Read a history of the world in 6 glasses reviews, rating & opinions:

Check all a history of the world in 6 glasses reviews below or publish your opinion.

100 Reviews Found

Sort by: Most Accurate (default) | Newest | Top Rated

  • 0

    Useful review?

    clash of clans []  2020-5-11 22:47

    recommend amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    guns of glory []  2020-5-21 22:34
    [email protected]

    Just played Guns of Glory on a phone application via mistplay reviews. Played this one with amazing interest as on the mobile you got the impression of controlling your characters on the ground level, helping catch pick pockets etc etc. Like all mobile ads this was misleading. Don't obtain me wrong the android game itself was addictive and you can spend hours playing (If you play via mistplay you can earn a fair few Amazon vouchers), but yeah false advertising? Really? Unfortunately this is a huge pitfall a lot of android games like these fall into. For example you can expect a nice create your kitchen safe android game but instead you obtain something quite various (garden scapes see add for application and play game)

    0  


  • 1

    Useful review?

    wordington: a word story []  2020-7-6 6:35

    I have completed all tasks to be told more tasks to come soon. Its been days and still waiting. I have accrued over 250 dollars and nothing to spend it on. If i dont have any fresh tasks soon i am deleting the android game and certainly not recommending it for anyone.

    0  


    Add your opinion on a history of the world in 6 glasses or scroll down to read more reviews ↓

     

  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 6 Glasses [Book]  2018-6-1 18:0

    My grandson was reading this book for his AP Globe History class. I started looking at the book and thought it looked beautiful interesting so I got it on my Kindle. Wow! What a amazing book! I learned so much about the history of all our well known beverages and how they tie in with globe history. I would never have guessed that it would turn out to be such an enjoyable read!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 6 Glasses [Book]  2018-6-1 18:0

    I'm a homebrewer, and I have a fascination with how beer, being resilient to bacterial growth, has impacted societies throughout history. I picked this book up on the suggestion of a friend, expecting a amazing story about the history of beer in ancient it turns out the author (Tom Standage - Business Editor for The Economist), tells an interesting story of the origins of beer, but a far more interesting set of tales regarding other drinks that had significant societal and economic impacts on the Western world. The tea section specifically, was wonderful, articulating how sugar from the colonies and tea from the Far East drove the British Industrial revolution in the 19th century, impacted British/European politics, and lead to the Opium Battles in China.I read this book nearly two years ago, and I still search myself referring to it in conversation when nearly any historical subject comes up.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 6 Glasses [Book]  2018-6-1 18:0

    This book is evidence of the power of a amazing idea to organize one's thoughts and arguments so as to create them compelling. Other than the air we breathe, which hasn't really changed all that much over the years, there is nothing so universally necessary as liquid refreshment. Mr. Standage's decision to structure his history of the globe upon beverages is brilliant. It is precisely because the drinks discussed remain so familiar to us that the history is so relevant and interesting. Though we understand quite well why alcohol has such a prominent put in history, who would have thought that water itself is only now just emerging as the drink of choice? or that the antibacterial properties of Tea supported the industrial revolution. True, the bias is towards Western history--but as that is my history, I'll take it.We are surrounded with objects that we take for granted and there are any number of amazing books that spin the historical tale around such objects; however, this work excels because of its brevity--the author manages to cover the subject without the pace of the book ever lagging. The lawyer in me appreciates a finely honed argument; Standage's book is so amazing that he makes the supremely difficult job of summarizing globe history look y authors of history are unable to prune the a lot of fascinating insights that history presents. And to be sure, I have fun a nice meandering presentation of interesting tidbits organized around a central theme, but it is always refreshing to search a history that has the same "can't place down" type of feel as a thriller or mystery. I can't think of a more perfect example of a history that is both appropriate for a younger student as well as an overeducated adult. Highest Recommendation.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 6 Glasses [Book]  2018-6-1 18:0

    As the author points out, there’s a natural subdivision to the book, which is that the first three beverages are alcoholic and the latest three are caffeinated. There’s another method of looking at it, and that’s the means used to achieve a drink that wasn’t a health hazard. The first three drinks achieve germ-killing by fermentation, the next two by boiling, and the latest through e era of beer is associated with the Agricultural Revolution and the growing importance of cereal grains. Geographically, the region of focus is the Fertile Crescent and Egypt. Among the more interesting points of discussion is the role of beer (along with the similar commodities of cereal grains and bread) in the development of written e era of wine is associated with the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome. Readers of the classics will be aware that wine was much celebrated among the Greeks and Romans, so much so that they developed gods of wine in their mythologies (Dionysus and Bacchus, respectively.) Of course, wine played no little role in Christian mythology as well--e.g. Jesus turns water to wine.Spirits are similar to the Colonial period, though they were first developed much earlier. The author emphasizes that these were the first global drinks. While beer and wine were robust to going bad, they could spoil in the course of long sea cohol of all kinds has always attracted opposition. This conflict, of course, owes to the fact that people under the influence of alcohol frequently act like idiots. One might expect that the transition to discussion of non-alcoholic beverages would correspond to the end of controversy, but that’s not the case. Each of the beverages brought controversy in its wake. There were attempts to ban coffee in the Islamic globe where its stimulative result was conflated with intoxication. Coca-Cola became associated with capitalism and American influence, and drew its own opposition because of it. It seems there’s no escape from controversy for a amazing e most fascinating discussion of coffee had to do with the role of cafés as corollaries to the internet. Centuries before computers or the internet as we know it, people went to cafés to search out stock values and commodity prices, to discuss scholarly ideas, and to search out which ships had come and gone from e role of tea in globe history is readily apparent. Besides the aforementioned Boston Tea Party, there were the Opium Wars. This conflict resulted from the fact that the British were racking up a large tea bill, but the Chinese had minimal wants for European goods. Because the British (through the East India Company) didn’t wish to draw down gold and silver reserves, they came up with an elaborate plan to prohibited opium in China in to earn funds to their tea bill. Ultimately, Britain’s tea addiction led to the growing of tea in India to create an end-run around the volatile relations with e book lays out the history of Coca-Cola’s development before getting into its profound result on international affairs. A huge part of this history with the Cold Battle years. While Coca-Cola was developed in the late 19th century, it was really the latter half of the 20th century when Coke spread around the world—traveling at first with US troops. The most interesting thing that I learned was that General Zhukov (a major Soviet figure in the winning of Globe Battle II) convinced the US Government to obtain Coca-Cola incorporated to create him some clear Coca-Cola so that he could have fun the beverage without the heart-burn of being seen as publicly supporting an American entity (i.e. it would look like he was drinking his vodka, like a amazing Russian should.) General Zhukov was perhaps the only person to stand in opposition to Stalin and live (the General was just too much of a national character to screw with.)There’s also an interesting story about how the cola battles played out in the Middle East. Both Coke and Pepsi wanting access to the huge Arab market, and were willing to forego the little Israeli shop to pave the method for that access. When Coke finally had to relent due to public outrage and accusations of anti-Semitic behavior, Pepsi slid in and followed Coca-Cola’s policy of snubbing Israel in favor of the Arab world.I enjoyed this book, and think that any history buff will as well. One doesn’t have to have a particular interest in meal and beverage history to be intrigued by stories contained in this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 6 Glasses [Book]  2018-6-1 18:0

    I got this book last-minute before a flight as reading material. It didn't quite latest me that long though as I kept reading it after arriving at my destination.I have read a decent number of books about meal and drink, but what sets this book apart for me is how it embeds itself into a historical context. Maybe it's just that I didn't take enough history classes in high school, but this book actually created me very interested in knowing about the history of the Persian empire, the different revolutions and monarchies in France. Did I learn how to create a amazing cappuccino or brew my own beer? Nope, but this is not a recipe book.Just to re-emphasize, I really dig how the book basically spans the entirety of human history from the dawn of civilization to modern day and beyond. The writing style is also interesting, entertaining, and at the same time historical/scientific. I'll have to check out his "Edible Hisstory of Humanity" next.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 6 Glasses [Book]  2018-6-1 18:0

    This book takes a special view of history. It describes how six various beverages have influenced the world. Looking at it all from the point of view of beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea and Coca Cola, this book is full of info about these drinks. I learned a lot from the book as it taught me more than I ever thought I required to know about the how beer has been around for centuries and how tea and coffee influenced globe history and the put that Coca Cola has taken in the past e book is full of facts and an simple read. I loved its point of view as well as the clarity in which the author described all these drinks. Every page is full of info and I appreciate the scholarship that went into explaining all the info of the manufacture of these drinks as well as describing the impact each of them had on history.I totally enjoyed this book. Not only was it interesting, I learned something as well.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 6 Glasses [Book]  2018-6-1 18:0

    A History of the Globe in 6 Glasses by Tom Standage"A History of the Globe in 6 Glasses" is a view of the history of the globe through the lens of beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and cola. Science correspondent and accomplished author Tom Standage has come up with a clever book that shows how the aforementioned drinks were reflections of the eras in which they were created. This 311-page book is broken out by the six drinks (two chapters per drink): Beer in Mesopotamia and Egypt, Wine in Greece and Rome, Spirits in the Colonial Period, Coffee in the Age of Reason, Tea and the British Empire and Coca-Cola and the Rise of America.Positives:1. A fun method to learn about history.2. A well-written and well researched book. Reads like a novel.3. A fascinating topic. The author cleverly charts the flow of history through six beverages: beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and cola.4. Every beverage has a story and the author does a amazing job of relaying it.5. Amazing use of primary science to explain how the beverages were discovered.6. Interesting tidbits throughout the book. This is the greatest strength of this book. Some of the stories will definitely stick with you.7. Interesting perspective on beer, "it seems most likely that beer drinking was just one of the a lot of factors that helped to hint the balance away from hunting and gathering and toward farming and a sedentary lifestyle based on little settlements".8. Guaranteed to learn something amusing, spoiler alert..."The workers who built the pyramids were in beer..."9. I love the stories of how mythology and beverages intertwine, "According to one legend, Dionysus, the god of wine, fled to Greece to escape beer-loving Mesopotamia".10. The philosophy of drinking wine.11. What wine represented to the Romans. Once again, some amusing stories, a recurring theme of this book.12. The relationship between some of these beverages to medicine/health.13. The relationship between the beverages and religion. Amazing...14. The invention of distillation.15. Interesting stories of how some of these beverages were used as a form of currency.16. The evil trade of slavery and how alcohol was related. Enlightening information.17. Search out what truly was the decisive factor in the Royal Navy's win over the French and Spanish fleets.18. The impact of rum for the North American colonists. Everything to do with American history and its relation to alcohol was fascinating. Colonialism by the bottles.19. The second half of the book dealing with caffeinated drinks was superior to the first half.20. The diffusion of rationalism and the relationship to coffee. Amazing stuff.21. The history of coffeehouses. The drink of intellectuals. Amazing stories.22. Each chapter opens up with a quote, "Better to be deprived of meal for three days than of tea for one". Chinese proverb.23. China, England and it's a tea thing. Fascinating history.24. The fascinating history of tea. Very famous with women, who had been excluded from coffeehouses.25. My favorite chapters in the book had to do with Coca Cola.26. Coca Cola and lawsuits. "Wiley place Coca-Cola on in 1911, in a federal case titled the United States v. Forty Barrels and Twenty Kegs of Coca-Cola. In court, religious fundamentalists railed versus the evils of Coca Cola, blaming its caffeine content for promoting transgressions..." I live for tidbits like this.27. Coca Cola the global icon.28. The epilogue provides the impact of water.29. A cool appendix on ancient drinks.30. Notes and gatives:1. As much fun as the book was to read, the quality wasn't consistent throughout. To illustrate my point, I felt that the chapters on caffeinated drinks (coffee, tea and coca-cola) were superior to the ones pertaining to the alcoholic beverages (beer, wine and spirits).2. In desperate need of a timeline chart. The author has a tendency of going back and forth in time which may cause the reader to lose their point of reference a timeline chart describing the main milestones of a given beverage would have certainly helped.3. The lack of charts and diagrams that would have aided the reader in understanding the full impact of the beverages involved. As an example, consumption of a given drink by country...4. A bit repetitive at times. Sometimes the author has a tendency to overstay his welcome with some tidbits...5. The history that is here is really simplified. This book is more an entertaining look at the impact and influence the beverages had in the context of the societies in which they were consumed. That being said, don't underestimate what is here.6. The Kindle ver of the book garbled up some words.7. Links not included for summary, I enjoyed reading "A History of the Globe in 6 Glasses". It's a fun and at times enlightening read. Cocktails will never be the same, now that I have added to my repertoire thanks in huge part to all the fun facts that I picked up from this book. That being said, the danger with a book like this is that it is too general for history buffs and it may not be interesting enough early on to hold the casual reader engaged. So as long as you are not expecting an in-depth history lesson and have a small patience with the drier sections of this book, it will go down smoothly and ultimately lead to a satisfying experience. I recommend it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 6 Glasses [Book]  2018-6-1 18:0

    I loved this book because it place history into a various sort of context, pulling together threads of the story of humans in a method that other books don't. I loved every page of it, and yes, it really does tell a history of the world.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 6 Glasses [Book]  2018-6-1 18:0

    ​The novel A History of the Globe in 6 Glasses by Tom Standage is an intriguing book describing six key beverages that impacted humanity and the globe in revolutionary ways. In chronological order, the beverages contain beer, wine, spirits, coffee, tea, and Coca-Cola. The drinks are used as markers throughout globe history related to how various ores tag time such as “the stone-age”. Various drinks have various effects on humanity, but all contribute to the advancing of culture whether it’s a revolution of the people or just a culinary addition. Standage does a brilliant job describing the ways people and their culture change as a effect of the beverages. Each and every drink serves a purpose and has/continues to impact humanity. I decided to read this book because it was highly recommended, and I was interested to see globe history from a various view in this case from the culinary advancement of beverages. In conclusion, I would highly recommend this book, because it is an perfect read for any time period as it covers almost all of globe history from 50,000 years ago to modern day. I found this book interesting because of the drinks were chosen and how he used them to define major turning points throughout history, giving a fresh perspective on the history itself. Something I want the author did better is go more in depth of how all of the beverages still affect us today and the outcomes of their existence. Standage’s writing style is very laid back and casual making it very simple to follow and written almost more a letter than a factual book. Recommended for almost any age.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 6 Glasses [Book]  2018-6-1 18:0

    Tom Standage presents the history of the globe in six glasses and he does a unbelievable job in doing so. He goes through the history of the globe using the history of six beverages - beer, wine, tea, coffee, water, soda. What impressed me with Mr. Standage's novel is how he interweaves the history of the globe with his history of the above beverages. Traditionally history is taught segmented - US History I, US History II, Globe History, etc. Rather than laying history out in such a fashion, Mr. Standage uses the beverages as his timeline and writes what is event in the globe at that time to explain how each beverage became popular. Not only does he explain how these beverages traveled the globe and became the staples they are, but he also helps create connections with what is event around the globe at the same time. This, to me, is what makes this book a must read, relating what is event on opposite sides of the world through the introduction, rise, and inevitable prominence of each beverage. A History of the Globe in 6 Glasses is 1 an impressive novel both in terms of the history it covers, as well as the manner in which it is presented.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh: A Woman in World History [Book]  2018-2-5 18:0

    Fascinating, but just a small slow for me. Probably amazing for someone who loves detail. Not my style. Have fun the read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh: A Woman in World History [Book]  2018-2-5 18:0

    Professor Colley has done a lot of research on Britain's 18th century world, and this book has come out of that. She presents an extraordinary interweaving of naval history, commerce, the status of women, slavery, and the emergence of the USA, among other subjects. I like the method she is upfront about her speculation about Elizabeth Marsh. As she goes along she makes it clear what is in the record, what she believes would have been typical of the era, and what she is only guessing at. Very admirable. But I found the book dry in places. A small more scholarly than I was in the mood for.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 12 Maps []  2020-5-9 18:23

    First paragraph ... I winced at the author's overwrought narrative style ... too a lot of adjectives, adverbs and thesaurus derivatives ... too small Strunk & White editing. I'm perfectly comfortable reading overly complicated narrative but it wastes time wading through it ... I can't support being irritated by the style and so risk missing the substance.If you can obtain past the overwrought writing style, you might think that the cartographer author would have taken a lesson from his own history and replaced words with sketches and notes. Every map discussed would be improved by the authors own sketch rather than 1000 words. One would expect a map book to be well illustrated but this one is not. The 5' long Hereford Mappa Mundi for example is deconstructed in narrative fashion. If the author had photographed his chosen maps ... imaged them with the best camera available... and then described them with side by side sketches, translations and notes, the book would be 100% tography is a reading hobby for me and there are better books. The 12 maps the author chose are interesting, but by comparison, the author makes much ado ... method to much ado, over these.I $26 for the book expecting quality maps illustrations and drawings as Kindle doesn't do maps well. As there are so few maps in this hardback, and the few maps that are here are dark, illegible, and downright not good ... if you think that you must read the book, save the hardcopy money, the Kindle and use wiki to bring in the higher fidelity original photos this author should have included in his book.p.s. I write reviews to support consumers chop through the publishers representations and call the book as I see it. The "no" vote this review got the day after I wrote it is typical of the publisher/author making side of the transaction punishing a less than flattering review and hiding behind an anon "No" vote with no comments. These aren't going to create the work any better. I would have preferred to write a glowing review that might attract more readers to this arcane subject. But ... I said it's "OK" ... it' is just as easily tipped to 2 stars= I don't like it but give it the benefit of doubt because I wish to see more authors writing amazing books in this genre.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 500 Walks []  2020-1-20 0:33

    Giving this to my son who likes to hike - its a Christmas show - It looks very nice!!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 500 Walks []  2020-1-20 0:33

    Unbelievable book that keeps the reader flipping from page to page; countries to continents; early historical eras to modern times. If you love someone with wanderlust for walking adventures, this is a amazing source.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 100 Objects []  2020-1-23 2:13

    Each of these BBC broadcasts, here in printed form, are absolutely brilliant. Mr. MacGregor has a rigorous and poetic grasp of these different and symbolic representations of the past. I have had the privilege of visiting the British Museum at least 8 times during my lifetime. I plan to visit it again, like a little child, and seek out the brilliant treasures Mr. MacGregor describes.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh: A Woman in World History [Book]  2018-2-5 18:0

    Linda Colley came across Ms. Marsh while researching her earlier "Captives," and found her compelling enough to devote a full work to her. The author utilizes a broad range of sources in reconstructing the life of an obscure person, albeit one who published her own pirate yarn after ransom from Morocco. How obscure? Colley did not unearth any photos of her subject, and cannot finally determine Marsh's racial composition. But Marsh personifies the connections and networks within which 18C global travelers created their way, so her story tells us a amazing about her world. The narrative moves briskly for the most part, though info of family business affairs are tedious at times; "Ordeal" well conveys the sense of a rapidly changing, increasingly mobile globe (globalization long predates NAFTA and the Internet). It quite effectively engenders 18C globe history from the perspective of an unusual but representative woman's life. As a Royal Navy brat she had an advantage over other travelers of the age, often securing passage on ships that normally didn't take civilians; as a effect she probably saw more of the globe than any female contemporary. The tides of history often buffeted Marsh so that she did not control her destiny, but she emerges as a strong-willed woman in an era with small use for them.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh: A Woman in World History [Book]  2018-2-5 18:0

    The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh is a fascinating tale of a globe we cannot remember or recognize. Elizabeth Marsh, of questionable race, origins, and status, traveled the globe and saw the ways it interacted with various people. At times treated as a half-slave or as a member of the conquering aristocracy, Elizabeth Marsh illustrated the globalization of trade networks and travel during the 18th century, a globe where the United States did not yet exist, pirates roamed the seas, and where her admittedly scarcely-documented life was lived. Elizabeth Marsh lived in tumultuous times, and faced them with resourcefulness and skill as she sought the shelter of locations from the storms of battle and r historians, this is a amazing resource to demonstrate the state of the globe in a particular time and to use one person's life to illustrate the variable nature of society, status, and women's rights. One unbelievable bit comes from Colley's preface, where she notes that a lot of historians and biographers often choose to shorten or minimize the names within their books. By contrast, Colley shows that a woman like Elizabeth Marsh changed names and identities; she married, but had companionship with an unmarried man; Elizabeth Marsh is the method to identify a woman without demeaning her accomplishments or acting unduly familiar (no Lizzies here).Last, Colley's work pulls on resources from a half-dozen nations, including some who came of being within Elizabeth Marsh's life. I would challenge a lot of readers to understand the ways that this forces a historian to spread themselves thin. Thinking of all the biographers who can barely encompass a biography in one nation and one language, the sheer scale and depth of this book is impressive, even if it cannot create up materials to tell a more compelling tale of Elizabeth Marsh's life.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh: A Woman in World History [Book]  2018-2-5 18:0

    Colley traces Elizabeth Marsh's travels from her birth in Jamaica in the 18th century to her return to England and her journeys by ship through Asia including a pirate adventure. However, the story is far from an adventure tale. It's a detailed excursion of what Colley is able to research about these travels. The focus is not on increasing tension but in attempting to develop a real to history acc of Marsh's life. It is often difficult to develop this acc because while Colley is able to unearth a surprising amount of material about (and by) a rather obscure woman, it is still largely incomplete. Colley does attempt to stick with what she has evidence for and when she dives into conjecture she acknowledges that she is doing so. So, you do feel like you are getting a historically accurate portrayal. However what she loses in her adherence to accuracy is anything to compel the reader on. You never obtain to know the woman Elizabeth Marsh except through very brief examples covered in lots of research e book works as a well-researched picture of British history in its postcolonial posts through the eyes of a middle class, unusual woman (so in that case this is not a picture of postcolonial history but a very specific portrayal). We obtain info about the extreme poverty and disease in Jamaica and brief looks at the British East Indian influence in India (and the power it held) and glimpses of life on ship in this e book does not work as a compelling portrait of an adventurous woman. I never really cared about Marsh and often forgot about her entirely, paying more attention to the rest of the book than to what was event to Marsh. There are multiple forays into the history of other people around her that were distracting and not particularly enlightening.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 500 Walks []  2020-1-20 0:33

    I have a lot of trail tutorial books. This is the best written one I have. Trail features are described without a lot of superfluous info. Maps are excellent. I am already making a list of locations to discover from this book on my next adventure.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 100 Objects []  2020-1-23 2:13

    I believe I learned more per page reading this book than any I've ever read. A tour through all of history using objects collected (stolen?) by the British Museum, this book is a bravura execution of material culture and archaeological studies. In fact, I used several entries with my Advanced Placement Literature class in to expose them to effective and interesting "close reading." MacGregor does with objects what literary critics do with a passage of poetry: he describes the object (lovely pictures ARE included), he gives a fascinating context of the period in which this object was used, and finally, provides an analysis of what the object "says" about the people, nation, and region that used or owned it. I search this way of historical explication incredibly engaging. Rather than start with abstract concepts like democracy, Federalism, or ethnic cleansing, MacGregor begins with the concrete--a vase, a coin, a flower pot-- and says here's what this culture produced, here's what that says about them. This also dovetails nicely with what I teach in class regarding advertising; that we can come to understand the ideals of a nation by studying its advertisements. Interestingly, the objects MacGregor chooses also function as "advertisements" for their respective milieus. A testament to how well this book is written and constructed is that I read it incredibly quickly. Before I knew it, I was on object 56 at the 300 something page tag and I had no mental fatigue. The fact that the book is organized in 100 3 to 4 pages "chapters" helps a lot because I found myself reading a few objects here and there whenever I had some spare time. I recommend this book highly to anyone who has even a fleeting interest in archaeology or cultural materialism; your efforts, and the rather hefty of the book will be worth it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 100 Objects []  2020-1-23 2:13

    Reading this book is like taking a tour of the British Museum. The author presents 100 objects from the British Museum and presents their stories and their significance in globe history. The objects are presented in roughly historical and also grouped according to several themes, and the author points out some common threads that are woven through this of the best parts of reading this book is encountering little-known facts, people, and cultural artifacts which one doesn't usually search in a textbook-style presentation of globe history.Overall I found this to be a very enjoyable read, simple to pick up and place down again, and I tended to read this during spare moments or a few chapters in the evening after rhaps the only "weakness" of this book is that as the book moves from object to object, there is not necessarily a coherent story line, and so I did not tend to feel drawn on to the next te also that the pictures in this book are in nice, high-resolution color. (Of course, not all Kindle models can display color.)

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 100 Objects []  2020-1-23 2:13

    This book will change your entire perspective of what historical objects in a museum represent. Neil MacGregor's discussion of each object is concise, well-written and often contains brief, but meaningful insights by an expert in an appropriate field. As an example, Neil MacGregor transforms what on the surface appears to be a mundane Egyptian sculpture of cattle, to a discussion of the transformation of humans as hunter/gatherers to communities which could only exist with the domestication of crops and livestock. In his concise discussion of that single object, Mr. MacGregor adds a very concise, clear discussion of the resulting geneology of modern cattle as from Asiatic origins and a brief discussion of the religious significance of cattle in some cultures.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 12 Maps []  2020-5-9 18:23

    Perfect and detailed study of twelve necessary maps and their put in cartographic and globe history. Some reviewers have complained that there is too much detail; but that is the amazing strength of the book. Most map books have too small info and are just glorified coffee table books. The only caveat is that the maps discussed are too small, but there is not really anything you can do about that since the size is constrained by the publisher. A useful companion book is the DK/Smithsonian's Amazing Maps book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 12 Maps []  2020-5-9 18:23

    A small to much prose and not enough maps ... very detailed...

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh: A Woman in World History [Book]  2018-2-5 18:0

    Absolutely fascinating. The story was compelling and I actually learned a amazing about globe history. Hopefully, this genre will flourish in years to come.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh: A Woman in World History [Book]  2018-2-5 18:0

    Excellent. Very well written and educational.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 500 Walks []  2020-1-20 0:33

    Absolutely amazing. When I bought the book I reckoned it would be walkable. Ain't. Even though it's unbelievable and at least moves one to track around time and history.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 12 Maps []  2020-5-9 18:23

    afBottom Line First: 3.5 stars rounded up. Jerry Brotton’s A History of the Globe in 12 Maps (paperback edition) has an interesting but narrow hypothesis. His intent is to limit his discussion to just globe maps and thereby artificially promote his belief. I accept his argument that maps reflect the purpose of the map maker but I am not sure that his conclusion is as significant as he does. 12 Maps gave me a lot of history and a lot to think about. The writing tends to be ponderous. This makes it hard to be sure who he is speaking to. The style is not academic nor particularly inviting to a general reader. For me, tugging through Brotton’s book was worth it. I am not sure what readers will most have fun his e central thesis of A History of the Globe in 12 maps is that maps, and especially globe maps are heavily reflective of the times and purposes of the both the map maker and the spirit and philosophy of their times. The earliest Western maps, mostly represented by the mapaemundi can be thought of as maps created to illustrate the prevailing belief in the Holy Trinity as being mirrored by a cruciform photo of the earth. By the 3rd map we are introduced to the political map, drawn closer to a modern form but serving the imperial and diplomatic needs of the earth bound governments in Asia and later dividing the newly discovered lands between Spain and Portugal. Eventually map will be designed to serve commercial needs and even humanitarian the time Brotton discusses the necessary maps designed in France and the Netherlands, he concludes an earlier argument that there can never be a 100% accurate, flat, globe map and that the best humans can do is create and remake fresh maps as humans change the geography of the planet and fresh methods are developed to portray geography.If we strictly limit ourselves to globe maps produced for official purposes, to stand church based illustrations or submitted for government negotiations, it is not hard to accept that these maps have no day to day practical function. That they reflect prevailing beliefs and the needs of the institutions that sponsors them seems, if only upon reflection, obvious. Brotton makes no mention of the types of navigational charts that traders and sailors would have required to cross the Asians grasslands or the Mediterranean Seas. I do not remember much discussion of maps in the works of Cesare, but it is an old Troops truism that geography is fate. It is hard to believe that there was no one producing the kinds of maps that were designed to give navigators local or regional maps to serve the less exhausted purposes such as marking out the zone and frequency of safe water along desert trades routes or safe harbors for ships crossing the Indian Ocean.If we limit ourselves to just these maps, this question goes unanswered. The absence of this respond itself invokes a larger discussion that Brotton could have productively addressed. Initially Brotton gives himself an out by declaring his examples limited to globe maps. But a lot of of his maps are not. The unbelievable maps of Napoleonic France, reflecting Cassinni surveys and Capitaine skills are wonderful. But they were intended to be maps of France. They helped Napoleon’s General to plan their movements, if only those maneuvers conducted in France, again begs the question: what had been generals been doing before Cassinni?When Brotton discusses Mercator, we are suddenly presented with the fact that there had been a number of projections developed before the Mercator projection. When? By Who? For what purpose? Why are these maps not necessary if we are to understand the relationships between maps and the societies that made the need for them?In terms of the production of the book, there was a convention in book publishing that discussions of illustration in the book should be referenced. The description of the floor maps in the Amsterdam City Hall, should direct the reader to Illustration 37. The absence of this kind of support tends to create it hard to know that a particular map is illustrated in the book and where to search it. Too often necessary maps are not illustrated.A delicious speculation by Brotton is that the map makers of the time can to accept the name America as an act of political correctness. Brotton retells the issues with and the understanding of Amerigo Vespucci’s naming rights to the Fresh World. Almost every aspect of these claims can now be regarded as doubtful. His contemporaries were clearly not unanimous in there their help for his primacy, but they may have given over the argument rather than put themselves in awkward positions between rival religious and national claims versus naming rights.dg

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 12 Maps []  2020-5-9 18:23

    Lots of information. Well written

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 100 Objects []  2020-1-23 2:13

    Extraordinary. Everything: the format, the language, above all the content matter spanning all cultures, never boring, ever illuminating the immense shadows of ignorance around those glimpses of our own story that school managed to slip through, but never really taught. I know the author could not possibly fit in the whole British museum, but I miss one more single item I test and never fail to go and see again every time in London: the "Karissima Lepidina" notice on wood smartphone that from the marginal outpost in Vindolanda speaks of family life and value through about 18 centuries with an immediacy... that requires no mediation, almost no translation: women were writing, cursive handwriting was telling, postage was functional, time was set apart to hold in touch, leisure trips were planned... I would really like everybody to learn from the mastery of Neil Macgregor the details. May the next edition will be of 101 objects.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 100 Objects []  2020-1-23 2:13

    I don't think this replaces the pod cast series, but is a amazing addition. I would love to have had the series be visual, not just audio clips, and this book gives more photos that support understand the objects. While there are quotes from the audios in the book, it is not just a transcript, but has fresh info that adds to the experience. I think it will stand alone as well, but it's hard for me to tell because I have listened to (some of) the

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh: A Woman in World History [Book]  2018-2-5 18:0

    You expect a biography to tell you about someone important, someone who has gained accomplishments in some field of human endeavor, and because of the accomplishments is worth coming to understand as some sort of outstanding example (good or bad) of humanity. Chances are you have never heard of Elizabeth Marsh, an Englishwoman of the eighteenth century, and it isn't that she has an undeserved obscurity. Her life was various in a lot of ways from those of her contemporaries, but she had no unique talents or accomplishments, and her life was not exemplary in any way. So it is in some ways odd that historian Linda Colley has created her the topic of a penetrating biography, _The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh: A Woman in Globe History_ (Pantheon). Colley has pieced together what can be known of Elizabeth Marsh's life from the spotty writings of Marsh and her family, but as an expert on globe history of Marsh's times, she has place the life in the context of the begin of globalization. It was a confusing age full of changes that no one knew were coming, and Elizabeth Marsh and her family, who had ties to the British navy and to seagoing trade, thus were in the middle of the changes. In this method Colley's book is history from the bottom up, an attempt to understand the lives of a few ordinary people caught up in larger events.Elizabeth Marsh got her beginning far from England, born in Jamaica in 1735. Her father was a ship's carpenter, and there is a surprising ease of access to shipboard travel throughout Elizabeth Marsh's life. Her traveling life, her true life, began in 1755, when her family sailed to Menorca, and later to Gibraltar. In 1756 she boarded the _Ann_, a merchantman full of a cargo of brandy, commanded by James Crisp, and thus that she began the prime adventure of her life. The _Ann_ was attacked by Moroccan pirates, and all those aboard were kidnapped and taken to Marrakech, where she had to confront the Sultan who may have wanted her for his harem; she was saved at least partially because she pretended to be James Crisp's wife. When they were released, they married for real. Crisp was involved in the nautical trades of tea, textiles, liquor, dried fish, and anything else. His trade was not always legal, but he had contacts worldwide and seems to have been energetic in his business dealings. His trade, however, did not go well due to global issues well above his capacity to predict or manage. He declared bankruptcy in 1767, moved with Elizabeth to India where he worked in the East India Company, but also failed there. The travels of the couple had worn them down; Colley writes that the fissures in the marriage were "due to the method in which she and he were repeatedly driven and chose to travel very huge distances on land and sea." She had left him, traveling ostensibly for her health, but in the company of an unmarried man, touring down the Indian eastern seaboard. She outlived her husband by six years, dying of breast cancer after a mastectomy at only age ere are few info and anecdotes to create Mr. and Mrs. Crisp fully rounded characters, but they are within these pages mere sport for larger historical and economic events. They are battered by battles between England and France, and then England and America, although neither of them saw a shot fired in either conflict. The opening up of globe markets, the changes in the slave trade, the conversion from agriculture to industry, and other revolutions all affected the couple. Colley's book succeeds in showing how these huge, sweeping forces affected a woman who could not have understood them and could have done nothing even if she had. Globalization meant, as Colley writes, that "the globe was both widening and shrinking" and thus the lives of Elizabeth Marsh and a lot of of the others detailed here were "twisted out of customary moulds in the process". Colley intelligently, but unforcefully, reminds us a lot of times in these pages that we are in the midst of fresh and even more strong globalization forces, and Elizabeth Marsh's "shock and wonder, entrapment and fresh opportunities, remain eloquent and recognizable."

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh: A Woman in World History [Book]  2018-2-5 18:0

    This is an interesting work for a Globe History class. Not a gender history in my opinion.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 100 Objects []  2020-1-23 2:13

    This is an perfect read. As usual, BBC does not disappoint. The book is compiled from transcripts of a 100-episode series on BBC Radio. One hundred objects are thoughtfully picked from exhibits at the British Museum to chronicle the history of mankind, from its earliest beginnings up to the 21st century. The 100 chapters are short, but solid, each corresponding to an episode on radio. The book is amazing for leisurely, but very informative reading. A definite advantage that the book has over the radio episodes is that it shows each of the 100 objects in full e book is highly recommended for any reader who is interested in understanding the development of mankind. It provides clear and useful background for reflecting on how we have come to where we are -- when and how we have progressed, as well as when and how often we have regressed.I read a Kindle version, which allows me to magnify photographs to look closely at the 100 objects. My only complaint is that, with Kindle, it has been rather more cumbersome for me to refer back to the page with the photographs in each chapter while I was cruising through.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 100 Objects []  2020-1-23 2:13

    When I began this formidably lengthy book I thought I would cherry pick among the 100 objects, choosing the ones that seemed interesting and skipping over others. In the event, I found it difficult to skip over anything, for each chapter seemed to include fresh and absorbing information. I thus wound up reading about virtually every one of the 100 stuff il MacGregor is a scholar of singular erudition who writes in a lively and engaging prose style. With the aid of numerous professionals whose commentary he invites, each of the 100 objects is brought to life by being placed in its appropriate geographical, historical, anthropological or archeological is is a truly unbelievable work of scholarship, one that is as pleasurable to read as it is didactic. Anyone interested in the history of art will not wish to miss it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 12 Maps []  2020-5-9 18:23

    saw an article by this author in BBC History Magazine.... article created maps so interesting, I wanted his book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 12 Maps []  2020-5-9 18:23

    Amazing book. Very informative and an simple read. Extremely interesting to see the globe from a various perspective.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 500 Walks []  2020-1-20 0:33

    Bonus and he loved it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 500 Walks []  2020-1-20 0:33

    Purchased for a birthday gift. Peeked. The bonus was mailed late because I couldn't stop exploring the book!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Ordeal of Elizabeth Marsh: A Woman in World History [Book]  2018-2-5 18:0

    A amazing book -- I discovered it from my History Book Club, before the amazing reviews poured in from the critics. I think the Fresh York Times had it as one of its ten best at the end of the year. For all persons interested in women's history, biography, India, Caribbean. Shows how much certain intrepid souls traveled in days of yore. And a rarity in those days--tales written by a woman. The author has done her research carefully & thoroughly; text is simple to follow, not boring. Loved the fact that she was similar to Edmund Burke.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 100 Objects []  2020-1-23 2:13

    I'm afraid I must respectfully disagree with other customers in the review section. For the price, this is a FIVE-STAR book. It is illustrated beautifully with full color photographs. I have the hard-copy and not the Kindle ver (though I do own a Kindle). My guess is that the pages would show stunningly on the Kindle for iPad or Kindle for Mac. I also have a Kindle E-ink reader. I doubt it would present well on that latest device. I noticed one of the reviewers criticized the image quality. I must disagree. I search it to be top notch. It is presented in a matte format rather than glossy print.. so my guess is the reviewer would have preferred the glossy versions. I, on the other hand, love the matte finishes on all the photographs which are nicely crisp and detailed.EXCELLENT book for the price. A excellent bonus for a history buff. I love it and I bought it here on Amazon.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 100 Objects []  2020-1-23 2:13

    Well organized. The history behind each of these attractive objects is so well presented. The high quality images support create this book a treasure. Also, at the museum, only a subset of these objects is displayed at any time. To see them all, one would have to create a lot of trips to London. If planing to visit the British Museum, knowing something about this collection of pieces beforehand, makes the adventure even more enjoyable.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 500 Walks []  2020-1-20 0:33

    attractive book. amazing photos.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 500 Walks []  2020-1-20 0:33

    Bought as gift

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 500 Walks []  2020-1-20 0:33

    Wow, so a lot of amazing ideas of locations to visit and have fun while walking. I want I had another lifetime to visit more of these locations but will seek to do as a lot of as I can. Would be helpful though if there was an index up front that listed all of the walks in sequence as they appear in the book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 500 Walks []  2020-1-20 0:33

    Very disappointing. I had hoped for useful info on each walk, when best to go, stuff of interest on the way, locations to stay, things to take along, etc. - but there was small of this. Walks of a few miles were listed alongside what are essentially extremely rigorous and potentially risky treks of more than a thousand miles that would take months. Some descriptions were just a few sentences. The premise of tracing the history of the globe through these walks does not, for me at least, work.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 12 Maps []  2020-5-9 18:23

    I bought this book specifically for my boyfriend. He had already read part of it after borrowing it from the library when it first became popular, but it was in such high demand, that he wasn't allowed to check it out again until after a waiting list had gone through it first. My boyfriend now has his own copy and can read it at his leisure. He is really into maps and history, so he really liked the book - hence my reason for buying it for him.I would recommend this book for anyone who likes history, particularly history that influenced how maps were drawn up or how country borders were created, destroyed, and rebuilt/moved after large happenings like wars. I definitely feel like twelve maps alone is not enough to really delve into a full acc of “the history of the world”. European countries alone itself have changed country borders hundreds of times, so I think they should’ve renamed the book as if it was more like one of a set and just hold it to a specific era or range of years. They could’ve also created more that method having a set of books rather than just one.I like the cover photo of the book, but I myself am really into old style maps, so maybe I’m biased on that. I would’ve preferred there to be a lot more actual photos of the maps in the book and better quality. It would’ve also been interesting to see each map as drawn by someone in a various country to compare the differences in cartography throughout the ages as well.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 12 Maps []  2020-5-9 18:23

    I heard about this book on NPR and over the years I have become a huge fan of science history. This book was outstanding. The early history was fascinating and the chapter on the Cassini's and their work to map France was especially te: I read this book on a Kindle and there were minor problems with some of the foreign characters being rendered correctly.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in 12 Maps []  2020-5-9 18:23

    Good

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Short History of the World []  2020-1-27 20:7

    A really fascinating read. I love history books, and as I look back on my school days I realize what a piecemeal education in history I was given. Just dates, wars and kings, one country at a time. Mr. Lascelles has the right idea - tie it all together so that the advance of civilization makes sense. You can only do that globally. I'm most interested in the method humankind has fumbled around trying to work out how government should work and how to "do" law. This book comes closer than any other in explaining that, for all the various locations of the earth. A heavy undertaking. Amazing job!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Short History of the World []  2020-1-27 20:7

    The author says in his preface that he aimed "to condense the generally accepted mainstream view into a simplified linear whole" and to correct teaching that "seldom gives a coherent picture of how it all fits together"... and then does exactly the opposite. The Bible isn't the best source of historical fact and mostly ignoring what was going on in China, the rest of Asia, S. America and Africa while the recounting a bunch of battles involving Westerners is not a amazing method to provide a 'coherent picture'.I really did obtain the feeling that the author spent a few days on Wikipedia and then rewrote his notes in his own words.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Little History of the World []  2020-1-16 11:30

    This is a pleasant small book with a whole lot that is missing, but still plenty enough that's sewn together in a meaningful narrative to provide children of all ages with a thoughtful journey through the ages.Gombrich's respectful and conversational voice encourages you, the reader, to evaluate the history as it unfolds. This is a nice literary device to support the stories stick. The effect is not just a stack of stories, but rather a conversation that you're invited to participate in to envision history with your own values and imagination. It's thoughtful and educational history.If you don't know your globe history, and wanna learn some basics from a book, it doesn't obtain any more fun than this.Enjoy!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Short History of the World []  2020-1-27 20:7

    To paraphrase the author in the introduction, it is one thing to take history classes in school, where you obtain bits and pieces of globe events, and another thing to understand how the history of earth came to be and how each of the pieces fit together to form what we now have. I liked that the book started with the Huge Bang, and progressed to life in the show time, including everything in between. For the sake of brevity everything is condensed, but supplies enough info to give the reader an understanding of what took put and how it affected the happenings that followed. The book contains several maps that fit the timeline of what is event and support the reader's understanding. I enjoyed reading this book and highly recommend it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Short History of the World []  2020-1-27 20:7

    This book is exactly as advertised. It's an simple read that gives the reader a fast view of the history of, well, history. It is well-written with tons of fun and fascinating facts. I plan to read it r the most part the book seemed very balanced and fact-based. My only criticism, and the only reason I deducted a star, is the author allow his left-leaning political bias creep into his writing about latest happenings in the Middle East and climate change. Specifically, "the threat of Iraq developing nuclear weapons that the USA used as an excuse to invade the oil-rich country in 2003," completely ignoring the sanctions approved by the UN, the multiple times Saddam was given to agree to inspections and avoid any military conflict, and the other countries involved in the action. Politics and Current Happenings are separate categories and I'd prefer to hold it that way.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Little History of the World []  2020-1-16 11:30

    Really fun and factual readLike stated on the title of my review, the book was pleasant and informative. The author begins around the time of the hominids, and descriptively info [their] life without communication, unity, laws, and material. Then he transitions to prehistoric times - that of the Neanderthals. This was the inception of communication (through paintings), language, man-made fire and tools. The periods discussed here are the Ice Age, the Stone Age, and the Bronze Age. In the proceeding chapters the author info the life of primitive civilizations living in Egypt, Mespotamia, Palestine and Israel. This is were religion formed, and historical religious prophets are spoken of such as Moses, David, Solomon and more. Around the time came the Phoenicians and the inception of the alphabet; therefore resulting in intelligible language. Other ancient civilizations are mentioned and expounded on, and same goes with their rulers (and influential figures). For example:Ancient China - the influence of Confucious and ruling of Shih Huang-tiPunics - HannibalRoman Empire - Julius ter the A.D. point, there was inception of superstition and the Dark Ages. There was Christendom, chivalry, cities and markets, merchants and knights. Throughout early times, the Arab globe came to be and had a powerful advantage on the globe intellectually and powerfully. Then came the fresh age, with fresh religions and fresh wars. Eventually we come to the enlightenment; a time of intellectual triumph in anthropoid history. Revolutions occurred, and so did Napoleon. Seas were crossed and America was founded, late of course, and local inhabitants were brutally slaughtered by the Spaniards. And eventually we obtain to modern times. The text transitioned fairly well and I enjoyed it much and learned a lot. To me it seemed that the author was of Christian faith, because of what looked like minuscule attempts at times to justify Christian actions. A small caveat for sure but overall there are a lot to learn from this short book on a large subject.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Little History of the World []  2020-1-16 11:30

    This book is a amazing read. It makes the globe history as fun to read like a amazing novel. But it emphasizes method too much on Europe. The title should be "A small history of Europe" to suit its contents.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Short History of the World []  2020-1-27 20:7

    3.5 StarsNot a poor overview for the general reader, but he does skip around quite a bit. It makes it harder to follow the progression. He writes well, but usually, history is easier to read if things are a bit more linear. (-1 star)Also, he takes every opportunity to push some kind of agenda for environmentalism (bad fossil fuels, global warming, etc.). That would be fine in other contexts but I don't prefer that in what is a very brief 'history' book. (-1 star)Also, while there are some errors and erroneous conclusions in the book, I didn't deduct any stars for them because it is supposed to be a very concise book. Plus, he does give some nice small tidbits along the method that are interesting. (+1 star)If you need a broad brush of globe history it is a nice book to read. I would recommend it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Short History of the World []  2020-1-27 20:7

    While dubious at first of the author's ability to describe even the highlights of the entire planet, I ended up being very impressed of how he identified the critical path happenings and do it in a concise manner. While there is much that got left behind, this discourse provides an perfect overview from which the reader can decide where to delve into grater depths. I would recommend to all to support develop a better understanding of what was going on in various parts of the world that may not have been highlighted in each of our national perspectives of the world.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Short History of the World []  2020-1-27 20:7

    Amazingly captivating story telling amidst breaking down a subject that would be a cumbersome read otherwise. Keywords for this book - short, summary, for people in a hurryWho this book is for: if you're looking to obtain a general picture or head begin on globe history broken down into milestone periods, this is for you. It is a fast read along with maps and amazing story telling.Who this book isn't for: if you are looking for a year by year, full detail dive into history, this isn't for you. You're best suited for an encyclopedia.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Little History of the World []  2020-1-16 11:30

    Writing a history book on which every reader will agree is tantamount to impossibility. In this regard, I will not allow his perspectives affect my evaluation on this book as a history e author uses a easy and friendly language so as for the readers to learn the history readily. As was this text intended for young readers in relatively short length, a lot of historical memorabilia are omitted. However, I do think that is forgivable, given the short length and intended usage of it. This book is not textbook worthy, but a book to compliment history gely argued versus this book was the lack of contents of other worlds than the West. I do agree that the title of this book "a small history of the world" is a bit misleading in this sense. However, I ascertain that this is condonable as well, based on that fact that the author showed much efforts to cover the history of Asia and Middle and large, this is a amazing history book that is not just dry, nor boring. I recalled a lot of that I had forgotten since high school history class and learned some fresh things. Never have I felt bored all the method through the book, and it is very rare that I feel this method about a history book. I do plan on reading more books written by this author.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Little History of the World []  2020-1-16 11:30

    An perfect book to read and enjoy. I used it to explain a wide dozens of bits of history to my son. It reads as a series of shorts which also makes it a amazing commuter book. The latest chapter is particularly amazing as the man reflects on the history that he has seen. Very poignant. Buy it for yourself or as a gift. Any history lover or simply someone who loves to read will adore this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Little History of the World []  2020-1-16 11:30

    I've read a lot of books about the general history of humankind. This one was definitely targeted towards 13 year olds but I still tolerated it. The only thing to hold in mind is it throws in a lot of random names, politicians, emperors, without describing them which makes happenings hard to track. Either eliminate names or flesh out the condly, be aware that this book's perspective is very EU-based; i.e. he focuses more on happenings in Europe or how they affected Europe rather than Asia or America.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Little History of the World []  2020-1-16 11:30

    I'm still half method this book but it is one of my favorite books ever read. It gives people who know about history a new and fast reminder of some topics, and it also gives a amazing begin for those who are fresh into the topics. Simple to read for all ages, with a bit of humor, you can tell the author took time to use the proper vocabulary and to some precise research.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Little History of the World []  2020-1-16 11:30

    I gave this book to my 14-year-old son, who is very interested in globe history, as a Christmas gift. He devoured the entire book over his two-week Christmas break. He said this was the best book on globe history that he has ever read. As he read, he Googled and read about various parts of history within the book. I was very impressed. If you know a teen or older adolescent who is interest in history this is definitely the book for them.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Short History of the World []  2020-1-27 20:7

    This book is exactly what it says it is...A Short History... I thought it was well done so if you wish an simple to read and digest history then give this one a shot.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Little History of the World []  2020-1-16 11:30

    This is exactly what it says it is...a LITTLE history of the world....the size of the book alone should be an indicator of that. As a historian, a history teacher and a homeschool mom, I love this book when paired with more in depth material.I have read a lot of negative reviews ( go to the 1 stars for this especially) and have found almost to a T that they are all commenting on the fact that religion is brought into the telling. Religion is a part of history. It was everywhere until very recently and until this day and age, it has always been the color of stories and history books. The method that history is written and interpreted, the objectives that are brought into history - and they ALWAYS are - is called zeitgeist, or the spirit of the a nutshell, this is a lovely book meant for children. It is meant to appeal to their sense of wonder.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Little History of the World []  2020-1-16 11:30

    When I saw Small History of The Globe in Amazon' website I knew (at once) it was the excellent one for me! I looked inside the book and I read all reviews about it. I orderd the illustrated edition and I Ifell in love with the book immediately. I bought another one and gave it to a mate as a gift. She loved it ing Amazon websites I discovered there is a CD edition of this book, and I ordered it too. It is exactly the same story in a beautiful amazing reading.Gombrich is a popular art historian and he wrote The Story of Art (a best seller). I strongly recommend you both Gombrich's books, if you are the kind of person who likes to have the best reference in your library.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Short History of the World []  2020-1-27 20:7

    This book is a short overview of the history of mankind. I've read other books with the same theme, this book is a very amazing example of that genre. The author gives a time line of when the genus homo began, when homo sapien developed, the exit from Africa, the migration patterns that settled the globe and the beginning of man living in cities as the agricultural revolution allowed civilization to begin.He covers ancient civilizations starting with the Sumerians and Egyptians, but also covers India and China. He hits the highlights of the ancient world, the [email protected]#$%!&?ites, Hebrews, Babylonians etc. The Persian empire is covered and the interaction between it and Ancient Greece with the affect on western civilization that the Greek victories in the 5 th century BC had.He covers the development of Christianity, Hinduism, Buddhism and Islam and the resulting affect these religions had on globe history.He continues with a amazing overview of globe development after the fall of Rome into the modern system we live under l in all this would be a amazing first book for someone to obtain a amazing overview of globe history so that they would be stimulated to investigate whatever strikes their fancy in detail. It is a quick read, you could probably do it one sitting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Short History of the World []  2020-1-27 20:7

    . . . history are doomed to repeat it.” [George Santayana]. This is a terrific overview for anyone who wants to remediate an incomplete grasp of the topic — and an even better refresher course (with perfect trivia and updated facts) for readers who, like me, missed a century here and there! Despite an occasional editorial boo-boo or omission, this is a superb work; not to be swallowed in a gulp, but savored and enjoyed at leisure.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Pilgrim Journey: A History of Pilgrimage in the Western World []  2020-2-2 7:0

    As a history lover and a fan of religious travel, allow me begin by saying that I really enjoyed this e research was impressive. I thought I knew a lot about religious pilgrimage, but Harpur's book was full of a historical tidbits that were completely fresh to me. I especially enjoyed the descriptions of travel in the Middle Ages, popular pilgrim hostels, and the like. Anyone who considers themselves a serious history wonk, especially European history, will obtain a kick out of the e writing was also very good. It was in depth without being dry, as books like this so often are. My only true criticism was the ending. Would have liked to read more about pilgrimage in the modern age, and possibly some commentary about how so a lot of necessary pilgrimage websites have been destroyed in latest decades.Anyway, if you're planning a visit to a Christian church in Europe or Israel in the near future, read this before you ard KramerThe Completer Pilgrim

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity []  2020-1-18 20:58

    Tag A, Noll, a Reformed evangelical Christian and a Professor of History at the University of Notre Dame, has written a textbook introduction and summary in his book The Old Religion in the Fresh World: A History of the North American Christianity to the history of Christianity in North America. He has "provided a broad outline of major events, developments, and occurrences in the history of the Christian churches that have filled North America with such remarkable vitality and diversity." (ix) The basic purpose of the book is to an introduction to the history of Christianity in North America while also offering reasons why Christianity in North America is various from Christianity in the "Old World" Europe. While it does give a cursory history of Canadian and Mexican Christianity (giving specific examples when required and providing a chapter to the subject), the book primarily with American Christianity. The bulk of the book is taken up with a succinct history of Christianity in the United States from AD 1482 to 2000. His narrative is not just about Protestant European-rooted Christianity. It has room for Catholics and Orthodox believers, blacks and whites (as well as other ethnicities), conservatives and liberals, clergy and laypeople, and gains and losses. Noll's history does well at describing how Christianity has affected the history of America and how America has affected Christianity as it moves to the North American Continent. For a cursory understanding of the history of Christianity in America, one would probably be better served, however, in reading Noll's 1992 History of Christianity in the US and Canada (Eerdmans), Noll's America's God: From Jonathan Edwards to Abraham Lincoln (Oxford), Nathan O. Hatch's The Democratization of American Christianity (Yale), Sydney Ahlstrom's A Religious History of the American People (Yale), or the later chapters of Justo L. Gonzalez's The Story of Christianity Volume 2: the Reformation to the Show Day (HarperCollins) for this history. The chapters dedicated to American History in The Old Religion in the Fresh Globe are at times too concise and selective. While they are worth reading due to Noll's required nuanced insight, they also leave out necessary facts. Dr. Noll saves some of his lengthy explanations for his other chapters. For example, he saves the bulk of his discussion on Jonathan Edwards in his theology chapter (chapter nine: Theology) rather than giving a fuller explanation in his history chapters. Dr. Noll's five chapters that do not give a cursory historical acc are worth their weight in gold in understanding the uniqueness of American Christianity. They give an in-depth analysis of the American context's affect on certain topics in Christian history. He has five chapters on certain particulars:1. chapter 1: "From Europe to America" - an overview of the impact of America's situation on Christianity that springs from Europe,2. chapter 9: "Theology" - how American practices shaped theology, especially populace ideas,3. chapter 10: "In the Shadow of the United States - Canada and Mexico" - the contrast to American Christianity provided by Canada and Mexico,4. chapter 11: "The Fate of European Traditions - Lutheran and Roman Catholics" - the impact of individualism and the separation of Church and State on certain Traditions, and5. chapter 12: "Day-to-Day Christian Spirituality and the Bible" - the populace practice of the Christian life. Chapter 1 basically sets up the entire book by explaining why Christianity in America is so various from its European counterpart. Noll's thesis in this chapter is that the American religious environment has allowed Christianity to be so diverse without people going to war, monarchs or despots rising, nor people feeling confined to the old ways. Noll considers pluralism, divisions, and fragmentation significant-and not altogether negative-aspects of American Christianity. He gives a compelling argument that the following reasons have allowed for such diverse expressions of faith: the sheer spaciousness of the land of America, the wide range of ethnicities and cultures (especially the African American culture), freedom of religion that has led to pluralism, and the lack of a confessional conservatism due to liberalism. Noll defines 19th century liberalism as "an affinity for populism, individualism, democratization, and market-making." (p. 23) This chapter does well in reflecting the distinctives arising from the American context and goes far to explain how Christianity is various in this context. The chapter on American Theology does well in explaining that most of the theology of the U.S. stems from or has been in tournament with European theology. Noll explains that it is in the American context, however, that science and the scientific way were allowed to outshine Christian doctrines more so than in the European context. Populace doctrines were also allowed to grow, especially dispensational premillennialism and charismatic teaching (which Noll erroneously calls Pentecostalism). Noll gives a plethora of protestant and Catholic examples of American theologians who contributed to Christianity. Most of his writing, however, is given to Jonathan Edwards's American approach to theology and his writings. In chapters 10 & 11, Dr. Noll writes about the contrast between the U.S. and Canada and Mexico and the contrast between European Traditions and American denominations. Noll gives a amazing cursory history of Mexico effectively showing the impact of its Roman Catholic roots compared to the British Protestant roots in America. Canada does not obtain an as in-depth history. Dr. Noll does show, however, how Canada and America are different, especially in their political secularizations. He also explains that every European tradition has had to with "America's liberal, democratic, commercial, mobile and individualistic values." (p. 235) Noll demonstrates that Lutherans and theologians like Schmucker, Krauth, and Walther have various answers on how to with the American context. Lutheran denominations like the ELCA and the Missouri Synod are formed in response. It was Catholic schools and higher education, and especially their emphasis on Neo-Thomism (a return to scholasticism and the classics) that have created Roman Catholicism a success in the U.S. These contrasts to the American denominations and Canada and Mexico's history to America are probably not found in other textbooks. Dr. Tag Noll's chapter called "Day to Day Christian Spirituality and the Bible," was eye-opening, especially his treatment of the American use of magic, even in conservative Christianity. Noll suggests that certain patterns of American life and behavior can be distinguished in history. He lays out five areas: the use of magic in the midst of formal religion; serious ethics that stresses the Golden Rule and discipline; the rejection and the embrace of material objects used in worship; devotional spiritual readings; and the consistent use of a "canon" of Protestant hymnody. Noll makes a amazing point in stating that "of all ancient religious authorities carried to the Fresh World, only the Bible was exempted from America's profound suspicion of the past." (p. 267) He gives a cursory history of the Scripture's prominence in American history and politics. This chapter is a fine preliminary survey of famous Christian practices. Dr. Tag A. Noll's book, The Old Religion in the Fresh World: A History of the North American Christianity, traces the developments of American Christianity while emphasizing the aspects of that faith that set it apart from its European counterpart Noll provides a amazing succinct textbook for students, but because its purpose is to be brief, it disappointedly leaves out some subjects. The rise of the influence of megachurches in America, the creation of Bible Colleges, and the impact of authors such as Francis Schaeffer & C.S. Lewis are absent. Dr. Noll, being an intellectual, also locations too much emphasis on intellectualism, especially when he lists theological influences. Overall, however, this book gives perfect insight into the history of Christianity in America. There are more detailed surveys of American Christianity available, but Dr. Noll's insights on the American context are worth the read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity []  2020-1-18 20:58

    In the minus column, the method the content was covered seemed a bit scattershot, going back and forth from a linear approach to a thematic one. Certain subjects felt like they should have received more coverage than they did, such as televangelism and connections between religion and partisan politics.On the plus side, Noll covered his central idea--old religion in the Fresh World--quite well, covering both continuity and discontinuity to establish what created Christianity in North America distinct from European Christianity. He also discusses happenings and figures that were less familiar but worthy of our t the best book I've read similar to church history, not even the best I've read from Noll, but still a worthwhile read to be sure.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Pilgrim Journey: A History of Pilgrimage in the Western World []  2020-2-2 7:0

    A history of pilgrimage in the Western globe will inevitably invite the reader to ponder some interesting questions, about faith’s history and practice if nothing more. James Harpur’s well-researched The Pilgrim Journey introduces readers to pilgrimages, icons and relics, from Christianity’s earliest times, comparing and contrasting past and present, the practices of various faiths, and the hopes and aspirations of rich and not good through passing centuries. It’s a smoothly written, fascinating read, which neatly addresses the excesses that led to the Reformation, the mysteries of more latest Marian appearances, and the spirituality of people through all ded to the religious implications, author James Harpur looks too at the geographic components of pilgrimage, and the historical records of those who undertook these journeys. An inspiring photo appears of the historical world, through battle and peace and everything in between, with little towns and nations obliging, encouraging and benefiting from pilgrimage, just as the pilgrims themselves benefit from devotion, labor and love.I wasn’t sure what I would create of such a serious historical read, but I really enjoyed it—an intriguingly various aspect of the past, rarely touched upon, but reassuringly true and generously portrayed.Disclosure: I was given a copy and I my honest review.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity []  2020-1-18 20:58

    Lots of facts, amazing read

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity []  2020-1-18 20:58

    as expected

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity []  2020-1-18 20:58

    The book just didn't seem to read smoothly, almost like the author was trying to force the content together from a larger source of content. If the author knows a significant amount but cannot place it together coherently, then don't publish the book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity []  2020-1-18 20:58

    I read Tag Noll's first foray into this subject, his 1992 History of Christianity in the US and Canada. I thought it was good, but a small too academic and scholarly for most is book is a tight condensation of what appeared in that previous volume, plus a amazing more about African-American Christian history, as well as Mexican Christian e thesis of the book seems to be how the separation of church and state in the USA created it possible for a lot of various kinds of Christianity (and of other sects) to flourish.We read about the influential preaching ministry of George Whitefield and thr writings of Jonathan Edwards in the 1740s and how their ministries impacted thousands of people for Christ.We learn about the indefatigable ministry work of Francis Asbury, who started Methodist study groups and congregations all through the states.We learn about Harriet Livermore, the first woman to preach the word in the US Congress.We also see how the black community drew strength and inspiration from the biblical narratives, both during and after the slavery years.We see how Catholicism has had a tremendous influence in Mexico and in Canada.We also see the formidable influence of Pentecostalism, both in the USA and in Mexico.I appreciated the afterword's mentioning of the some of the influences that impacted American Christianity: The slavery issue, the first amendment which guaranteed that the government would not pass legislation with respect to the establishment of a religion, the ministries of Edwards, Whitefield, and other revivalists, and the westward method this perfect book could be strengthened would be the addition of material about the impact of postmodernism on biblical Christianity. Perhaps there could also be added sections on the influence of Rick Warren, Bill Hybels, and other evangelical megachurch is book is great, and it will support you to obtain a sense of the lay of the land as you seek to learn more about what God has done and what others have done in His name, both amazing and bad.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity []  2020-1-18 20:58

    Perfect read for a better understanding of Cristianity in American history!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Pilgrim Journey: A History of Pilgrimage in the Western World []  2020-2-2 7:0

    It was much more interesting than I expected and worth the reading. It was educational and enlightening as well as thought provoking.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity []  2020-1-18 20:58

    This is one of the best surveys regarding American Christianity that I've found. Noll is accessible but scholarly and objective in his presentation of history.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Old Religion in a New World: The History of North American Christianity []  2020-1-18 20:58

    I read Tag Noll's work while in seminary. I found it an excellant exposition of the development of Christianity within America. Since reading it myself, I have recommended it as a primary reading in adult education for understanding today's political melieu. The subject is helpful in understanding the development of religious thought that has invaded our understanding of democracy.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet []  2020-1-15 22:58

    Capitalist ecology’s stranglehold on life makes everything cheap. Work, care, food, nature, lives are cheapened under capitalism, which is not economics but rather a set of relationships (and thus an ecology). Super necessary book for those trying to imagine a better, more just world. A quick read that untangles the deceptions of capitalism and its assumptions and that lays bares a lot of the relationships that hold us bound up.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet []  2020-1-15 22:58

    This was a terrific summer read in advance of my course at ESSY. Thanks to Patel and Moore!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet []  2020-1-15 22:58

    This is a relatively short book (200 pages) so more people have less of an excuse not to read it. It shows capitalism as a way of organizing society and its very fundamental need to reduce nature to a resource (mankind versus nature rather than mankind as part of nature). Worse yet, the authors point out, capitalism required a amazing percentage of mankind to be seen as part of nature (in other words, resources to be exploited). They trace this development from the point where the European people discovered the Global South, beginning with Columbus' voyages. I actually appreciate this. It seems that Columbus' view of the natives of the Caribbean is still, today, the view of Western leaders of the rest of the world. It's a very clarifying book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet []  2020-1-15 22:58

    An incredibly accessible but erudite book, with perfect flow, fine research, and a convincing, well-argued, informative argument.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet []  2020-1-15 22:58

    Highly recommended. A wide and illuminating history with which to better understand the origins and evolution of capitalism. In expertly identifying its appetites and assessing its damage, the authors are able to present how capitalism has always depended on the undervaluation of what is most valuable, what effects this cheapening has had, and why this fundamental dependency can no longer be depended on.Raj Patel has always been particularly adept at shedding light on the nature and workings of capitalism. He is able to do so partly because he doesn't dwell on laying blame or pointing fingers, but doggedly endeavors to present us how capitalism is only a relatively latest political construct, made and perpetuated by a specific class of people for certain self-interested ends, and we should not be surprised that it is unjust (and in these times, plain dangerous). We should also not expect it to govern our global civilization for the duration. Capitalism is coming to a close. This book gives us a broad, connected-dots view of its history and modus operandi, so we have a better sense of what we need to disentangle ourselves from.And please never mind the one-star "reviews" from people who obviously haven't read the book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet []  2020-1-15 22:58

    I read this book because of a recommendation of a former student, and I loved it. Patel and Moore provide a compelling argument for the method in which our modern globe devalues people, resources, and the environment. I like how they blend together Marxist, environmental, and identity-based arguments.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet []  2020-1-15 22:58

    This is a brilliant, must-read book! It's a easy and deep method to create sense of the moment we are in now and what it might take to move beyond this. I highly recommend this book for insight, information, and inspiration toward a fresh world!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet []  2020-1-15 22:58

    Simple to read and fascinating.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet []  2020-1-15 22:58

    Most of the very low ratings on this book are written by shop radicals who are on a death march to the climate apocalypse. This is a very enlightening book which ties anti capitalism with much required ecological contributions.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of the World in Seven Cheap Things: A Guide to Capitalism, Nature, and the Future of the Planet []  2020-1-15 22:58

    amazing read

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Sacred Gifts, Profane Pleasures: A History of Tobacco and Chocolate in the Atlantic World []  2020-2-1 8:23

    The author documents very carefully the history of these two substances from their cultivation and use in Central America to their spread to Europe and throughout the world. She emphasizes that Europe (the Spanish conquistadors etc.) certainly influenced (and changed) the ways of the Central American Indians but they in turn also greatly influenced the Europeans, more than most people today seem to understand.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Sacred Gifts, Profane Pleasures: A History of Tobacco and Chocolate in the Atlantic World []  2020-2-1 8:23

    The Mesoamerican roots of these two substances commences the book, connecting both with the Nahua cosmology where both played key roles in divination and socialization. The psychoactive attributes of tobacco created it a key part of the Mesoamerican rituals of worship and a community bonder, while chocolate's value as votive offering, currency and aristocratic beverage of choice distinguished it as a social barometer. These did not entirely disappear when Cortez conquered the Mexica Empire but were modified and adapted by both the surviving Nahua speakers as well as their Hispanic overlords. A lot of Nahua who resisted outright the attempts at conversion by the zealous friars or even those who pretended to worship the Catholic faith relied on tobacco and chocolate in their hidden rites. Even though the initial inclination by the ecclesiastics was to give both a pass in to help in the religious assimilation efforts, it wasn't long before the Inquisition came down hard on both as purveyors of idolatry and paganism. By then though the habit of drinking the spice laced cacao drink and inhaling the burning leaves of tobacco had become an acquired addiction for many, including priests. Soon the Fresh World-born Spaniards (Creoles) and even newly arrived Spaniards developed the habits of consuming these substances, even though it wouldn't be until the 17th century that both began to become famous in Spain proper. Brought to Spain and Europe by sailors, tobacco rapidly became famous among the lower classes, amazing for alleviating hunger and invigorating the fatigued, but its allure did not escape the aristocrats, who soon found social pleasure in sniffing snuff from fancy boxes. Chocolate was quicker to become a commodity as it was grown on plantations that could be regulated, but tobacco quickly overcame its dark companion as a revenue earner. The author argues that the Spanish crown's endeavor to create tobacco a Crown monopoly accelerated the formation of the strong centralized nation-state that epitomized 17th century Europe. The key role played by "New Christians" (Christianized Jews) in this monopoly is discussed, as were the efforts by the Inquisition to persecute these merchants as being crypto-Jews. In fact, the Church never got over its suspicions about either consumable, but especially tobacco. Its previous association with pagan worship in Mesoamerica, criticism of its health effects and the question of it's profaning the act of the Eucharist Mass and of fasting during holy days vexed theologians, who lined up on both sides. Gradually, the secularizing effects of both the Reformation and Enlightenment created such arguments appear frivolous to a lot of Europeans. The consumption of chocolate, which was entirely in liquid form until the 19th century, is credited with paving the method for the two more highly caffeine-laden drinks, coffee and tea, which soon swept chocolate away in the preferred social beverage category. Tobacco's insidious health effects, masked by the lower average age of mortality in the pre-scientific age, has created it a pariah substance today while paradoxically it remains the most consumed narcotic of all time. Chocolate emerged from being knocked off its beverage perch by dominating the worldwide candy empire. This is a well written acc of how two substances originally viewed with disgust, trepidation and suspicion came to dominate the world.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Philosophy in the Islamic World: A history of philosophy without any gaps, Volume 3 []  2020-6-23 18:32

    Outstanding book. Reflects deep appreciation of the continuum of philosophical development in the Islamic world, and the competing ideas over time. The detailed analysis of Ibn Sina's contribution alone is worth the of the book. It is awesome that Ibn Sina found time to create seminal contributions in Philosophy while being distracted by his modest side project ... a text that gave the word Canon to the English language, and was the authoritative text in Medicine in Europe and Asia for almost seven centuries.I want Dr Adamson had spent a small less time on some of the Jewish scholars and more the contributions of Imam al Haramain (who was such a purist that he refused to accept anything without going back to first principles, including his treatment on the Existence of God)) and Imam al Ashari. More detailed treatment of some contemporary writers such as wahdatul wajood (Syed Naqib ul Attas is the first name that comes to mind), al Ghazali fans such as Hamza Yusuf, and proponents of different Salafi strains would have rounded things of nicely.But no huge deal. Still a unbelievable read, so I gave it 5 ar Hasan, PhD

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Philosophy in the Islamic World: A history of philosophy without any gaps, Volume 3 []  2020-6-23 18:32

    unbelievable copy and book

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Sacred Gifts, Profane Pleasures: A History of Tobacco and Chocolate in the Atlantic World []  2020-2-1 8:23

    Tobacco and Chocolate have become ubiquitous in global capitalist society to the point that they have taken on an almost ahistorical nature. A lot of of us may associate the smell of tobacco smoke with a particular family member or the taste of chocolate with childhood mischief. Marcy Norton shatters this subconscious ahistoricism with her book Sacred Gifts, Profane Pleasures: A History of Tobacco and Chocolate in the Atlantic World, in which she traces the early path that led to the global hegemony of Chocolate and Tobacco, what she calls "the first commodity fetishes of the modern world" (12).The beginning of Sacred Bonuses examines how chocolate was a key commodity for Mesoamerican elites in the precolumbian era but most of the book focuses on the contradictory trajectory that tobacco and chocolate acquired in European eyes. From the time of the conquest when the commodities were viewed as diabolic vestiges of a savage civilization to by the 17th century becoming a fundamental part of European life for both settlers in the Americas and those in Europe. The path that these commodities took over this roughly 300 year period illustrates an often overlooked part of the conquest, the method that Europeans appropriated not only indigenous goods but also customs while trying to show themselves as distinctly European and superior to the inhabitants of the newly "discovered" globe across the ever, the book goes beyond simply looking at the method that Europeans adapted tobacco and chocolate to their culture but also the social context that surrounded the use of the commodities from the prehispanic period onwards. Norton begins by examining the spiritual connection that chocolate and tobacco had with MesoAmerican cultures, the interesting ways that both were tied to the sensory and that chocolate, in particular, came to serve as a surrogate for blood in the literal sense, in the case of Nahua prescriptions of chocolate for blood loss, but also the method that it was tied to the familiar and the construction of gender. The book then goes on to examine how the commodities were perceived as novelties among Europeans and in some cases were tied to survival in a hostile middle ground where neither Indigenous people or Europeans were in complete control of their lives. For example, she mentions the case of Francisco Martín who during the early conquest of what is now Venezuela who in near-death experience encountered and assimilated to the Pemeno indigenous community, using tobacco extensively as a shaman and sharing it with fellow Europeans when he returned to European cred Bonuses illustrates how the conception of Tobacco and Chocolate as novelties of a strange Fresh World, thus relegated to the Europeans who choose to interact with that world, did not latest while in the initial period after the conquest. The commodities would slowly penetrate the European Metropoli first through medical literature written by Creole doctors then it found its method into the administration through a trinity of the state, empire, and the Portuguese Fresh Christian diaspora. Norton shows how this unlikely trinity was responsible for solidifying Spanish state power and bringing tobacco into the European shop under a Spanish monopoly to ensure the hegemony of the Spanish state in the tobacco trade something. The metropli's need for centralization led to an increase in the power of the Spanish state and an increasing ability to control the political economy of its e next part of the book examines some of the debates around the health effects of Tobacco with the humoral system and the ability of tobacco to purge cold humors dominating those debates. From there the book goes on to examine the complex ways that Tobacco and chocolate undermined the sanctity of Iberian Catholicism. Tobacco presented a special regulation issue for the church because of its popularity among the clergy generating debate about whether it was sacrilegious for them to use it. However, its ability to subvert traditional religious values may have lied with its inadvertent promotion of relativism, with the fresh exotic, American, and unchristian goods leading their users to delve into other practices which could question the church's monopoly on truth (255). In the epilogue Norton briefly examines the method that Chocolate and Tobacco were diffused outside of Europe, displaying the ways that other parts of the "old world" were more receptive to the effects of tobacco and less prejudice to its origins. Tobacco smoking actually influenced the method that other goods like Marijuana and Opium would be consumed in Asia. This section may prove to be helpful to further research the method that the effects of the conquest of the Americas would reverberate throughout what is today the rest of the third globe and that the so-called Columbian exchange would not be limited to Europe and the nce the industrial age chocolate and tobacco have become very various from their original form, at least outside of Mexico and Central America where it is still a famous liquid in the form of Champurrado. With Chocolate transforming into a mass-produced candy bar and tobacco gaining the most popularity in high nicotine and additive filled cigarettes. However, both have become a fundamental part of globalized capitalist culture. For this reason, Norton's book is a must-read for scholars of food, early modern political economy, and even those studying public health. Different chapters of the book could be used for upper-level undergraduate classes on early Latin American history, culinary History, and European history. It is a amazing resource to understanding how Tobacco, Chocolate, and other so-called vices have been regulated in the past, the effects that the conquest of the Fresh Globe had on European culture and early capitalism, as well as the growth of the Spanish empire. The method that chocolate and tobacco still dominate our globe and prove to be lasting ways of socialization support to ensure the relevance of Norton's groundbreaking study.

    0  



    Search Cloud

    About us

    Use our product reviews finder and generate tons of ratings & opinions on any item, shop product or service. Search, read and publish reviews for brands, TV shows, ebooks, gadgets, video games, meals, music, household items or movies. Would you like to rate recently purchased thing? Go ahead! Express satisfaction or sadness, describe own experience & identify strengths and weaknesses of the product. Write short or detailed review with a few clicks.

    Community

    Publish review of any item you find here, registration is not required
    Share own experience, point out the pros and cons, warn or recommend
    Search for opinions on any item, product or service, read tons of reviews

    Contact

    www.add-reviews.com

    Use contact form to reach us or write a message via email:

    [email protected]

    Describe your problem, share ideas or report a bug on the site.

    https://add-reviews.com/
    0856-458-386