Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 1 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) Reviews & Opinions


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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 3 (Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (1968-1971)) review [Book]  2018-3-15 18:0

    FINALLY...I own all three hardcover volumes collecting the original run of "Nick Fury, Agent of SHIELD." What a treat!Of course, the series itself had a checkered career, starting with its extraordinary debut by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and ending on its sorry cancellation about four years later. But how amazing is it to have the whole enchilada available in three gorgeous hardcover volumes?As mentioned in an earlier review, the stories collected into this third volume aren't all that stellar, in either the story or art departments. Besides a single remaining Steranko tale (and a classic it is!), the rest of the items here is a hodgepodge, but an interesting hodgepodge nonetheless for Marvel Comics and Nick Fury fans.And hooray -- there are BONUSES included:* The Avengers story that tied up loose ends from the final Fury book (and brought back Scorpio).* A ten-years-later reprint of a tale that added some necessary doodads to the Nick Fury mythos.* The covers from those problems beyond #15 that merely reprinted early stories from the STRANGE TALES a nice introduction to the book by Roy e quality of these SHIELD stories don't sing like those from the two years of Jim Steranko's run, but this is a fine collection anyway. Certainly worth it for completists.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 3 (Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (1968-1971)) review [Book]  2018-3-15 18:0

    This is quite a book . In the sixies Nick Fury of SHIELD was made cuz of the " BOND " craze at the time . He began , sharing a book with DOCTOR STRANGE in STRANGE TALES , then got his own book title later. Though Steranko created Him popular , only just one or two of His are in this issue, He did do most of the cover art .Archie Goodwin , Roy Thomas and Stan Lee did the writing and an had a few various artists such as Herb Trimpe and Frank Springer. Now toward the end of the sixies the " secert agent items was on the method out , and it started to present also that since Fury didnt have any "super powers " or sidekicks . His books started to wane . This book is about the latest of the best stories of Nick Fury . As a child I owned four outta the nine featured here back in the sixies. So if you do collect Nick Fury , this book should be added to your collection . Like all my MARVEL MASTERWORKS , I usually look here for the best price , the selection is wide an have a lot of choices .

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 3 (Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (1968-1971)) review [Book]  2018-3-15 18:0

    SHIELD....sixties......Steranko...... Stan Lee.....superb!Join Marvels` ver of James Bond on a rocket ride of adventures from spooky to the zone race!!!

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 3 (Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (1968-1971)) review [Book]  2018-3-15 18:0

    Most Marvel Masterworks volumes are quite readable if not outstanding. This one is one of the rare exceptions. If you've read the Ant Man/Giant Man or the Human Torch volumes you have a fair basis for comparison. This ranks below e issue with this book is right there in black and white on the credits page - six various writers, six various pencilers, six various inkers. With few exceptions the stories in this volume have no sense of pacing, laughable plots, the most simplistic of characterization, and are a chore to read. This is not the fault of any particular creator (how could it be?) but a complete lack of any idea of where to take the book from editor Stan Lee on down. Sales created that choice for them; Nick Fury was to be a supporting hero henceforth.Did it have to be this way? The mid-60s "spy craze" was well over by then but comics have outlived the fads that spawned them before. Both Jack Kirby and Jim Steranko did very creditable work (especially artistically) on this feature as seen in the previous two Shield masterworks. I think the ultimate issue was the inevitable dilution of talent that ensued when Marvel launched a lot of fresh titles when their distribution issues were sorted a masterwork the book has all the amazing production values we've come to expect. The book is padded out with a lot of extras including the Nick Fury story from Marvel Spotlight #31 (December 1976). There is an unused cover and some collection and reprint covers as l in all for the completist only.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 3 (Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (1968-1971)) review [Book]  2018-3-15 18:0

    Notable for Steranko's latest SHIELD story if not much else. Some fun extras but not Nick Fury at his best.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 3 (Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (1968-1971)) review [Book]  2018-3-15 18:0

    As a child in the 1960s, finding and affording comics was difficult at r me, it was all about the artwork. Amazing artwork could compensate for a lack-luster story almost every time (except for Neal Adams' Skate Man, but that's another story altogether).I had heard about Steranko's legend as a teen, but the only Nick Fury comics I could search were #6, 7, and 11 with Steranko covers and interior art by Frank Springer. Much has been said about the uneven nature of the stories, but most were done-in-one problems (try finding that today), so I don't level the same harsh criticism as some other ong with #4's S.H.I.E.L.D. origin story, these four problems are a brilliant showcase of Frank Springer's work for Marvel in the 60s. Problems #8-10, not so much, but that has more to do with the coloring of those problems than anything else. Perhaps the art was not as imaginative as the Steranko problems (Steranko also wrote most of the stories he drew), but Springer was a more competant draftsman: There was a realistic quality to his work that rivaled Will Eisner's at times.I would later experience Steranko's work and was very impressed by it. But, for me Frank Springer's art stood out on Nick Fury. When I told Mr. Springer this at San Diego Comic Con one year, he was characteristically modest, praising Steranko's contributions instead, so much so that he was surprised that I wanted him to sign my comics. As an aside, a Nick Fury action figure was created that was packaged with a comic book reprint. It had the cover of #4, but the interior was that of Steranko's "Who is Scorpio?" from problem #1. This could have been a amazing intro to Springer's work on S.H.I.E.L.D. had the interior of that reprint matched the is Marvel Masterworks volume finally reprints the Springer stories so that readers who never read them can appreciate them for the first time.Let me offer an analogy of sorts: When it was released, the movie "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" was hated by James Bond fans. George Lazenby was no consolation to the withdrawal that fans felt over Sean Connery's departure. Upon later reflection, a lot of Bond fans have come to appreciate that movie as one of the franchise's better outings, Lazenby notwithstanding. So too is the case of Frank Springer following to the Barry (Windsor) Smith issue, he was still finding his way, stylistically, but for comics fans, his problem has historical e Herb Trimpe problems were always a disappointment, but he was also pencilling The Wonderful Hulk at the same time. When Jack Kirby was pencilling 4-6 comics per month during the early 1960s for Marvel, his quality was not 'up there' either.While not the best Marvel Masterwork of the series, it is not painful to read as the first volume of Ant Man/Giant Man was (but, even then, it shows Marvel in its 1960s infancy).

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 3 (Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (1968-1971)) review [Book]  2018-3-15 18:0

    Nick Fury is a neat character, made as a tough-as-nails WWII Sergent he was later promoted to Colonel Fury Agent of SHIELD, a cold battle super-spy.His 60s adventures are best remembered for a short but innovative run by master artist Jim Sterenko whose innovative layouts and art are still admired today. The issue is most of them were covered in Volume 2 of this series. Book 3 has just one Sterenko drawn story (Agent of SHIELD #5) and then several other stories by a host of writers and artists. Some of the artists such as veteran penciler Herb Trimpe and up-and-comer Barry Windsor-Smith do competent enough jobs and even test to continue Sterenko's innovations but there's nothing truly spectacular. Problem 11 stands out as a amazing one where the first few pages are drawn as psychodellic album cover e stories are even more lackluster, often feeling like retreads of older SHIELD tales or making small sense. In one problem Nick Fury has small problem taking a SHIELD 'self-orbiting attack craft' into space. The next problem he has to go begging to NASA for a lift into space. Oddly both stories are by the same writer. Later an interesting story where Fury is framed as a traitor is then dismissed as a mind android game to try his loyalty but the portrayal of what was true and what was not is not consistent within the e latest problem of Agent of SHIELD has Nick gunned down by Bullseye, the gaudiest sniper in history. With his own book canceled Nick's fate is revealed a few months later in an problem of the e book ends with an problem of Marvel Spotlight where Jim Starlin and Howard Chaykin explain just how a WWII vet can still be fit and healthy in 1976. It's not a poor story but Nick feels out of hero tip for the first book remains the same. If you're looking for the amazing items either pick up Nick Fury Agent of SHIELD vol 2, or hunt down the older paperbacks that reprint Sterenko's run. This book has some interesting moments but it not worth hunting down unless you have a real love for the character.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 3 (Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (1968-1971)) review [Book]  2018-3-15 18:0

    This is the weakest book in the Masterwork collections of Nick Fury, Agent of SHIELD. Steranko did one story and then other writer/artists tried to emulate or "succeed", but they didn't have an idea of what created Nick and SHIELD great! Nick was brought about in a time of James Bond excitement and the early adventures were like comic versions of the best of 007. Then the creativity was gone and they tried to create the series latest longer than it should have. Overall, this is amazing for the Steranko story and the covers, but look elsewhere for excitement.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 3 (Nick Fury: Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. (1968-1971)) review [Book]  2018-3-15 18:0

    The third volume with the history of SHIELD with Nick Fury arrived on time and in excellent condition. While I liked the earlier stories better, there are some classics in the later years that are worth getting the whole collection.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 1 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    In the 60s with James Bond, the Man from U.N.C.L.E. and other superspies at the height of their popularity Marvel comics had the inspiration of retooling their tough-as-nails Globe Battle II hero Sergent Fury into the greatest superspy of them all: Nick Fury Agent of is book covers Nick's earliest adventures and his first encounters with sinister organizations like Hydra, AIM, the Druid and the Secret Empire. The creative minds of Jack Kirby and Stan Lee are on fine display as Fury visits flying aircraft carriers, drives around a flying Porsche, and wars all sorts of insane schemes to rule to world. All the while he does it while speaking in an outrageous Noo Yawk accent and griping about how things were a lot simpler back in the mehow the crazy mix works. Fury serves as our character and as our point of view character, always commenting on how crazy the situations are and somehow always getting the job why only 3 stars? For one thing the art in this book is rather lackluster, Kirby provided layouts but the art was finished by a host of mediocre draftsmen. For another it ends just as the series was getting good, when Jim Sterenko's innovative layouts and designs would really create it a classic. Lastly, there is a much cheaper and better reprint out there in the form of 'Nick Fury Agent of SHIELD' which covers most of Sternko's run and a lot of of the classic moments people still remember unless you are devoted fan of the hero and wish to see where it all began, the Marvel Masterworks edition is really not for you.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 1 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    Growing up and watching Marvel cartoons, S.H.I.E.L.D. and Nick Fury we're given a mixed portrayal. While generally, the villains hated them, they also ended up fighting heroes like Spider-man and even the Hulk. This portrayal has gotten more nuanced with the militaristic S.H.I.E.L.D. being viewed with distrust in the wider Marvel ever, it wasn't always so. In the 1960s, with James Bond and the Man from U.N.C.L.E. a phenomena, Stan Lee and Jack Kirby launched Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. as a regular half-issue feature in Strange Tales. This book collects the 12-page stories from Problems 135-153 of Strange Tales plus a crossover with Captain America in Tales of Suspense #78 and Fury's first post-World Battle II story which appeared in Unbelievable Four #21 and had Fury as a CIA e stories are great, the villains are superb classic 1960s poor guys on an epic scale. The supporting cast is powerful as well with Fury supported by fellow Globe Battle II Commandos Dum Dum and Gabriel Jones, as well as conscientious rookie Jasper Sitwell, who also brings a bit of comic ever, the star is the huge feature and it's Nick Fury. The silver age incarnation of this tough as nails Globe Battle II commando turned super spy could only have been effectively played by John Wayne. Fury is wise-cracking, ornery, and courageous with a firm and steady admiration between him and his men. Fury is the type of character they just don't create any more. Truly, a amazing hero in all of his quirks such as his cigars and his tendency to appear shirtless (some times without any explanation.) This was a blast and I can't wait to read Volume 2.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 1 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    This volume isn't as stong as what would come later; But it's got alot of amazing stories in which Shield lead by NIck Fury go after the forces of darkness like hydra and aim. Both of which are like forms of spectre. I disagree that the art is lackluster , it's just not as spectacular as what would come later. Except of course for the kirby and steranko work in this one. I do think John Severins work is as amazing as anybody out there. his style is fluid and awesome, john buscema as well is a amazing artist. So that makes four greats imo, howard purcell who really can draft a fine artpage is in here too. You can really see his best work in the 'doctor fate' archives book from d.c. Here he is still doing a amazing job. The other artists are decent though and even ogden whitney who did alot of funny books is in here. THe stories are typical spy stories and they have lots of action. And one of shields agents is a african american, that's a step up for comics. These were 12 page stories that usually told one epic over several issues. Stan lee scripts of course and jack kirby does most of the layouts. Primary art and then the others work over him. This is a cheap method to obtain all these tales.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 1 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    I disagree with the previous reviewer who says this volume "really isn't for you". I enjoyed Sgt. Fury's exploits and was quite glad when Marvel brought the hero back as Colonel Nick Fury - now with S.H.I.E.L.D. Yes, the artwork is mostly not by Steranko, but so what? Most of the Marvel titles -- including Sgt. Fury and his Howling Commandos -- were not drawn by Steranko, and I love his work. Here we obtain to see the first stories of Colonel Fury and the first glimpses of Hydra and A.I.M. in Marvel's Strange Tales series. Plus the pairing of Nick Fury and Captain America! Both this and the following Nick Fury Volume are well worth it.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 1 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    Received it when estimated and was not disappointed. It was amazing to read the early SHIELD stories in color and in their uncut fullness. Several of the stories I had read earlier in reprints, but this collection includes the original pages and panels in put and I was surprised with some fresh scenes I had never come across before. Excellent!

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 1 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    I thoroughly enjoyed Sgt. Fury's exploits and was quite glad when Marvel brought the hero back as Colonel Nick Fury - now with S.H.I.E.L.D. Here we obtain to see the first stories of Colonel Fury and the first glimpses of Hydra, A.I.M. and -- in the latest two stories -- the artwork of Jim Steranko -- all from Marvel's Strange Tales series. Plus the pairing of Nick Fury and Captain America! Both this and the following Nick Fury Volumes are well worth it.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 2 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    I missed out on the early Steranko work for Marvel so this was a book that I really wanted.I had high expectations based on the Steranko work that I had already read and this was not a e book itself was nicely packaged and the coloring which comes out 'bolder' on fine paper instead of the cheap comicbook paper of that time looked only complaint is that the latest Steranko problem (#5) was not included in Vol. 2 and I had to buy Masterworks SHIELD 3 to complete the Steranko run. But that volume can be found fairly cheaply and does contain a Barry Windsor Smith problem along with some creative Frank Springer problems so I can't complain too much.If you are a Steranko fan then I also recommend Masterworks Captain America Vol. 3 which has a mini-run of Steranko problems that is very nice.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 2 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    This is a amazing look at Jim Steranko's take on Nick Fury in his classic Strange Tales run. If you're a Nick Fury fan or a Jim Steranko fan, this is worth the read. The introduction from Steranko is particularly interesting and getting to see the art and panels in nice, crisp color, as if the comics had come new off the newsstands, is a treat as well.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 2 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    Amazing book

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 2 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    The first SHIELD Masterwork introduced the reader to Nick Fury repackaged from WWII as a modern spy in Marvel's attempt to capture some of the interest in the James Bond-fad of the mid 1960s. Steranko began his work in that volume, but now he takes over with a wild energy rarely seen before in comics. He pushes the art in all sorts of directions and actually writes dialogue and script that reads more like a novel than the typical comic. This volume collects the best of his series. Though a few Steranko problems will appear in the next volume, this is the one that is all for the quality of reproduction, it has the same glossy paper of the other Masterworks. As for the coloring, it is closer to the original than the "modernized" coloring that appeared in the Marvel reprints of a few years ago. This preserves more of Steranko's original work.

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    Nick Fury, Agent of S.H.I.E.L.D. Masterworks Vol. 2 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    Amazing Book

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    Atlas Era Strange Tales Masterworks Vol. 1 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-23 18:1

    Atlas Era: Strange Tales Vol.1 is one of the earliest horrormags from Timely/Atlas/Marvel and is slighty inferior tohis sister publication Journey into Mystery, partly becauseAtlas staff didn't know exactly how to sell and promotesuch a strange beast like a horror comic (remember that weare on early fifties!!!)and partly because the majority of theearly scripts really e first four or five problems have some highlights butthe overall quality is not good. Later problems are much betterplotted and drawn,despite some clunkers. Atlas horror isnot distinguished for scripting sophisticated stories butsome of them are very fun and enganging and the level of artis remarkable high.If you don't know the fascinating horror comics from thefifties I strongly recommend the comics from E.C. likeTales from the Crypt and Vault of Horror and the Atlasas a second are my private ratings:Atlas Era: Strange Tales Vol. 1:Strange Tales #1:Strange Men ===================== **1/2The Beast ======================= *The Room That Didn't Exist ====== *1/2A Call in the Night ============= **Strange Tales #2:The Egg! ======================== *****Trapped in the Tomb! ============ ****1/2The Pin! ======================== **1/2The Island of Madness =========== **Strange Tales #3:The Shadow ======================= ****The man Who Never Was ============ *****The Invisible Death ============== **The Madman ======================= *1/2Voodoo =========================== **1/2Strange Tales #4:The Evil Eye! ===================== ****Dial... Town Morgue =============== ***1/2It ================================ **The Man on the Beach ============== **Strange Tales #5:The Room Without Door ============ ****The Small Man Who was There ===== ****1/2The Trap ========================= *****My Brother Harry ================= ****1/2Strange Tales #6:The Unihabited ==================== *****The Eyes of March ================= ****The Back Door ==================== **1/2The Assassins ======================= ****1/2The Ugly Man ==================== ***Strange Tales #7:My Brother Talks to Bats ============== ****1/2He Wished He was a Vampire ========== ***1/2Tap!Tap!Tap! ======================= ****Who Stands in the Shadow ============ ***1/2The Horrible Man ==================== ****Strange Tales #8:The Old Mill =========== ****1/2Fame =================== ***1/2The Storm ============== ****Something in the Fog === ***If the Shoe Fits ======= ****Strange Tales #9:Blind Date ============== **Strange Android game =========== *The Man from Mars ======= **Drink Deep Vampire ====== **1/2The Voice of Doom ======= ***1/2Strange Tales #10The Boy Who Was Afraid ====== ****1/2The Monster's Son =========== ****1/2The Frightful Feet! =========== *****The Hidden Head =========== ****1/2Keep Out! ================= *****

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    Atlas Era Strange Tales Masterworks Vol. 1 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-23 18:1

    Collects Strange Tales 1-10, covering from June 1951 to September 1952. Contains a six-page essay from Dr. Michael J. Vassallo titled The History of Atlas Horror/Fantasty (Origins and Pre-Code 1949-1951).Strange Tales is the longest running horror title from Marvel pre-cursor Atlas, lasting 100 problems until The Human Torch took over in problem 101. Until I read this essay, I had no idea just how prolific Atlas was in the 50s. They produced an avalanche of titles across all genres until the Atlas Implosion (details within the essay). This deluge of horror stories came at a price: an occassional missfire was place to press. Atlas provided more artistic freedom than the other top publishers, doing away with a "house" e first few problems look a bit rough to me. Some of the material looks related to Adventures into the Unknown (ACG) from the same time period. By early 1952, Atlas artists were each creating their own special style, aided by intense coloring (mostly by Stan Goldberg). This led to awesome artwork that just kept getting better through the mid-50s.Highlights:#1 - "A Call in the Night" with art by George Tuska finds a TV repairman heading out to an odd house on a stormy night. His wife pleads with him not to go, but the caller said he would create it worth his while. Once there, an unusual looking set, a locked door and a mysterious photo on the screen build into a nightmare for sue #2 doesn't have much to redeem it, except for camp appeal. Russ Heath provides artwork far from his peak on "The Pin", which features a freakishly huge baby on the signed splash page.#3 - "The Shadow" with art by Joe Maneely is an perfect story and has amazing art by Maneely but hasn't quite developed into his style yet. A man gets into a war with his long-time nemesis, George, in front of his lady, Iris. Now things are going quickly downhill when Iris stands him up for their date and his shadow is disconnected from his body. With each step, his shadow seems to be getting further away. Iris still refuses to speak to him. What did George say to her and what does this have to do with the hallucinations he's having about his shadow?"The Man Who Never Was" with art by John Romita and Les Zakarin was printed ten years before the Twilight Location episode that seems to have drawn inspiration from it.#4 - "The Evil Eye" has lush art by Bill Everett. I love the fabrics that he painstakingly rendered: plaids, pinstripes, floral prints, and a angry scientist with crazy hair and a crazier grin. The story itself is not the best that ever showcased his unbelievable work, but it was a fun read.#5 - This problem starts off with a bang with awesome art by Joe Maneely and amazing writing by Hank Chapman. "Within its rotting walls lay hidden the hideous mysteries of the past... and the unknown wonders of the future... but how was it possible for me to open... The Room Without a Door" It's Black Magic vs. Science. Oh, and Henry is a true nut."The Small Man Who Was There" is a creepy story with art to match by long-time Marvel Age artist Jim Mooney. A small man with a wry smile and sleepy eyes keeps following Captain Ames, first in a shell hole in the middle of the Korean War, then in an troops hospital in Florida. Next, on a crowded train. Even worse, it seems that tragedy follows in the small man's wake, tragedy that Captain Ames narrowly avoids each time. What secret does the small man carry with him?"My Brother Harry" by Tony DiPreta has a related plot to an acclaimed film created 47 years later in 1999.#6 - "Uninhabited" with art by Russ Heath is a chilling sci-fi tale about a squad that lands on a desolate moon. Nineteen other squads have attempted the landing but simply vanished en route. Now that this spaceship has successfully lands on the dead planet, one by one the squad is disappearing..."The Killers" is a rousing thriller by Harry Lazarus about a virus that escapes a lab, infecting a assassin who is now loose in the city. If the assassin isn't found soon, the virus may spread into a homicidal epidemic. Only ace reporter Jason Hudkins seems to realize where this mystery leads."The Ugly Man", written by Carl Wessler and with art most likely by Vern Hinkel, finds deathrow inmate Brock Hines escapes prison and carjacks an ugly man who can't stop laughing, even with a tommy gun pointed in his face. "Look at his face, and you'll know that there are things beyond the death... an evil that reaches beyond the grave!"#7 - Joe Maneely gives us another perfect tale in "My Brother Talks to Bats" A young boy tells the reader "That's him. That's my brother George. And it's true... he really does talk to bats. But that's not why we have him chained up like that. It's for something much more horrible."Gene Colan provides amazingly moody art on "He Wished He Was a Vampire", related to his epic Tomb of Dracula work for Marvel twenty years "Tap! Tap! Tap!", Joe Sinnott renders an perfect tale of a ruthless submarine commander who leaves a wounded crewman on the deck as he orders the sub to dive."Who Stands in the Shadows" is an eerie chiller with artwork to match from Pete Tumlinson. Len Ambers desperately wants to obtain out of his marriage. Someone in the shadows leaves a note on his back porch, offering tip on how to obtain out of his predicament.#8 - This problem starts off with a creepy cover by Bill Everett. Next, "The Old Mill" has more intense artwork by Gene Colan. "The Storm" is eerily rendered by Vic Carrobotta. Miko has committed the excellent murder and dumped the body into the water below when a police officer spots him and wings him. Now, Miko's only possibility is to lose the police at the airport, but he's in for the flight of his life. "If the Shoe Fits" is another gem drawn by Joe Maneely.#9 - "The strangest thing happened when Mac Farrand picked up that gorgeous redhead in the convertible. He soon found out she was somebody else's... Blind Date" with pencils by Mike Sekowsky. The text story "Death Finds a Way" with Joe Sinnott art features a drawing of a gruesome skull by Bill Everett. "Drink Deep Vampire" is a macabre tale about a graveyard watchman who wants to create a deal with a castle full of wealthy vampires that will create him quite rich.#10 - Jim Mooney draws a amazing Frankenstein's creature in "The Monster's Son". "Keep Out" is a amazing crime suspense story with art by @#$% Ayers.

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    Atlas Era Strange Tales Masterworks Vol. 1 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-23 18:1

    This volume is actually a mix of precode horror and sci fi. The sci fi stories become lass evident as each problem of Strange Tales was e art is amazing in this volume with amazing artists like Bill Everet, Joe Maneely, Gene Colan and a lot of others lending a story or two in the series first ten issues. Thankfully Marvel decided to release these in this format so that you can affordably read them. These tales were not overly gory but they are entertaining; in full color, and they look better in this volume than they ever did in their original comic books. The book has the first ten problems of Strange Tales (including cool cover reprints) and it is a very enjoyable read as the magazine launches itself along into the Horror field of it's day. And the amazing news is that more comics from the marvel's 1950 output are making their method to us. Hopefully some of their amazing battle comics; which were among the best of the entire 1950's will also see a Masterworks along side these other well done reprints.

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    Atlas Era Strange Tales Masterworks Vol. 1 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-23 18:1

    Lost a star for being badly wrinkled but a amazing collection of Pre-Code horror.

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    Atlas Era Strange Tales Masterworks Vol. 1 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-23 18:1

    WONDERFUL. VERY NICE AND CLEAN. WAITING FOR NEXT ONE. THIS IS JUST WHAT I EXPECTED IT WOULD BE. CAN'T WAIT FOR THE NEXT ONE.

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    Atlas Era Strange Tales Masterworks Vol. 1 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-23 18:1

    collecting all the masterworks some are very hard to find, it is nice to know i can come to amazon to search the missing ones, this is a unbelievable book and series worth collecting for reading or saving for your children which is what i intend to do.

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    Atlas Era Strange Tales Masterworks Vol. 2 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-30 18:1

    Read Vol # 1 and had to obtain this one. Not a superhero fan but the items in these volumns and the creature stuffis great.

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    Atlas Era Strange Tales Masterworks Vol. 2 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-30 18:1

    IF one seeked out these original problems of Strange Tales.11-20 on ebay, your talking in fine+ shape, more or less, 5,000. Amazing work from some of the industries best from the mid ere will be at least eight more volumes, all worth getting!

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    Atlas Era Strange Tales Masterworks Vol. 2 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-30 18:1

    Collects Strange Tales 11-20, cover dates October 1952-July 1953. Contains a unbelievable 6-page introduction by Dr. Michael J Vassallo. Each problem contains 4 or 5 stories from some of the best artists in the business during the atomic age. I'll give a non-spoiler teaser for the stories from each problem that were the best. Atlas horror had awesome coloring, using an expanded palette from their competition, and having a surreal mix of colors. Often, a figure would be cast in a single color with a tone for shading. Atlas stories usually had an economy of dialog and narration when compared to their contemporaries, but enough material to invest you in the characters and their world.11 - "The Devil and Donald Webster" by Stan Lee and Paul Reinman is about a brow-beaten worm that's had enough and makes a deal with the devil."Darkness" by Jim Mooney is a unbelievable idea about a convict who's tired of being imprisoned. As he flees to freedom, a mishap finds him adrift in a dark sea. He wakes to an oppressive darkness that he can't escape.12 - "The Corpse" also by Jim Mooney. "Maybe the whole thing wouldn'ta happened if that crummy watchman hadn'ta spotted me before I finished my haul." A three-time loser commits murder during a routine burglary and is now on the run. He has a slim possibility of beating the rap but his soulless ways catch up with him."Graveyard at Midnight" by Bill Everett. The Man of a Thousand Faces disguises himself, holds up a bank, and then ditches the disguise in an old cemetary. A billboard outside his dressing room proclaims him as Charles Squad starring in "The Devil's Alibi", which also would've been an perfect title for this strange tale. Bill Everett's art shines as always.13 - "The Witching Hours" by Ed Goldfarb poses the dilemma of a young man who falls in love with a beauty queen but spies a witch trying to cast a spell in her direction. The young woman is thankful for the man's attention. Still the skull-faced witch follows the couple. What is her sinister purpose?"The Hiding Place" by Carl Wessler and John Tartaglione pits three greedy criminals versus each other. They each create a pact to hide the loot until the heat is off but then they become increasingly suspicious of each other. The color scheme uses a controlled pallette, panel to panel, with lurid and haunting effect.14 - "Horrible Herman" has terrific art by Joe Maneely. Maneely, paired with Stan Lee as they often were, tell the tale "Herman Hooper... little and ugly! But he was also the most risky man on Earth.""The Man Who Talked to Ghosts" by Stan Lee and Carl Burgos, the man who made the Human Torch. This 4-pager has some of Burgos' best art of his career.15 - "Mary and the Witch" has fantastically stylized art by Bernie Krigstein. Carl is a magician who appears to use true magic in his act, creating jewels from thin air. Mary is bent on discovering his secret so that she can shower herself with wealth."The Latest Word" by Larry Womoray is an interesting story about Wilbur, a husband who married a rich wife in Minerva that he doesn't search attractive. He really has eyes on broadway actress, Gloria. Wilbur begins to crack under the strain but thinks he has the excellent plan until it all falls apart."Don't Look Down" by Silver Age Marvel mainstay George Roussos. "How far is down? To Benson, it could be a foot or a mile.. but even an inch meant a vast yawning chasm of death!""Afraid" has special art by Sam Kweskin with primarily shades of blue and orange.16 - "The Man in the Mud" by Sy Barry illustrates how fickle fate can be but how steadfast karma an Lee is paired with Harry Anderson in one beautifully drawn story called "You Can't Slay Me" and then "They Created Me a Ghost" with Mike Sekowsky.17 - "Feud" is by Stan Lee and Jerry Robinson, with a take on a McCoy-Hatfield style Appalachian family war, with the trigger for the feud told from each family's viewpoint."Father-in-Law Trouble" by @#$% Briefer has a twist on the man who marries into a wealthy family versus the father's wishes. Now he finds out that the daughter is chop off from daddy's bank account. He thinks he has a method out, except he didn't acc for her father's influence.18 - "John Doe" by Stan Lee and Joe Maneely has an inventor that proclaims he can build a robot that can think and feel just like a human. His daughter, Erika, has a boyfriend, Danny, that figures this invention could be worth a fortune if he can explore how her father does it."Witch Hunt" by Larry Womoray and Matt Fox has unbelievable art and colors. This strange tale is about a village that's suddenly plagued by mysterious and ominous signs of witchcraft. An old hag promises to rid the city of the devil and his coven, but at what price?"Boris and the Bomb" by Gene Colan is a unbelievable cold battle piece about.. "what happens when something goes wrong during an H-bomb test? When the bomb-button touches off nothing but an hour of horrifying suspense?!"19 - "You Created the Pants Too Long" by Stan Lee and Fred Kida gives us another morality play about karma."Look Out" by long-time Marvel artist George Tuska has another swindler that's about to obtain his comeuppance.20 - "He Swallowed It Up" by Gene Colan is eerily is collection also contains art from Joe Sinnott, John Forte, Bob Brown, and Werner Roth. Three perfect covers from Bill Everett and Russ Heath each with the collection's cover for #16 drawn by Harry Anderson.

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    Atlas Era Strange Tales Masterworks Vol. 3 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-7 18:1

    I've read all the Atlas Era horror masterworks as they've been released. All are beautifully reproduced. All have (for the most part) amazing artwork featuring a lot of various and varied artists. Some of these artists have been long neglected or forgotten entirely because of career changes or premature demise. For me personally it has been a true treat to see some stories by John Forte who worked on the Bizarro and Legion of Super-Heroes features in the 1960s before his untimely death.But it has equally been the case that the writing quality has been anywhere from fair to downright wretched. Even the stories in the much ballyhooed Menace volume did not present much improvement. So I am satisfied to report that there has been a large upswing in writing quality in the show volume. That's not to say that the wretched and mediocre stories are gone; they're still well represented. But there are now stories that are actually interesting, engaging, and genuinely package some punch, especially towards the end of the book. Even some of the text pieces (yes, I do read the text pieces) read like they were written by and for someone within hailing distance of short, if you've been frustrated with the story quality of these horror masterworks this volume should offer some relief. Not up to the quality of the EC volumes (what is?) but there are stretches here where one doesn't have to force oneself to hold reading. As always, Dr. Michael J. Vassallo provides a thoughtful and detailed introduction. Highly recommended for fans of the genre who are cognizant of the material's strengths and weaknesses.

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    Atlas Era Strange Tales Masterworks Vol. 4 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-12 18:1

    This is another entry in Marvel's Atlas Era Masterworks series. This is the 4th volume in the long running Strange Tales book. This volume has two necessary distinctions from the previous three. First, only 9 problems are included instead of the usual 10. This is no doubt due to a desire to hold the remaining books at a consistent length. Second, the Comics Code comes into result about halfway through this though, Dr. Michael Vassallo, in his usual unbelievable and detailed introduction, makes a huge deal of this, to me there is very small difference in story quality. Like previous volumes, about 50% of the scripts have no redeeming merits, about 35% have a germ of a amazing idea, and about 15% seem to be decently e art is a various matter, of course. Some really fine craftsman worked on the stories in this volume, some well known, some not so much. One of the amazing things to come out of the Atlas Era Masterworks are the rediscovery of so a lot of artists that worked for comics only in this era and that have been hitherto forgotten or underappreciated. Why can't DC give us collections from this era?Reproduction, as always, is absolutely first rate. The writing is just too lame to give this book a full five stars. If you plan to read it instead of just look at it I can only recommend it in little doses. Visually, it's fantastic.

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    Atlas Era Strange Tales Masterworks Vol. 4 (Strange Tales (1951-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-12 18:1

    I want that Marvel would also reprint some of their other pre-code horror titles. Namely, Adventures Into Terror and Spellbound.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    These science-fiction and horror stories from the so-called Atomic Age (the 1950s) keep a unique fascination for me. There were a number of these anthology style titles from this publisher stretching all the method to the Silver Age and slightly beyond. The stories were sometimes cliched and formulaic, featuring one strange and unusual creature after another (it was always fun seeing what they would come up with next). Some were earnest and ironic and featured lessons about human nature, ethics, and morality. The artists were often amazing names like Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko, already known to a lot of readers here. If you like these kinds of stories, you will like this book. After the latest of Marvel's reprint titles from the '70s was discontinued, finding these stories became difficult if not impossible. In Marvel Masterworks, we now have an perfect format for reading them.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    I like the book for its stories, but the formula for the stories becomes rather evident about half method through. Its still a amazing book with art by some of Marvel's greatest.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    Affordable edition - amazing to see all these Kirby & Ditko artwork before they made Unbelievable Four, Spider-man & others. Want they would publish more of the Marvel Masterworks of these sci-fi/monster comics in this affordable format & not just hardcover.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    fun from the ironic pen of the early Marvel gang, amazing reproduction, well bound collection. Not up to EC Horror quality, but amazing for a fun afternoon read.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    Perfect compilation of the pre-hero Tales to Astonish stories. Amazing reading.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    this was an perfect purchase. i would buy from this vendor again without hesitation.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    Collects Tales to Astonish 1-10 (1959-1960). Stan Lee writes the introduction.Tales to Astonish had all of early Marvel's top artistic talent. In some ways, their artwork here is even better than it would be for the first few years under Marvel's heroes, possibly due to lower page rates? Yes, some of the tales appear a bit predictable and some of the characters are one-dimensional, but what amazes me is the shear dozens of various stories Kirby and Ditko were doing at this time. Kirby did 7 covers and 4 stories that were published in Jan '60 (Tales to Astonish 7, which he did the cover and "We Met in the Swamp", published in this volume). He was doing Westerns, Romance and Battle stories in addition to these Sci-Fi, Fantasty/Horror and Atomic Creature tales. Kirby has 8 stories in this collection. Ditko has ry few characters repeat in these stories. Kirby's Genie and Ditko's Colossus are the only two in this volume. Each month, they had to invent completely fresh worlds and fresh casts, introduce us to them along with the threat or mystery, and wrap it up all within 5 pages. A lot of of these stories leave me wishing we could see would happened just before or just after the story ends.Even artists that were considered lesser talents during the Marvel Age, such as Don Heck and Paul Reinman, turn in fine work during this period. Joe Sinnott and @#$% Ayers have several stories that they pencil e hardcover has been sold out for awhile. Copies now sell for $100-200, so this softcover is a amazing method to have fun these classic stories.Highlights from the problems (all writing credits are unattributed. The collection assigns plot and script to Stan Lee and Larry Lieber. I'll mention who is credited with the art):#1 - "We Found the Ninth Wonder of the World" by Kirby, starts off with a twelve-foot lobster terrorizing a research vessel and their issues continue to obtain bigger. "I Know the Secret of the Poltergeist" by Ditko has moody art as only Ditko can deliver. This story would fit well within the globe of Dr. Strange. "I Was the First Person to Set Foot on… the Mystery Planet" by Carl Burgos (creator of the original Human Torch) and, some folks speculate, Jack Kirby. This story is an interesting sci-fi tale about an interplanetary explorer and the strange globe he finds.#2 - "When Aliens Meet" is a amazing morality tale and drawn surprisingly well by Don Heck. "I Was a Man in Hiding" is a amazing sci-fi piece by John Buscema, one of only six stories he did for Atlas during the first half of 1959. He wouldn't return to Stan Lee's fold until 1966.#3 - I liked every story in this sci-fi packed issue. Ditko's "I Journeyed Back to the 20th Century" is an interesting take on time travel. His art in this story is very various than the first, using a much thinner stroke. "I Discovered the Men from Mars" has amazing artwork from Joe Sinnott and looks like it could've been a supporting story to DC's Legion of Super-Heroes from the early 60s. "I Found the Excellent Hiding Place" has stylized art by Carl Burgos and is an interesting morality tale that tries to convey the vastness of space. "I Am the Giant from Outer Space" has amazing artwork from Paul Reinman. The ending might be a bit expected by us now and was not exactly original even then, but it was probably much less predictable to readers of the late 50s. "I Escaped to the Stars" by Bob Forgione is an interesting introspective on dealing with imprisonment in the future.#4 - "I Was a Prisoner of the Martians" has some of the best full artwork that I've ever seen from Joe Sinnott. Likewise "My Forbidden Paintings" has exceptional art from Don Heck and is a neat tale in the vein of "be careful what you want for." Ditko has Captain Racer war Bogane in "The Man who Floats in Space."#5 - This is another potent issue. Kirby turns in strong art on "I was Trapped by the Things on Easter Island." I really enjoyed "I Can See Tomorrow" about the risks in predicting the future. "I Found the Nightmare Note" has attractive renderings of a gray cat by Al WIlliamson. "I Landed on the Forbidden Planet" by Ditko is an amazing tale about a globe gone giant. Marvel might have had this story in mind when Steve was briefly tasked with the Micronauts.#6 - "I Saw the Invasion of the Stone Men" is one of Ditko's rare Giant Creature works and it's fine indeed. "I Laughed at the Amazing God Pan" shows Kirby's penchant for mythology tales. "I Was the Man Under Glass" by Joe Sinnott is a amazing morality tale about the folks in power having such disregard for those beneath them. I remember reading a tale from earlier in the Atlas Era that was more directly colonial than this sci-fi allegory, but had a related conclusion.#7 - Here is where sister title Tales of Suspense and Tales to Astonish really take off. Don Heck has spectacular art in a giant creature tale called "He Waits for Us in the Glacier". "We Met in the Swamp" has terrific art by Kirby in a tale about aliens and otherworldly cultural differences. "I Lived a Ghost Story" has spooky art by Paul Reinman."I Spent Midnight on Bald Mountain" and its companion story in #8 "I Live Again" are my two favorite stories in this collection. A sculptor moves to a deserted castle in central europe to craft his masterpiece. He uses material from hallowed grounds to construct his colossus of amazing and material from locations of infamy to construct his figure of evil to depict the symbolic struggle of "Good versus Evil". Lightning strikes the clay causing it to spring to life. This colossus is not directly similar to the monster called "It, the Living Colossus" made by Jack Kirby in Tales of Suspense #14 but definitely seems to be a source of inspiration, especially from the second tale.#8 - "I Live Again" is a unbelievable tale, though the Colossus is significantly bigger this time around and more of the scale for The Living Colossus. The ending to this one is haunting indeed, if you hold your disbelief suspended. "I Dared Defy the Floating Head" by Reinman emulates Kirby to a degree. "I Am the Genie" is a amazing mystical story by Kirby with perfect inking by Ditko. "Mummex, King of the Mummies" has wonderful art by Don Heck. It's a shame we didn't obtain more of this ver of Heck during the Marvel Age. I would definitely have fun Mummex versus Iron Man.#9 - "The Return of the Genie" bears small resemblance to the Genie story from #8, this time Kirby is inked by Christopher Rule and the tale is more sci-fi oriented. "No Method Out" by Steve Ditko has a Twilight Location flavor to it. "I Saw Droom The Living Lizard" us a amazing Godzilla/Gorgo tale done by Don Heck. (Steve Ditko did several problems of the Gorgo comic starting a half year later in 1961 for Charlton Comics.)#10 - For the finale, we obtain a double-dose of Jack Kirby: "I Was Trapped by Titano the Creature that Time Forgot" and "What Was the Strange Power of Simon Drudd". "Something Lurks Inside" is an perfect sci-fi horror is is a unbelievable volume and something that young and old alike can enjoy. Fans of Marvel's Silver Age will have fun seeing these artists in their pre-superhero mode but still see the heritage of a lot of Silver Age stories.

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    Atlas Era Tales of Suspense Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales of Suspense (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    This Marvel Masterworks volume (one of the paperback versions) was a fun read, featuring the first 10 problems of Marvel's Tales of Suspense, the comic that would eventually be home to Iron Man and later become Captain America's ese stories are all more of a science fiction bent than the companion titles like Tales to Astonish or Strange Tales, but some of the creature or quirky stories fall into the groove here, too. There's plenty of amazing artwork by artists that are legends: Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, Don Heck, John Buscema, Al ink of this as a comic book ver of television's The Twilight Zone, or perhaps Tales of Tomorrow. It will fill your average rainy afternoon quite nicely.

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    Atlas Era Tales of Suspense Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales of Suspense (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    Affordable edition - amazing to see all these Kirby & Ditko artwork before they made Unbelievable Four, Spider-man & others. Want they would publish more of the Marvel Masterworks of these sci-fi/monster comics in this affordable format & not just hardcover.

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    Atlas Era Tales of Suspense Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales of Suspense (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    A masterly collection of amazing science fiction stories and art work from the late 1950s and early 1960s. Favourite stories: One Of Us Is a Martian; Who Hides Beneath My Mask; and Earth Will Be Destroyed. In truth, all the stories were entertaining. If you are into creepy creatures and quirky martians from Planet X, then you will certainly enjoy....

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    Atlas Era Tales of Suspense Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales of Suspense (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    this was amazing reading and bought back a lot of memories.

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    Atlas Era Tales of Suspense Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales of Suspense (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    This is a collection of horror, science fiction, and fantasy by some of the amazing comic book artists and writers of the time (early 60s). The book itself is printed on much higher quality paper than what was available back then. Anyone who appreciates the comics of that day will appreciate this volume. 'Nuff said.

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    Atlas Era Tales of Suspense Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales of Suspense (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    I think Tales to Astonish had more consistent quality, but the best of Tales of Suspense holds up compared to Tales to Astonish. From the subscription rates that Marvel quoted in the 60s, TTA outsold TOS by about 10% most r the Marvel Age fan, this volume is packed with concepts or characters later reused and artists that would create their name in the Silver Age doing super-heroes. Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, Don Heck, John Buscema, Joe Sinnott, @#$% Ayers, and Stan Lee. This volume contains Russ Heath (better known for Playboy cartoons, Sgt Rock and Haunted Tank at DC), John Forte (from the Legion of Super-heroes fame or infamy, depending on your view) and Al Williamson, one of the all-time amazing sci-fi artists. Paul Reinman, inker on a lot of Silver Age super-hero tales, has some fine work on four stories. Bill Everett, creator of Sub-mariner, and Carl Burgos, creator of the Human Torch, also each have a story ug Wildey, co-creator of Johnny Quest, has a amazing story in here called "the Runaway Planet". He also does a unbelievable job on "The Wrath of Chondu" for those Defenders fans out sue #1 highlights - After a amazing Buscema cover, we obtain Steve Ditko's "Prisoner of the Satellites" features amazing art and an interesting premise with daily man Tag Coren afflicted by a power from outer space. This could've been turned into an Atom nearly two years before his Silver Age debut in Showcase #34.#2 - After a amazing Steve Ditko cover, the lead story is by Jack Kirby "Invasion from Outer Space". The ending is a bit silly, but I like the intent. The best story is once again turned in by Steve Ditko with "The Secret of Planet X".#3 - The highlight here is Kirby's "The Not good Time Machine". Ditko's "The Thing from Planet X" is interesting but probably not intending to be hilarious. The face of the Flower just cracks me up. Don Heck turns in amazing moody artwork for "The Haunted House".#4 - "One of Our Spacemen is Missing" by Kirby is an interesting premise with a strange ending. "The Voice of Doom" requires some suspension of disbelief but is a neat premise with very amazing artwork by Carl Burgos. "Beware of the … Robots" has greet Al Williamson artwork. Finally "One of us is a Martian" by Ditko would stand up well in Awesome Fantasy.#5 - "Ditko's "I Fought the Tyrannasaurus" is perfect with very powerful artwork by Steve and an unexpectedly soulful story about an out-of-time traveler.#6 - "I Hear it Howl in the Swamp" by Ditko as he turns in a giant monster story with heart. Joe Sinnott explores the globe of Mutants almost four years before the X-men in "The Mutants and Me".#7 - "I Come From the Shadow World" is a spooky Ditko tale with a amazing ending. "I Know the Power of the Genie" has some of Don Heck's best artwork ever and shows his real potential. "My Name is Robot X" by Paul Reinman is a novel story that Awesome Adventures would revisit in a few years in a various context. "I Was Trapped Inside of the Martian Maze", Ditko's second tale, again exalts the common man. "I Fought the Molten Man-Thing" is a decent Kirby Creature story.#8 - This is the best problem of the bunch!After an wonderful Kirby cover, we obtain the lead story also done by Kirby, "Monstro… the Menace from the Murky Depths" straight out of Challengers or the FF, we obtain the scientist character versus the Atomic Monster. What I always search remarkable is how polished his artwork looks here compared to the early problems of Unbelievable Four and Avengers, which looked very raw and uneven in comparison several years later. Dick Ayers, one of my favorite Kirby inkers, inks this one. Bill Everett turns in another one of his one-shot hero gems with "the Story of Sammy Snork". Everett's thick and lush brushwork is on evidence here. He had a magic quality to render daily women as sublimely beautiful, but still in an understated way. "I Am the Changing Man" from Steve Ditko is his best art in this collection. The alien from the planet Deth could be a prototype for the Skrulls in FF#2, still more than a year away. "The Runaway Planet" by Doug Wildey is a amazing apocalyptic tale. "It Walks by Night" is a fantastically creepy story by Don Heck.#9 - Another amazing Kirby one-two of cover and lead story with "Diablo… the Demon from the Fifth Dimension". Diablo was resurrected in the all Atomic Creature Hulk Annual #5 (which I crave to be masterworked).The story doesn't keep up as much as the art does, with inking by Dick Ayers. The figure at the story's end doesn't look like a typical Kirby or Ayers figure but more like Everett line work to me. I've always loved "The Wrath of Chondu" by Doug Wildey. The splash has unbelievable artwork of Chondu, who would later appear in the Defenders as Chondu the Mystic. "Earth Will Be Destroyed" is an perfect Ditko story. "The Return of the Living Robot" reprises the earlier powerful story in this volume, also by Heck.#10 - The third in a row with Kirby providing powerful artwork for both cover and lead story. "I Brought the Mighty Cyclops Back to Life" has a romance story pop up in the middle of a giant creature tale! Once again Ayers inks really create Kirby's art shine. Reinman turns in amazing artwork in "I Was Trapped in Nightmare Valley". Ditko has another masterful tale in "Behind My Door Waits… Medusa" which vies for #8' Changing Man for the best tale in the collection. I love his bearded hero and the ornate door that he holds the skeleton key up to. This could've been a backup tale in Doctor Strange! Lastly, Heck does decent work with "I Am the Shaggy Creature".These latest four problems in particular are treasures of the transition period from the Altas Era genre stories into the Marvel Age. All the earmarks are here: creature as sympathetic anti-hero a la the Thing and the Hulk, scientist as character a la Hank Pym, Tony Stark and Reed Richards, Robot as hero, related to Iron Man, mystic tales gravitating to Doctor Strange with Chondu and …Medusa. The alien menaces that would soon confront the Unbelievable Four. Mutants! The ever-present fear of the Red Menace. This is a valuable window into the evolution of Ditko, Kirby, Lee, Heck into the stalwarts that usher in the Marvel ping all that is a wonderfully informative introduction by Dr. Michael J. Vassallo. He points out several interesting tidbits about the artists and stories, such as intriguing info on Bill Everett and John Buscema's tales in here as well as placing the collection in its historic context post-Atlas implosion and e hardcover has long-since sold out so grab the softcover while there are still copies for this rare glimpse into an underrated and by-gone era in comic literature and art.

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    Sub-Mariner Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-16 18:1

    While I was never a huge Namor fan (and this boy growing up in The Bronx had to watch where he plunked down his 12 cents for a Marvel fix) he was involved in tales with the Avengers and Unbelievable Four so I knew his origins story. Most of the Sub Mariner stories here are circa 1966 and have SUCH a total '60's feel to them. I have always loved Gene Colan's work. At this point he was working for DC and wanted to work on Namor so the pseudonym Adam Austin (Adam was a baby name he and his wife were considering) was born. Stan Lee claims not to know why in the foreward but any history of Marvel will reveal how woefully underpaid these guys were. Anyway if you like Gene you MUST check this out because with the exception of 4 stories- the 1939 origin, a Daredevil #7 pencilled by Wally Wood and 2 Kirby stories it's all Austin nee Colan, such a treat to watch the evolution of an artist. Gene in an interview expressed displeasure in his early SM work but IMO it's just a perfectionist never being totally satisfied with the finished product. The deep sea panels are beautiful, I suggest you check them out for yourself as I uploaded a few. As for the stories, eh, never a fan of all Namor's regal posturing but it had its' place. This was a favorite of Stan Lee's and I love it as it showcases the artwork of Gene Colan.

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    Sub-Mariner Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-16 18:1

    An perfect volume in the Marvel Masterworks series, but probably not for everyone. Besides brief appearances by Iron Man and Daredevil, there's not a lot of connection to the regular Marvel Universe. And there's a lot of reading - you know, actual reading - so that might be off-putting to a lot of modern eat stories and some unbelievable artwork by Gene Colan and Bill Everett, including Everett inking Colan. Unfortunately, most of the first few stories are inked by Vince Colletta, completely destroying Colan's moody artwork. Colletta can do some amazing work, but he wrecks detailed pencils with his e stories beautiful much present Namor reclaiming his kingdom, finding Neptune's trident to cement his rule, all amidst the machinations of Warlord Krang. Interesting, near-Shakespearean dialogue highlights these unbelievable old tales! Recommended!

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    Sub-Mariner Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-16 18:1

    Now available on Kindle! I started collecting the Kindle versions of the early Marvel Comics latest year. This was a gap I wanted to fill! The Sub-Mariner guest appeared in stories since his Silver Age revival in 1962, but he finally got his on series in Tales To Astonish #70 replacing Giant Man. Daredevil # 7 is his latest guest appearance before his TTA series debut and Tales of Suspense #80 is part of a crossover war with Iron Man.

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    Sub-Mariner Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-16 18:1

    Though I'd rather have the comics, Tales to Astonish are not only rare, but 's a blast watching Gene Colan develop. At first he is somewhat hobbled by Vince Colletta's inking, but as his style develops, Colletta is forced to improve too. Bill Everett inks 2 issues, and their opposite styles really blend well. To my surprise, Colan's most stunning art (before Doctor Strange) are the two problems #80 & #81 inked boldly by @#$% Ayers. The art is fluid and like distorted, odd-angle photographs. Though Colan would return for fill-ins on Sub-Mariner #'s 10, 11, and a run in the 40's, he never captured the majesty, arrogance and power of Namor as he did in the two best problems of TOS. The quest theme allows the extended storylines that Stan Lee excelled in. It's funny how Namor goes from being cool & stand-offish to the smitten Dorma, but a few problems later is head-over-heels & launching into violent tirades of jealousy. Much of the writing is humorous since Namor is so headstrong and sometimes insulting to his minions. Lucky for us he never took anger management e problems by Jerry Grandinetti & Bill Everett are amazing too, though Everett's style was so stylized, it looked dated by the '60's (& pre-historic by the mid-70's, before his untimely death). But let's be clear, Everett made Sub-Mariner by himself. Part of Stan Lee's genius was bringing back characters from another era, like Subby & Cap, and making them exciting to newer e Kirby fill-ins are fantastic, because The King never got to draw Namor & Iron Man enough. Usually just guest-stint in early FF or Avengers. His Iron Man is classic, and even if you don't like his take on Namor, no one, but nobody draws action sequences like Kirby. On top of that, you obtain a Wally Wood Daredevil vs. Sub Mariner issue, at the peak of Wood's style. Overall a fine collection at a decent price.

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    Sub-Mariner Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-16 18:1

    Marvel Masterworks aptly named with Namor's 1960's adventures.

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    Sub-Mariner Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-16 18:1

    classic stuff...modern comics don't keep a candle to these stories

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    Sub-Mariner Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-16 18:1

    I love the marvel masterworks sub-mariner vol 1 I have vol 2 also thank you.

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    Sub-Mariner Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-16 18:1

    Contains very first Golden Age Sub-Mariner story by Bill Everett and DD #7; nice of all is Jack Kirby drawn story fighting Iron Man.

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    Sub-Mariner Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-16 18:1

    I am glad Marvel is publishing paperback versions of their Masterpiece collections... this book is amazing and does show the best of the Sub-Mariner storys. I love watching the progression of Gene Colons work (under several various inkers) and the Jack Kirby drawn tales. Love the paper and coloring as well... thank you Marvel.

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    Sub-Mariner Masterworks Vol. 1 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-16 18:1

    When I was a kid, growing up on the Atlantic, I had a connection with Namor. Aquaman never did it for me. When I was in the ocean all day I wanted to be Subby. Mad because of the injustice done to his people by the human race, Namor was a much more complex hero than most. He was def before his time, being an anti-hero and his speech and cry of "Imperious Rex" was a declaration of the underdog. I loved his fast temper and his immaculate physique, I had no access to his old stories-give or take a couple in "History of Comic" books that were published at the time, so it all began here, in these stories for me.I had never read the Daredevil #7 by Wally Wood , which is, as mentioned here, a very unique comic. I can't really place my finger on why it's so great- there is something very unique about it, not just the art, story etc., but it really stands out. Maybe it's the method Namor is portrayed as a very stoic yet ethically/morally correct figure and it's meshing with Wood's illustration? The "Quest for the Trident" story line is stellar. It's a true "Hero's Journey" story. Namor having to prove himself by obtaining the Trident, that Neptune himself has offered up to the true ruler of the Atlantis. Namor's obstructions are enormous:massive Octopus, Seaweed man, Deadly Diamonds, and my fave, the Faceless Ones!! Krang is the prime antagonist, not only wanting Namor's spot as ruler, but also his love for The altruistic Lady Dorma!! Krang's "RoboTank" stands out as one of the amazing weapons. From problem 70 to 76 tension is high. In 76 Namor finally gets his hands on Krang, who of course,has more tricks up his sleeve! Krang then gets Puppet Master to support him out, which he does by awakening the Behemoth!!! Subby wars the scientific surface man over the polluted water/nuclear testing; represented by Hank Pym (Ant-Man), and Namor's time in NYC always provides illustrations with verve and flair and action at it's peak!! I don't need to mention the awesome art by Adam Austin (Gene Colans pen name) which just gets better as the story moves along- this has been mentioned over and over in these reviews. I never believed to this day that Subby gets the respect he deserves in the Marvel Universe. I understand that his ambiguity is probably the reason for this. He is one of my favorite characters and this is the best put to start. Stan's Trident Find story is in his top 10 in my opinion ever. I think he has a amazing respect for the hero and it shows tremendously in this collection.

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    Atlas Era Tales of Suspense Masterworks Vol. 3 (Tales of Suspense (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    If you're after it just for the giant creatures (as I was), then they are Oog, Klagg, Bruttu, the Monster in the Black Bog, the Insect Man, Monstrollo, the Thing That Crawled at Night, the Martian Who Stole a City, the ghost on The Haunted Roller Coaster, and the Creature in the Iron Mask.But this isn't meant to denigrate the other stories, some fantasy, some sci-fi, some paranormal--all well done. As another reviewer pointed out, we got these comics a month at a time when we were children and were thus unaware of the repetition, but now, when you read them all together, you can see how plots got recycled and recycled and recycled yet again. However, all the stories remain entertaining, which shows how skilled Lee, Kirby, Ditko, Ayers, et al. were at putting a fresh twist on an old ese Masterworks books memorialize an era which will never be repeated in comics, the Age of (and the fascination with) The Giant Monster--unless the true globe unleashes another inexplicable horror upon us like Atomic Fear.

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    Atlas Era Tales of Suspense Masterworks Vol. 3 (Tales of Suspense (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    I love this period of Marvel's history, and cannot obtain enough of these stories. Even though I own most of the original comics this hardcover will be read again and again. The fresh intros by the likes of Roy Thomas and Dr. Mike Vassalo are unbelievable and informative.

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    Atlas Era Tales of Suspense Masterworks Vol. 3 (Tales of Suspense (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    Amazing book at a amazing price!

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    Atlas Era Tales of Suspense Masterworks Vol. 3 (Tales of Suspense (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    All went well. Thank you! :)

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    Atlas Era Tales of Suspense Masterworks Vol. 3 (Tales of Suspense (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    Although marketed as an Atlas era masterwork, this masterwork actually overlaps into the "Marvel Age". Sprinkled throughout are bottom of the page blurbs for the Unbelievable Four, the Hulk, and Awesome Adult Fantasy. Unfortunately, the winds of change did not blow very strongly through this e artwork is its strongest selling point. Indeed, the Atlas era masterworks are broadly aimed at fans of Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko. Those fans will have small to complain of in this book. Ditko's stories especially will resonate strongly with readers of his Dr. Strange feature. To my eye is the stellar work of Don Heck. Heck is finally getting the respect as the consummate professional that he was. His stories in this book demonstrate that super heroics wasn't his strongest genre. Paul Reinmann also turns in fine e writing is still at the levels of the late Atlas era. Repetitive, derivative, and unsophisticated. Stan Lee's major strength was in dialog and characterization and the short stories here gave small scope for that. All the wretched text stories are uncredited; no doubt their authors prefer it this e major difference between this and the two previous volumes is the additional problem included in this book. This is presumably setting up the next volume to finish up the non Marvel Age features that started in a few issues. Such planning is typical of series editor Cory Sedlmeier as is the superb commended to all those aware of the limitations of the stories of this era. Few of these stories keep up as stories; there appeal is strictly artistic.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 3 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    If you know much history about this period for Marvel, you can have fun these collections for their strengths while overlooking their shortcomings. To wit:1. A still-young Jack Kirby was cranking out reams of pages to fill these books, and the work ranges from solid Kirby to absolute brilliance. There's a raw power to his pages that became smoothed over and lost as he shifted to superheroes (and slicker inkers). It you wish to see what create Kirby's raw power at its most undiluted, these stories are the place.2. The stories are, with rare exceptions, tripe. Like Kirby, Stan Lee was cranking out scripts at a madman's pace, and these stories reveal three things. First, Lee always had that terrific knack for dialogue that helped lift Marvel to distinction in the sixties. Second, Lee was at the same time a cheat who was content to crank out mediocre stuff; a lot of of these stories, and especially a lot of the Kirby giant-monster stories, are obvious reworkings of the same easy plot over and over, and almost all of the stories are forgettable. Third, though Lee built a reputation as the driving force behind Marvel's success, these stories present over and over that Kirby was by far the prime talent and that Lee merely assisted and complemented Kirby's stunning imagination. I think Marvel would have still been amazing (if perhaps not quite as great) without Lee, but it would never have been amazing without Kirby. The same applies to Steve Ditko, whose early work is richly represented in these volumes. Although far less prolific and less of a driving presence than Kirby, Ditko had a style and power that stands out despite Lee's mundane stories.A couple other things:1. Don Heck is also amply represented in these volumes, and while his figures were stiffer than Kirby's and Ditko's, his compositions during this era were superb. See for yourself.2. Those whose experience primarily began (as mine did) in the mid-sixties with Marvel's superhero line will search a fresh appreciation for @#$% Ayers, who by then was delivering mediocre pencils on titles like Sgt. Fury. These volumes reveal the younger Ayers to be a masterful inker and probably the best inker Kirby ever had. To see these stories and then think of all those years Marvel allow Vince Colletta destroy Kirby's work makes you wish to cry.Enjoy!

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 3 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    Item as described. Glad I ordered it.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 3 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    All went well. Thank you! :)

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 3 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    Collects Tales to Astonish #21-30. Extras contain an introduction by Jon B. Cooke and a page each of original art from Kirby and Ditko from #l of the Kirby art in here, 14 stories in all, are inked by @#$% Ayers. The first two Kirby stories are double-length. I enjoyed every Ditko story in here and most of the Don Heck stories. We also obtain a couple of Bob Forgione stories as well as the return of Gene Colan to Marvel in "The Scheme" in #28. The production quality, as with all the Masterworks edited by Cory Sedlmeier and printed by RR Donnelly, looks gorgeous. These volumes are a treasure to own.Highlights:1 - "The Silent Screen" by Ditko has unbelievable art and a attractive escher-esque quality to the story. "Open Wider Please" is an interesting take on an oft-told story of hidden factions on our world. Here, the battleground takes the form of a mundane dentist's office.2 - With "I Dared to War the Crawling Creature", Kirby takes us to a hidden land below the Earth's surface and unleashes an ancient terror to our world. "Help" by Don Heck is a mystery about a magic typewriter. In "For Whom the Drum Beats", Ditko delves into the realms of magic.3 - "Less than Human" by Don Heck has amazing art in this morality allegory. "The Voice from Nowhere" by Ditko is a amazing sci-fi yarn about expectations and perceptions of life in space.4 - "I Found the Abominable Snowman" by Kirby is an odd tale with amazing art about a reality TV present that presents the viewer whatever they ask for. In this case, a rival present sends in a phony request for the Yeti and the show's host wants to deliver at all costs. "He Waits in the Dark" is a Ditko-Lee morality tale lushly rendered by Ditko with a strange man in black and a slumlord.5 - "Behold him! He is a Martian" has amazing Kirby/Ayers artwork. "The Gypsy's Revenge" by Heck is a amazing story. "Where Lurks the Ghost" has a unbelievable splash page and is an interesting story that might surprise you.6 - "Look Out! Here Come the Four-Armed Men" is Kirby's take on the Bill Everett - Stan Lee classic from the Atlas Era horror comic, Menace. Even better is Kirby's "I Walked Through Walls". "Run Rocky Run" by Bob Forgione is a wonderfully rendered tale and an interesting take on an ending I've seen a couple of times from Atlas. Lee and Ditko squad up on their popular "Dream World" in another Escher-esque storyline. The lead hero looks like a combination of Peter Parker and Harry Osborne.7 - Did Kirby suspect the future for his scientist-hero, Henry Pym when he penciled "The Man in the Ant Hill"? Costumed super-hero a few months later when he returns in Tales to Astonish #35 and then a year later, star in two titles as a founding member of the Avengers. I loved this story. Heck delivers his most macabre tale in this collection with "Mirror Mirror on the Wall". Anne reminds me of Janet van Dyne. She's even wearing a yellow vest with red sleeves and skirt when we first meet her and then a red and black ensemble on page 168.8 - "I am the Gorilla-Man" by Kirby starts with a amazing sequential panel cover, and then strikes with a strong splash of the Gorilla Man exploding through a stone wall. As much as I've always liked the panel cover, how much more would the splash have worked as a cover? Maybe it was deemed too terrifying as a cover while we were still deep in the comic code era? Kirby and Ayers demonstrates flexibility by also delivering a moody piece in "Midnight on Haunted Hill". In "The Frightening Fog", Ditko and Lee give us a tale that echoes the Watcher in Unbelievable Four hiding our planet from Galactus.9 - "When the Zone Beasts Attack" look like prototypes for the parademons Kirby would use a decade later in the Fresh Gods. Heh, it just crossed my mind that this story could be a "what if?" tale to "The Frightening Fog" story from latest issue. Luther Gorr could easily have been the leader of the Mongoors from latest issue. "The Man Who Blew Up the Earth" has Kirby conjuring the Hunchback and a lot of other tragic disfigured soles from Mole Man to The Thing. "The Latest Laugh" had a amazing ending on the eternal prankster.10 - "The Return of the Gorilla-Man" by Kirby and Ayers rivals the first one. "What Was the Staggering Secret of the 13th Floor" is another exceptional piece by Don ter rereading this volume again for the review, I really want that Marvel would masterwork the rest of Journey into Mystery and Strange Tales.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 3 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    Book arrived in brand-new condition; being shrink-wrapped and in a sturdy box virtually assures this of being the case!

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 3 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    Collections like these are published mostly to be just that - collections. Masterworks have evolved to the point where the goal is to preserve, in a high quality format, the comics of bygone eras. In this respect the current Masterwork is an unqualified success; the book is gorgeous. It is a tribute to collections editor Cory Sedlmeier and his staff. Only a few nits can be picked. The two page introduction by Jon B. Cooke is uninspired. Artist Bob Forgione, who did two stories in the book, does not rate a do the stories keep up on their own merits? Not well at all unfortunately. The art is very nice to look at. Indeed, I'm guessing that the main attraction to most buyers will be the Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko gems within that would otherwise be hard to search otherwise. The much underrated Don Heck holds his own nicely compared to those two stalwarts.But the stories are virtually unreadable to one with adult sensibilities. The stories run the gamut from absurd to illogical to the same plot over and over. What small glimmer of interest that there is comes from the Ditko stories for my taste. Everyone who reads the text pieces (not many) condemns them rightly as pure drivel. What is not so well appreciated is that they are not far below the level of the main stories - they just don't have Kirby, Ditko, or Heck distracting from their looming flaws.I can only recommend this book to those for whom it is intended - the aficionado who knows what he's in for with these stories. All others - you have been warned. I couldn't even recommend this for current ten year olds; the stories are too dated.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 4 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    The book wasn't as monster-packed as I would have liked, but bear in mind, the giant creatures of TTA, as well as Tales of Suspense, Strange Tales, Journey Into Mystery, and so on in Marvel's Atlas years, always shared the book with three or four other non-monster tales (a la Twilight Zone, Outer Limits, etc.). Nonetheless, it is a fun read, and for boomers who remember these old books, it'll really take you back. Some, but far from all, of these old stories have been digitized and are on Marvel's subscription site. You might wish to subscribe to the website first (about $60) before buying the reprint books -- unless you're like me and have to have the feeling of a book in your hands.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 4 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    Back in 2006 the Marvel Masterworks line expanded into hitherto uncharted territory, the "Atlas Era", as opposed to the original "Marvel Age" which largely came after and the "Golden Age" which came before. The first title in the Atlas Era Masterwork range was Tales to Astonish Volume 1. The show book is Tales to Astonish Volume 4 which closes out the Tales to Astonish line as that title became a superhero only e show volume not only does not contain the Ant Man/Giant Man and the Wasp stories as one might expect it also does not contain the "Tales of the Wasp" horror stories. All these stories are in the relevant Marvel Age Masterworks.What we do have here is exactly in line with the three Tales to Astonish published hitherto. The major differences are the artistic talent that gradually bled away as more and more superhero features are launched. The first to go is Jack Kirby who drew the Ant Man stories which appeared from TtA #35 on. Steve Ditko continues on through most of the book complemented by Don Heck and others. Finally, Larry Lieber is left doing the pencilling with different inkers. But don't obtain the wrong impression - the book has enough classic art and artists to satisfy most e writing is still mediocre with occasional flashes of brilliance and occasional train wrecks. The text pieces are in put in the first four "full" problems but for the remaining problems through #57 the text stories were reprints; the only the titles and original appearances are given. Given the quality of the text stories, my disappointment wasn't too always, highly recommended for the comic connoisseur. The rather lame writing makes it unsuitable to those looking for amazing reads. Even kids will search the stories horribly dated.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 4 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    Have ALL of these volumes. BEWARE! They never finished the Strange tales or the Journey Into Mystery Sets. SHAME ON MARVEL!!!!!

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 4 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    I enjoyed the Tales to Astonish very much.Each story was like a mini film .

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 4 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    I have all 4 volumes of both Tales To Astonish And Tales Of Suspense and just love them all. Fun all the method through and a amazing historical essay starts each volume. Highly Recommended!!!

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 4 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    This book, has the latest gasp of Astonish's tales,as marvels age of heroes kicked into high gear.I particulary like Matt Fox's Wolverton like inks on larry liebers nsidering the prices asked for the old books these stories came from,this is a bargin.

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 4 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    All went well. Thank you! :)

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    Atlas Era Tales To Astonish Masterworks Vol. 4 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-3 18:1

    I just received this volume, and while it has some of the classic tales, it does NOT, and I repeat, does NOT include a single story featuring Ant-Man or the Wasp. Beware!!

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    Sub-Mariner Masterworks Vol. 2 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-1 18:1

    Now Available on Kindle! The remaining Tales to Astonish stories, The story from the Iron Man and Sub-Mariner one shot, and the first problem of his own series! Attuma, The Plunderer, and Destiny!

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    Sub-Mariner Masterworks Vol. 2 (Tales to Astonish (1959-1968)) review [Book]  2018-4-1 18:1

    Long time favorite character.

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    Golden Age U.S.A. Comics Masterworks Vol. 1 (USA Comics (1941-1945)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    I love this book. I bought a graded copy which I can not begin up (because it's sealed) so I bought this MARVEL MASTERWORKS so I could read the comic book. Thank you again.

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    Golden Age U.S.A. Comics Masterworks Vol. 1 (USA Comics (1941-1945)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    Perfect reprint of some interesting golden age characters. Reading the Marvel Masterworks for a lot of of their golden age titles has shown me that while they were dominated by Captain America. The Torch and the Sub-Mariner. Timely/Marvel had afairly amazing stable of characters, a lot of of which we didn't see Roy Thomas touch upon in the seventies.

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    Golden Age U.S.A. Comics Masterworks Vol. 1 (USA Comics (1941-1945)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    Perfect service! Love these comics!

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    Golden Age U.S.A. Comics Masterworks Vol. 1 (USA Comics (1941-1945)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    Like a lot of of the early Timely Comic titles, among them Daring Mystery, USA at first has no regular line-up of strips appearing problem to issue. A lot of appearances were one-shots. USA Comics was one of those in its earliest days, so the problems presented here give the reader a possibility to obtain a rare peak of what worked for Timely and what didn't. Some heroes were not well written or thought out, but were more or less "a stab in the dark," some catching on, a lot of not. That is what makes this volume a MUST HAVE and MUST READ by the Golden Age comics fan, and by the Marvel reader of today. Every company "had its roots," so to speak, and to appreciate Marvel's heroes of today [for amazing or bad], one must know of the past and see what has come before. This volume is a amazing method of doing this....being able to see MORE than just the Torch, Capt. America and the Sub-Mariner, the main-stays for the company down through the years. Seeing is believing, and you'll dig this amazing tome.

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    Golden Age U.S.A. Comics Masterworks Vol. 1 (USA Comics (1941-1945)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    A very funny cavalcade that share with us the now-almost-forgotten other heroes of Timely-Atlas-Marvel!A must-have for all the Golden Age fans!

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    Golden Age U.S.A. Comics Masterworks Vol. 1 (USA Comics (1941-1945)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    The printing is terrible. Why can't Marvel take the time to produce quality reprints like D.C.? The artwork looks blotchy.

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    Golden Age U.S.A. Comics Masterworks Vol. 1 (USA Comics (1941-1945)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    Marvel already had Marvel Mystery Magazine, and solo titles for Sub-Mariner, Captain America, and the Golden Age Human Torch. Narvel comics honcho Martin Goodman was never one to settle for amazing enough and so USA comics was yet another one of the comics and this book collects Problems 1-4, each containing multiple was home to a lot of second tier material and characters and at least in a couple of places, , but the book was not without its charm. The first three problems featured long stories of nearly twenty pages, a rare thing in the golden age, allowing for complex plots. So let's dig into the highlights and lowlights of this book:1) Rockman: This is a cool character who really could have been developed further. Rockman was leader of an underground kingdom who surfaced (ha ha) when learning about the dangers of the coming war. The design and powers of the characters were cool. With a better creative team, this could have emerged. It's not quite the Destroyer, but still a amazing small feature.2) The Whizzer: Marvel's golden age speedster superhero acquired his power after getting injected by mongoose blood. The hero was really one of the best of Marvel's second tier golden age characters and his origin story (silly as it is) is here.3) Captain Terror: This hero appeared only in Problems 2-4, but was memorable. In his real life identity Dan Kane, he was not allowed to join the Navy due to his heart troubles and is persistently turned down when trying to support the country. However as Captain Terror, he's able to take on the opponents of America and be a heroic figure. The hero is just inspiring and I can't support but wonder if in the back of his mind, Stan Lee wasn't inspired by this hero when he made his own character with heart problems, Iron Man. Lee was a young man at the time, working for Marvel and even wrote a couple stories in this book.4) Corporal Dix: This feature only appeared in Problem 4 but was actually beautiful well-done and endearing. Dix is a tough soldier on furlough and spending time with his small brother whose falling in with a poor crowd. It's a sweet, moving, and patriotic tale. I've read that there's more about him in the 2nd volume of USA comics which gives him a promotion to Sergeant.5) Jack Frost: This is where I become a small less positive. Frost was a decent enough hero and his ice powers were fun to watch, and the story in Problem 4 was particularly good, but really he seemed to be like an ice ver of the sub-mariner with a very related personality.6) The Vagabond: A story about law enforcement officer who disguises himself as a hobo, and often the disguise just doesn't create any sense. It seems a small dumb.7) The Defender: His story was actually a 19-page cover in USA comics #1 and was a prime example of Marvel ripping off itself. The Defender was dressed in a red, white, and blue costume and fought evil alongside a boy sidekick who looked almost identical (except for hair color) to Bucky. In addition, the costume is just atrociously designed. Red and white striped pants aren't patriotic. The thought behind this seemed, "To be a character like Captain America except in the Marines, without the super soldier serum, and in a poorly designed costume." The scripts were weaker versions of Captain America stories. The only amazing thing I can say for the book is that it really created me appreciate the elegance and timelessness of Jack Kirby's design for Captain America even more.And the one-shot features, "The Young Avenger" and "Powers of the Press" are both forgettable.Overall, the collection has some amazing points such as Captain Terror and the Whizzer's origin that create it a decent book, but certainly not one that's worth its retail price.

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    Golden Age U.S.A. Comics Masterworks Vol. 1 (USA Comics (1941-1945)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    Who hasn't thrilled to the golden age adventures of Rockman, Young Avenger, Major Liberty, and Captain Terror? What's that you say, you haven't? Or you? Or you? Therein lies both the interest in this collection of golden age comics and the explanation for why it falls is collection reprints problems 1-4 of U.S.A. Comics, which began publication in 1941. Timely (now Marvel) Comics had a large hit on their hands with Captain America and hoped to capitalize on Cap's success with an entire comic's worth of patriotic superheroes. Unfortunately, just slapping a red, white, and blue outfit on someone and sending him out to punch Nazis without the backstory and care given to Captain America created for lackluster stories and clearly forgettable e collection begins with the Defender, the worst of the Cap knock-offs. While his name doesn't scream patriotism the method Cap's does, his red, white, and blue uniform (with "USA" printed down the front in the first adventure) leaves no doubt. Captain America hides his identity by posing as a low ranking solider in the Army? The Defender hides his identity by posing as a low ranking solider in the Marines. Captain America has a costumed child sidekick named Bucky? The Defender has a costumed child sidekick named Rusty. This would perhaps be forgivable if the stories were stellar or even better than average, but they are poorly plotted and, in the case of the Defender, the most racist golden age stories I have yet read (which given the sad standards of the golden age is really saying something).The Young Avenger story in the first problem (his first and latest comic book appearance) is a useable example of how poorly these stories are written. The story begins in the den of Nazi agents plotting to blow up key American industrial centers, but what's this? A shadow overhears them! The shadow then flits to the Young Avenger's apartment, wakes him up with a warning of what the Nazis are up to, and then Young Avenger is off to stop them. Who or what is this mysterious shadow? No idea, as it isn't seen again after Young Avenger suits up and heads out to war Nazis. Do shadows report to the Young Avenger as part of his powers? Does this one shadow just really hate Nazis so it legged it over to Young Avenger of its own accord? If you'd like to know, you're asking too much; the plot here being "give Young Avenger a reason to punch Nazis and then Young Avenger punches Nazis." This throwaway storytelling, prevalent throughout this collection, explains why these superheroes have mostly been forgotten and why this collection isn't going to appeal to the average comic book fan, even those with an interest in golden age ere are some redeeming elements here, however. The Jack Frost story in the first problem was written by Stan Lee, one of his first comic book credits. Rockman has an interesting concept (though the stories are formulaic), and I genuinely enjoyed the stories of the Vagabond, a character who hides his real identity by dressing up as a hobo. Also, Major Liberty's super power (forgotten in two of his four stories in which he is just a Captain America knockoff dressed Revolutionary Battle style) is to call forth patriotic ghosts to support him war Nazis, and as a native Vermonter, I was amused to see the ghosts of Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys kick some Nazi e only two heroes appearing in these four problems that I had heard of before were Jack Frost (who Roy Thomas used in the Liberty Legion in the 1970s) and the Whizzer, Marvel's respond for the Flash, who became the only character in this book (despite a truly unfortunate name) to search at least a smidgen of golden age success (with stories appearing in All Winners Comics alongside stories of Captain America, the Sub-Mariner, and the Human Torch). The first problem here includes his first appearance, however, and he is even given an origin story, albeit it a lame one: he gained his super speed when his father injected him with mongoose blood (don't test this at home kids!).In a nutshell, I wouldn't recommend this to the average modern comic reader--whose taste for even the best of golden age stories may be limited--but I also wouldn't recommend this to someone who regularly reads golden age stories, as the ones here really are subpar. However, if you're a huge fan of golden age superheroes and wish to fill in your collection with some tales of forgotten heroes you are unlikely to come across anywhere else then this may be for you. It is a hardcover book with glossy color pages, though, so the accompanying retail price may scare off all but the most determined of golden age fans. I was fortunate enough to obtain my copy for more than half off the retail price. Otherwise this isn't something I would have picked up.

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    Golden Age U.S.A. Comics Masterworks Vol. 1 (USA Comics (1941-1945)) review [Book]  2018-3-12 18:1

    "The mightiest troops of red-blooded patriots ever assembled under one cover! Gathered together from those halcyon days when comic books were all in color for a dime."As our units met the menace of the Axis powers on the land, sea and air, back home the nation's adolescent readers took comfort in the daring exploits of: The Defender (by Al Avison, Al Gabriele, George Klein & Joe Simon), The Whizzer (by Al Avison, Al Gabriele & Howard James), Mr. Liberty (by Phil Sturm, Syd Shores & George Klein), Rockman (by Basil Wolverton, Stan Lee & Charles Nicholas), Young Avenger (by Howard Purcell), Jack Frost (by Stan Lee, Charles Nicholas, Frank Giacoia, Carmine Infantino, Pierce Rice & Louis Cazenueve), Captain Terror (by Mike Suchorsky), Major Liberty (by Syd Shores & George Klein) and Vagabond (by Ed Winiarski.) These were Timely Comics (Marvel Comics' granddad) greatest Nazis-smashers brought to the page by comics' most talented writers and artists of the rvel Masterworks: U.S.A. Comics Vol. 1 reprints U.S.A. Comics problems 1-4 in all it's patriotic four-color glory and is a must have for any Marvel comic fan or early comic book enthusiasts who have enjoyed vintage comic collections like @#$% Briefer's The Creature of Frankenstein or Monster Masterworks.

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    Vampire Tales Vol. 1 (Vampire Tales (1973-1975)) review [Book]  2018-3-23 18:1

    I got this thinking it would be a trade paperback ver of the magazine(Issues 1-3).When the magazine came out it was ~60% fresh stories and ~40% repeats from the past. Well this puts it all in ..repeats(from before the Mag. was published)...articles and the at the time fresh stories(some of the articles maybe new). To add insult to the whole thing...it is the size of a book digest(5-3/4"X8-7/8"). It is just a small bigger then a is also very much thinner(1/2") then a trade l in black and white for $20. Just be warned....this is not what it seems and from now on I will watch what I buy from Marvel before seeing it myself first. Shame on you Marvel.

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    Vampire Tales Vol. 1 (Vampire Tales (1973-1975)) review [Book]  2018-3-23 18:1

    First to the reviewers who commented here already-- are you kidding me?The size is listed in the description-- shame on you for not reading it. This was a GREAT book reprinting those black and white magazines Marvel place out in the 1970s, the paper is bright white and much higher quality than their Essentials line which is printed on ese reprint problems 1-3 of Vampire Tales, yes including all of the articles and amazing image spreads from vampire films from the 1920s up through the 70s-- it's a REPRINT folks-- it REPRINTS the problems in question-- I'd be disappointed if it didn't!These stories are moody and effective entries into the horror genre from a period when Marvel was stagnating with umpteen Spider-Man and X-Men titles.Featuring works by some of the amazing South American artists Marvel employed in the 70s as well as reprints of earlier horror tales by such masters as Carmine Infantino, John Romita (Sr) and more-- this was a really entertaining read and excellent for a cool fall ze wise it's digest-- a small bigger than a typical Manga collection-- but the work is beautifully reproduced. My only complaint is the cover-- very generic and not much thought given to an otherwise unbelievable it worth $20? No, but that's why I bought it on Amazon for $n't wait for the second volume-- highest possible recommendation--

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    Vampire Tales Vol. 1 (Vampire Tales (1973-1975)) review [Book]  2018-3-23 18:1

    This is a faithful reprint edition of the old Marvel Vampire Tales Magazines from the 1970s. Complete black white horror comics as well as reviews and short fiction shine in this odd-ball formatted edition. This is a amazing method to read all those old horror stories without having to track down the original issues. I bought this for myself, and liked it so much I bought one for a mate (she loves it, too). It just goes to present that vampire mania cycles in and out of American pop culture every few years!

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    Vampire Tales Vol. 1 (Vampire Tales (1973-1975)) review [Book]  2018-3-23 18:1

    Perfect book...

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    Vampire Tales Vol. 1 (Vampire Tales (1973-1975)) review [Book]  2018-3-23 18:1

    Much too small!

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    Vampire Tales Vol. 1 (Vampire Tales (1973-1975)) review [Book]  2018-3-23 18:1

    Buyer be warned, this is a little format. This is not a normal sized comic trade, this book is 5.75" X 8.875". It should have been marketed as a "digest" version.

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    Sgt. Fury Masterworks Vol. 3 (Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos (1963-1974)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    Amazing !

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    Sgt. Fury Masterworks Vol. 3 (Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos (1963-1974)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    I had a possibility to order this at a amazing price and did for nostalgia's sake.....but I was worried it wouldn't keep does! Totally entertaining, I fell right back into the dynamics of the individual Howlers. I'm docking a star for realism, but there's always been something about this comic that makes it a amazing nd of like how I grew up (in the '70's) on reruns of 60's TV shows, some neighborhood mates steered me to (60's) Sgt Fury when we first visited the local comic book shop (The Comic Book Put of Bel Air, Maryland, for the record). I went on to buy half a dozen back problems or so, a couple of which are in this volume: "Fury Wars Alone" is the first one I ever bought.Ok, so it's ridiculous how they escape again and again from certain execution....then again, if a group of guys DID manage a few such escapes, they could obtain some confidence/karmic mojo working. And the Nazis certainly weren't the buffoons the Howlers encounter them as....then again, if a group of guys WERE to be in regular hand to hand with the same enemy, of course their best shot at prevailing would be to cultivate a fearless confidence by diminishing the enemy's strength in their own right, I'm never gonna justify all the miraculous escapes and victories.....I'm just sayin'. If you were ever a fan, you'll still love 'em. They keep up as much as they ever did.If you've never read 'em......all I can tell you is, I just read this from cover to cover and it ended too soon!

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    Sgt. Fury Masterworks Vol. 3 (Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos (1963-1974)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    ...but has a charm all its t. Fury and his Howling Commandos was reportedly launched to prove a point. Editor and writer Stan Lee maintained to publisher Martin Goodman that the newly devised "Marvel style" could be applied to any genre, not just superheroics. Goodman reportedly scoffed, "Even battle books?"Lee proved his point. Sgt. Fury was the "war mag for people who hate battle mags!" It featured over the top action combined with massive doses of characterization and a powerful measure of soap opera style continuity. It also had lots of supporting characters and recurring villains also, staples of superhero books but almost unknown in battle books. Each Howler (as the Commandos were known), although clearly based on common sterotypes (Irishman, Brooklynite, stiff upper lip Briton, etc), acquires greater depth as the series moves along. Lee's and later Roy Thomas' snappy dialog adds much true humor to the title.What isn't here is any tip of a realistic portrayal of warfare. One could easily come away with the notion that battle is just fun and games. The Howlers are rarely shown shooting the opponent but are usually engaging in fisticuffs. The issue is recognized though and we do have occasional deaths of supporting characters and depictions of Nazi brutality. There is also no clear concept of what the different combatants were actually capable of. Secret weapons abound and we have preposterous plots of German Me 109 warriors (and Ju 87 dive bombers) attacking bombers being ferried across the e show volume is a small on the thin size (213 pages) for reasons that are not created clear. Possibly it is an attempt to keep the line on price. There are only 9 problems and 1 annual included. Noteworthy is the first appearance of future Howler Eric Koenig. The book also marks the handing over of the scripting chores from Lee to Thomas (in mid story). There is only an unused cover by penciller @#$% Ayers as an additional but Roy Thomas delivers yet another highly detailed and enjoyable quired reading for all Silver Age Marvel fans (which is no doubt why Fury is being Masterworked) but battle book fans in general might have problems with the whole approach.

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    Sgt. Fury Masterworks Vol. 3 (Sgt. Fury and His Howling Commandos (1963-1974)) review [Book]  2018-3-13 18:1

    I had the amazing fortune to search SGT Fury is out again in a handsome hardcover I bought and read these in the late 1960s.Oh well,nobody stays young ever,this series covers problems #24 to #32 and for amazing messure The unique D DAY ver is thrown two favorites are The [email protected]#$%! The Home Front.Fury and the boys go on furlough to 1940 WW2 America,they meet each others families,go to a jazz club,and also go to a USO present where they meet Bing Crosby,Bob Hope,Barry Fitzgerald,Groucho Marx,etc.I wonder why John Garfield,Humphrey Bogart,Deanna Durbin,Joe E Brown,Bette Davis,Errol Flynn,etc were not also there,Go Figure.Anyway getting on with the plot the boys explore a Nazi plot to search out about the Manhattan Project and its up to them to prevent Adolph from getting the A bomb.Fury Wars Alone is amazing with the Sergent in the heart of Nazi occupied Europe and its up to him to save the day alone againt Fatso Goring and his rat is is a amazing trip down memory enjoying sure you will too.

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    MASON JAR RECIPES BOOK SET 5 book in 1: Meals in Jars (vol.1); Salads in Jars (Vol. 2); Desserts in Jars (Vol. 3); Breakfasts in Jars (Vol. 4); Gifts in Jars (Vol. 5): Easy Mason Jar Recipe Cookbooks review [Book]  2017-10-16 18:3

    All kinds of recipes to create in jars.

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    MASON JAR RECIPES BOOK SET 5 book in 1: Meals in Jars (vol.1); Salads in Jars (Vol. 2); Desserts in Jars (Vol. 3); Breakfasts in Jars (Vol. 4); Gifts in Jars (Vol. 5): Easy Mason Jar Recipe Cookbooks review [Book]  2017-10-16 18:3

    This tutorial is absolutely amazing. I know the power of the pressure cooker in making meal fast and easy. However, I have always assumed that the flavor is just mushy and tasteless. Well, that is what I felt until I tried the awesome recipes in this book. I love the fact that this book has pictures of the various recipes. Even the children love the recipes from this book. They wish to support prepare the meals because they are so easy. It has become a fresh family favorite activity around the pressure cooking making meal together. This was an awesome book on multiple levels!

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    MASON JAR RECIPES BOOK SET 5 book in 1: Meals in Jars (vol.1); Salads in Jars (Vol. 2); Desserts in Jars (Vol. 3); Breakfasts in Jars (Vol. 4); Gifts in Jars (Vol. 5): Easy Mason Jar Recipe Cookbooks review [Book]  2017-10-16 18:3

    There aren't a lot of healthy recipes. The Lean Turkey Lasagna has 20 grams of fat per serving!

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    MASON JAR RECIPES BOOK SET 5 book in 1: Meals in Jars (vol.1); Salads in Jars (Vol. 2); Desserts in Jars (Vol. 3); Breakfasts in Jars (Vol. 4); Gifts in Jars (Vol. 5): Easy Mason Jar Recipe Cookbooks review [Book]  2017-10-16 18:3

    This tutorial is absolutely amazing. I know the power of the pressure cooker in making meal fast and easy. However, I have always assumed that the flavor is just mushy and tasteless. Well, that is what I felt until I tried the awesome recipes in this book. I love the fact that this book has pictures of the various recipes. Even the children love the recipes from this book. They wish to support prepare the meals because they are so easy. It has become a fresh family favorite activity around the pressure cooking making meal together. This was an awesome book on multiple levels!

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    Tales of Wedding Rings, Vol. 1 review [Book]  2018-3-25 18:1

    Tales of Wedding Rings looked to have promise, so I ordered the first volume. It does obtain off to a amazing begin and shows potential as a fantasy series. We have Satou, a high school student and his best mate Hime. He's fond of Hime and when she tells Satou she's moving away, he decides to follow. This gets involved as Hime is leaving the planet to resume her role as princess of a distant globe and enter into an arranged marriage with a prince. When there is trouble, Hime changes her mind and gives her wedding ring to Satou. In fact, that ring gives him the power to be the mighty character who will save their globe from the Abyss King, who is threatening devastation. Married life gets off to a complicated begin as Hime is nervous and just wants to stay mates for the time being. Meanwhile, it seems that there are four other rings held by four other princesses and Satou might have to marry them all to gain the power he's going to need to conquer the Abyss King. Despite her "just friends" notion, the idea of sharing Satou doesn't go over well with Hime. Besides Satou and Hime, they are joined by Sage Alabaster Getomik, the court wizard and Prince Marse, Hime's intended groom, who is proving to be a nice guy and a amazing ally. i will continue to follow this series; it can boast of a powerful cast and a promising storyline. Fantasy readers will wish to give Tales of Wedding Rings a look.

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