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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    This menu is only for the parents and student. Unlike Nutraslice, it doesn't present images or actual ingredients. The meal stuff are not grouped together like they are served at each individual school. They place a menu together and allow you figure out which school line your kid us to eat in. A display of the meal should be placed in view so each kid can see what prepared meal looks like to create choices easier

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    Love it!! I love being able to create a profile specific to my child's dietary needs and it lets me know what they can or cannot eat.

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    Worked fine for the first month, then it didn't modernize to present the menus the second month. Much easier to take a snapshot of the menu from the school www service

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    keeps closing and does not present one of my childs menu

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    My son got autism from eating meal provided by sodexo

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    I liked the light ver that just told me what was on the menu. The fresh ver requires my 5 year old to make an account. That's not going to happen. This ver is amazing for parents who really need to track how their child is eating, but I just wish to know what's for lunch

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    It doesn't work, cannot add my child, nor select the school. Screens over lap and cannot click.

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    Doesn't let you to look at the menu unless you have a student added.

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    The first ver was better.

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    Liked the concept so well I bought a satisfied journal to remind myself of all the satisfied moments in my life. Jennie's book gives everyone permission and direction on how to record the moments in life that are fleeting and could be forgotten unless recorded. And recorded in a fun, childlike freedom that retains the moments in a gleeful fashion. My stick figures, sign posts and squiggles re-enforce amazing times that I can return to again and again.

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    I loved this book! My favourite takeaway from the book was “You can even work on a satisfied journal as a family. Imagine raising the next generation as resilient thinkers. Your children will be able to note the positive in life as well as the is particularly stood out for me since I’ve struggled with how to support my children focus on the positive, if they had a poor day at school and are only focusing on the negative. Drawing our day together also gives us a easy method to connect as a family.

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    I have kept a journal since I was a teenager, but most of what I recorded in my journal was negative. Definitely not anything I would ever wish anyone to read. After reading Satisfied Journal Satisfied Life, my perspective on journals has changed. I now record positive things from my life. I even allow my daughter look at all the pages in my journal. It always brings a smile to her face, even though she sometimes chuckles at my drawings :-) If you have ever struggled with finding joy and happiness in your life, you NEED to read this book!

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    Unbelievable book. Fast read and such a amazing idea. Makes me feel like a child again. It also helps me to realize that when I have a poor day there are still things to be grateful for. I'm not an artist but it doesn't matter because this book is mine about my special life. You will love the book- such a fast and rewarding practice to do daily. Thank you Jennie!

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    This small book is a fast read that packs a huge punch. A reminder to take a few moments each day to see and record the amazing in a fun, non- threatening way. If you're looking for one easy thing to do to increase your gratitude and awareness of the amazing in each day, Jennie gives you exactly that. Satisfied journal, satisfied life. Because happiness is a choice.

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    I follow Jennie's blog and was so intrigued when she mentioned this book! Jennie walks you through the few steps it takes to begin a small journal to take note of the happy, small things in your e book helps us all to realize how simple it is to overlook the little things that create us satisfied in our everyday life. A amazing method to support a beginner or long time journalers search and record satisfied life moments to look back on. And, along the way, you'll start to message how seeking out and jotting down these moments changes the method you think about your day to day life, ultimately resulting in your own "happy life"!

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    Jennie Moraitis' goal with "Happy Journal, Satisfied Life" is to encourage people to record satisfied things in their lives. According to her, it is significant to recognize the little things. Furthermore, one does not have to be an artist to do this. A blank book and writing utensils are sufficient. In chapter 4 "How To Begin Your Own Journal" Jennie gives step-by-step instructions for the starting of a Satisfied Journal.I loved the book so much that I actually started to draw in my printed out advance copy.I have received the advance copy of "Happy Journal, Satisfied Life" as a PDF. I was under no obligation to offer a positive review.

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    You don't have to be an artist to have fun this book. I'm not much of a writer but found myself excited to sit down and draw out my day; happenings that created me smile throughout the day. Jennie does an perfect job at giving you step by step directions on how to obtain those photos onto paper. In a globe where everything seems so negative it's nice to sit back and look for the amazing and satisfied things that create you smile. I highly recommend this book to anyone who's willing to sit still for a few mins each day to draw out their thoughts and joys.

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    This was such a fun, positive, quick read. I'm not sure there's any better word to describe it than "happy." :)I struggle with perfectionism, so I love the author's emphasis on releasing the need for your satisfied journal to be excellent and instead embracing whatever it is that brings you joy. If you're looking for something to provide a small creative spark, I highly recommend you pick up this sweet, encouraging small book.

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    Love this book! As a mental health therapist, I am a huge supporter of focusing on the positive experiences we have in life. It can be so simple to obtain pulled into negativity if we aren't careful, and it can quickly become a habit.Happy Journal, Satisfied Life is a amazing tutorial in helping you move toward making happy-focus a habit the book. Be inspired. Begin a Satisfied Journal by yourself or with your family. You won't regret a shift to satisfied thinking!!

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    If you are reading this review, according to the cornucopia of research offered in this book, you are unlikely to be an iGen’er. “By 2015, one out of three high school seniors admitted they had not read any books for pleasure in the past year, three times as a lot of as in 1976.” While Professor Twenge cautions us not to evaluate some of her findings as amazing or bad, this, for me, is surely a bit a sexagenarian father of two daughters, aged 14 and 16, I desperately required and wanted to read this book. And I wasn’t disappointed. It is well written and provides a wealth of info and insight. Much of it, I found, reinforced my own observations of my daughters. In some cases, that allowed me to breathe a sigh of relief. At the very least, their habits that are the most various from my own at their age are not special to enge is careful up front to articulate the limitations of this type of statistical analysis. “Because the survey samples are nationally representative, they represent American young people as whole, not just an isolated group.” That larger group, the iGen’ers, are defined as those born from 1995 to 2012, a group of 74 million Americans that currently acc for 24% of the of the things I normally search limiting in this kind of huge data statistical analysis is that it chronicles attributes. But if a picture is worth a thousand words, a behavior is worth ten thousand pictures, and Professor Twenge clearly appreciates that. She doesn’t just show the data, she probes it.A few random thoughts occurred to me as I read it.I came of age at the height of the Vietnam War. When I was needed to register with Selective Service, the draft was still in put and college deferments, for amazing reason, had been eliminated. I vividly recall standing in my high school cafeteria at the age of 17 listening to the statewide announcement of our lottery draft numbers. The numbers were drawn by birth date and the official reading the numbers started the broadcast noting that the first 123 numbers drawn were almost certain to be drafted, the second 123 numbers may or may not be depending on need, and the latest 119 could rest easier. My birthday was drawn 124th. The birthday of my friend, who happened to be standing next to me, was drawn 3rd.I offer that only to suggest that there are certain historical happenings that support to define individuals, if not a generation. The risk of being sent to war in the jungle of Southeast Asia was one for me. That’s not to say that iGen’ers have not endured such historic events. It’s just to remind us that they e other observation that I had, which isn’t directly explored in the book, is the change not just in how we live, but where we live. I walked to school on my own starting in the fourth grade, street my bicycle everywhere, and spent nearly all of my waking hours with friends—with no adult supervision. People didn’t live in sub-divisions so much in those days. We lived in economically diverse neighborhoods. Urban sprawl and the socio-economic homogeneity of the suburban subdivision have both empowered and demanded certain changes in how our kids final observation has to do with the individualistic vs collective social norm. Professor Twenge writes, “…cultural individualism is connected to slower developmental speeds across both countries and time. Around the world, young adults grow up more slowly in individualistic countries than collectivist ones.”My family lived in China for nine years. For my daughters, it was during the period from age 5 until age 14, on average. China has a collective culture in the extreme and it was my observation that the kids matured very slowly, at least compared to my private experience as a Boomer. (I found out from this book that this is a global development.) Because of the collectivist culture, however, my wife and I were very lenient with the independence we allowed out daughters. At a restaurant, for example, we never hesitated to allow the kids go off and play on their own, out of our sight. (A children’s play zone is offered at virtually every restaurant.) Violent crime and attacks on kids are rare in China, but more importantly, we knew that everyone else at the restaurant, including the staff, would hold a close eye on the safety of the children. It’s just part of the collectivist mentality. They all feel responsible. My point being that I’m not sure the individualistic vs collectivist dimension isn’t a bit counter-intuitive when you obtain to the social e study does reinforce the far-reaching impact of technology. It comes with a lot of baggage. Social media is not social at all. It’s entertainment. And, for the most part, it’s not authentic. Selfies, for example, are always staged. Reminded me of The Jetsons, when they would always keep a mask of perfection in front of their face when talking on the video a lot of ways, I consider this book to be a launching pad rather than a conclusion. Professor Twenge has done a amazing job of starting the conversation. But it needs to continue. What is it about technology that has cast our kids in this way? Why do they think and behave the method they do? (Twenge has started that conversation in a lot of areas.) And what, as parents and members of the larger community, can we do to reinforce the amazing things (e.g., our kids are safer) and attack the negatives (e.g., suicide rates are up).Some of the developments are going to be a small tricky. Twenge points out, for example, that iGen’ers are overwhelmingly inclusive. In terms of the racism that is haunting our society today, that might suggest we just need to wait and the issue will be resolved. I don’t think so, and, to her credit, Twenge apparently agrees. A commitment to inclusion is not enough. We must do more.I also think it will take the village to address the iGen’ers overwhelming anxiety about their financial future. That is truly a issue for the business community and the government to solve. The implied social contract that existed between employer and employee when I started my career disappeared starting in the 80s. It isn’t coming back but we have to build some form of alternative. Technology and social evolution have taken away the safety net of self-sufficiency (i.e. the Thoreau model) and have left a void in its place. It’s a void that needs to be filled; or bridged, perhaps.I, therefore, go beyond the parents of iGen’ers and educators in recommending this book. We all need to read it because we all have a role to play, both for our children, our selves, and the future of our society.

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    Wow. This is the most comprehensive tutorial you will search on the culture and attitudes of iGen - those born between e author, writing in a clear, engaging, and easily understandable style, identifies 10 locations in which the iGen radically differs from their generational predecessors when they were the same age. These range from attidues toward work, religion, sex (more suprising than you might think), family, tolerance and lled from statistics gathered from 11 million people, the book tracks the changes in attitudes among young people in these locations starting from the 1970s and on. The most radical shift in attitudes has accured with the emergence of the iGen. While the author doesn't explicitly link the advent and ubiquity of smartphones to these cultural changes - she does frequently tip at it - there is small room for doubt that this is the is book is an perfect addition to the growing body of literature highlighting this issue, like Glow Kids, by Dr. Nicholas Kardaras; Irresistible, by Adam Alter; Reclaiming Conversation, by Sherry Turkle and The Huge Disconnect by Catherine Steiner-Adair (I highly recommend all of these books).This book should be needed reading for every parent and educator who wants to understand their kids and perhaps do something to reverse some of the more disturbing and frightening trends in their homes and communities.

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    This book makes you think What will society look like in 20 years - how will we answer to natural disasters who will volunteer?

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    The book uses long-term generational surveys (I remember taking the 12th grade survey back in 1986!) to present how the generation born since 1995 have changed. Not only is the info incredibly interesting and compelling, it's vital to helping us understand the kids and young adults in our country. I highly recommend the book for parents, educators, and anyone else who works with young people.I also recommend the book for teens. My 17 year old picked it up and read several pages and plans to read more. I'm also sending the book to my college-aged daughter and hoping she will share it with the Residential Life office where she e book is based on hard data and filled with charts, but there are also anecdotes to humanize the numbers. Fast read and super interesting!!!

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    Born in 1996 and now in senior year of college at UCSanDiego. And everything in this book has seemed to ring real for me, and of the students around me. For me, I'd say screen time and reliance on texting/messaging instead of true conversations was a huge factor in my lack of social skills in high school leading to much social and romantic failure; the sapping of social media; the constant sleep deprivation in high school (constantly felt asleep at the wheel driving to school though never crashed, and often in classes). I have deleted fb and all that validation-hunting antisocial social media. This book has been very eye-opening to see how my generation is sadly faring. I want there was something I could do for the students around me and the ones coming in. And their soft, [email protected]#$%!&. -Will Sun

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    I was born in 1995 (but I consider myself a mix of Millennial and iGen). If anyone else my age read this book they would obtain really defensive and blame the author for generational-shaming. But there is a lot insight which is the author's whole entire point to present us iGeners.I really enjoyed this book. It's amazing to learn that a part of my generation now compared to years ago have for themselves a safer/keener sense of judgment towards alcohol and drug use, sex, relationships. We're more inclusive and advocating as far as race and LGBT(QIA) issues. But I have concerns with iGen's groupthink responses. Like, nude pictures (I'm not even gonna explain). And regarding individualism-- I don't agree with most iGens that "it's all up to the individual under *all* circumstances" because it overlooks the human capacity to screw up and go overboard--which is evident. It's totally amazing we moved away from imposing/ forcing certain values and practices on others, but the downside of redundantly chanting "let people be who they wish to be" has made a generation of high-and-mighty entitled narcissists to do literally whatever they please even if it results in far worse problems, struggles, and consequences had they not done whatever they wanted just cause they can. Our generation also lacks empathy because "oh well that sucks for them, I can't do anything about it. Their issue not mine" which is actually contradictory to our advocating social problems that require empathy for human rights and equality anyway. Maybe this is more of Millennial behavior than iGen as the author mentions, but both generations do overlap. While I love that iGen is definitely more conscious about social problems and advocates more equality (b/c of fresh media), it sucks that we're less likely to actually go out there and make social change because of more screen time than outside time. I can't accept the idea that we'll talk about social issues, but not actually obtain off our butts and create them happen in the true world-- in real, tangible, physical space-- **without** trying post it online for attention and me concerns I have about Twenge's latest chapter: I agree that moderation is key, I'm just concerned about giving your child a flip-phone when all the other children have an iphone and feel left out. iGen will probably demand safe locations for iphone use. Jk. Can we solve it with education? And FYI Twenge is mindful to say she doesn't wanna ditch iphones completely, but for those in elementary and maybe even middle school yes. It'll just be really hard to change that kind of culture towards flip phones again.. but I'm not saying we can't fix was weird when she talked about the Jobsnap video interviews... iGen might spend more time and attention to glamorous editing. Maybe even idealize their own work ethic and fall short on their claims when their employer finally meets them in real-life (b/c lack of social skills and work experience). As an iGen I personally know what it's like to fall short. I also want we weren't born into a globe to have to choose over the whole extrinsic thing over the intrinsic. That's an institutional problem. And I supersupersuper agree with teaching iGen (and everyone tbh) to know the difference between peer-reviewed sources and blog-type ones and also trying to actually use peer-reviewed as much as possible to acc for credibility and accuracy. It's super necessary especially with fakenews and misinformation.Fellow iGeners, this book wasn't written to criticize us. It's to support us.

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    I approached this book with both private and academic interest. My private interest is that my wife and I are cohorts of the “Boomer” generation. We’ve raised our son, born in 1995, to adulthood. Author Jean E. Twenge characterizes him as belonging to the “iGen” generation, which she defines as persons born between 1995 and 2012. We are interested in understanding the views of our son and our nieces and nephews in their early academic interest is that I’m an amateur historian with professionally published magazine articles on American history. I am a firm believer in the Cycles of History Theory, which postulates that pivotal crisis points occur every four generations, or eighty years. For example, generation-shaping happenings like the Amazing Depression of 1929 and the Amazing Recession of 2008 occurred almost exactly eighty years e Cycles of History theory supposes that within each eighty-year cycle there are four generations spanning birth ranges of 20 years, each with its own distinguishing characteristics. This interpretation of history is described in GENERATIONS: THE HISTORY OF AMERICA’S FUTURE, 1584 TO 2069 written by William Strauss and Neil Howe, and published in 1991.I thus sought to put the “iGen” Generation in its context with prior generations. If my interpretation of the theory is correct, the “IGen”ers should align with the “Silent Generation” of four generations ago, which became young adults in the 1950s, sired most of the Boomer Generation, reached the peak of middle aged power in the mid 70’s to mid 90’s, and is now passing away in late old e “Silent Generation,” born during the Amazing Depression and Globe Battle II, were a generation that valued peace, conformity, compromise, and healing. They were risk-averse, preferring corporation employment to entrepreneurship, and favoring stable marriages and families. Malt shops, high school “hops,” subdivisions, family outings, and men in grey suits reporting to work as cogs in the wheels of corporation bureaucracies were the reassuring photos of their lifepaths.Dr. Twenge characterizes the “iGen” generation as being chop from the same mold: a quiet, conformist, risk-averse generation very various from the dynamic and often crass materialism of their Baby Boomer, Generation “X” parents and the dreamy ambitions of their “Millennial” older brothers and sisters. Being conformist and risk-averse, they are growing up more slowly than the Millennial, Generation ‘X’, and Boomer generations. A lot of are still living with their parents.=====iGen’ers are practical, forward looking, and safe, a far cry from the “You can be anything” and “Follow your dreams” Millennials. With managers focusing on Millennial employees in the latest decades, small time has been spent understanding what might motivate iGen’ers in their careers.[IGener’s] agree that “helping others in difficulty” and “making a contribution to society” is important, average agreement with eight stuff on “empathy for others” and “being willing to donate” to nine various charities…and they have no patience for inequality based on gender, race, or sexual orientation.=====If the Cycles of History theory is valid, then the politically divisive, economically unstable, crisis-prone period of our history may soon be over. The “iGen”ers will shepherd us through a period of constructive prosperity, and restoration of familiar values --- perhaps socially conservative in cherishing family values, but egalitarian liberal in demanding equality and fairness for all. Their days may resemble the “Happy Days” of the 1950’s “Silent Generation.”This book definitely rings real with my family, and my circle of mates and neighbors. My generation of Boomers left our small-town homes in the Midwest when we finished school. We created our fortunes in glamour spots like California, Colorado, and Florida. We were afraid that our “iGen” kids were being degraded by the quick (and frequently destructive) pace of life in the urban areas. We brought our families back to the small-town Midwest to raise them among the mates and neighbors we grew up with. An inner voice told us, “Bring your children back home where they will grow up safe, and with amazing values of work and family.”The book also seeks to explain practical matters such as why social media like Fb has such a powerful keep on the iGen’ers, and why it is necessary to obtain them involved in sports to exercise their bodies, take their mind away from the social media pages, and improve their mental health. It explains their insecurities, and why they may be more prone to depression culminating in suicide than previous generations. (Perhaps their quiet conformity tends to hold negative emotions bottled up inside them).I found this book to ring real in describing the iGen’ers I know. I felt intuitively that they are a constructive generation. The book has confirmed me in that opinion. The book paints iGen’ers with a “bittersweet” brush --- some bitterness in their quiet insecurities of youth, but far sweeter with their affections for themselves and their ter reading this book, I have gleaned some concrete reasons for believing that life will be satisfied and prosperous for this “iGeneration” now setting out to carve its destiny in the world. In the process, they will recover and restore some of the best values that have us such a successful country. I thus viewed this as an optimistic book, and I am glad I read it.

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    Prof Twenge offers data, descriptions and an abundance of private interviews to uncover the rather confused culture of Americans born since the mid-1990's. A amazing read to obtain a handle on the next generation, but with a couple of serious rst, her generational slice is too narrow. In the classic "Generations: the history of America's future," Strauss & Howe identify a generation to be about twenty years. Prof Twenge shaves her generation down to ten, perhaps to create her data more marketable to corporate America. In spite of this unnecessary data manipulation, the info she provides is enlightening if disheartening. Her iGen generation don't read books or invest time in friends, and they're frightened of most everything--particularly being labeled intolerant, and don't wish anyone to have their feelings second caveat is beginning her iGen generation as those born in the mid-1990's, claiming the 2007 begin of the intelligent phone as the seminal cultural experience. The happenings of 9/11 offers a more logical explanation for the method iGeners have been coddled and for their fears; while the 2008 economic panic more likely explains their pre-occupation with economic success. Still, the Professor's data does help how intelligent phones are literally "Rewiring the human brain," as Jim VandeHei, co-founder of Politico, gardless of how she slices and dices the data, her research demonstrates iGeners believe, "Emotional reasoning is now accepted as evidence." They are doing without relationships and religion, are insecure and insulated--liable to lash out at anyone who threatens their feelings. While imposing upon themselves an inclusive and tolerant ethic, their lack of maturity and responsibility, their avoidance of the huge questions, and most troubling their dependence upon social media coupled with their fearfulness may create Prof Twenge's iGeners easily manipulated by corporate America. Indeed, it is already happening. ~Star Readers: from out of the east

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    Our kids are growing up in a difficult time period. Everything is so various from when I was in my teens! They are growing up with technology I would never have even dreamed of. This technology has to have had an impact on their childhood and the method they connect with family, mates and is book examines just how drastically this generation has changed (and looks at statistics from a broad range of cultures, ages and numbers). It looks at several locations where this generation has differed from their predecessors, such as religion, politics, family, work, sex and attitudes. It is awesome to see how the iGen generation has shifted with their thinking and a parent with kids growing up in this iGen generation, I think this book is a must read. It points out so a lot of necessary facts that really create you think about your own parenting. Do I focus too much on safety at the risk of not allowing my kid to learn and grow? Am I preventing independence and important life skills by doing things for them? Is my kid spending so much time socializing online that they are lacking the important communication and verbal skills needed for later on in life? What are the implications of all of this?This book was a definite eye opener for me as parent. I can see my kids in this book and it really created me focus on what I can do now as a parent to support my kid prepare for their future. There are so a lot of skills that I learned in my teen years that are not being passed down to my children. I loved that this book offered hope and suggestions on how to change behaviour now before kids spiral out of control. The most shocking (although we see it in the news all the time) is the mental health aspect. This culture is hurting them with depression, anxiety and loneliness and this book tackles the whys of this.iGen is well written and expressed in a manner that parents can understand and apply in their own homes. It is a definite must read parenting book especially for parents raising young children, teens or even planning families.

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    Over the weekend, I saw Dr. Twenge's short snippet on CNN. I occasionally hold CNN or some other random TV present on as background noise (usually while I am working). I decided to buy the book and am glad I is book focuses on the fresh generation, particularly the most latest one that does not know of a globe without a screen that you can flip photos through with the flick of a finger on a backlit display. Dr. Twenge also compares this to the previous generation, the Millenials as well as GenX. In such a short time period, there have been enormous changes in American culture. Dr. Twenge evaluates these changes and provides significant data from well-known, reliable sources.Dr. Twenge uses data and true life interviews with those that are part of iGen. I found a lot of of her conversations quite humerous. In particular, a lot of of her interviewees used the word 'like' several times, often in the same sentence. I found this to be quite humerous, but very true from conversations with my nieces and nephews.Overall, amazing book. I plan on buying Dr. Twenge's other books. Personally, I like her writing style in that it is clear and unambigous. Mostly, given the contents it describes, it in no way, shape or form reads like a textbook.

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy-and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood-and What That What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2018-5-12 18:1

    Born in 1996 and now in senior year of college at UCSanDiego. And everything in this book has seemed to ring real for me, and of the students around me. For me, I'd say screen time and reliance on texting/messaging instead of true conversations was a huge factor in my lack of social skills in high school leading to much social and romantic failure; the sapping of social media; the constant sleep deprivation in high school (constantly felt asleep at the wheel driving to school though never crashed, and often in classes). I have deleted fb and all that validation-hunting antisocial social media. This book has been very eye-opening to see how my generation is sadly faring. I want there was something I could do for the students around me and the ones coming in. And their soft, [email protected]#$%!&. -Will Sun

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy-and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood-and What That What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2018-5-12 18:1

    If you are reading this review, according to the cornucopia of research offered in this book, you are unlikely to be an iGen’er. “By 2015, one out of three high school seniors admitted they had not read any books for pleasure in the past year, three times as a lot of as in 1976.” While Professor Twenge cautions us not to evaluate some of her findings as amazing or bad, this, for me, is surely a bit a sexagenarian father of two daughters, aged 14 and 16, I desperately required and wanted to read this book. And I wasn’t disappointed. It is well written and provides a wealth of info and insight. Much of it, I found, reinforced my own observations of my daughters. In some cases, that allowed me to breathe a sigh of relief. At the very least, their habits that are the most various from my own at their age are not special to enge is careful up front to articulate the limitations of this type of statistical analysis. “Because the survey samples are nationally representative, they represent American young people as whole, not just an isolated group.” That larger group, the iGen’ers, are defined as those born from 1995 to 2012, a group of 74 million Americans that currently acc for 24% of the of the things I normally search limiting in this kind of huge data statistical analysis is that it chronicles attributes. But if a picture is worth a thousand words, a behavior is worth ten thousand pictures, and Professor Twenge clearly appreciates that. She doesn’t just show the data, she probes it.A few random thoughts occurred to me as I read it.I came of age at the height of the Vietnam War. When I was needed to register with Selective Service, the draft was still in put and college deferments, for amazing reason, had been eliminated. I vividly recall standing in my high school cafeteria at the age of 17 listening to the statewide announcement of our lottery draft numbers. The numbers were drawn by birth date and the official reading the numbers started the broadcast noting that the first 123 numbers drawn were almost certain to be drafted, the second 123 numbers may or may not be depending on need, and the latest 119 could rest easier. My birthday was drawn 124th. The birthday of my friend, who happened to be standing next to me, was drawn 3rd.I offer that only to suggest that there are certain historical happenings that support to define individuals, if not a generation. The risk of being sent to war in the jungle of Southeast Asia was one for me. That’s not to say that iGen’ers have not endured such historic events. It’s just to remind us that they e other observation that I had, which isn’t directly explored in the book, is the change not just in how we live, but where we live. I walked to school on my own starting in the fourth grade, street my bicycle everywhere, and spent nearly all of my waking hours with friends—with no adult supervision. People didn’t live in sub-divisions so much in those days. We lived in economically diverse neighborhoods. Urban sprawl and the socio-economic homogeneity of the suburban subdivision have both empowered and demanded certain changes in how our kids final observation has to do with the individualistic vs collective social norm. Professor Twenge writes, “…cultural individualism is connected to slower developmental speeds across both countries and time. Around the world, young adults grow up more slowly in individualistic countries than collectivist ones.”My family lived in China for nine years. For my daughters, it was during the period from age 5 until age 14, on average. China has a collective culture in the extreme and it was my observation that the kids matured very slowly, at least compared to my private experience as a Boomer. (I found out from this book that this is a global development.) Because of the collectivist culture, however, my wife and I were very lenient with the independence we allowed out daughters. At a restaurant, for example, we never hesitated to allow the kids go off and play on their own, out of our sight. (A children’s play zone is offered at virtually every restaurant.) Violent crime and attacks on kids are rare in China, but more importantly, we knew that everyone else at the restaurant, including the staff, would hold a close eye on the safety of the children. It’s just part of the collectivist mentality. They all feel responsible. My point being that I’m not sure the individualistic vs collectivist dimension isn’t a bit counter-intuitive when you obtain to the social e study does reinforce the far-reaching impact of technology. It comes with a lot of baggage. Social media is not social at all. It’s entertainment. And, for the most part, it’s not authentic. Selfies, for example, are always staged. Reminded me of The Jetsons, when they would always keep a mask of perfection in front of their face when talking on the video a lot of ways, I consider this book to be a launching pad rather than a conclusion. Professor Twenge has done a amazing job of starting the conversation. But it needs to continue. What is it about technology that has cast our kids in this way? Why do they think and behave the method they do? (Twenge has started that conversation in a lot of areas.) And what, as parents and members of the larger community, can we do to reinforce the amazing things (e.g., our kids are safer) and attack the negatives (e.g., suicide rates are up).Some of the developments are going to be a small tricky. Twenge points out, for example, that iGen’ers are overwhelmingly inclusive. In terms of the racism that is haunting our society today, that might suggest we just need to wait and the issue will be resolved. I don’t think so, and, to her credit, Twenge apparently agrees. A commitment to inclusion is not enough. We must do more.I also think it will take the village to address the iGen’ers overwhelming anxiety about their financial future. That is truly a issue for the business community and the government to solve. The implied social contract that existed between employer and employee when I started my career disappeared starting in the 80s. It isn’t coming back but we have to build some form of alternative. Technology and social evolution have taken away the safety net of self-sufficiency (i.e. the Thoreau model) and have left a void in its place. It’s a void that needs to be filled; or bridged, perhaps.I, therefore, go beyond the parents of iGen’ers and educators in recommending this book. We all need to read it because we all have a role to play, both for our children, our selves, and the future of our society.

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy-and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood-and What That What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2018-5-12 18:1

    The book uses long-term generational surveys (I remember taking the 12th grade survey back in 1986!) to present how the generation born since 1995 have changed. Not only is the info incredibly interesting and compelling, it's vital to helping us understand the kids and young adults in our country. I highly recommend the book for parents, educators, and anyone else who works with young people.I also recommend the book for teens. My 17 year old picked it up and read several pages and plans to read more. I'm also sending the book to my college-aged daughter and hoping she will share it with the Residential Life office where she e book is based on hard data and filled with charts, but there are also anecdotes to humanize the numbers. Fast read and super interesting!!!

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy-and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood-and What That What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2018-5-12 18:1

    Over the weekend, I saw Dr. Twenge's short snippet on CNN. I occasionally hold CNN or some other random TV present on as background noise (usually while I am working). I decided to buy the book and am glad I is book focuses on the fresh generation, particularly the most latest one that does not know of a globe without a screen that you can flip photos through with the flick of a finger on a backlit display. Dr. Twenge also compares this to the previous generation, the Millenials as well as GenX. In such a short time period, there have been enormous changes in American culture. Dr. Twenge evaluates these changes and provides significant data from well-known, reliable sources.Dr. Twenge uses data and true life interviews with those that are part of iGen. I found a lot of of her conversations quite humerous. In particular, a lot of of her interviewees used the word 'like' several times, often in the same sentence. I found this to be quite humerous, but very true from conversations with my nieces and nephews.Overall, amazing book. I plan on buying Dr. Twenge's other books. Personally, I like her writing style in that it is clear and unambigous. Mostly, given the contents it describes, it in no way, shape or form reads like a textbook.

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy-and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood-and What That What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2018-5-12 18:1

    The author presents necessary findings on how iGen differs from previous generations. Briefly, iGen is less religious, more childlike, less interested in becoming adults, more screen dependent, more concerned about safety, and more depressed than previous generations. The author meticulously documents her research findings. Although she does not provide any tests of statistical significance, she does provide multiple line graphs that present trends over time. I have two basis concerns: A concern about her finding that young adults wish to remain children and a concern about her recommendations on social media.1) Young adults wish to remain childrenShe asks “what is wrong with teenagers?” Maybe we should ask, “What is wrong with adulthood?”The author finds that young adults simply do not wish to become adults: they don’t wish to drink, have sex, obtain jobs, drive, or socialize without their parents. I accept this finding at face value. The author explains that young adults wish to stay kids because of the advantages of kids in our society. I am more interested in why adult lives so crappy, or least so unenviable in the eyes of teenagers that teenagers don’t wish them. Teenagers have noticed that something vital and necessary is missing from adult lives in the contemporary U.S. What is that thing? I know this problem is not directly similar to the author’s main point, but it is such an obvious question from her findings that it merits some consideration. The author asks what has changed about teenagers (of course, this is the point of her book). But perhaps the larger issue is that something has changed in what it means to be an adult and teenagers are just responding to that change. Extra research (outside of this book) could investigate this issue.Why are young adults withdrawing from political life?The author discussed “Safe Spaces” on college campuses where students could retreat from difficult conversations. Like most other adults, I search it ridiculous that college students would need a room filled with childlike objects where they could retreat in the face of a controversial campus speaker. But this problem requires more subtlety. To conceptualize this problem another way, college students in this situation are withdrawing from public debate. They don’t wish to challenge it, they just wish to obtain away from it. There are a lot of other times in U.S. history where oppressed groups simply leave rather than stay and fight. I imagine here people who emigrated from the U.S. to avoid certain political movements, huge demographic groups that simply stopped voting, and young people who simply left traditional religions rather than stay and challenge them. They don’t wish to victory and they don’t wish to lose—they just wish out.Withdraw is an interesting process and it deserves more than the cursory suggestion that these young adults are all wimps. I believe that withdraw is a strategy used when people feel like they can’t effectively fight. It is usually a beautiful desperate move created in the face of absolute powerlessness. And these students may be right. If a powerful, charismatic, famous, and expensive speaker is coming to their college, what possibility does an individual Freshman have of successfully challenging them? Any effort to publicly disagree with the speaker is likely to end with the college student’s own humiliation. Withdraw is a reasonable approach when direct confrontation is unlikely to be successful. The fact that they are withdrawing to a common put (a “Safe Space”) is actually a sign that they are looking for solidarity with other like-minded individuals. Strong political opposition may someday emerge from young adults working together in these “Safe Spaces.”How did today’s youth become so risk averse?The author argues that teenagers today are risk-averse but does not really explain why. In this regard, I think the author lets the “culture of fear” off the hook. In my own opinion, political leaders, the media, and religious groups have stoked a culture of fear over the latest several years. I believe today’s teenagers are partly a consequence of this “fear-based” model of politics. Everyone is now afraid to go outside because we are all convinced that we will be killed.2) What are alternative explanations for why screen time increases depression?The author finds evidence that screen time, especially social media, increases depression and that the relationship is causal. For the sake of argument, I accept her findings. However, I was not convinced about why social media increases depression. The author hypothesizes that this is because of cyberbullying, oversexualization (especially of girls) in social media, sleep deprivation, and the fact that social media portrays people as having excellent lives (making individuals feel worse about their own average lives). The issue is that she does not provide evidence that any of these hypotheses actually explain why screen time increases depression. The author’s primary argument is to not worry too much about why screen time causes depression and instead work to reduce screen time. I believe this is a mistake.What would you do if you found out that people living in Atlanta had more depression? And, specifically, that moving to Atlanta caused an increase in depression? One option, of course, is to tell people to not move to Atlanta. But it would be far more useful to figure out what is event in Atlanta that is causing such e irony that stands out to me about the suggestion to “limit screen time” is that I read that very phrase on a screen while reading this book and I heard about this book through social media. I am an online college professor and, thus, my entire professional career happens on a screen. Thus, I am highly skeptical of any blanket suggestion to “limit screen time.” I think it is more useful to ask about what kind of screen time to limit and what kind of screen time to ere are some other reasons that social media might increase depression. I have no evidence for these possibilities, but I believe they need to be considered:• Social media exposes teenagers to more advertising, especially more targeted advertising. We don’t know the long-term impact of this kind of advertising.• Social media may provide an avenue for teenagers to interact without adult supervision. In fact (per the author’s findings), it may be one of the only avenues where teenagers can be with other teenagers without adult supervision. Teenagers who spend more time with just other teenagers (and not adults) may end up experiencing more depression because they have to deal directly with their peers without being able to turn to an adult to solve problems.• The issue may be when and where social media is used. It is an activity that often keeps people indoors, at an awkward physical angle, and sedentary. People may also overeat when using social media (like they do when watching TV), which could be the reason social media use increases depression. Thus, the relationship between social media use and depression could be entirely spurious.• Depression may be contagious in a method that happiness is not. People who experience depression and post on Fb may “infect” others with depression. If this were true, then the longer one spends using social media, the more one would be exposed to other depressed people.• Social media use on a phone often requires the user to split attention. That act of splitting attention alone might lead to depression.• Social media use might make too a lot of friendships for a person to adequately maintain. This could cause particular hurt to introverts.• There are not clear norms regarding social media. Living in an ambiguous social environment is likely to cause stress. It could be the ambiguity itself that is to blame.• Social media might restrict people to expressing their ideas primarily in words. This may be straining for people who would otherwise prefer to express themselves in other mediums, like art, poetry, music, fashion, etc.I have no evidence for any of the above hypotheses. However, it is really necessary to search evidence-based explanations about why social media causes depression, since the solution is vastly various depending on the cause. Without knowing the cause, a blanket prescription to limit screen time could end up being counterproductive. To use the Atlanta analogy from above, there might be a lot of amazing things about Atlanta that we would miss out on if everyone just avoided it e author also assumes that if teens reduced their screen time, they would increase their more prosocial behavior (exercise, in-person socialization). There is no evidence of this. While the author shows that adults who decreased screen time showed more overall happiness, the author doesn’t have evidence that teens have the same experience. It is very possible that teens who reduce screen time would fill up that time with even more destructive behavior (alcohol, sex, drugs, etc.).The author’s tip to parents is to test to limit teenagers screen time. I think this could be dangerous. As the author herself finds, teenagers live a portion of their lives online. If all teenagers simultaneously changed their behavior, we would probably see amazing outcomes. But if one teenager reduced their social media, texting, and internet use, we don’t really know what would happen in terms of their social ties. If other teenagers in her social group continue to live their lives online, the teenager who abstains from online use would effectively be alienating herself from her entire social group.We need some extra research about social media, the impact of limiting it, its alternatives, and its component parts before we can create blanket recommendations versus e data in this book simply do not exist anywhere else. As a professor who will be teaching this generation for several years to come, I am interested in her findings. As a sociologist, I think that the author missed some opportunities to raise some necessary questions.

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy-and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood-and What That What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2018-5-12 18:1

    With 3 IGen children in our household, this book appealed to me. I know Millennial children - and our children exhibit all their poor habits and more. So I'm glad someone finally noticed that this IGen subset is various and deserves its own category, if only to study them independent of Millennials. We gave cell phones to the kids when they got their drivers licenses - just the cell phones to talk and text; we never bought them intelligent phones at all. When they began working summer jobs, we advised they buy the more inexpensive Ipods in order to avoid the expensive service plans, but they would have none of that. Now as young adults, they are absolutely tethered to their intelligent phones, and their service plans are one of the largest stuff in their monthly budgets (in spite of having WiFi everywhere) so I'm not sure holding them off created any difference at all. And where will this lead? The book ends with a giant question mark. I gave this book 4 stars because I felt the content could have been condensed into a long article - maybe in The Atlantic or the Fresh Yorker. Then again, perhaps I am so spoiled by having a content-rich environment on my own intelligent phone, I no longer see the value in purchasing a book. Sigh...

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy-and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood-and What That What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2018-5-12 18:1

    “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair…”Charles Dickens’ opening for “A Tale of Two Cities” might well have been written yesterday to capture the latest transition between generations, pre to post arrival of modern electronic communication and its impact on human culture.Of course, how memorable the lines are nowadays may depend on the method they are delivered and if that delivery can latest in cyberspace. Not to mention the minds of the an M. Twenge’s 2017 work, “iGen”, is a thought-provoking look into the transition among different generations and their differences from one another, especially with the arrival of the newest group she has dubbed iGen. They are the first group living entirely within the modern technology age completely immersed in the Internet and its tools – intelligent phones, a burgeoning menu of apps and accelerating delivery lying on four huge research-tracking databases, Twenge makes assessments and observations about how this newest generation is various from the its predecessors in ten chapters, mixing private anecdotes with quantitative findings in a comfortable, trim style:• Boomers (1946 – 1964)• GenX (1965 – 1979)• Millennials (1980 – 1994)• iGen (1995 – 2012) – iPhone (2007), iPad (2010), Amazing Recession (2007 – 2010)The author offers beautiful convincing research showing a major shift in iGen attitudes and behavior compared to previous generations:• Taking more time to mature and more time spent with parents and at home compared to earlier generations, hence, slower to mature for social experiences event earlier for prior generations (sex, drugs, other risk-taking experiences)• More protective parents (Millennials and earlier) who are having families later, hence, lower numbers of children• More time on the Internet, less time in social situations such as going to out-of-home entertainment with mates (an interesting point not raise here: increasing in-home delivery systems threatening retail shopping may play a role as well• Shifting to more visual emphasis in communication and a resulting shorter attention span for verbal or written materials• More susceptible at earlier ages (early high school and middle school) to insecurities arising from Internet contact (number of likes and followers, bullying, private appearances)• More staying safe, less risk taking, more extrinsic value driven (job and future income security possibly due to witnessing the impact of the Amazing Recession on family income and attitudes)• Unsure about future family commitment to having kids and being married though comfortable with pre-marital sex• Accepting of LGBT and certain minority groups but based more on allow people be what they wish to be (as long as iGen doesn’t have to create a commitment)Two of the most interesting, contradictory observations Twenge makes have small to do with electronic media and devices. First is the rising need for “safe places” among iGen students to protect themselves from radically various views even at the expense of free speech guarantees. The author provides several examples of college students demanding speakers with radical views be disinvited by college administrators (and succeeding).Second is the appreciation of political independence that reflects more of the iGen attitude toward their belief and mantra: “be yourself.” This fundamental value showed up in the younger people voting for the individualistic candidates – Trump and Sanders – in the 2016 national election.A February 2018 Scientific American article, “Are intelligent phones really destroying the adolescent brain?” weighed in on this subject. Using Twenge’s views about electronic and social media usage as an example of an overreaction to teen preoccupation with these fresh tools and culture, the author provided opposing views from different professors and academics.While this singling out is a convenient foil for an opposing position, the author seems to have ignored Twenge’s observations about iGen life beyond these tools,Her book indicates other factors at play in contributing to iGen’s development, e.g. working parents, smaller families, possibly overprotection of the next generation. All of these, not just social media and its tools, may be mutually reinforcing with predictably dubious development results for the next e author concludes her book with practical suggestions for parents, relatives and mates about helping iGen members to come of age and take advantage of their positive values. Not surprisingly, the key point is making more effort and time for communication and interaction – in person.Take a moment to read “iGen”and see where you come out on these timely issues.

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy-and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood-and What That What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2018-5-12 18:1

    Wow. This is the most comprehensive tutorial you will search on the culture and attitudes of iGen - those born between e author, writing in a clear, engaging, and easily understandable style, identifies 10 locations in which the iGen radically differs from their generational predecessors when they were the same age. These range from attidues toward work, religion, sex (more suprising than you might think), family, tolerance and lled from statistics gathered from 11 million people, the book tracks the changes in attitudes among young people in these locations starting from the 1970s and on. The most radical shift in attitudes has accured with the emergence of the iGen. While the author doesn't explicitly link the advent and ubiquity of smartphones to these cultural changes - she does frequently tip at it - there is small room for doubt that this is the is book is an perfect addition to the growing body of literature highlighting this issue, like Glow Kids, by Dr. Nicholas Kardaras; Irresistible, by Adam Alter; Reclaiming Conversation, by Sherry Turkle and The Huge Disconnect by Catherine Steiner-Adair (I highly recommend all of these books).This book should be needed reading for every parent and educator who wants to understand their kids and perhaps do something to reverse some of the more disturbing and frightening trends in their homes and communities.

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy-and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood-and What That What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2018-5-12 18:1

    I appreciate the wealth of data and objective research that leads any sane rational person to conclude that intelligent phones and fresh technology are having a very negative impact on the lives and minds of teenagers.I think the author makes a poignant case that Igen generation is being raised in a cocoon insulated from true life experiences and trading in true life experiences for virtual Life is book also has a powerful anthropological bent because it shows you how the culture of teenagers is manifested and how it's various from previous generations. As a therapist I really like this book and recommend it to all Educators and people that work with adolescents

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy-and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood-and What That What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2018-5-12 18:1

    As the parent of a 21-yr old, I found it comforting that the immaturity and dependence on parents that concern me about my daughter are as much about her generation as it is about her personally. I've only read the first few pages, but think it will provide the structure for some amazing discussions with her.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    I am one of those people who love animals (especially dogs) more than I do most people so I was really drawn to this book. I thought it would be another warm fuzzy, light read kind of book that I'd speed through but it ended up being more cerebral, in-depth and educational than I expected and I really enjoyed reading it. It had so a lot of facts about the history of pets that I had no idea about before reading this book. I kept reading parts of it out loud to my spouse because I'd search it so interesting.I'm glad I got a possibility to read it and for me it exceeded my expectations. For some others though I can see the potential for it not meeting them because the cover and title (at least to me) does give off the impression of a lighter read than it is.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    "Dogs love their friends... quite unlike people, who are incapable of pure love and always have to mix love and hate." - Sigmund FreudWe love them. We pamper them. We overspend on them, and when they leave us, it is loneliness like we have never known. They provide us real unconditional love. I can personally attest that my experience with animals, most recently with raising and then losing our 18 year old German Shepherd, was the most attractive and rewarding experience and a bond I will never forget as long as I live.Early on in Bradshaw's book, he grapples and refrains for the overuse, or perhaps misuse, of certain labels such as "pet," "companions," "owners," "pet parent," and even "caregiver." The reason is, that words can't seem to describe our "pets" and we can't circumscribe their significance to us with any label. Our relationship with our animals is coded in our DNA and we venture through the history and evolution of our working animals and hunting with them, to domesticated companions in "The Animals Among Us," you will explore fresh insights such as how Pet-based therapy seems to have positive effects on Autistic children, the reverence of cats in ancient Egypt, popular personalities and their pets, how grieving and death effects us and other in various parts of the globe and much is book will support you discover and reflect on our rich history with our animals and the benefits their unconditional love brings to us. There is no question that "pets" create us more human and Bradshaw's fresh book explains why in significant detail.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    This book was everything I had hoped it would be and more. Gosh, I do love animals and always have to have a cat or two living with me. So when it comes to books about pets and people, I'm all over it. I so enjoyed reading this book and it actually created me feel even closer to my furry feline adshaw did a unbelievable job writing this book with amazing flow, words that translated into photos dancing in my head, and so much more. It's a hard to place down book and one I could have just kept on reading if there were more pages to read. It's that p, this is a very unique book that anyone with animals sharing their lives would enjoy.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    John Bradshaw’s THE ANIMALS AMONG US discusses the relationships humankind has with animals of all kinds, with an emphasis on dogs and cats. This work is extensive; the mail text is about 310 pages, with a preface and an explanation of the conventions Bradshaw uses, such as how he prefers to refer to the humans who care for animals (He explains why he prefers and uses “owner.”) and how and why he does use “it” when the animal’s gender is unknown or perhaps not particularly important. In the back matter, the notes cover about thirty-seven pages. The final copy will be indexed, but my advance copy is not; I’m certain that the index will be thorough as adshaw works as a biologist, and this work probably leads to what I see as some faults with this book. Though thorough, Bradshaw seems to lack a warmth that a lot of people reading a book like this one would want. I felt too much as if I was in his laboratory with him rather than talking with him about and among his pets or mine and how humankind domesticated animals to become pets. Though a clinical tone is appropriate for a scholarly work, that tone seems “off” for a work like I believed this one to be. With two advanced degrees myself, I have read a lot of scholarly papers; this work reminded me of a scholarly paper, not something a pet owner would smile and laugh over. Who did he truly intend as his audience, and what was his purpose?With this in mind, I give THE ANIMALS AMONG US a four-star rating. I do wish to read Bradshaw’s other works, but I think this work misses the tag a small when it comes to his readership and his purpose. It may be perfect for a science department library, but to general readers Bradshaw may come across as a small cold about the animals he claims to care so much about.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    I have long been a sucker for any kind of non-fiction book that looks at the history of the human-animal bond, especially when it comes to dogs. So, naturally, I was quite drawn to this one which is a good, well-researched history of pets. It relies a lot on quantifiable evidence more so than anecdotes and speculation (like this subset of non-fiction sometimes seems to turn to). The formatting of the book with breakouts gives it a more modern flow, though it does break-up the experience if you are reading this cover-to-cover. I think some readers would prefer actual photographs than the detailed drawings, but this didn’t bother me at all. I wouldn’t recommend this as a non-fiction book to read straight-through, as by the ending, it started to feel a bit e historical view of domestication is laid out in an interesting and logical fashion and there are some anecdotes interspersed throughout that liven things up a bit, too. And though the author leans towards the science side, there are still some missing links and steps that are frankly unknowable. But these do not go unacknowledged. And I think that this is handled very well here. I really was quite taken with the idea that there is a genetic link for a “knack” with animals that may run in some families (I know that my grandmother had such a knack for dogs, and it interesting to see which of her six kids share this, and which of her grandchildren also can’t imagine life without a dog). Unlike some books on this topic, it never gets overly preachy or political but it is fascinating and definitely a amazing addition to this subsect of non-fiction!

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    I chose this book to review because I am a die-hard, animal lover. I've always had cats and dogs live with me (along with a few other assorted species) and really can't imagine life without them. I can't tolerate animal cruelty and even watching nature shows where animals slay each other for meal is impossible for me to endure. I've wondered sometimes why I feel so strongly in this zone and chose this book mainly because it delves deeply into the human/pet relationship. A lot of time and effort has been place into it and it fully deserves 5 stars. Besides the expected info about our love and need for companion animals (mainly dogs and cats but other animals are mentioned), some very interesting info and some speculation is given too - such as the need for people to stroke pets. From page 216 - "Perhaps we search stroking our pets so pleasurable because it taps into some half-remembered primate instinct that we can no longer satisfy entirely by touching each other."The book discusses pet assisted therapy for elderly, cats playing with toys are actually hunting in their heads, people who are violent to each other are also violent to animals, does compassion for animals have a genetic component? and much, MUCH more very interesting and enlightening info is given. I don't necessarily believe it all to be true, and some of it is hypothesized, but the source of the hypothications create amazing sense.If you have ever wondered about your relationship with your pet(s), or why people act the method they do concerning their pets and vice-versa, then this book should definitely respond a lot of questions. Warning - some things are not simple to read. I had a hard time in the very beginning about people eating animals especially dogs and cats. The fact that millions of dogs and cats are consumed annually makes me sick to think about it.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    Attractive book in so a lot of ways. I am a senior gal and have always been around animals and having been raised on a cattle ranch in OR I learned the harshness and responsibility of loving them. I can't imagine my life without a dog or cat to dote on. I have loved them so fiercely I cried more at their loss than any human in my life. Seriously.I could not wait to read this book and while there were some parts I had to skim over, just because some sections of how animals live and what happens to them and who eats them is something I know about but prefer not to read about. Can't handle the Animal Planet or National Geo when that topic is shown either. This book is exceptionally well written and reading it makes you think. Makes you realize some things you thought were fact, are is a book I intend to read again. There is a part about why we pet animals. Why we feel we need to. I immediately thought of a middle of the night asthma attack I had a lot of years ago. I was alone waiting for the EMT's to take me to the hospital and I was panicking because the attack was so poor and I was scared. Out of nowhere came my 15 yr old Lhasa Apso who was blind. He place his head in my lap and I just began stroking him and thinking about brushing him over and over until the EMT's showed up and everything turned out much better than it could have had I gone into a full blown panic attack. My Sam kept that from happening. In reading the book I understood more about what happened that night.When I left home for college method back when my grandmother told me to never trust anyone who did not like animals because that meant something human was lacking inside themselves and over the years that has proven to be so true, both with men and women.I loved this book.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    A few years ago I read a discussion among book lovers gently mocking the readers of books about pets. The main question being asked was why waste time on the topic when there is so much unbelievable literature, history, etc. to read. The reason for me is simple—the unsolved mystery of non-verbal communication with a various species and the hope of a better understanding of these relationships with pets have been both rewarding and at times a frustrating challenge. The joy and compassion I feel along with the reminder of easy pleasures and to live in the moment without worry have enriched my life, so my effort to optimize our communication is worthy of my time and e author has made a thoughtful, thorough exploration of the subject, and although he is a scientist his approach is broader and more inclusive than might be expected from a biologist. Covering a lot of ground the books explores views of animals in our lives, as food, workers performing different tasks like herding and the value they add to our lives through ded to this is the exploration of how in our interactions our brains assign intentions and then answer to them. This is then deftly blended with info both scientific and anecdotal along with cultural motivations that encourage keeping a e style of writing is engaging, it is simple to become immersed in the text. And, this is not a book that is essential to read from cover to cover, so if any section or chapter is uncomfortable for the reader it may be skipped without penalty. Substantial and valuable addition to the subject.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    As I type this, my dog is lying on the couch watching me type. Naturally, he has feelings about this. I am not petting him, feeding him, or playing with him. This has led to embarrassment that he has been overshadowed by my computer, guilt that he is not a amazing enough pet to be attended to at all times, or maybe to jealousy for which he will later obtain back at my computer by trying to short it out. Or perhaps I'm imagining all of this, and really he is simply lying on the couch wondering when he will be given meal and taken out for a walk. The method we think about our animals, the qualities we believe they hold, and the degree to which we incorporate our animals into our lives are all covered within this series of essays. The essays cover historic and cultural perspectives and differences while pointing out how our lives have changed within the past century, and how pets have been integrated differently with the passage of time. For those who have love for their pets, this fresh text from Bradshaw provides plenty of interesting background.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Create Us Human is a unbelievable book. It relates how we as humans are so tied to our pets and how we consider them as family. Having owned a lot of dogs over the latest forty five years I can attest to that. There are so a lot of fascinating stories and info throughout this book. Interesting that we treat our pets as kids (I do) and that we are as attracted to a puppy sometimes more so than a human baby. This is a book to read and reread and learn more about our relationships with our pets. I love this book.

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    Happy Glass - Draw A Line: Happy Fun Game review [App]  2019-8-2 13:29

    amazing, amazing android game for mind freshx

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    Happy Glass - Draw A Line: Happy Fun Game review [App]  2019-8-2 13:29

    satisfied glass application has cute features its an awesome application

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    Happy Glass - Draw A Line: Happy Fun Game review [App]  2019-8-2 13:29

    Very nice application and user friendly, the best thing about it is that you have to use your brain and skills in order to complete levels. I recommend the development team.

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    Happy Glass - Draw A Line: Happy Fun Game review [App]  2019-8-2 13:29

    Waoooo this is very interesting game,, it's glass is very cute and the android game is unbelievable

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    Happy Glass - Draw A Line: Happy Fun Game review [App]  2019-8-2 13:29

    ❤❤

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    Hygge: The Danish Secrets of Happiness: How to be Happy and Healthy in Your Daily Life. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:1

    If you are interested in the concept of "hygge" you will love this book! It's an simple read, very informative, contains a lot of interesting ideas for incorporating more hygge into your life. You should test the 21 day challenge and some of Danish meal and drinks what you can search in the book. I also think this book can be a amazing bonus for Christmas.

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    Hygge: The Danish Secrets of Happiness: How to be Happy and Healthy in Your Daily Life. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:1

    Wonderfully written, simply laid out and full of information! Thank you for the possibility to read this. I look forward to studying it and adding the hints to my life!

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    Hygge: The Danish Secrets of Happiness: How to be Happy and Healthy in Your Daily Life. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:1

    Hygge – or ‘hoo-gah’ as it’s pronounced – is a concept of living that is taking over Ig feeds across the globe. Danish for cosiness – well, sort of, there is no direct translation – hygge represents a truly Scandinavian method of Thoresen explains, ‘hygge can be used to refer to all aspects of life in the form of a noun, verb or adjective to describe someone that falls under the hygge concept’.And that concept is one that this book goes to discover within various aspects of Western life: home, work, relationships, meal and drink, and activities.Hygge is a fast read, something that takes you through the very basics of the lifestyle, making it a amazing introduction to the concept for someone who has never heard of it. It’s the ideal ‘Hygge For rsonally, I have been interested – bordering on sceptical – in the concept of ‘hygge’ for a year or so, but have never really taken the time to search out more. Aside from scrolling through the hygge-sters’ social media feeds of taupe blankets, cups of steaming coffee and pristine IKEA-style apartments (which I like!), I have never really considered how the concept of hygge could work outside the home or how it can be embraced in family oresen’s book is brilliant at addressing what hygge actually means and how it works on a day-to-day level. Her style of writing is clear, informative and functional – taking hygge to its very nature.A point I found particularly (and personally) interesting is when the principles of hygge are discussed at the begin of the book: ‘Choose to talk about the amazing things instead of voicing complaints, and look for sources of amazing news’. Linking back to social media, I know I can search it difficult to think positively in the sea of angry, political tweets. The reminder that we actually have some power to curate what we read is e book covers lots of hints to achieve a sense of hygge in even the busiest, more distracted of lifestyles. Some are easier to experience than others. The key points are ‘pleasure’ and ‘comfort’, with a true importance on spending time with those you love with the minimum of distractions, which describes my ideal r those who do have some knowledge of hygge, this book may not feature anything new, but it’s a speedy refresher on its principles, with so a lot of ideas for family ed on Whispering Stories Book Blog*I received a free copy of this book, which I voluntarily reviewed

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    Hygge: The Danish Secrets of Happiness: How to be Happy and Healthy in Your Daily Life. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:1

    Hygge is a lifestyle that brings happiness and a sense of cozy contentment. Imagine sitting on a couch sipping hot apple cider while candles flicker softly on your table as you read a comforting book while listening to calming music. This for me is Hygge.If you have pets however you will wish to take precautions with candles. Hold them out of reach. Since I have cats I use battery operated candles now and that solves the whole ere is also some tip in this book about how to have better relationships. And there are some amazing parenting is book really has easy ideas that anyone can incorporate into their everyday existence. After reading this book I created Scandinavian Meatballs for dinner and drank a cup of calming tea while reading in bed. So even if you just do one or two things the book suggests it will be worth e only thing I'd say not to do is not to watch a sunrise or sunset too closely. I hear it is not a amazing idea to look into the sun.~The Rebecca ReviewI borrowed this book from the Kindle Unlimited program. The author did alert me to her book and I'm glad she did because I loved it.

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    Hygge: The Danish Secrets of Happiness: How to be Happy and Healthy in Your Daily Life. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:1

    I search this book interesting! I had never heard of the Danish concept of hygge before this book, but I have to say I absolutely love this book. The easy line drawings by the author finds throughout the book were delightful. They were a reminder that hygge is about easy things. And I gained a better definition of what hygge is from this book, and learned it isn't just for winter, but all year long. I would love to recommend this book!

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    Hygge: The Danish Secrets of Happiness: How to be Happy and Healthy in Your Daily Life. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:1

    The book "Hygge. The Danish secrets of Happiness" offers a short and sweet overview of the concept of Hygge and provides ideas that support one implement the concept in one's daily life. The thought of making life better and more enjoyable through little lifestyle changes is very appealing. There definitely are some nice hints in the book such as Hygge at home and work, Hygge in relationships not just with others but with yourself, how can you incorporate Hygge in various seasons and holidays. I also started the 21-day challenge and hope it will lead me to more satisfied and enjoyable life.

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    Hygge: The Danish Secrets of Happiness: How to be Happy and Healthy in Your Daily Life. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:1

    I didn't know a lot about hygge but was curious. So I found this book. I don't know why I choose this one, maybe I like the cover and the feeling it gives to is written in a really nice relaxing style. When I was reading it I felt comfortable and is books gives you the description of main hygge commandments. I love the 21 day challenge in the end of the book, I enjoyed it so much. Even created my best mate do it with me.I would like this book to have more info about hygge style but still rate it 5 stars as I enjoyed it so much.

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    Hygge: The Danish Secrets of Happiness: How to be Happy and Healthy in Your Daily Life. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:1

    This was the excellent book to introduce my mates to the concept of hygge! Concise and to the point. No photos. I created hygge boxes for bonuses and everyone saw the book first and were very excited to read the book as well as have fun the contents to experience the joy of hygge.

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    Hygge: The Danish Secrets of Happiness: How to be Happy and Healthy in Your Daily Life. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:1

    Fast read with dozens of amazing tip on living a better and more rewarding life. Nice layout, well organized and well written.

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    Hygge: The Danish Secrets of Happiness: How to be Happy and Healthy in Your Daily Life. review [Book]  2017-12-28 18:1

    The secrets and ways to be satisfied are here in this tutorial book. I loved it. Highly recommended!

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    US Police Cop Chase : US Navy Ship Games review [App]  2019-7-19 13:14

    police speed boat

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    US Police Cop Chase : US Navy Ship Games review [App]  2019-7-19 13:14

    Police pursuit ship

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    US Police Cop Chase : US Navy Ship Games review [App]  2019-7-19 13:14

    amazing

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    Unveiling Happiness: Discover the keys to creating happiness within yourself, at work and in your relationships review [Book]  2018-4-16 18:0

    Amazing book on happiness. I really enjoyed the read, the only part I found a small drab was the section on physical health. That's only because the info is easily available. Everything else struck me as special and very well written.

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    Unveiling Happiness: Discover the keys to creating happiness within yourself, at work and in your relationships review [Book]  2018-4-16 18:0

    I was given a review copy and I absolutely love this book! The book opens with a story of a funeral. A bunch of employees attend the funeral to mourn the death of their happiness. He then goes on to explain how we are responsibility for our happiness or lack of happiness. The keys are placed in a logical order that makes complete sense and is simple to follow.

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    Unveiling Happiness: Discover the keys to creating happiness within yourself, at work and in your relationships review [Book]  2018-4-16 18:0

    This book lists 6 keys Brady has identified as the most necessary to unveiling happiness. Once you obtain to the end of the book, he explains how these keys are all connected and the rationale behind the order of these keys. At this point, everything created complete sense.

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    Unveiling Happiness: Discover the keys to creating happiness within yourself, at work and in your relationships review [Book]  2018-4-16 18:0

    I was given a review copy. Initially, I felt sceptical about the book, because I do not ordinarily read of lot of non-fiction, but I am so glad I did. It's filled with little, helpful suggestions. Now to place this book to practice.

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    Unveiling Happiness: Discover the keys to creating happiness within yourself, at work and in your relationships review [Book]  2018-4-16 18:0

    Astonishing read for beautiful much anyone. The small stories to emphasize the author's point created this a very enjoyable read. This is an honest review in exchange for a review copy.

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    Unveiling Happiness: Discover the keys to creating happiness within yourself, at work and in your relationships review [Book]  2018-4-16 18:0

    I've actually written down all the keys and hold a post-it note on my PC to serve as a reminder of what I need to focus on whenever I feel down. This is an ARC review.

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    Unveiling Happiness: Discover the keys to creating happiness within yourself, at work and in your relationships review [Book]  2018-4-16 18:0

    This was an simple read and more importantly, helpful, which is what you look for in a amazing non-fiction book.

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    Unveiling Happiness: Discover the keys to creating happiness within yourself, at work and in your relationships review [Book]  2018-4-16 18:0

    Practical and simple to follow suggestions to 'unlock' happiness within. Amazing book

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    Unveiling Happiness: Discover the keys to creating happiness within yourself, at work and in your relationships review [Book]  2018-4-16 18:0

    This has to be one of the best self-help books I've read in a very long time

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    Unveiling Happiness: Discover the keys to creating happiness within yourself, at work and in your relationships review [Book]  2018-4-16 18:0

    One of the best self-help books Solid tip and simple to follow

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    I learned Nothing and it keeped on zooming in on random things and everytime you obtain it right an loud noise pops up and what if someone with autsim is playing this they would be scared poor android game ;-;

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    It's a beautiful amazing application but it doesn't tell you your score at the end. Since it doesn't tell you how you did, you test to pay attention more to what you missed while you are taking the try which is a bit of a distraction. Otherwise beautiful good.

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    I want you had challenge levels in the android game than just only 10 questions at. A time Like if you obtain 10 right you go to 20...then 30 and so forth.

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    method too a lot of adds, not good graphics, colouring of the states is very confusing as part of michigan is one color and the other part is a various color.

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    I like it alot. It helps to study for huge try

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    I was trying to support my daughter learn the northeast but it didn't have that option so that you could do the states in certain regions.

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    I pooped on my face when playing this android game

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    This application is helping me as an adult learn about the states privately on my phone. I also play android games with my granddaughter using this app.

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    I love this! Before I was only getting 11/50 and now I'm almost 100%!

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    It is a fun method to learn the state and captials. The downside is that there is no downside.

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    Not very amazing

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    It has support me learn my states so far

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    Ads suck

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    Very simple to have fun this android game

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    It's a huge support 😁

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    create you learn your states much better😊😊😊😊😊😊

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    Perfect quiz.

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    Yes

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    Awesome!

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    Beautiful amazing

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    Very amazing

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    Muito bom, adorei, só faltou uns gráficos que apontem a performance, mas eles não são tão fundamentais, o application funciona muito bem e cumpre seu papel.

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    US Map Quiz - 50 States Quiz - US States Quiz review [App]  2019-1-24 21:58

    Liked the android game but the ads were completely inappropriate for my 5th grader.

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