The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo(Pulitzer Prize for Biography) Reviews & Opinions


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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo(Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    I was unaware of the wonderful and almost superhuman life of General Alexander Dumas and its significance during the French Revolution and later the dictator Napoleon's reign. It is a shocking expose of freeing all peoples of color and then after using their spirit of freedom and hope to conquer their opponents are then stripped of that freedom and forced into third class citizenry and slavery again.Dumas is a battle hero! His exploits are written of and celebrated until the end when Napolean turns back the clock and reinforces systematic racism. This is one of the best history books I've read....kept my interest throughout the reading.I would definitely recommend to readers if history..... It was a real eye opener for e most striking thing about this is the likeness to modern day thinking and generally accepted norms. It is unsettling and is obviously not an isolated case. It is shameful history!

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo(Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    This belongs on the needed reading list for students of French history. That a stalwart character of fiction could be brought to such a vivid true person existence is enlightening and entertaining. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas has enjoyed a long life on the reading lists of a lot of students. That story was based on the true life experiences of Alexander’s father, fictionalized as the title character, but this work covers the life and times of The Black Count. The son of a white Frenchman and a black slave mother was an asset during his youth, but with the advent of Napolean, his fortunes dwindled and the equality enjoyed by “men of color” were replaced with a French code too close to our own Jim Crow laws. If I could give it six stars, I would.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo(Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    I bought this on recommendation of a seller of another product I purchased on Amazon and loved it. It is a very interesting part of history that most people never hear. It is history but it is also woven in to a nice story that I think is enjoyable just in general. I typically read books and then pass them on simply to avoid having stacks and stacks of books. This one I intend to hold and read again at a later time.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo(Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    A mate recommended this book to me, and I'm so glad she did. On the plus side, I learned, learned, learned. I had no idea that Dumas was part black, had no idea that his father was the son of a slave and a French aristocrat, no idea just how rotten Napolean could be. I learned more about the French revolution than I ever thought I even wanted to know. I learned info about Marie Antoinette, the French military, the oppression of the revolutionary forces.On the minus side, sometimes the writing was ponderous. I had a hard time keeping track of just what year it was, since the author jumped around a bit in time. I was reading on a kindle, so it was more difficult to go back and check when I realized things were a bit "off", at least in my ever, I do recommend the book. If you have to, skim through the more ponderous sections (for me that would be the military details) and you'll still beautiful much obtain the main point, namely that the Black Count was one hell of a leader, one hell of a fighter, one hell of a husband and father (however briefly he was home) and was royally screwed over by Napolean!

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo(Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    I almost didn't buy this book after reading some of the reviews here on Amazon nitpicking different info or, worse yet, suggesting that the book was overly pre-occupied with race--an immediate turnoff for me. I didn't search that to be real at all. It is a fascinating tale about a relatively unknown and uniquely interesting historical figure. It was also an simple method to learn about a part of history with which I was unfamiliar: the circumstances around the French revolution, the Terror, Robespierre, the guillotine and, of course, Napoleon. They are all here in a well-told story that reads like fiction (albeit it with a lot of detail and backstory). If that sort of detail is too much of a distraction for you, then just read James Patterson or Tom Clancy. If you wish to read a 300 page historical book without a single little error, then read....hmmmm......I don't know what. Otherwise, you won't be disappointed with Black Count.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo(Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    This book will change your understanding of a lot of things. #afromations Nehesu Nag-Negus El states that this book was so enjoyable that he could not place it down. the history is so rich that he can see why it would create historians upset by its potential classification. This book is more true than fiction.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo(Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    I'm glad I decided to pick up this book. It an awesome history of a forgotten General of the French Revolution. Mr. Reiss really brought this story to life, I didn't wish to place it down. My only true issue with the book are its lack of pictures, there are some maps but could have been more. I found myself having to stop from time to time to look up photos of people. It could just be my gripe, but when I'm reading about actual happenings and people I like to know that they looked like.I enjoyed reading this book. I have been a fan of Alexandre Dumas books and it was a treat to read about the man who influenced him and the was inspiration for a lot of of his books.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo(Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    I never knew much about Alexander Dumas, much less anything about his father, and I did not know much about the French Revolution. These happenings create for a fascinating read, and the biographical car gives the history much poignancy. The French Revolution led to a lot of enlightened milestones, including the granting of equal rights to blacks, a breakthrough that belatedly inspired rebellion versus France's extremely cruel system of slavery in its West Indies colonies. It also led to the liberation of the Jews from the ghettos, as well as greater rights for minorities, women and commoners wherever volution spread. At the same time, the revolution featured not good arbitrary cruelty and injustice, especially versus the Christian clergy and the wealthy, as guillotines were erected in towns ruled by the revolutionaries. A lot of innocent people were unjustly murdered. When Napoleon took the reins of power, liberty, equality and fraternity tended to be eclipsed by egomania, rank and empire. Of course, after Waterloo, Europe reverted to its old ways as the republican innovations were rescinded. Through it all, Alex Dumas, son of a slave woman and a white planter, Alexander Dumas's father, shone as a beacon of bravery, military brilliance, and fairness, embodying the ideals of the revolution as they were originally meant to be. His career tended to follow the arc of the revolution, ascending rapidly as revolutionary forces advanced, declining as Napoleon arose and corrupted republican practices, and then coming to a poor end as he was imprisoned for years in Italy on his method back from Napoleon's disastrous Egyptian venture, a stint that broke his health. Alexander Dumas based his popular novels on his father's life. The author demonstrates interesting biographical parallels with these works and is to be commended for his tireless and painstaking research efforts in uncovering the documents that enabled him to write this awesome book.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo(Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    This is a fascinating book both from the broader historical perspective and in its careful and detailed exposition of the life of General Dumas - a man of heroic stature (both literally and figuratively) who rose high and then was felled by those who should have valued him most, - particularly Napoleon Bonaparte. The roller coaster saga of the French handling of racial relations is by itself very interesting - and disturbing.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo(Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-13 18:0

    Besides having an exceedingly long title, I think the time was wrong for me to read this book. Wrapped up in other ideas and too much nonfiction reading on my plate, I had a difficult time getting into this book despite the fact that it is actually quite well om the slave-run plantations of Sainte Domingue (now Haiti) through the French Revolution, the Dumas family is traced and linked to every vital episode of the era. The author tells the story of General Dumas and points out happenings that inspired a lot of of the stories later written by his y political problems are thoroughly discussed, from the special French view of slavery to the origination of the terms "left" and "right" when ranking liberals and conservatives. Those who are fans of Alexander Dumas (the younger) and anyone interested in the French Revolution will have fun this deeply researched narrative.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo (Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-18 18:0

    As a historical fiction novelist, I have unique respect for writers of narrative nonfiction. Not only do they do far more exhaustive research, they show it in a manner that reads like fiction. (Perhaps their only disadvantage is that they can’t create things up!) I’ve long been a fan of Erik Larson’s work and can now add Tom Reiss to the list. He shot to fame with The Orientalist, and The Black Count is that rarity, a sensational sophomore effort. His topic is Thomas-Alexandre Dumas (1762-1806), born in Saint-Domingue (Haiti) to a black slave mother and white father. Dumas became one of the most illustrious and daring generals of his day, amazing enough to attract the envy of Napoleon himself. His story is that of the French Revolution, the fresh Republic, black and mixed-race rights in the eighteenth century (not what you might think), and the rise of Napoleon. Reiss’s vivid recreation of the ill-fated Egyptian campaign created my skin crawl, and reading about the War of the Nile was like watching an action movie. Writers of this genre don’t typically add their voice, but I enjoyed Reiss’s private remarks about his find for the amazing general’s past. Dumas has been called the “real” Count of Monte Cristo as written about by his illustrious son, Alexandre Dumas, but his real-life story is far richer and engaging. It’s also high time it was told.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo (Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-18 18:0

    I like history. Actually, I love history. Anything set in the past gives me that delicious “tell me a story” feeling.Of course, I’m not talking about dry facts and figures, although they can be interesting in little doses. Nope, I’m talking about the amazing stuff. People are what bring history alive for me. What did they want; what did they fear? How were they better than me, and even more delightful, how were they worse? Who did they love? Who hated them? Allow me share in their triumphs and create me dread their disasters. For amazing or ill, create me care that this person lived and died. Create them live again for ’s not too much to ask, is it?Obviously, not for Tom Reiss. In writing The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the True Count of Monte Cristo, he’s succeeded admirably. Don’t just take my word for it; I sure wouldn’t. But if you place any stock in a small prize established by a man named Pulitzer, then you might wish to check this book out. Especially if you know and love the work of General Alex Dumas’ son, Alexandre Dumas (pere). Stories like The Three Musketeers and The Count of Monte Cristo, both of which were inspired by the author’s spectacular father, General Alex ah, I went there. Spectacular is kind of a wimpy word when it comes to General Alex Dumas. He was the original Superman. A man too strong, too principled, too kind, too charismatic, too handsome—too amazing to be true. And yet he was truly that man. Others have complained in their reviews that Reiss’ bias toward his topic was too apparent, but I am amazed that anyone could read of General Alex Dumas’ life and not be besotted by ilty!Read this book. Meet General Alex Dumas. To know him is to love him. Don’t believe me. Believe his son, who immortalized his exploits, his bravery, and his humanity in the best method he knew te Thomas-Alexandre Davy de la Pailleterie, who served his country as General Alex Dumas. I want I would have known him in life, but after reading The Black Count, somehow I feel I do.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo (Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-18 18:0

    A mate recommended this book to me, and I'm so glad she did. On the plus side, I learned, learned, learned. I had no idea that Dumas was part black, had no idea that his father was the son of a slave and a French aristocrat, no idea just how rotten Napolean could be. I learned more about the French revolution than I ever thought I even wanted to know. I learned info about Marie Antoinette, the French military, the oppression of the revolutionary forces.On the minus side, sometimes the writing was ponderous. I had a hard time keeping track of just what year it was, since the author jumped around a bit in time. I was reading on a kindle, so it was more difficult to go back and check when I realized things were a bit "off", at least in my ever, I do recommend the book. If you have to, skim through the more ponderous sections (for me that would be the military details) and you'll still beautiful much obtain the main point, namely that the Black Count was one hell of a leader, one hell of a fighter, one hell of a husband and father (however briefly he was home) and was royally screwed over by Napolean!

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo (Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-18 18:0

    I was unaware of the wonderful and almost superhuman life of General Alexander Dumas and its significance during the French Revolution and later the dictator Napoleon's reign. It is a shocking expose of freeing all peoples of color and then after using their spirit of freedom and hope to conquer their opponents are then stripped of that freedom and forced into third class citizenry and slavery again.Dumas is a battle hero! His exploits are written of and celebrated until the end when Napolean turns back the clock and reinforces systematic racism. This is one of the best history books I've read....kept my interest throughout the reading.I would definitely recommend to readers if history..... It was a real eye opener for e most striking thing about this is the likeness to modern day thinking and generally accepted norms. It is unsettling and is obviously not an isolated case. It is shameful history!

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    Is this review useful?

    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo (Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-18 18:0

    This belongs on the needed reading list for students of French history. That a stalwart character of fiction could be brought to such a vivid true person existence is enlightening and entertaining. The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexander Dumas has enjoyed a long life on the reading lists of a lot of students. That story was based on the true life experiences of Alexander’s father, fictionalized as the title character, but this work covers the life and times of The Black Count. The son of a white Frenchman and a black slave mother was an asset during his youth, but with the advent of Napolean, his fortunes dwindled and the equality enjoyed by “men of color” were replaced with a French code too close to our own Jim Crow laws. If I could give it six stars, I would.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo (Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-18 18:0

    I almost didn't buy this book after reading some of the reviews here on Amazon nitpicking different info or, worse yet, suggesting that the book was overly pre-occupied with race--an immediate turnoff for me. I didn't search that to be real at all. It is a fascinating tale about a relatively unknown and uniquely interesting historical figure. It was also an simple method to learn about a part of history with which I was unfamiliar: the circumstances around the French revolution, the Terror, Robespierre, the guillotine and, of course, Napoleon. They are all here in a well-told story that reads like fiction (albeit it with a lot of detail and backstory). If that sort of detail is too much of a distraction for you, then just read James Patterson or Tom Clancy. If you wish to read a 300 page historical book without a single little error, then read....hmmmm......I don't know what. Otherwise, you won't be disappointed with Black Count.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo (Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-18 18:0

    This is the awesome real story of Alexander Dumas - but not the Alexander Dumas so popular for writing 'The Man in the Iron Mask' and 'The Count of Monte Cristo. It's about the author's father (of the same name), who's life was the basis for a lot of of his son's most popular novels. [for clarity I will use 'Alex' to refer to the father and 'Alexander' for the son from here on]Alex Dumas was born a black slave in the Dominican Republic, the son of a slave who was used and tossed aside, one of many, by a shiftless French aristocrat who was broke and on the run. This book is the story of how he created his method to France, becoming a towering giant of a man, reputedly so powerful that he could mount a horse, grab an overhead beam in the stable, and lift himself and the horse off the ground.While this is doubtless a myth, it was one that was widely told in his day, and indicates the kind of power and presence that Alex projected as he rose to become one of the most popular French generals of his time, ultimately accompanying Napoleon on his ill fated invasion of Egypt as the General of the though the book is meticulously researched and references historical documents frequently, it still manages to read like a fiction thriller. Author Tom Reiss also uses notes and comments from Alex's son about his father to add a fascinating inter generational reflection on the times and life of Alex is book is an easy, fun read, and I highly recommend it to anyone with an interest in Napoleon, the French Revolution, slavery and abolitionism, or the roots of today's Dominican Republic.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo (Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-18 18:0

    I bought this on recommendation of a seller of another product I purchased on Amazon and loved it. It is a very interesting part of history that most people never hear. It is history but it is also woven in to a nice story that I think is enjoyable just in general. I typically read books and then pass them on simply to avoid having stacks and stacks of books. This one I intend to hold and read again at a later time.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo (Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-18 18:0

    This book will change your understanding of a lot of things. #afromations Nehesu Nag-Negus El states that this book was so enjoyable that he could not place it down. the history is so rich that he can see why it would create historians upset by its potential classification. This book is more true than fiction.

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    The Black Count: Glory, Revolution, Betrayal, and the Real Count of Monte Cristo (Pulitzer Prize for Biography) review [Book]  2018-2-18 18:0

    I'm glad I decided to pick up this book. It an awesome history of a forgotten General of the French Revolution. Mr. Reiss really brought this story to life, I didn't wish to place it down. My only true issue with the book are its lack of pictures, there are some maps but could have been more. I found myself having to stop from time to time to look up photos of people. It could just be my gripe, but when I'm reading about actual happenings and people I like to know that they looked like.I enjoyed reading this book. I have been a fan of Alexandre Dumas books and it was a treat to read about the man who influenced him and the was inspiration for a lot of of his books.

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    Count My Eggs review [App]  2018-1-3 13:9

    Can only go to 9 eggs a day if I know that wouldn't have paid for it I would of got the free application disappointed

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    Count 'Em Up review [App]  2018-1-18 13:0

    Unbelievable android game by ICE Development. Addicting, fun, and ready to learn. Amazing for the fast study break, street trip, or tournament with friends. Would recommend to all ages!

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    Counting Us review [App]  2018-1-20 13:7

    Tired of counting your homeless on pen and paper? Aren't we all! Amazing app, and with the fresh formatting adjustments and offline form submissions you just can't go wrong!

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    Counting Us review [App]  2018-1-20 13:7

    My go-to application for my Point in Time homeless census needs.

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    Count Three and Pray review [Movie]  2017-10-13 21:51

    The Punching Preacher. Count Three and Pray is directed by George Sherman and written by Herb Meadow. It stars Van Heflin, Joanne Woodward, Raymond Burr, Phillip Carey and Allison Hayes. A CinemaScope/Technicolor production, melody is by George Duning and cinematography by Burnett Guffey. At first glance it appears to be a movie about a poor man finding his faith and coming amazing in the face of adversity, but there are a lot of more strings to this particular bow. Even if it never quite reaches greatness. Story has Heflin as Luke Fargo, a man who before the Civil Battle was something of a hell raiser, he loved women, he loved to drink, and he loved to fight. While serving in the battle he was emotionally scarred by what he witnessed at The War of Vicksburg, he decided then that a change in his life trajectory was required. The bite here is that Fargo, a Southerner, fought for the North because that was the political side he believed in. So upon returning to his Southern hometown, he's persona non grata, a major issue since he wants to spread the gospel and cast off his previous sins. His efforts are further complicated when he locates himself to the derelict - ramshackle - church and parsonage, to search living there is a feisty orphan girl called Lissy (Woodward), a sharpshooting tomboy with fire in her belly. Right from the off we search Fargo having to reach back to his hellfire club days, forced to brawl when confronted with outright hostility that's being instigated by self appointed city leader Yancey Huggins (Burr on splendidly nasty form). Oh there is plenty of God fearing folk in the city who desperately wish to have the church up and running again, they wish to give Luke a chance, but there's the constant feeling that a leopard never changes its spots, something that is further compounded by the attention Luke receives from the city "madam" (Jean Willes). While the fact that Luke is living under the same roof as young Lissy sets tongues a wagging, unhealthily so. Luke valiantly ploughs on, but his unorthodox methods are sure to be used versus him... As the relationship between Lissy and himself develops, you sense quite early on how things are going to pan out, but the by-play between Heflin and Woodward is amazing viewing. Initially you would be forgiven for thinking that Woodward's hero is going to be greatly annoying, but Woodward quickly dispels those fears to deliver a quite unbelievable portrayal of a wastrel who is unaware she herself needs guidance. Heflin also is amazing value, a true mixed bag of emotions, lurching from tough to vulnerable with consummate ease. We could have done with a bit more of Burr's villainy up front and center, while Hayes' (yummy!) treacherous femme comes off as under written, but the main characterisations are powerful enough to help the thematics. Nicely photographed around the Agoura Hills zone of California by ace lensman Guffey, it's a pleasing production visually. Aurally the musical score provided by Duning has the requisite sedate and bluster moments, though fans of the original Star Trek TV present may search themselves suddenly whisked off on the Enterprise, Duning would clearly rework his score here for Kirk and Spock's adventures. Woodward playing a gal 7 years younger than she actually was asks us for some leeway, while the ending is to my mind a stretch too far, but this is an enjoyable experience for Heflin and Woodward fans. There's amazing action with knuckles (on a Sunday no less!) and horse racing, and plenty of breezy humour as well, making this a picture that's not quite a hidden gem, but definitely worthy of consideration by the Oater loving crowd. 7/10

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Had a few issues initially, the same as Helena mentions below. It's not immediately clear where underneath the 'location description' request that you enter your text, it's actually at the very bottom of the screen. Although I could swear I had tried that zone a few times, eventually allowed me to enter information and move on. All functioning well now. A lot of submissions created with no further issues to date.

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Tried to type in the optional box at the end, but when I tried to use spell check the application threw me out. In the end I just left the wrong spelling and it seemed to work.

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Downloaded the application but I am unable to add any info such as a brief description, so I can't past the first page 🤔 please help?

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Very simple to use, but did not contain other species we saw during our count as i live on a river and obtain a wide dozens there. Perhaps this can be expanded in future versions of the app?

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Application worked great, its helped us learn the correct names for some 'Brown Butterflies'. Larger butterfly photos may help. Amazing necessary job in a world of too a lot of people. Well done

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    What a allow down. Doesn't remember your latest location. Most people will sit monitoring in same place. Putting device(s) onto auto zone the map on app only shows where you are but doesn't place the apps red zone pin in that point. Application doesn't remember what you've named the zone you're monitoring in. So, sadly, it's too much like hard work. I've place 1 sighting in and think I'll uninstall now.

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Fantastic, easy, and so important! I think the ID chart could be a bitbetter (they all look the same size?) and wd be amazing to access it from inside the app.

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    The calendar would not allow me choose a previous day when i did the count

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Couldn't obtain the zone to work. No option to write in or use phone location. Couldn't obtain past this stage.

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Was ok but thought it would require less of my info and should have a timer to count the 15 mins .

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    It won't allow me enter a description of zone but won't allow me move on without one.

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    As a nature lover, this is a amazing tool to support us understand our wildlife and the issues it faces

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Cannot enter a description of the zone and so cannot move on to add details

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Can't see why people are having any issues with it it's straightforward & easy to use & record any sightings

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    I love to do my bit to support with all wild life and this application is one method you can help.

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Promoting conservation of butterflies do the right thing and download it😀

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Brilliant method of improving my knowledge of butterflies and making us all aware of how a lot of butterflies are around us.

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Amazing Application to obtain you interested in the smaller things in your garden

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Amazing app, really simple to use, and so necessary to track the butterfly Thank you

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Amazing small application and does exactly what you need it to do.

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Necessary for our environment. Want there were more like this.

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Brilliant. Simple to do, amazing layout and a amazing cause. Would do again.

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    support the environment and have fun chasing butterfly x

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    So simple to use and so necessary to do!

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Very simple to use with clear pictures

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    easy to use amazing to identify butterflies

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Fine - does what it needs to!

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    No issues using this application

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Very simple to use.

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Very simple to use

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Amazing Application Amazing Cause

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Simple to use

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Simple to use

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Amazing application

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Amazing fun

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Perfect

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Cool

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Fast try suggests it's usable once you obtain used to some quirky user interface. You have to be able to search your zone on a map with no facility to find for a put name or grid reference, quite tricky if you are not entering the data at or near the put the count took place, when you can use GPS (phone location). The default, pre-selected zone is a field somewhere in Oxfordshire; it should be an overview map of UK that is ready to zoom in on, with no zone selected. Maybe that Oxfordshire zone will have a disproportionate number of sightings?

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Being out in the sticks I had no issue with the zone as it looks a tad special from above! My only slight moan is that I'd like to be able to scroll back through my comments at the end to correct anything. Couldn't do that on my Moto G3.

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    Big Butterfly Count review [App]  2018-7-21 21:8

    Irritating having to move zone point. Always starts overa100 miles from my selected point. I did the bee count . Much easier quicker and more info back. Eg sitings in local zone etc. Only carrying on as it's important. However I feel a lot of would be place off by little problems which are really irritating every time enter application . 😔

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    Candybots Numbers 123 Counting review [App]  2017-11-21 13:8

    Amazing d remebers the almost all the numbers.

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    Hey Duggee: The Counting Badge review [App]  2017-11-27 13:0

    Really lovely fun app. Bit of a glitch when trying to exit - it asks "are you sure?" but when you select yes nothing happens. Also its one continuous android game with various activities. My son isn't quite 3 so can only do some of the primary counting ones. I was expecting you to be able to select various android games so you could pick for your child's abilities ie pick counting for a young kid or adding for an older child. But still fun and well designed.

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    Pro Card Counting Academy review [App]  2018-3-8 13:9

    Used it to play online live dealer blackjack. It had paid for itself a lot of times over. I highly recommend it.

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    Pro Card Counting Academy review [App]  2018-3-8 13:9

    Created so much cash using this

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    Pro Card Counting Academy review [App]  2018-3-8 13:9

    I've been playing blackjack for 15 years and this application is a android game changer!

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    Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? (Black Panther (2005-2008)) review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:2

    Amazing story - origin of the Black Panther, amazing illustrating by Romita Jr., amazing use of some of Marvel's classic villains. Amazing introduction for thos who don't know the Black Panther & wish to learn about him before the film comes out. The DVD ver is very good. My local library has ordered in the prose novel based on this. Can't wait to read it! Recommend this classic..

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    Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? (Black Panther (2005-2008)) review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:2

    This graphic novel was the first Black Panther book I've ever read. I read a 4-issue miniseries a long time ago, but it didn't leave much of an impression on me because I've forgotten what the story was even about(I think it was about someone, a cop I think, named Casper Cole taking on the role of Black Panther and fighting corruption on the roads in America). Needless to say, it was not the classic Black Panther that this story is about. This Black Panther, T'Challa of Wakanda(a little independent country in Africa that is both a tribal and simultaneously more technologically advanced nation than any other in the world), is WAY various and MUCH cooler! I have read books with T'Challa in them before, but never one where he was the central hero of the story. And what a heck of a story it e story is an origin story and a suspenseful, political, action-thriller about revenge and power - those who have it, and those who wish it. I won't go into the info of the plot, so don't worry, no spoilers here. What I will do is comment on the quality of the story in both the writing and the rst, the writing. Reginald Hudlin, coming from the film industry, does a nice job in weaving together a history for both the Black Panther and the nation of Wakanda, while telling an intriguing action-thriller that moves at a quick pace which rarely lets up. His movie-making influence can be felt here in the best possible way. His history makes for an perfect transition into telling this story in a wonderfully cinematic fashion. You could see this as a film quite easily. In fact, Marvel Knights DID create this into an animated movie/motion comic. This leads me to the hn Romita, Jr.(a favorite of mine) contributes heavily to the cinematic look and feel of this book. Although the panel layouts are of the simple, classic kind(there are no panels-within-panels/overlapping panels, or non-square/rectangle panels to be found here), which is typical of JRJR's stuff, there is still that feeling of watching a film unfold before your eyes. I search that this is the case with much of his works(see "Daredevil: The Man Without Fear", "[email protected]#$%", or "The Wonderful Hulk v.1: Return of the Monster"). If you aren't familiar with his style, I would describe it as highly tangible. That is to say, it is clearly intelligible. It isn't elusive in any way. It's very straightforward and simplistic. That doesn't mean that it isn't stylized. You could have 100 artists draw the same page, and I could pick his out with ease. His look is both cartoonish and realistic in nature. And his characters have a somewhat blocky nature to them. I happen to like this aspect and think that it works well for him. The amount of detail in his panels is modest, yet he hits all the right notes to sell the reality of the scene. His close-ups, for example, are typically absent of any background elements entirely(aside from a solitary color). He chooses, rather wisely(for HIS style anyway), to emphasize the main focus of the scene; be it an apologetic yet uneasy expression on the face of a prostitute declining a proposition from a customer to let him to kiss her in exchange for added cash; or the photo of two hands - one, the customer's holding out a wad of hundreds, the other the prostitute's, reluctantly outstretched in acceptance of the money - completing the foreboding transaction of which she had just previously declined. JRJR is a master storyteller. He makes even small things like this palpable. And his action sequences? ere were a couple of things that were drawbacks. One was the fact that beautiful much all of the non-Wakandans in the story tended to be portrayed in a rather negative light. I understand that Hudlin was trying to establish that Wakanda was not only technologically advanced, but also socially and morally advanced as well. You can agree or disagree with this premise, but although I think Hudlin may have pushed a small too hard sometimes in trying to validate this stance, I respect his position and I believe that it makes sense within the sociopolitical context of this book. The other thing that detracted from this book was the fast ending. It seemed to end a small too quick for me. But I can live with these things because the overall story is a fun read, and the artwork is great. In the end, I really enjoyed this book. I would recommend it to anyone who is a fan of either JRJR or suspenseful action-thrillers in general.

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    Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? (Black Panther (2005-2008)) review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:2

    I got this because I'm a Black Panther fan, and also because I'm a huge John Romita Jr. fan. Klaus Jansen inks JRJR like no one else can, and for my money, no one else should ink his pencils. The artwork here is very amazing - but lacking something for me. I was trying to figure out why, and I think the book is too dark. Not in storyline, but just in coloring. The older versions if Black Panther have his suit almost a blue color, with lots of massive darks and line work. This gives him a depth and shows off the artistic touches much better than trying to hold him all dark with grays/blacks. JRJR's linework needs to be seen, otherwise his style becomes too blocky and sparse, like cardboard cutouts. The rest of the book is gorgeous, but when it comes to the main character, that's who I wanted to see tricked out in JRJR's e plot was the best in the history of Black Panther yet. It was nice to have him in his country of origin, instead of finding reasons to bring him to huge cities via silly plot twists. I found the tech a small overdone and unexplained, and also the villian was boring and not only named after Inspector Gadget's arch enemy, he had the same gimmicky hand.A solid book for a hero that required it by a amazing team.Look for the animated series on Netflix or DVD - because it's cooler than the book, and I think JRJR's pics came out better in that format. Plus, Captain America's stage figures in much more in the animated series than his too brief treatment here.

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    Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? (Black Panther (2005-2008)) review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:2

    Group of villians invade Wakanda. The leader, Klaw, has history with Tchalla. Ebony blade falls from the hands of the Black Knight during a war in the sky and remains in Wakanda. The country is somewhat damaged by the intruders.

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    Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? (Black Panther (2005-2008)) review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:2

    This collection is a very amazing introduction to the Black Panther and associated aspects of the Marvel universe. Overall it's a fairly straightforward comic tale, but by the end the reader should feel prepared and intrigued to read more stories about Wakanda and the characters introduced here.Fair warning, this is not a Saturday morning cartoon comic. A character's death is the central driver of the story, a handful of other deaths occur along the way, and sometimes the Black Panther values vengeance over virtue. So parents should give it a read before handing it over to young readers.

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    Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? (Black Panther (2005-2008)) review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:2

    This is a quintessential reboot of the Black Panther Character. This brings Wakanda, and The former avenger to the forefront of political and international intrigue. The books ties the past and show together and shows why T'Challa could be a first string is book could very easily translate into a movie. A fun read for a hero who is so often ignored.

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    Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? (Black Panther (2005-2008)) review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:2

    The Black Panther was made in a late-60s fit of conscience. Marvel Comics writers wanted to add a black character to the roster; they saw a news item about some "Black Panther" group scaring white people in California. Boom: The fresh hero had a name, albeit instead of protesting racism in America, he was the superpowered king of a wealthy African dlin has taken a second-tier hero and created him fascinating. In his fresh Panther mythos, the Panther's Wakanda is constantly under siege from arrogant (white) would-be conquerers. One of them, The Klaw, is trying to avenge the shame of his South African forefather, who tried and failed to defeat the Wakandans. He draws blood. He gives the Panther an epic challenge on his home turf. It's a thrilling story that could be turned into a Will Smith car tomorrow. But maybe they'd blow it! Romita's art elevates the story and the action the method some bland CGI never could.

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    Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? (Black Panther (2005-2008)) review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:2

    This is a well written and very interesting story. Really like seeing the rhino in the story. Watching him running through everything is great.

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    Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? (Black Panther (2005-2008)) review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:2

    Perfect book featuring one of my favorite artists. Highly recommend.

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    Black Panther: Who Is The Black Panther? (Black Panther (2005-2008)) review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:2

    Amazing buy. No issues

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    The Goldfinch: A Novel (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction) review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    I won't go into the plot since everyone will know it. My concern whenever I'm given or purchase a very long book is, "Will it hold me engaged?" and is it worth the weeks it will take me to [email protected]#$%!?"The respond with THE GOLDFINCH is "Yes!" and "Sorta!"To me, the book is divided into sections or novellas--the explosion, living with the wealthy family, moving to Vegas, e brilliant opening section immediately kept me engaged--I think the explosion and Theo's experience and recovery is some of the best writing I've read in e family he moves in with may remind you of THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS or Salinger's Glass family. They are funny, a bit tragic and sort of odd. The father especially--something about his behavior seemed a bit "off" as did his wild dialogue; it didn't seem at all "real" in a novel that's very grounded in reality. (It's revealed later why he behaves this way.)The next--and for me, strongest novella--takes put in Las Vegas where we "live" with Theo's father and girlfriend. The writing is vivid, the characters and plot really move along and it's all terrific.And then, for me, THE GOLDFINCH seems to stall a bit and slightly loses its way. This painting that Theo carries with him seems to be forgotten about and then every 100 pages or so is mentioned again (not that we care.)There's a novella about dealing in art (collection and deception) and our character takes a downward turn, but I found myself losing interest and by page 600 was growing impatient for it to end...or for the plot to kick in again as it did in the first few e amazing thing about this book is that you can set it aside for a few days and pick it up again and not be "lost"--the writing and characters are that strong. The "plot" on the other hand seems to grow thinner and less necessary as you head down the latest 200 plus pages as "big issues" are thoughtfully woven in.I'm sure this will keep a lot of 4 and 5 star ratings, but I'm giving it a very amazing solid 3 since, unfortunately, it seemed to run out of gas toward the end. But those first 600 pages -- great, amazing stuff!

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    The Goldfinch: A Novel (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction) review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    It has been a while since I've read a novel that was nearly eight hundred pages in length. The Goldfinch, of course, won the Pulitzer, and that's why I was initially drawn into tackling it. First off, I concur with a friend's succinct assessment: There's just too much of it. Ms. Tartt has a penchant for flaunting her knowledge (or researched knowledge) of art, literature, languages, philosophy, and all things arcane--to a degree of overkill that seems obsessive (along with a tedious insistence upon describing in min detail the physical appearance of every character--even if they only appear for one sentence!).That said, Donna Tartt is the most poetic of prose writers I have encountered to date, creating a sumptuous feast of a globe where the courses never stop coming in a tale about a boy, his mother, his best friend, and a centuries-old painting that possesses a timeless, hypnotic appeal. Ms. Tartt is a writer of such fiery brilliance and depth that I can excuse the tangents she sometimes goes off on--she is showing off, like a wide receiver who has just created a spectacular catch dancing in the end zone--just because she can. And that's okay. If you've got it, flaunt it. But I can see why it would be off-putting to some readers, and I say to those who couldn't stick with it...man, you've missed out! There is a reason why this novel won the Pulitzer. It's a piece of art that belongs right up there with the works of the amazing masters in any medium.

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    The Goldfinch: A Novel (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction) review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    The idea of working a novel around an actual master work of paining is not a fresh idea, but a very amazing one. It interested me enough to look up the painting on the Internet, and copy off said copy on watercolor paper and it is now displayed on our piano.Well written, but a bit long. Concerning the story, I kept hoping the major personage would obtain his act together long before he did.

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    The Goldfinch: A Novel (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction) review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    I was disappointed when I finally finished The Goldfinch, and for all the best reasons. This book created me laugh out loud, sigh, and also deeply resonated with me. The narration of Theo is nothing less than brilliant. He is witty and funny, but he ultimately understands that in the end we are all alone in this world, a fact created clear to him by his private loss he experiences in the beginning of the story. Due to these unfortunate events, he is plagued with sadness and loneliness. Theo's hero is in direct contract to his gleeful Russian sidekick Boris, a hero who jumps off the page. If you happen to know any Russians he is even funnier - Tartt is spot on. There are so a lot of amazing quotes in this book and the story is so intricate that I would have to dedicate a long time writing a review that does justice to this novel (which I don't have!) The Goldfinch doesn't flinch from the sometimes miserable and ultimately lonely parts of the human condition, but Tartt is able to transcend this plight and turn it into something beautiful.

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    The Goldfinch: A Novel (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction) review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    A beautifully written first-person story, so psychologically engaging that you feel the author's pain and desperate longing only too real in human nature, in the in-between zone of art, love, and magic that connects us all.Timothy A. Storlie, PhDAuthor of Transformational Daydreaming

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    The Goldfinch: A Novel (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction) review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    This is a refreshingly various work of fiction involving orphans and art work, terrorism and antiques, Las Vegas low-lifes and NY society types, loves on a lot of levels and high stakes crime both foreign and domestic. Everything fits together neatly and plausibly, for the most part, with a morally satisfying ending. That's the 4 star part. It's missing one star because I was initially place off and not at all engaged when I first started to read it. It began with a disjointed segment from what was the end of the story. I'm guessing that the intent was to pull you in to learn what was going on. I picked up the book a couple of months later and got past my initial bewilderment to the real beginning of the story which proved to be quite engaging. An 800+ page book has got to be engaging if it's to be read. That being said, I thought that there were a couple of segments that were much lengthier and repetitive than they required to be, particularly the Las Vegas time period and the ending. I found myself thinking "I obtain it already, let's move on".I would highly recommend this book as it is well written, engaging and satisfyingly different.

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    The Goldfinch: A Novel (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction) review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    I really enjoyed this book. I see why the book.won the Pulitzer. The author has a amazing method of telling you about her characters. They begin to feel familiar, like folks you've seen about town. I felt like I wanted to step in and protect Theo, obtain him back on track, especially during the years after his tragic loss. Often, I was frustrated by his choices. I highly recommend this book.

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    The Goldfinch: A Novel (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction) review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    I had high hopes for this Pulitzer winner. The beginning was engaging, but along the way, the transitions seemed abrupt and I kept hoping that this part of his life would move on to something better. Every joyful moment was very quickly countered with an extreme sorrow or disappointment. When he finally seemed satisfied with Kitsey, I knew something was amiss. The descriptions and thoughts of the protagonist were very deep and sometimes disturbing. I think the author may have overdone the lengthly descriptions of his agony and depression. The book did not give much hope for humanity until the end where he talks to the reader like a philosopher. I didn't have fun reading this book. I was glad when I finished it and won't recommend it to my friends.

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    The Goldfinch: A Novel (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction) review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    I was so eager to read this book, but I was disappointed in the end. I was glad to reach the end. I kept wanting to take out my red editing pen and slashing some of the overly long parts, especially the episodes with his "best friend" Boris, who quite frankly spoke at boring length taking pages to obtain to his point. I thought the plot was good, a bomb set off in a museum with a boy taking a painting his mother -- who dies in the explosion -- adored. But this is the story of a boy/man in problem all of his life -- he and his mother were on the method to his school for a disciplinary talk with the headmaster -- diverted to the museum to slay time before the school appointment. They never obtain there, but after the bomb the boy is in one predicament after another -- his father comes to claim him, he loves Pippa but doesn't end up with her, he falsely sells furniture as rare antiques, and uses drugs, drugs and more drugs. I did like discussions about art and paintings, and particularly like the put where Hobie talks about how one particular painting will mean various things to each is end of the story was so phony. Boris discovers The Goldfinch painting in a European apartment that has a trove of stolen art and gets a large reward that he shares with Theo. This relives Theo of the weighty problem of getting the painting he stole years before back to the museum. From the start, I was the one with the issue reading this book. I didn't realize until the end that this was Theo's diary, so this stream of consciousness writing created sense, but it was still too damned long.

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    The Goldfinch: A Novel (Pulitzer Prize for Fiction) review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    Prize winning ...whaaat! Verbose and tiresome prose drones on and on and takes us nowhere. Tartt steps right into being a depressed teenager and imbues the lad with all the sensibility of an urban litterary snob.

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    Less (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize): A Novel review [Book]  2018-6-2 18:0

    Arthur Less is hilariously well-named. In the opening salvo, he is waiting to be escorted to a literary event, sitting in a hotel lobby, while a woman he is meant to meet is circling the room looking for a woman, mistakenly thinking the author of the book she's read cannot be a man. On the eve of Arthur's fiftieth birthday, his partner of almost ten years has announced his upcoming nuptials, and in order to avoid this nightmare, Arthur has cobbled together a trip around the globe accepting an odd congregation of invitations to host, attend, and teach different literary events. With each stop, he goes into his past, revealing more and more about himself and his history. Each experience generates memory, both poignant and absurd. Greer has a fine sense of hero and irony, and this surpasses other books I've read by him.

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    Less (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize): A Novel review [Book]  2018-6-2 18:0

    Tender, funny, sometimes melancholy, written with attractive language. I first read a chapter of the novel when it appeared as a short story in The Fresh Yorker earlier this year. It was a tour de force of carefully managed absurdity, heartache, and wistful humor. The book is just as amazing (although its structural device perhaps goes on a bit too long -- one country too many, maybe). Greer's writing is masterful. He manages to be meaningful and funny at the same time, an wonderful balancing act. And he is just so lovely with words. This could have really gone off the rails, it could have been repetitive and gimmicky, but he's too skilled a writer for that. 4 stars instead of 5 (4.5 if I could) for what felt like a giving up at the end (that one chapter too many, and too fast an ending). Otherwise, a unbelievable book and a truly amazing discovery.

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    Less (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize): A Novel review [Book]  2018-6-2 18:0

    When I finished it, I bought four copies to give as gifts. The book is not going to victory a Nobel or be taught in universities or anything but it was a pure pleasure to read and it'll stay with me for the rest of my life.

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    Less (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize): A Novel review [Book]  2018-6-2 18:0

    The first chapter of the book struck me as a whinging litany of first globe issues and I would have dropped the book had not my daughter insisted it was a amazing one. As the reader later discovers, the author seems to have had the same concern about his work, but ... Arthur Less, The unprepossessing character kept growing on me, first to raise my empathy and eventually to search our common humanity. Yes, the perfect stylist who is Andrew Sean Greer gets at times a small too clever for the amazing of the book (hence the four instead of five stars), but I recommend it highly.

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    Less (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize): A Novel review [Book]  2018-6-2 18:0

    I expected this book to be good; it had received a very positive review in the NYT and sounded like one I would have fun between more ponderous works of non-fiction (science and history) and as a pleasant escape from selections that our Bookclub has prescribed that do not appeal to me. "Less" was light in the beginning, with a tip of the unpredictable and with flashes of wit. So, enjoyable enough. BUT, it kept getting better. Plenty of wit and humor, plenty of humanity, emotion, and universal appeal, as well as bits of slap-stick hilarity in the life of the hero/anti-hero, Arthur Less. The story dips and weaves and builds to the end. By the end, one has been offered life lessons and philosophy along with ample entertainment. The writing is clever and crisp, appropriate to the moods of Less; the wording is excellent. Dare I say it? One begins to want for more of Less.

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    Less (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize): A Novel review [Book]  2018-6-2 18:0

    Andrew Sean Greer propels his characters through time and zone only to have them land right where they always were or right where they always should have been. In Less, our comic character pushes through a global series of misadventures that are akin to a Midsummer Night's Dream meets The Odyssey. In the words of both Arthur Less’s literary agent and his lover: “A man on a walking tour… of his past, returning home after a series of blows and disappointments (‘All you do is write gay Ulysses’).” It is the comic tale of a trip around the globe taken in part as evidence of midlife crisis but the novel is a reflection on youth, growing older, love, commitment and adulthood. Will our hapless character ever land where he needs to be?

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    Less (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize): A Novel review [Book]  2018-6-2 18:0

    This book was a delight from beginning to end. The sadness of the story was undercut by the originality of the writing and the little size of the setbacks for our hero. And he really is a character for our age. Polite, unassuming, and faintly aware of the privilege that follows him around even in his darkest hour. I could not place it down.

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    Less (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize): A Novel review [Book]  2018-6-2 18:0

    “Where was he? Somewhere in there he lost the first phase of youth, like the first phase of a rocket; it had fallen, depleted, behind him. And here was the second. And last. He swore he would not give it to anyone; he would have fun it. He would have fun it alone. But: how to live alone and yet not be alone?”Arthur Less is on the brink of turning 50, and he is beginning to grasp the fact that the days of his youth have passed. A run-of-the-mill novelist, Less finds out that his recent work is on the brink of being tossed in his publisher’s trash bin while faced with the harsh reality that his past lover is getting married. After a string of invitations fall into his lap, Less sets out on a trip around the world, which will let him to both rework his failing novel while avoiding the dreaded wedding. From Fresh York Town to Japan (accompanied by the infamous blue suit he is known for) Less sets out on this journey as a method of avoiding his own insecurities while combatting them at the same time. Every time a plane touches down in a fresh destination, disaster seems to arise for Less leaving me asking, “Why is this man so cursed?” Greer has crafted a well-written read that kept me laughing as Less navigates his method from continent to continent. Is he trying to run from his unhappiness and regret, or perhaps trying to embrace it? And who is this narrator?

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    Less (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize): A Novel review [Book]  2018-6-2 18:0

    “Strange to be almost fifty, no? I feel like I just understood how to be young.”Andrew Greer is a gifted writer and a skilled storyteller. I started reading this book with a amazing deal of cynical lip-curling over the precious fumbling of its title character, Arthur Less. My radar was attuned to every small bit of self-conscious “literariness,” that affectation of language through which an author separates him or herself from the herd of other writers. By the latest page of the book, however, I was in tears. Somehow, Andrew Sean Greer’s feckless, nearly-fifty, aging-twink author protagonist began, versus the odds, to resonate with me.I am fifteen years older than Andrew Greer, and a decade older than the fictional Arthur Less. Why does this matter? Because age is not just a number: age is your put in history, your worldview, your experience. As a sixty-something gay man, with a husband of forty-two years, the experience of my life gives me a point of view, for amazing or for ill. I have opinions, especially about other gay men, and particularly about gay men in the public spotlight.And there, you see, is part of the point. “Less” is a gay book by a gay author that won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 2018. This, in the same year that a gay journalist, Ronan Farrow (age 30), won a Pulitzer for his work. This is news. This matters, especially to a gay man of my generation for whom this all feels a bit miraculous, especially given the bizarro-world of our national political stage at the hur Less is a writer, a novelist. He is approaching his fiftieth birthday, and has behind him two decade-long romances that both ended badly. Did they end badly because Less was an idiot? Possibly. When faced with the impending marriage of his second ex-boyfriend, Less does the only thing he can imagine to save himself: he flees. Accepting a half-dozen heretofore ignored invitations from different global destinations, he sets off, still fumbling and irritating, on a trip around the globe that will support him avoid the wedding and his fiftieth ong the method we obtain most of Arthur’s life. We meet the “young Arthur Less,” beautiful and feckless, talent untapped, as he bumbles into his first relationship. We follow him into early middle age, when one relationship is exchanged for another. At first, it’s not clear how necessary these two relationships are; but with time, it becomes clear that not only were they important, they were ’s a small bit as if Arthur has been going through life not quite paying attention. He is often startled, often confused, often hurt. He is not hugely promiscuous, but he is not not promiscuous either. Arthur doesn’t seem to consider the potential significance of fidelity or monogamy. On the other hand, he’s not thinking about heteronormativity either. He doesn’t seem to give much thought to his romantic life, but just sort of takes it as it comes. It’s as if he can’t quite focus—on his writing career, on his emotional life, on the globe around one point, in yet another vaguely surreal moment on his globe tour, Arthur is accused of being a “bad gay” by another gay author. He is told by that author (who is presented as supercilious and pretentious), that “It is our duty to present something attractive from our world. The gay world. But in your books, you create the characters suffer without reward.”That moment struck me, because this very book, the book that won Greer his Pulitzer, is the first book by this gay author that contains the experience of a gay man; that contains any gay character, as far as I can tell. Greer is an author who, while his being gay is not a secret, never makes being gay a part of his public persona—at least in what I found. He is out, he has a husband, but I had to dig to search it. His other books, which contain at least two best sellers, are devoid of any gay content. This book has, for the first time, created him a gay author. And even here, one of the reasons for this book’s success is that it is “A gay guy novel that even a non-gay guy can appreciate.” (Tony’s Book World)For a gay man of my generation and from my vantage point, this rankles. As a voracious reader, who gathered a huge library of contemporary gay literature in the 1970s and 80s, I am leery of gay men who, in this day and age, don’t place gay content in their books. I know this is grossly unfair, because the prejudice in the publishing globe (as in Hollywood and in virtually all the arts) is still very much present, no matter what anyone tells you. The globe is better than when I was born, but it is not entirely good, not by a long shot, in the method it approaches gay content and treats gay , Greer’s first gay book, a book which surely has resonance with the artist’s own life (made doubly so by Arthur Less’s revision of his own recent unwanted novel in the course of this novel) wins him the brass ring, the Oscar of novelists. Is this ironic? Is this a message?“Boredom is the only true tragedy for a writer; everything else is material.”In the end, this book got five stars from me because it honored both the author’s experience as a gay man, and my experience as a survivor of gay life in a straight world. I expect no less from gay authors. None of the gay authors I read routinely will ever victory a Pulitzer prize, and I’m fine with that. I’m glad that I ended up loving “Less,” because it is an necessary moment in the history of gay fiction. I hope the author cares about this as much as I do.

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    Less (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize): A Novel review [Book]  2018-6-2 18:0

    After I started reading Less I immediately thought “So, why did this victory the Pulitzer?” Then, about half method through, I began to understand. By the time we obtain to Morocco with Arthur Less, I was mentally comparing Less to Lolita, though the characters are nothing alike. While you hate the protagonist Humbert in Lolita, there is no denying the power of the novel. And where you will love the protagonist Arthur Less, it is the writing that shines here, not the sweep of the story or the depth of the characters. Is there a literary genre called Profound Humorous Romps? That’s where this book belongs. This is not a “gay” book, but Arthur is gay. This is not a story about middle age, but Arthur is confronting his own aging. This is a story about how humans are constantly swimming upstream versus life. This is a story about how humans are old or young or bald or sad or attractive or boring and sometimes we are more, but sometimes we are…(wait for it)…Less. I just hope Arthur turns sixty really soon, and Andrew Greer brings us a fresh book so we can ride shotgun again with Less.

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