchy-feely crap or people writing “internal blogs” that nobody cared about.’ Graeber argues that the rise of such jobs was not due to economic factors but political and moral ones. He discusses how jobs can truly have value, and how exactly can value be measured. What is clear that we must resist ‘The pressure to value ourselves and others on the basis of how hard we work at something we’d rather not be doing…if you’re not destroying your mind and body via paid work you’re not living right’. The latest part of the book is devoted to answering the question, ‘How have so a lot of humans reached the point where they accept that even miserable, unnecessary work is actually superior to no work at all?’ From there Graeber discusses the modern culture of managerial feudalism and the resentment it generates, yet is itself oblivious to it. If Graeber is right that this is not an economic issue but a political and moral one, then the solution cannot be economic either. Unfortunately, Graeber is loath to create policy recommendations. That keeps us then, in utter suspense – unless workers revolt.

    0  


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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-8 18:2

    no specific comments

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-8 18:2

    You can always search people who are dissatisfied with their jobs and question the value of what they obtain paid to do. Graeber cites a YouGov survey in the UK which reports that 37% of survey respondents feel that way. Unfortunately, Graeber ignores it that You Gov survey respondents are a select group. You have to be a You Gov user to participate in the survey, which creates a built-in selection bias. Graeber views with approval the proposal for a Universal Primary Income in India without noting that this proposal hasn't been tried yet and that it isn't universal, it is means-tested. In his discussion of Universal Primary Income, he argues that "If it (Universal Primary Income) seems implausible to most, it's largely because we've all gronw up with largely false assumptions about what cash really is, how it's produced, what taxes are really for, and a hose of other problems that lie far beyond the scope of this volume." That's begging the question, claiming that doubts about a Universal Primary Income are intellectually false, and then refusing to explain what is false about them. The book is fun to read because most of us have had useless scutwork jobs at some point and some of us still do, but his argument is too short on facts to take it seriously.

    0  


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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-8 18:2

    I have never felt so validated in my entire life. I could relate to almost every private anecdote, and now understand why I have been so miserable and depressed and mad in my BS job. I wish to give this book to everyone in my company. Society really needs to come together and take action for a 15 hour work week. Corporations, huge and small, don't own your time on this earth. Really a form of slavery.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-8 18:2

    Would liken the experience to finding a puzzle piece in my (probably) vain attempt to understand the professional world/understand how I ended up in one of these so, I wish to thank the author for writing this. Even if the book is complete BS (which I don't think it is), it created me really satisfied to feel that I'm not alone in having a BS job.

    0  


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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-8 18:2

    The book convincingly associates the current economic control of industry and government over the production of useless BS jobs. The issue is at its worst when industry and government collude directly. The proliferation of BS jobs also becomes apparent when government imposes useless regulation over industry to enforce its political objectives. This was illustrated in the book by the mind-numbing Foreign Corrupt Practices Act compliance needed of US companies, but there are a lot of y of the examples in the book to describe BS jobs resulted from managerial incompetence. The author implies this incompetence is driven from a systemic economic policy special to capitalism that encourages production of useless products and the power of the capitalists over working classes. The author favors a system (anarchy) that would free the working classes from these constraints. While he makes a amazing case that BS jobs are ubiquitous in the current system (he estimates between 40-50% or more), he does not adequately explain the process he would use to create the important changes. He does create a amazing case that the current system in the West is clearly not a market-based or free enterprise system due to the collusion of government and industry to favor industry over the worker. He also illustrates quite well the process by which wages are repressed to favor the rich vs working class. Perhaps a later work will discover this further.I believe that his estimate of BS jobs could actually be low. For example, the medical, meal and drug industries all collude with the government to promote their products. This profit-making motive enables these industries to promote unhealthy outcomes for the entire population in the interest of making cash for those industries. For example, promoting processed meal and animal products are a disaster for the environment and health. In other words, eliminating these represents a vast number of BS jobs and would be beneficial to everyone by allowing the population to consume an unprocessed whole meal plant-based diet that would be healthy and avoid a lot of of the drugs and medical costs (doctor, hospital, medical procedure, etc.). Unfortunately, this was not explored in specific detail.Overall, the book was very thought provoking and worthy of a read.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-8 18:2

    I used to have a lot of jobs like this. This should be needed reading for a lot of college graduates.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-9 18:0

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

    0  


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    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-9 18:0

    John Maynard Keynes had amazing confidence that capitalism will improve not only the wealth but also the well-being of all in society. One of the specific predictions he created that, sadly, did not come true, was that by the end of the twentieth century, the major Western societies would have achieved the fifteen-hour work week because technology would have alleviated hitherto long menial hours. Why has that not happened and instead employees are working longer and longer hours? Graeber blames the creation of what he calls ‘BS jobs’ (I had to shortened the word to pass Amazon censorship rules) and the ‘BSization’ of proper jobs. Graeber’s defines a BS job as ‘a form of paid employment that is so completely pointless, unnecessary, or pernicious that even the employee cannot justify its existence even though, as part of the conditions of employment, the employee feels obliged to pretend that this is not the case’. He also says that ‘Hell is a collection of individuals who are spending the bulk of their time working on a task they don’t like and are not particularly amazing at’. He provides plenty of examples, cabinetmakers compelled to fry fish is one of them. There is the story of a corporate lawyer who went on to become a satisfied singer in an indie rock band when he became disillusioned with his job as a corporate lawyer. He had taken ‘the default choice of a lot of directionless folk: law school’ but has found his job as a lawyer to be ‘utterly meaningless, contributed nothing to the world, and, in his own estimation, should not really exist’. Some such BS jobs are so pointless that no one notices even if the employee vanishes. One case involved a Spanish civil servant who skipped work for six years to study philosophy and became an expert in Spinoza before he was found out. In another case, an employee had been sitting at his desk, dead for four days before his colleagues realised that he had died. BS jobs can also be defined by the scope of work. People who are employed in jobs that exist primarily to create someone else look or feel necessary are known as ‘flunkies’. Doormen are examples in this category. There are also ‘goons’ who exist only because people employ them – soldiers, for example; and ‘duct-tapers’ who are employed to support one part of an organisation communicate with another in the same organisation. In addition to financial consultancy, middle management is where one might search BS jobs aplenty. A sign that you have a job like this is when you are designated to provide ‘strategic leadership’. This is what Graeber has to say in middle management in academia:‘Now, those of us toiling in the academic mills who still like to think of ourselves as teachers and scholars before all else have come to fear the word “strategic”. “Strategic statement” (or even worse, “strategic vision documents”) instil a particular terror, since these are the basic means by which corporate management techniques – setting up quantifiable methods for assessing performance, forcing teachers and scholars to spend more and more of their time assessing and justifying what they do and less and less time actually doing it – are insinuated into academic life’. Graeber interviewed employees from different sectors. From one he quoted, ‘in banking, obviously the entire sector adds no value and is therefore BS’. Then there is the Human Resources Department that sets up intranet and instruct employees to create it ‘into a kind of internal “community”, like Facebook. They set it up; nobody uses it. So they then started to test and bully everyone into using it…Then they tried to entice people in by having HR post a load of touchy-feely crap or people writing “internal blogs” that nobody cared about.’ Graeber argues that the rise of such jobs was not due to economic factors but political and moral ones. He discusses how jobs can truly have value, and how exactly can value be measured. What is clear that we must resist ‘The pressure to value ourselves and others on the basis of how hard we work at something we’d rather not be doing…if you’re not destroying your mind and body via paid work you’re not living right’. The latest part of the book is devoted to answering the question, ‘How have so a lot of humans reached the point where they accept that even miserable, unnecessary work is actually superior to no work at all?’ From there Graeber discusses the modern culture of managerial feudalism and the resentment it generates, yet is itself oblivious to it. If Graeber is right that this is not an economic issue but a political and moral one, then the solution cannot be economic either. Unfortunately, Graeber is loath to create policy recommendations. That keeps us then, in utter suspense – unless workers revolt.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-9 18:0

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-9 18:0

    To what does the title of this book refer? According to David Graeber, a latest research study comparing employment in the US between 1910 and 2000 reveals that "professional, managerial, clerical, sales, and service workers" tripled, from one-quarter to three-quarters of total employment." In other words, "productive jobs have, just as predicted, been largely automated away."Graebner says these tend to be "[email protected]#$%": pointless, dead end/no end, and without purpose except, of course, for minimal income. They offer small (if anything) that will contribute to private growth and professional development. Consider these four dimensions of contemporary life that Graebner cites in the Preface:o "Huge swathes of people spend their days performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed."o "It's as if someone were out there making up pointless jobs for the sake of keeping us all working."o "The moral and spiritual hurt that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it."o "How can one even start to speak of dignity in labor when one secretly feel one's job should not exist?"Graebner wrote this book in order to "open up," widen and deepen, a discussion of "a social phenomenon that has received almost no systematuc attention," at least (in his opinion) until now: bullshit employment.He adds: "It's as if we have collectively acquiesced to our own enslavement. The main political reaction to our awareness that half the time we are engaged in utterly meaningless or even counterproductive activities -- usually under the orders of a person we dislike [and do not trust or respect] -- is to rankle with resentment over the fact there may be others out there who are not in the same trap. As a result, hatred, resentment and suspicion have become the glue that holds society together. This is a disastrous state of affairs. I want it to end."The title of each chapter is a question to which Graeber then responds:1. What's a Bullshit Job?2. WhAt Sorts of Bullshit Jobs Are There?3. Why Do Those in Bullshit Jobs Regularly Report Themselves Unhappy?4. What Is It Like to Have a Bullshit Job?5. Why Are Bullshit Jobs Proliferating?6. Why Do We as a Society not Object to the Growth of Pointless Employment?7. What Are the Political Effects of Bullshit Jobs, and is There Anything That Can be Done About This Situation?The information, insights, and counsel that Graeber provides in abundance help "a theory" to which the book's subtitle refers. No spoiler alert is required because I think the theory and how Graeber delineates it are best revealed within his lively and eloquent narrative, in context. However, I do suggest, here, that those who disagree with him must bring to the discussion the focus, substance, and passion that he does in this an article by Ed O'Boyle and Jim Harter cite Gallup analytics that reveal this: only 15% of worldwide workers came to work today engaged and ready to maximize their performance. In the U.S., the percentage is less than 30%. Obviously, whatever the statistics, whatever the nature and extent of the problem, David Graeber offers a strong argument for human freedom in the workplace. He hopes to "start us thinking and arguing about what a genuine free society might actually be like."

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-9 18:0

    You can always search people who are dissatisfied with their jobs and question the value of what they obtain paid to do. Graeber cites a YouGov survey in the UK which reports that 37% of survey respondents feel that way. Unfortunately, Graeber ignores it that You Gov survey respondents are a select group. You have to be a You Gov user to participate in the survey, which creates a built-in selection bias. Graeber views with approval the proposal for a Universal Primary Income in India without noting that this proposal hasn't been tried yet and that it isn't universal, it is means-tested. In his discussion of Universal Primary Income, he argues that "If it (Universal Primary Income) seems implausible to most, it's largely because we've all gronw up with largely false assumptions about what cash really is, how it's produced, what taxes are really for, and a hose of other problems that lie far beyond the scope of this volume." That's begging the question, claiming that doubts about a Universal Primary Income are intellectually false, and then refusing to explain what is false about them. The book is fun to read because most of us have had useless scutwork jobs at some point and some of us still do, but his argument is too short on facts to take it seriously.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-9 18:0

    Would liken the experience to finding a puzzle piece in my (probably) vain attempt to understand the professional world/understand how I ended up in one of these so, I wish to thank the author for writing this. Even if the book is complete BS (which I don't think it is), it created me really satisfied to feel that I'm not alone in having a BS job.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-9 18:0

    The book convincingly associates the current economic control of industry and government over the production of useless BS jobs. The issue is at its worst when industry and government collude directly. The proliferation of BS jobs also becomes apparent when government imposes useless regulation over industry to enforce its political objectives. This was illustrated in the book by the mind-numbing Foreign Corrupt Practices Act compliance needed of US companies, but there are a lot of y of the examples in the book to describe BS jobs resulted from managerial incompetence. The author implies this incompetence is driven from a systemic economic policy special to capitalism that encourages production of useless products and the power of the capitalists over working classes. The author favors a system (anarchy) that would free the working classes from these constraints. While he makes a amazing case that BS jobs are ubiquitous in the current system (he estimates between 40-50% or more), he does not adequately explain the process he would use to create the important changes. He does create a amazing case that the current system in the West is clearly not a market-based or free enterprise system due to the collusion of government and industry to favor industry over the worker. He also illustrates quite well the process by which wages are repressed to favor the rich vs working class. Perhaps a later work will discover this further.I believe that his estimate of BS jobs could actually be low. For example, the medical, meal and drug industries all collude with the government to promote their products. This profit-making motive enables these industries to promote unhealthy outcomes for the entire population in the interest of making cash for those industries. For example, promoting processed meal and animal products are a disaster for the environment and health. In other words, eliminating these represents a vast number of BS jobs and would be beneficial to everyone by allowing the population to consume an unprocessed whole meal plant-based diet that would be healthy and avoid a lot of of the drugs and medical costs (doctor, hospital, medical procedure, etc.). Unfortunately, this was not explored in specific detail.Overall, the book was very thought provoking and worthy of a read.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-9 18:0

    I have never felt so validated in my entire life. I could relate to almost every private anecdote, and now understand why I have been so miserable and depressed and mad in my BS job. I wish to give this book to everyone in my company. Society really needs to come together and take action for a 15 hour work week. Corporations, huge and small, don't own your time on this earth. Really a form of slavery.

    0  


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    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-9 18:0

    I used to have a lot of jobs like this. This should be needed reading for a lot of college graduates.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-10 18:0

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-10 18:0

    John Maynard Keynes had amazing confidence that capitalism will improve not only the wealth but also the well-being of all in society. One of the specific predictions he created that, sadly, did not come true, was that by the end of the twentieth century, the major Western societies would have achieved the fifteen-hour work week because technology would have alleviated hitherto long menial hours. Why has that not happened and instead employees are working longer and longer hours? Graeber blames the creation of what he calls ‘BS jobs’ (I had to shortened the word to pass Amazon censorship rules) and the ‘BSization’ of proper jobs. Graeber’s defines a BS job as ‘a form of paid employment that is so completely pointless, unnecessary, or pernicious that even the employee cannot justify its existence even though, as part of the conditions of employment, the employee feels obliged to pretend that this is not the case’. He also says that ‘Hell is a collection of individuals who are spending the bulk of their time working on a task they don’t like and are not particularly amazing at’. He provides plenty of examples, cabinetmakers compelled to fry fish is one of them. There is the story of a corporate lawyer who went on to become a satisfied singer in an indie rock band when he became disillusioned with his job as a corporate lawyer. He had taken ‘the default choice of a lot of directionless folk: law school’ but has found his job as a lawyer to be ‘utterly meaningless, contributed nothing to the world, and, in his own estimation, should not really exist’. Some such BS jobs are so pointless that no one notices even if the employee vanishes. One case involved a Spanish civil servant who skipped work for six years to study philosophy and became an expert in Spinoza before he was found out. In another case, an employee had been sitting at his desk, dead for four days before his colleagues realised that he had died. BS jobs can also be defined by the scope of work. People who are employed in jobs that exist primarily to create someone else look or feel necessary are known as ‘flunkies’. Doormen are examples in this category. There are also ‘goons’ who exist only because people employ them – soldiers, for example; and ‘duct-tapers’ who are employed to support one part of an organisation communicate with another in the same organisation. In addition to financial consultancy, middle management is where one might search BS jobs aplenty. A sign that you have a job like this is when you are designated to provide ‘strategic leadership’. This is what Graeber has to say in middle management in academia:‘Now, those of us toiling in the academic mills who still like to think of ourselves as teachers and scholars before all else have come to fear the word “strategic”. “Strategic statement” (or even worse, “strategic vision documents”) instil a particular terror, since these are the basic means by which corporate management techniques – setting up quantifiable methods for assessing performance, forcing teachers and scholars to spend more and more of their time assessing and justifying what they do and less and less time actually doing it – are insinuated into academic life’. Graeber interviewed employees from different sectors. From one he quoted, ‘in banking, obviously the entire sector adds no value and is therefore BS’. Then there is the Human Resources Department that sets up intranet and instruct employees to create it ‘into a kind of internal “community”, like Facebook. They set it up; nobody uses it. So they then started to test and bully everyone into using it…Then they tried to entice people in by having HR post a load of touchy-feely crap or people writing “internal blogs” that nobody cared about.’ Graeber argues that the rise of such jobs was not due to economic factors but political and moral ones. He discusses how jobs can truly have value, and how exactly can value be measured. What is clear that we must resist ‘The pressure to value ourselves and others on the basis of how hard we work at something we’d rather not be doing…if you’re not destroying your mind and body via paid work you’re not living right’. The latest part of the book is devoted to answering the question, ‘How have so a lot of humans reached the point where they accept that even miserable, unnecessary work is actually superior to no work at all?’ From there Graeber discusses the modern culture of managerial feudalism and the resentment it generates, yet is itself oblivious to it. If Graeber is right that this is not an economic issue but a political and moral one, then the solution cannot be economic either. Unfortunately, Graeber is loath to create policy recommendations. That keeps us then, in utter suspense – unless workers revolt.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-10 18:0

    no specific comments

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-10 18:0

    To what does the title of this book refer? According to David Graeber, a latest research study comparing employment in the US between 1910 and 2000 reveals that "professional, managerial, clerical, sales, and service workers" tripled, from one-quarter to three-quarters of total employment." In other words, "productive jobs have, just as predicted, been largely automated away."Graebner says these tend to be "[email protected]#$%": pointless, dead end/no end, and without purpose except, of course, for minimal income. They offer small (if anything) that will contribute to private growth and professional development. Consider these four dimensions of contemporary life that Graebner cites in the Preface:o "Huge swathes of people spend their days performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed."o "It's as if someone were out there making up pointless jobs for the sake of keeping us all working."o "The moral and spiritual hurt that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it."o "How can one even start to speak of dignity in labor when one secretly feel one's job should not exist?"Graebner wrote this book in order to "open up," widen and deepen, a discussion of "a social phenomenon that has received almost no systematuc attention," at least (in his opinion) until now: bullshit employment.He adds: "It's as if we have collectively acquiesced to our own enslavement. The main political reaction to our awareness that half the time we are engaged in utterly meaningless or even counterproductive activities -- usually under the orders of a person we dislike [and do not trust or respect] -- is to rankle with resentment over the fact there may be others out there who are not in the same trap. As a result, hatred, resentment and suspicion have become the glue that holds society together. This is a disastrous state of affairs. I want it to end."The title of each chapter is a question to which Graeber then responds:1. What's a Bullshit Job?2. WhAt Sorts of Bullshit Jobs Are There?3. Why Do Those in Bullshit Jobs Regularly Report Themselves Unhappy?4. What Is It Like to Have a Bullshit Job?5. Why Are Bullshit Jobs Proliferating?6. Why Do We as a Society not Object to the Growth of Pointless Employment?7. What Are the Political Effects of Bullshit Jobs, and is There Anything That Can be Done About This Situation?The information, insights, and counsel that Graeber provides in abundance help "a theory" to which the book's subtitle refers. No spoiler alert is required because I think the theory and how Graeber delineates it are best revealed within his lively and eloquent narrative, in context. However, I do suggest, here, that those who disagree with him must bring to the discussion the focus, substance, and passion that he does in this an article by Ed O'Boyle and Jim Harter cite Gallup analytics that reveal this: only 15% of worldwide workers came to work today engaged and ready to maximize their performance. In the U.S., the percentage is less than 30%. Obviously, whatever the statistics, whatever the nature and extent of the problem, David Graeber offers a strong argument for human freedom in the workplace. He hopes to "start us thinking and arguing about what a genuine free society might actually be like."

    0  


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    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-10 18:0

    You can always search people who are dissatisfied with their jobs and question the value of what they obtain paid to do. Graeber cites a YouGov survey in the UK which reports that 37% of survey respondents feel that way. Unfortunately, Graeber ignores it that You Gov survey respondents are a select group. You have to be a You Gov user to participate in the survey, which creates a built-in selection bias. Graeber views with approval the proposal for a Universal Primary Income in India without noting that this proposal hasn't been tried yet and that it isn't universal, it is means-tested. In his discussion of Universal Primary Income, he argues that "If it (Universal Primary Income) seems implausible to most, it's largely because we've all gronw up with largely false assumptions about what cash really is, how it's produced, what taxes are really for, and a hose of other problems that lie far beyond the scope of this volume." That's begging the question, claiming that doubts about a Universal Primary Income are intellectually false, and then refusing to explain what is false about them. The book is fun to read because most of us have had useless scutwork jobs at some point and some of us still do, but his argument is too short on facts to take it seriously.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-10 18:0

    Would liken the experience to finding a puzzle piece in my (probably) vain attempt to understand the professional world/understand how I ended up in one of these so, I wish to thank the author for writing this. Even if the book is complete BS (which I don't think it is), it created me really satisfied to feel that I'm not alone in having a BS job.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-10 18:0

    The book convincingly associates the current economic control of industry and government over the production of useless BS jobs. The issue is at its worst when industry and government collude directly. The proliferation of BS jobs also becomes apparent when government imposes useless regulation over industry to enforce its political objectives. This was illustrated in the book by the mind-numbing Foreign Corrupt Practices Act compliance needed of US companies, but there are a lot of y of the examples in the book to describe BS jobs resulted from managerial incompetence. The author implies this incompetence is driven from a systemic economic policy special to capitalism that encourages production of useless products and the power of the capitalists over working classes. The author favors a system (anarchy) that would free the working classes from these constraints. While he makes a amazing case that BS jobs are ubiquitous in the current system (he estimates between 40-50% or more), he does not adequately explain the process he would use to create the important changes. He does create a amazing case that the current system in the West is clearly not a market-based or free enterprise system due to the collusion of government and industry to favor industry over the worker. He also illustrates quite well the process by which wages are repressed to favor the rich vs working class. Perhaps a later work will discover this further.I believe that his estimate of BS jobs could actually be low. For example, the medical, meal and drug industries all collude with the government to promote their products. This profit-making motive enables these industries to promote unhealthy outcomes for the entire population in the interest of making cash for those industries. For example, promoting processed meal and animal products are a disaster for the environment and health. In other words, eliminating these represents a vast number of BS jobs and would be beneficial to everyone by allowing the population to consume an unprocessed whole meal plant-based diet that would be healthy and avoid a lot of of the drugs and medical costs (doctor, hospital, medical procedure, etc.). Unfortunately, this was not explored in specific detail.Overall, the book was very thought provoking and worthy of a read.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-10 18:0

    I have never felt so validated in my entire life. I could relate to almost every private anecdote, and now understand why I have been so miserable and depressed and mad in my BS job. I wish to give this book to everyone in my company. Society really needs to come together and take action for a 15 hour work week. Corporations, huge and small, don't own your time on this earth. Really a form of slavery.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-10 18:0

    I used to have a lot of jobs like this. This should be needed reading for a lot of college graduates.

    0  


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    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-11 18:0

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-11 18:0

    John Maynard Keynes had amazing confidence that capitalism will improve not only the wealth but also the well-being of all in society. One of the specific predictions he created that, sadly, did not come true, was that by the end of the twentieth century, the major Western societies would have achieved the fifteen-hour work week because technology would have alleviated hitherto long menial hours. Why has that not happened and instead employees are working longer and longer hours? Graeber blames the creation of what he calls ‘BS jobs’ (I had to shortened the word to pass Amazon censorship rules) and the ‘BSization’ of proper jobs. Graeber’s defines a BS job as ‘a form of paid employment that is so completely pointless, unnecessary, or pernicious that even the employee cannot justify its existence even though, as part of the conditions of employment, the employee feels obliged to pretend that this is not the case’. He also says that ‘Hell is a collection of individuals who are spending the bulk of their time working on a task they don’t like and are not particularly amazing at’. He provides plenty of examples, cabinetmakers compelled to fry fish is one of them. There is the story of a corporate lawyer who went on to become a satisfied singer in an indie rock band when he became disillusioned with his job as a corporate lawyer. He had taken ‘the default choice of a lot of directionless folk: law school’ but has found his job as a lawyer to be ‘utterly meaningless, contributed nothing to the world, and, in his own estimation, should not really exist’. Some such BS jobs are so pointless that no one notices even if the employee vanishes. One case involved a Spanish civil servant who skipped work for six years to study philosophy and became an expert in Spinoza before he was found out. In another case, an employee had been sitting at his desk, dead for four days before his colleagues realised that he had died. BS jobs can also be defined by the scope of work. People who are employed in jobs that exist primarily to create someone else look or feel necessary are known as ‘flunkies’. Doormen are examples in this category. There are also ‘goons’ who exist only because people employ them – soldiers, for example; and ‘duct-tapers’ who are employed to support one part of an organisation communicate with another in the same organisation. In addition to financial consultancy, middle management is where one might search BS jobs aplenty. A sign that you have a job like this is when you are designated to provide ‘strategic leadership’. This is what Graeber has to say in middle management in academia:‘Now, those of us toiling in the academic mills who still like to think of ourselves as teachers and scholars before all else have come to fear the word “strategic”. “Strategic statement” (or even worse, “strategic vision documents”) instil a particular terror, since these are the basic means by which corporate management techniques – setting up quantifiable methods for assessing performance, forcing teachers and scholars to spend more and more of their time assessing and justifying what they do and less and less time actually doing it – are insinuated into academic life’. Graeber interviewed employees from different sectors. From one he quoted, ‘in banking, obviously the entire sector adds no value and is therefore BS’. Then there is the Human Resources Department that sets up intranet and instruct employees to create it ‘into a kind of internal “community”, like Facebook. They set it up; nobody uses it. So they then started to test and bully everyone into using it…Then they tried to entice people in by having HR post a load of touchy-feely crap or people writing “internal blogs” that nobody cared about.’ Graeber argues that the rise of such jobs was not due to economic factors but political and moral ones. He discusses how jobs can truly have value, and how exactly can value be measured. What is clear that we must resist ‘The pressure to value ourselves and others on the basis of how hard we work at something we’d rather not be doing…if you’re not destroying your mind and body via paid work you’re not living right’. The latest part of the book is devoted to answering the question, ‘How have so a lot of humans reached the point where they accept that even miserable, unnecessary work is actually superior to no work at all?’ From there Graeber discusses the modern culture of managerial feudalism and the resentment it generates, yet is itself oblivious to it. If Graeber is right that this is not an economic issue but a political and moral one, then the solution cannot be economic either. Unfortunately, Graeber is loath to create policy recommendations. That keeps us then, in utter suspense – unless workers revolt.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-11 18:0

    no specific comments

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-11 18:0

    To what does the title of this book refer? According to David Graeber, a latest research study comparing employment in the US between 1910 and 2000 reveals that "professional, managerial, clerical, sales, and service workers" tripled, from one-quarter to three-quarters of total employment." In other words, "productive jobs have, just as predicted, been largely automated away."Graebner says these tend to be "[email protected]#$%": pointless, dead end/no end, and without purpose except, of course, for minimal income. They offer small (if anything) that will contribute to private growth and professional development. Consider these four dimensions of contemporary life that Graebner cites in the Preface:o "Huge swathes of people spend their days performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed."o "It's as if someone were out there making up pointless jobs for the sake of keeping us all working."o "The moral and spiritual hurt that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it."o "How can one even start to speak of dignity in labor when one secretly feel one's job should not exist?"Graebner wrote this book in order to "open up," widen and deepen, a discussion of "a social phenomenon that has received almost no systematuc attention," at least (in his opinion) until now: bullshit employment.He adds: "It's as if we have collectively acquiesced to our own enslavement. The main political reaction to our awareness that half the time we are engaged in utterly meaningless or even counterproductive activities -- usually under the orders of a person we dislike [and do not trust or respect] -- is to rankle with resentment over the fact there may be others out there who are not in the same trap. As a result, hatred, resentment and suspicion have become the glue that holds society together. This is a disastrous state of affairs. I want it to end."The title of each chapter is a question to which Graeber then responds:1. What's a Bullshit Job?2. WhAt Sorts of Bullshit Jobs Are There?3. Why Do Those in Bullshit Jobs Regularly Report Themselves Unhappy?4. What Is It Like to Have a Bullshit Job?5. Why Are Bullshit Jobs Proliferating?6. Why Do We as a Society not Object to the Growth of Pointless Employment?7. What Are the Political Effects of Bullshit Jobs, and is There Anything That Can be Done About This Situation?The information, insights, and counsel that Graeber provides in abundance help "a theory" to which the book's subtitle refers. No spoiler alert is required because I think the theory and how Graeber delineates it are best revealed within his lively and eloquent narrative, in context. However, I do suggest, here, that those who disagree with him must bring to the discussion the focus, substance, and passion that he does in this an article by Ed O'Boyle and Jim Harter cite Gallup analytics that reveal this: only 15% of worldwide workers came to work today engaged and ready to maximize their performance. In the U.S., the percentage is less than 30%. Obviously, whatever the statistics, whatever the nature and extent of the problem, David Graeber offers a strong argument for human freedom in the workplace. He hopes to "start us thinking and arguing about what a genuine free society might actually be like."

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-11 18:0

    You can always search people who are dissatisfied with their jobs and question the value of what they obtain paid to do. Graeber cites a YouGov survey in the UK which reports that 37% of survey respondents feel that way. Unfortunately, Graeber ignores it that You Gov survey respondents are a select group. You have to be a You Gov user to participate in the survey, which creates a built-in selection bias. Graeber views with approval the proposal for a Universal Primary Income in India without noting that this proposal hasn't been tried yet and that it isn't universal, it is means-tested. In his discussion of Universal Primary Income, he argues that "If it (Universal Primary Income) seems implausible to most, it's largely because we've all gronw up with largely false assumptions about what cash really is, how it's produced, what taxes are really for, and a hose of other problems that lie far beyond the scope of this volume." That's begging the question, claiming that doubts about a Universal Primary Income are intellectually false, and then refusing to explain what is false about them. The book is fun to read because most of us have had useless scutwork jobs at some point and some of us still do, but his argument is too short on facts to take it seriously.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-11 18:0

    Would liken the experience to finding a puzzle piece in my (probably) vain attempt to understand the professional world/understand how I ended up in one of these so, I wish to thank the author for writing this. Even if the book is complete BS (which I don't think it is), it created me really satisfied to feel that I'm not alone in having a BS job.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-11 18:0

    I have never felt so validated in my entire life. I could relate to almost every private anecdote, and now understand why I have been so miserable and depressed and mad in my BS job. I wish to give this book to everyone in my company. Society really needs to come together and take action for a 15 hour work week. Corporations, huge and small, don't own your time on this earth. Really a form of slavery.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-11 18:0

    The book convincingly associates the current economic control of industry and government over the production of useless BS jobs. The issue is at its worst when industry and government collude directly. The proliferation of BS jobs also becomes apparent when government imposes useless regulation over industry to enforce its political objectives. This was illustrated in the book by the mind-numbing Foreign Corrupt Practices Act compliance needed of US companies, but there are a lot of y of the examples in the book to describe BS jobs resulted from managerial incompetence. The author implies this incompetence is driven from a systemic economic policy special to capitalism that encourages production of useless products and the power of the capitalists over working classes. The author favors a system (anarchy) that would free the working classes from these constraints. While he makes a amazing case that BS jobs are ubiquitous in the current system (he estimates between 40-50% or more), he does not adequately explain the process he would use to create the important changes. He does create a amazing case that the current system in the West is clearly not a market-based or free enterprise system due to the collusion of government and industry to favor industry over the worker. He also illustrates quite well the process by which wages are repressed to favor the rich vs working class. Perhaps a later work will discover this further.I believe that his estimate of BS jobs could actually be low. For example, the medical, meal and drug industries all collude with the government to promote their products. This profit-making motive enables these industries to promote unhealthy outcomes for the entire population in the interest of making cash for those industries. For example, promoting processed meal and animal products are a disaster for the environment and health. In other words, eliminating these represents a vast number of BS jobs and would be beneficial to everyone by allowing the population to consume an unprocessed whole meal plant-based diet that would be healthy and avoid a lot of of the drugs and medical costs (doctor, hospital, medical procedure, etc.). Unfortunately, this was not explored in specific detail.Overall, the book was very thought provoking and worthy of a read.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-11 18:0

    I used to have a lot of jobs like this. This should be needed reading for a lot of college graduates.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-12 18:0

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-12 18:0

    John Maynard Keynes had amazing confidence that capitalism will improve not only the wealth but also the well-being of all in society. One of the specific predictions he created that, sadly, did not come true, was that by the end of the twentieth century, the major Western societies would have achieved the fifteen-hour work week because technology would have alleviated hitherto long menial hours. Why has that not happened and instead employees are working longer and longer hours? Graeber blames the creation of what he calls ‘BS jobs’ (I had to shortened the word to pass Amazon censorship rules) and the ‘BSization’ of proper jobs. Graeber’s defines a BS job as ‘a form of paid employment that is so completely pointless, unnecessary, or pernicious that even the employee cannot justify its existence even though, as part of the conditions of employment, the employee feels obliged to pretend that this is not the case’. He also says that ‘Hell is a collection of individuals who are spending the bulk of their time working on a task they don’t like and are not particularly amazing at’. He provides plenty of examples, cabinetmakers compelled to fry fish is one of them. There is the story of a corporate lawyer who went on to become a satisfied singer in an indie rock band when he became disillusioned with his job as a corporate lawyer. He had taken ‘the default choice of a lot of directionless folk: law school’ but has found his job as a lawyer to be ‘utterly meaningless, contributed nothing to the world, and, in his own estimation, should not really exist’. Some such BS jobs are so pointless that no one notices even if the employee vanishes. One case involved a Spanish civil servant who skipped work for six years to study philosophy and became an expert in Spinoza before he was found out. In another case, an employee had been sitting at his desk, dead for four days before his colleagues realised that he had died. BS jobs can also be defined by the scope of work. People who are employed in jobs that exist primarily to create someone else look or feel necessary are known as ‘flunkies’. Doormen are examples in this category. There are also ‘goons’ who exist only because people employ them – soldiers, for example; and ‘duct-tapers’ who are employed to support one part of an organisation communicate with another in the same organisation. In addition to financial consultancy, middle management is where one might search BS jobs aplenty. A sign that you have a job like this is when you are designated to provide ‘strategic leadership’. This is what Graeber has to say in middle management in academia:‘Now, those of us toiling in the academic mills who still like to think of ourselves as teachers and scholars before all else have come to fear the word “strategic”. “Strategic statement” (or even worse, “strategic vision documents”) instil a particular terror, since these are the basic means by which corporate management techniques – setting up quantifiable methods for assessing performance, forcing teachers and scholars to spend more and more of their time assessing and justifying what they do and less and less time actually doing it – are insinuated into academic life’. Graeber interviewed employees from different sectors. From one he quoted, ‘in banking, obviously the entire sector adds no value and is therefore BS’. Then there is the Human Resources Department that sets up intranet and instruct employees to create it ‘into a kind of internal “community”, like Facebook. They set it up; nobody uses it. So they then started to test and bully everyone into using it…Then they tried to entice people in by having HR post a load of touchy-feely crap or people writing “internal blogs” that nobody cared about.’ Graeber argues that the rise of such jobs was not due to economic factors but political and moral ones. He discusses how jobs can truly have value, and how exactly can value be measured. What is clear that we must resist ‘The pressure to value ourselves and others on the basis of how hard we work at something we’d rather not be doing…if you’re not destroying your mind and body via paid work you’re not living right’. The latest part of the book is devoted to answering the question, ‘How have so a lot of humans reached the point where they accept that even miserable, unnecessary work is actually superior to no work at all?’ From there Graeber discusses the modern culture of managerial feudalism and the resentment it generates, yet is itself oblivious to it. If Graeber is right that this is not an economic issue but a political and moral one, then the solution cannot be economic either. Unfortunately, Graeber is loath to create policy recommendations. That keeps us then, in utter suspense – unless workers revolt.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-12 18:0

    no specific comments

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-12 18:0

    To what does the title of this book refer? According to David Graeber, a latest research study comparing employment in the US between 1910 and 2000 reveals that "professional, managerial, clerical, sales, and service workers" tripled, from one-quarter to three-quarters of total employment." In other words, "productive jobs have, just as predicted, been largely automated away."Graebner says these tend to be "[email protected]#$%": pointless, dead end/no end, and without purpose except, of course, for minimal income. They offer small (if anything) that will contribute to private growth and professional development. Consider these four dimensions of contemporary life that Graebner cites in the Preface:o "Huge swathes of people spend their days performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed."o "It's as if someone were out there making up pointless jobs for the sake of keeping us all working."o "The moral and spiritual hurt that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it."o "How can one even start to speak of dignity in labor when one secretly feel one's job should not exist?"Graebner wrote this book in order to "open up," widen and deepen, a discussion of "a social phenomenon that has received almost no systematuc attention," at least (in his opinion) until now: bullshit employment.He adds: "It's as if we have collectively acquiesced to our own enslavement. The main political reaction to our awareness that half the time we are engaged in utterly meaningless or even counterproductive activities -- usually under the orders of a person we dislike [and do not trust or respect] -- is to rankle with resentment over the fact there may be others out there who are not in the same trap. As a result, hatred, resentment and suspicion have become the glue that holds society together. This is a disastrous state of affairs. I want it to end."The title of each chapter is a question to which Graeber then responds:1. What's a Bullshit Job?2. WhAt Sorts of Bullshit Jobs Are There?3. Why Do Those in Bullshit Jobs Regularly Report Themselves Unhappy?4. What Is It Like to Have a Bullshit Job?5. Why Are Bullshit Jobs Proliferating?6. Why Do We as a Society not Object to the Growth of Pointless Employment?7. What Are the Political Effects of Bullshit Jobs, and is There Anything That Can be Done About This Situation?The information, insights, and counsel that Graeber provides in abundance help "a theory" to which the book's subtitle refers. No spoiler alert is required because I think the theory and how Graeber delineates it are best revealed within his lively and eloquent narrative, in context. However, I do suggest, here, that those who disagree with him must bring to the discussion the focus, substance, and passion that he does in this an article by Ed O'Boyle and Jim Harter cite Gallup analytics that reveal this: only 15% of worldwide workers came to work today engaged and ready to maximize their performance. In the U.S., the percentage is less than 30%. Obviously, whatever the statistics, whatever the nature and extent of the problem, David Graeber offers a strong argument for human freedom in the workplace. He hopes to "start us thinking and arguing about what a genuine free society might actually be like."

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-12 18:0

    You can always search people who are dissatisfied with their jobs and question the value of what they obtain paid to do. Graeber cites a YouGov survey in the UK which reports that 37% of survey respondents feel that way. Unfortunately, Graeber ignores it that You Gov survey respondents are a select group. You have to be a You Gov user to participate in the survey, which creates a built-in selection bias. Graeber views with approval the proposal for a Universal Primary Income in India without noting that this proposal hasn't been tried yet and that it isn't universal, it is means-tested. In his discussion of Universal Primary Income, he argues that "If it (Universal Primary Income) seems implausible to most, it's largely because we've all gronw up with largely false assumptions about what cash really is, how it's produced, what taxes are really for, and a hose of other problems that lie far beyond the scope of this volume." That's begging the question, claiming that doubts about a Universal Primary Income are intellectually false, and then refusing to explain what is false about them. The book is fun to read because most of us have had useless scutwork jobs at some point and some of us still do, but his argument is too short on facts to take it seriously.

    0  


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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-12 18:0

    Would liken the experience to finding a puzzle piece in my (probably) vain attempt to understand the professional world/understand how I ended up in one of these so, I wish to thank the author for writing this. Even if the book is complete BS (which I don't think it is), it created me really satisfied to feel that I'm not alone in having a BS job.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-12 18:0

    I have never felt so validated in my entire life. I could relate to almost every private anecdote, and now understand why I have been so miserable and depressed and mad in my BS job. I wish to give this book to everyone in my company. Society really needs to come together and take action for a 15 hour work week. Corporations, huge and small, don't own your time on this earth. Really a form of slavery.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-12 18:0

    The book convincingly associates the current economic control of industry and government over the production of useless BS jobs. The issue is at its worst when industry and government collude directly. The proliferation of BS jobs also becomes apparent when government imposes useless regulation over industry to enforce its political objectives. This was illustrated in the book by the mind-numbing Foreign Corrupt Practices Act compliance needed of US companies, but there are a lot of y of the examples in the book to describe BS jobs resulted from managerial incompetence. The author implies this incompetence is driven from a systemic economic policy special to capitalism that encourages production of useless products and the power of the capitalists over working classes. The author favors a system (anarchy) that would free the working classes from these constraints. While he makes a amazing case that BS jobs are ubiquitous in the current system (he estimates between 40-50% or more), he does not adequately explain the process he would use to create the important changes. He does create a amazing case that the current system in the West is clearly not a market-based or free enterprise system due to the collusion of government and industry to favor industry over the worker. He also illustrates quite well the process by which wages are repressed to favor the rich vs working class. Perhaps a later work will discover this further.I believe that his estimate of BS jobs could actually be low. For example, the medical, meal and drug industries all collude with the government to promote their products. This profit-making motive enables these industries to promote unhealthy outcomes for the entire population in the interest of making cash for those industries. For example, promoting processed meal and animal products are a disaster for the environment and health. In other words, eliminating these represents a vast number of BS jobs and would be beneficial to everyone by allowing the population to consume an unprocessed whole meal plant-based diet that would be healthy and avoid a lot of of the drugs and medical costs (doctor, hospital, medical procedure, etc.). Unfortunately, this was not explored in specific detail.Overall, the book was very thought provoking and worthy of a read.

    0  


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    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-12 18:0

    I used to have a lot of jobs like this. This should be needed reading for a lot of college graduates.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-12 18:0

    This book is hilarious. The entertainment value alone is worth reading. The social value is off the charts. Amazing summer read on the beach or when stuck o na cruise ship.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-28 18:0

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

    0  


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    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-28 18:0

    John Maynard Keynes had amazing confidence that capitalism will improve not only the wealth but also the well-being of all in society. One of the specific predictions he created that, sadly, did not come true, was that by the end of the twentieth century, the major Western societies would have achieved the fifteen-hour work week because technology would have alleviated hitherto long menial hours. Why has that not happened and instead employees are working longer and longer hours? Graeber blames the creation of what he calls ‘BS jobs’ (I had to shortened the word to pass Amazon censorship rules) and the ‘BSization’ of proper jobs. Graeber’s defines a BS job as ‘a form of paid employment that is so completely pointless, unnecessary, or pernicious that even the employee cannot justify its existence even though, as part of the conditions of employment, the employee feels obliged to pretend that this is not the case’. He also says that ‘Hell is a collection of individuals who are spending the bulk of their time working on a task they don’t like and are not particularly amazing at’. He provides plenty of examples, cabinetmakers compelled to fry fish is one of them. There is the story of a corporate lawyer who went on to become a satisfied singer in an indie rock band when he became disillusioned with his job as a corporate lawyer. He had taken ‘the default choice of a lot of directionless folk: law school’ but has found his job as a lawyer to be ‘utterly meaningless, contributed nothing to the world, and, in his own estimation, should not really exist’. Some such BS jobs are so pointless that no one notices even if the employee vanishes. One case involved a Spanish civil servant who skipped work for six years to study philosophy and became an expert in Spinoza before he was found out. In another case, an employee had been sitting at his desk, dead for four days before his colleagues realised that he had died. BS jobs can also be defined by the scope of work. People who are employed in jobs that exist primarily to create someone else look or feel necessary are known as ‘flunkies’. Doormen are examples in this category. There are also ‘goons’ who exist only because people employ them – soldiers, for example; and ‘duct-tapers’ who are employed to support one part of an organisation communicate with another in the same organisation. In addition to financial consultancy, middle management is where one might search BS jobs aplenty. A sign that you have a job like this is when you are designated to provide ‘strategic leadership’. This is what Graeber has to say in middle management in academia:‘Now, those of us toiling in the academic mills who still like to think of ourselves as teachers and scholars before all else have come to fear the word “strategic”. “Strategic statement” (or even worse, “strategic vision documents”) instil a particular terror, since these are the basic means by which corporate management techniques – setting up quantifiable methods for assessing performance, forcing teachers and scholars to spend more and more of their time assessing and justifying what they do and less and less time actually doing it – are insinuated into academic life’. Graeber interviewed employees from different sectors. From one he quoted, ‘in banking, obviously the entire sector adds no value and is therefore BS’. Then there is the Human Resources Department that sets up intranet and instruct employees to create it ‘into a kind of internal “community”, like Facebook. They set it up; nobody uses it. So they then started to test and bully everyone into using it…Then they tried to entice people in by having HR post a load of touchy-feely crap or people writing “internal blogs” that nobody cared about.’ Graeber argues that the rise of such jobs was not due to economic factors but political and moral ones. He discusses how jobs can truly have value, and how exactly can value be measured. What is clear that we must resist ‘The pressure to value ourselves and others on the basis of how hard we work at something we’d rather not be doing…if you’re not destroying your mind and body via paid work you’re not living right’. The latest part of the book is devoted to answering the question, ‘How have so a lot of humans reached the point where they accept that even miserable, unnecessary work is actually superior to no work at all?’ From there Graeber discusses the modern culture of managerial feudalism and the resentment it generates, yet is itself oblivious to it. If Graeber is right that this is not an economic issue but a political and moral one, then the solution cannot be economic either. Unfortunately, Graeber is loath to create policy recommendations. That keeps us then, in utter suspense – unless workers revolt.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-28 18:0

    I love how an obscure magazine asked an internationally recognized scholar to submit what he believed no one else would publish -- and how that essay went instantly viral and eventually became what may be the author's top bestseller.I work in true estate. I'm of the opinion that realtors serve a useful purpose in our society, but only because of how the property laws are written. This book, along with Debt: The First 5000 Years, convinces me that within the constraints of US property law, which are outdated and unnatural, all true estate specialists exist as "duct tapers" (BS job #3) -- performing a job that only needs to obtain done because the system is set up in a flawed method that requires it. My proof: what other societies need realtors? The ones where American property laws are forced on people. (I recognize that American property law stems from English common law which depended on Roman legal systems.)This book is brilliant. It may literally save hundreds if not thousands of lives from suicide and other forms of self-destruction, especially if employers take much of its notice to heart, implementing remedies along the way. I know I will hold several copies on the shelf at work, sharing them with anyone who expresses interest. I can only hope this book fuels a revolution versus all kinds of wage labor, and that the dignity of work can be taken back from the people who use work just as a means to further their own exploitative, unexamined, or sadistic ends.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-28 18:0

    I thought Graeber's book "Debt" was brilliant and interesting and so was looking forward to this one. However, this was a amazing magazine article that was expanded into book length and it definitely feels like it. Intriguing and relevant topic, but it becomes a bit repetitive and boring. "Yeah, I obtain it," I thought a number of times. The book itself started to feel like a BS job. Maybe the ideas would be better expressed in a novel or philosophy book that in a dry sociological survey.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-28 18:0

    Very amazing book. As distributed ledger technology speeds towards us at an increasing speed, all the [email protected]#$% jobs tethered to the intermediary industries will quickly disappear.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-28 18:0

    Amazing book, love everything Graeber has kicking around in his head.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-28 18:0

    another amazing read by david graeber

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-28 18:0

    To what does the title of this book refer? According to David Graeber, a latest research study comparing employment in the US between 1910 and 2000 reveals that "professional, managerial, clerical, sales, and service workers" tripled, from one-quarter to three-quarters of total employment." In other words, "productive jobs have, just as predicted, been largely automated away."Graebner says these tend to be "[email protected]#$%": pointless, dead end/no end, and without purpose except, of course, for minimal income. They offer small (if anything) that will contribute to private growth and professional development. Consider these four dimensions of contemporary life that Graebner cites in the Preface:o "Huge swathes of people spend their days performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed."o "It's as if someone were out there making up pointless jobs for the sake of keeping us all working."o "The moral and spiritual hurt that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it."o "How can one even start to speak of dignity in labor when one secretly feel one's job should not exist?"Graebner wrote this book in order to "open up," widen and deepen, a discussion of "a social phenomenon that has received almost no systematuc attention," at least (in his opinion) until now: bullshit employment.He adds: "It's as if we have collectively acquiesced to our own enslavement. The main political reaction to our awareness that half the time we are engaged in utterly meaningless or even counterproductive activities -- usually under the orders of a person we dislike [and do not trust or respect] -- is to rankle with resentment over the fact there may be others out there who are not in the same trap. As a result, hatred, resentment and suspicion have become the glue that holds society together. This is a disastrous state of affairs. I want it to end."The title of each chapter is a question to which Graeber then responds:1. What's a Bullshit Job?2. WhAt Sorts of Bullshit Jobs Are There?3. Why Do Those in Bullshit Jobs Regularly Report Themselves Unhappy?4. What Is It Like to Have a Bullshit Job?5. Why Are Bullshit Jobs Proliferating?6. Why Do We as a Society not Object to the Growth of Pointless Employment?7. What Are the Political Effects of Bullshit Jobs, and is There Anything That Can be Done About This Situation?The information, insights, and counsel that Graeber provides in abundance help "a theory" to which the book's subtitle refers. No spoiler alert is required because I think the theory and how Graeber delineates it are best revealed within his lively and eloquent narrative, in context. However, I do suggest, here, that those who disagree with him must bring to the discussion the focus, substance, and passion that he does in this an article by Ed O'Boyle and Jim Harter cite Gallup analytics that reveal this: only 15% of worldwide workers came to work today engaged and ready to maximize their performance. In the U.S., the percentage is less than 30%. Obviously, whatever the statistics, whatever the nature and extent of the problem, David Graeber offers a strong argument for human freedom in the workplace. He hopes to "start us thinking and arguing about what a genuine free society might actually be like."

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-28 18:0

    no specific comments

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-6-28 18:0

    Would liken the experience to finding a puzzle piece in my (probably) vain attempt to understand the professional world/understand how I ended up in one of these so, I wish to thank the author for writing this. Even if the book is complete BS (which I don't think it is), it created me really satisfied to feel that I'm not alone in having a BS job.

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    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-1 18:0

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

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    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-1 18:0

    John Maynard Keynes had amazing confidence that capitalism will improve not only the wealth but also the well-being of all in society. One of the specific predictions he created that, sadly, did not come true, was that by the end of the twentieth century, the major Western societies would have achieved the fifteen-hour work week because technology would have alleviated hitherto long menial hours. Why has that not happened and instead employees are working longer and longer hours? Graeber blames the creation of what he calls ‘BS jobs’ (I had to shortened the word to pass Amazon censorship rules) and the ‘BSization’ of proper jobs. Graeber’s defines a BS job as ‘a form of paid employment that is so completely pointless, unnecessary, or pernicious that even the employee cannot justify its existence even though, as part of the conditions of employment, the employee feels obliged to pretend that this is not the case’. He also says that ‘Hell is a collection of individuals who are spending the bulk of their time working on a task they don’t like and are not particularly amazing at’. He provides plenty of examples, cabinetmakers compelled to fry fish is one of them. There is the story of a corporate lawyer who went on to become a satisfied singer in an indie rock band when he became disillusioned with his job as a corporate lawyer. He had taken ‘the default choice of a lot of directionless folk: law school’ but has found his job as a lawyer to be ‘utterly meaningless, contributed nothing to the world, and, in his own estimation, should not really exist’. Some such BS jobs are so pointless that no one notices even if the employee vanishes. One case involved a Spanish civil servant who skipped work for six years to study philosophy and became an expert in Spinoza before he was found out. In another case, an employee had been sitting at his desk, dead for four days before his colleagues realised that he had died. BS jobs can also be defined by the scope of work. People who are employed in jobs that exist primarily to create someone else look or feel necessary are known as ‘flunkies’. Doormen are examples in this category. There are also ‘goons’ who exist only because people employ them – soldiers, for example; and ‘duct-tapers’ who are employed to support one part of an organisation communicate with another in the same organisation. In addition to financial consultancy, middle management is where one might search BS jobs aplenty. A sign that you have a job like this is when you are designated to provide ‘strategic leadership’. This is what Graeber has to say in middle management in academia:‘Now, those of us toiling in the academic mills who still like to think of ourselves as teachers and scholars before all else have come to fear the word “strategic”. “Strategic statement” (or even worse, “strategic vision documents”) instil a particular terror, since these are the basic means by which corporate management techniques – setting up quantifiable methods for assessing performance, forcing teachers and scholars to spend more and more of their time assessing and justifying what they do and less and less time actually doing it – are insinuated into academic life’. Graeber interviewed employees from different sectors. From one he quoted, ‘in banking, obviously the entire sector adds no value and is therefore BS’. Then there is the Human Resources Department that sets up intranet and instruct employees to create it ‘into a kind of internal “community”, like Facebook. They set it up; nobody uses it. So they then started to test and bully everyone into using it…Then they tried to entice people in by having HR post a load of touchy-feely crap or people writing “internal blogs” that nobody cared about.’ Graeber argues that the rise of such jobs was not due to economic factors but political and moral ones. He discusses how jobs can truly have value, and how exactly can value be measured. What is clear that we must resist ‘The pressure to value ourselves and others on the basis of how hard we work at something we’d rather not be doing…if you’re not destroying your mind and body via paid work you’re not living right’. The latest part of the book is devoted to answering the question, ‘How have so a lot of humans reached the point where they accept that even miserable, unnecessary work is actually superior to no work at all?’ From there Graeber discusses the modern culture of managerial feudalism and the resentment it generates, yet is itself oblivious to it. If Graeber is right that this is not an economic issue but a political and moral one, then the solution cannot be economic either. Unfortunately, Graeber is loath to create policy recommendations. That keeps us then, in utter suspense – unless workers revolt.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-1 18:0

    I love how an obscure magazine asked an internationally recognized scholar to submit what he believed no one else would publish -- and how that essay went instantly viral and eventually became what may be the author's top bestseller.I work in true estate. I'm of the opinion that realtors serve a useful purpose in our society, but only because of how the property laws are written. This book, along with Debt: The First 5000 Years, convinces me that within the constraints of US property law, which are outdated and unnatural, all true estate specialists exist as "duct tapers" (BS job #3) -- performing a job that only needs to obtain done because the system is set up in a flawed method that requires it. My proof: what other societies need realtors? The ones where American property laws are forced on people. (I recognize that American property law stems from English common law which depended on Roman legal systems.)This book is brilliant. It may literally save hundreds if not thousands of lives from suicide and other forms of self-destruction, especially if employers take much of its notice to heart, implementing remedies along the way. I know I will hold several copies on the shelf at work, sharing them with anyone who expresses interest. I can only hope this book fuels a revolution versus all kinds of wage labor, and that the dignity of work can be taken back from the people who use work just as a means to further their own exploitative, unexamined, or sadistic ends.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-1 18:0

    I thought Graeber's book "Debt" was brilliant and interesting and so was looking forward to this one. However, this was a amazing magazine article that was expanded into book length and it definitely feels like it. Intriguing and relevant topic, but it becomes a bit repetitive and boring. "Yeah, I obtain it," I thought a number of times. The book itself started to feel like a BS job. Maybe the ideas would be better expressed in a novel or philosophy book that in a dry sociological survey.

    0  


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    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-1 18:0

    Very amazing book. As distributed ledger technology speeds towards us at an increasing speed, all the [email protected]#$% jobs tethered to the intermediary industries will quickly disappear.

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    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-1 18:0

    Amazing book, love everything Graeber has kicking around in his head.

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-1 18:0

    another amazing read by david graeber

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-1 18:0

    To what does the title of this book refer? According to David Graeber, a latest research study comparing employment in the US between 1910 and 2000 reveals that "professional, managerial, clerical, sales, and service workers" tripled, from one-quarter to three-quarters of total employment." In other words, "productive jobs have, just as predicted, been largely automated away."Graebner says these tend to be "[email protected]#$%": pointless, dead end/no end, and without purpose except, of course, for minimal income. They offer small (if anything) that will contribute to private growth and professional development. Consider these four dimensions of contemporary life that Graebner cites in the Preface:o "Huge swathes of people spend their days performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed."o "It's as if someone were out there making up pointless jobs for the sake of keeping us all working."o "The moral and spiritual hurt that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it."o "How can one even start to speak of dignity in labor when one secretly feel one's job should not exist?"Graebner wrote this book in order to "open up," widen and deepen, a discussion of "a social phenomenon that has received almost no systematuc attention," at least (in his opinion) until now: bullshit employment.He adds: "It's as if we have collectively acquiesced to our own enslavement. The main political reaction to our awareness that half the time we are engaged in utterly meaningless or even counterproductive activities -- usually under the orders of a person we dislike [and do not trust or respect] -- is to rankle with resentment over the fact there may be others out there who are not in the same trap. As a result, hatred, resentment and suspicion have become the glue that holds society together. This is a disastrous state of affairs. I want it to end."The title of each chapter is a question to which Graeber then responds:1. What's a Bullshit Job?2. WhAt Sorts of Bullshit Jobs Are There?3. Why Do Those in Bullshit Jobs Regularly Report Themselves Unhappy?4. What Is It Like to Have a Bullshit Job?5. Why Are Bullshit Jobs Proliferating?6. Why Do We as a Society not Object to the Growth of Pointless Employment?7. What Are the Political Effects of Bullshit Jobs, and is There Anything That Can be Done About This Situation?The information, insights, and counsel that Graeber provides in abundance help "a theory" to which the book's subtitle refers. No spoiler alert is required because I think the theory and how Graeber delineates it are best revealed within his lively and eloquent narrative, in context. However, I do suggest, here, that those who disagree with him must bring to the discussion the focus, substance, and passion that he does in this an article by Ed O'Boyle and Jim Harter cite Gallup analytics that reveal this: only 15% of worldwide workers came to work today engaged and ready to maximize their performance. In the U.S., the percentage is less than 30%. Obviously, whatever the statistics, whatever the nature and extent of the problem, David Graeber offers a strong argument for human freedom in the workplace. He hopes to "start us thinking and arguing about what a genuine free society might actually be like."

    0  


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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-1 18:0

    no specific comments

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-1 18:0

    Would liken the experience to finding a puzzle piece in my (probably) vain attempt to understand the professional world/understand how I ended up in one of these so, I wish to thank the author for writing this. Even if the book is complete BS (which I don't think it is), it created me really satisfied to feel that I'm not alone in having a BS job.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-2 18:0

    This review was written at the desk of a salaried office job, where I am paid $65,000/yr to do virtually nothing important, so I mostly sit in my chair and listen to podcasts and audiobooks all day. I do this until enough executives and managers above me are gone that I can feel comfortable sneaking out. With my income from this sit, I then outsource all my chores to a slew of below living wage 21st Century gig economy employees--Uber drivers, meal delivery, food kits, laundry.Having been one of these low paid wage laborers several years ago, it seems like a cruel joke. The higher paying job I find, the less I actually have to work. The higher ranking the position, the less the job is about doing things and contributing to this a blessing or immoral sin? Yes. But it turns out, I'm not is is an entertaining book of anecdotes and statistics on what turns out to be a common phenomena. It is one of the most refreshing reads that a college-educated conscious working professional can have in their library. Place down every other garbage business book that supposedly empowers you. You don't need to practice mindfulness, or rules for life, or begin a lean startup. Breathe in and breathe out, your job is unnecessary and so are most of the other jobs!Admitting this is the first step of us all solving the collective problem.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-2 18:0

    John Maynard Keynes had amazing confidence that capitalism will improve not only the wealth but also the well-being of all in society. One of the specific predictions he created that, sadly, did not come true, was that by the end of the twentieth century, the major Western societies would have achieved the fifteen-hour work week because technology would have alleviated hitherto long menial hours. Why has that not happened and instead employees are working longer and longer hours? Graeber blames the creation of what he calls ‘BS jobs’ (I had to shortened the word to pass Amazon censorship rules) and the ‘BSization’ of proper jobs. Graeber’s defines a BS job as ‘a form of paid employment that is so completely pointless, unnecessary, or pernicious that even the employee cannot justify its existence even though, as part of the conditions of employment, the employee feels obliged to pretend that this is not the case’. He also says that ‘Hell is a collection of individuals who are spending the bulk of their time working on a task they don’t like and are not particularly amazing at’. He provides plenty of examples, cabinetmakers compelled to fry fish is one of them. There is the story of a corporate lawyer who went on to become a satisfied singer in an indie rock band when he became disillusioned with his job as a corporate lawyer. He had taken ‘the default choice of a lot of directionless folk: law school’ but has found his job as a lawyer to be ‘utterly meaningless, contributed nothing to the world, and, in his own estimation, should not really exist’. Some such BS jobs are so pointless that no one notices even if the employee vanishes. One case involved a Spanish civil servant who skipped work for six years to study philosophy and became an expert in Spinoza before he was found out. In another case, an employee had been sitting at his desk, dead for four days before his colleagues realised that he had died. BS jobs can also be defined by the scope of work. People who are employed in jobs that exist primarily to create someone else look or feel necessary are known as ‘flunkies’. Doormen are examples in this category. There are also ‘goons’ who exist only because people employ them – soldiers, for example; and ‘duct-tapers’ who are employed to support one part of an organisation communicate with another in the same organisation. In addition to financial consultancy, middle management is where one might search BS jobs aplenty. A sign that you have a job like this is when you are designated to provide ‘strategic leadership’. This is what Graeber has to say in middle management in academia:‘Now, those of us toiling in the academic mills who still like to think of ourselves as teachers and scholars before all else have come to fear the word “strategic”. “Strategic statement” (or even worse, “strategic vision documents”) instil a particular terror, since these are the basic means by which corporate management techniques – setting up quantifiable methods for assessing performance, forcing teachers and scholars to spend more and more of their time assessing and justifying what they do and less and less time actually doing it – are insinuated into academic life’. Graeber interviewed employees from different sectors. From one he quoted, ‘in banking, obviously the entire sector adds no value and is therefore BS’. Then there is the Human Resources Department that sets up intranet and instruct employees to create it ‘into a kind of internal “community”, like Facebook. They set it up; nobody uses it. So they then started to test and bully everyone into using it…Then they tried to entice people in by having HR post a load of touchy-feely crap or people writing “internal blogs” that nobody cared about.’ Graeber argues that the rise of such jobs was not due to economic factors but political and moral ones. He discusses how jobs can truly have value, and how exactly can value be measured. What is clear that we must resist ‘The pressure to value ourselves and others on the basis of how hard we work at something we’d rather not be doing…if you’re not destroying your mind and body via paid work you’re not living right’. The latest part of the book is devoted to answering the question, ‘How have so a lot of humans reached the point where they accept that even miserable, unnecessary work is actually superior to no work at all?’ From there Graeber discusses the modern culture of managerial feudalism and the resentment it generates, yet is itself oblivious to it. If Graeber is right that this is not an economic issue but a political and moral one, then the solution cannot be economic either. Unfortunately, Graeber is loath to create policy recommendations. That keeps us then, in utter suspense – unless workers revolt.

    0  


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    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-2 18:0

    I love how an obscure magazine asked an internationally recognized scholar to submit what he believed no one else would publish -- and how that essay went instantly viral and eventually became what may be the author's top bestseller.I work in true estate. I'm of the opinion that realtors serve a useful purpose in our society, but only because of how the property laws are written. This book, along with Debt: The First 5000 Years, convinces me that within the constraints of US property law, which are outdated and unnatural, all true estate specialists exist as "duct tapers" (BS job #3) -- performing a job that only needs to obtain done because the system is set up in a flawed method that requires it. My proof: what other societies need realtors? The ones where American property laws are forced on people. (I recognize that American property law stems from English common law which depended on Roman legal systems.)This book is brilliant. It may literally save hundreds if not thousands of lives from suicide and other forms of self-destruction, especially if employers take much of its notice to heart, implementing remedies along the way. I know I will hold several copies on the shelf at work, sharing them with anyone who expresses interest. I can only hope this book fuels a revolution versus all kinds of wage labor, and that the dignity of work can be taken back from the people who use work just as a means to further their own exploitative, unexamined, or sadistic ends.

    0  


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    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-2 18:0

    I thought Graeber's book "Debt" was brilliant and interesting and so was looking forward to this one. However, this was a amazing magazine article that was expanded into book length and it definitely feels like it. Intriguing and relevant topic, but it becomes a bit repetitive and boring. "Yeah, I obtain it," I thought a number of times. The book itself started to feel like a BS job. Maybe the ideas would be better expressed in a novel or philosophy book that in a dry sociological survey.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-2 18:0

    Very amazing book. As distributed ledger technology speeds towards us at an increasing speed, all the [email protected]#$% jobs tethered to the intermediary industries will quickly disappear.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-2 18:0

    Amazing book, love everything Graeber has kicking around in his head.

    0  


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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-2 18:0

    another amazing read by david graeber

    0  


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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-2 18:0

    To what does the title of this book refer? According to David Graeber, a latest research study comparing employment in the US between 1910 and 2000 reveals that "professional, managerial, clerical, sales, and service workers" tripled, from one-quarter to three-quarters of total employment." In other words, "productive jobs have, just as predicted, been largely automated away."Graebner says these tend to be "[email protected]#$%": pointless, dead end/no end, and without purpose except, of course, for minimal income. They offer small (if anything) that will contribute to private growth and professional development. Consider these four dimensions of contemporary life that Graebner cites in the Preface:o "Huge swathes of people spend their days performing tasks they secretly believe do not really need to be performed."o "It's as if someone were out there making up pointless jobs for the sake of keeping us all working."o "The moral and spiritual hurt that comes from this situation is profound. It is a scar across our collective soul. Yet virtually no one talks about it."o "How can one even start to speak of dignity in labor when one secretly feel one's job should not exist?"Graebner wrote this book in order to "open up," widen and deepen, a discussion of "a social phenomenon that has received almost no systematuc attention," at least (in his opinion) until now: bullshit employment.He adds: "It's as if we have collectively acquiesced to our own enslavement. The main political reaction to our awareness that half the time we are engaged in utterly meaningless or even counterproductive activities -- usually under the orders of a person we dislike [and do not trust or respect] -- is to rankle with resentment over the fact there may be others out there who are not in the same trap. As a result, hatred, resentment and suspicion have become the glue that holds society together. This is a disastrous state of affairs. I want it to end."The title of each chapter is a question to which Graeber then responds:1. What's a Bullshit Job?2. WhAt Sorts of Bullshit Jobs Are There?3. Why Do Those in Bullshit Jobs Regularly Report Themselves Unhappy?4. What Is It Like to Have a Bullshit Job?5. Why Are Bullshit Jobs Proliferating?6. Why Do We as a Society not Object to the Growth of Pointless Employment?7. What Are the Political Effects of Bullshit Jobs, and is There Anything That Can be Done About This Situation?The information, insights, and counsel that Graeber provides in abundance help "a theory" to which the book's subtitle refers. No spoiler alert is required because I think the theory and how Graeber delineates it are best revealed within his lively and eloquent narrative, in context. However, I do suggest, here, that those who disagree with him must bring to the discussion the focus, substance, and passion that he does in this an article by Ed O'Boyle and Jim Harter cite Gallup analytics that reveal this: only 15% of worldwide workers came to work today engaged and ready to maximize their performance. In the U.S., the percentage is less than 30%. Obviously, whatever the statistics, whatever the nature and extent of the problem, David Graeber offers a strong argument for human freedom in the workplace. He hopes to "start us thinking and arguing about what a genuine free society might actually be like."

    0  


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    Is this review useful?

    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-2 18:0

    no specific comments

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    [email protected]#$% Jobs: A Theory review [Book]  2018-7-2 18:0

    Would liken the experience to finding a puzzle piece in my (probably) vain attempt to understand the professional world/understand how I ended up in one of these so, I wish to thank the author for writing this. Even if the book is complete BS (which I don't think it is), it created me really satisfied to feel that I'm not alone in having a BS job.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Dubai Jobs- Jobs in Dubai review [App]  2018-7-6 13:7

    No jobs. Worst application ..no calls

    0  


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    Dubai Jobs- Jobs in Dubai review [App]  2018-7-6 13:7

    so nonsense apps must be abhorred by all

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    Dubai Jobs- Jobs in Dubai review [App]  2018-7-6 13:7

    Staff nurse Seeking job In dubae abu dhabi

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    Dubai Jobs- Jobs in Dubai review [App]  2018-7-6 13:7

    10th pass @stcw95 in job [email protected] cdc

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    Dubai Jobs- Jobs in Dubai review [App]  2018-7-6 13:7

    Storekeeper Engineering company

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    Dubai Jobs- Jobs in Dubai review [App]  2018-7-6 13:7

    Production engineer Engineer

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    Dubai Jobs- Jobs in Dubai review [App]  2018-7-6 13:7

    Nice 1

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