a history of weiss lake Reviews & Opinions


Submit a history of weiss lake review or read customer reviews:

100 Reviews Found

Sort by: Most Accurate (default) | Newest | Top Rated

  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A History of Weiss Lake review []  2020-1-16 0:16

    Interesting and accurate historical information.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A History of Weiss Lake review []  2020-1-16 0:16

    Amazing book. Recommended for anyone near or on the lake.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A History of Weiss Lake review []  2020-1-16 0:16

    Bought as a bonus and my dad enjoyed reading it!

    0  


    Add Your Opinion on a history of weiss lake or Continue Reading Reviews Below ↓

     

    Watch a history of weiss lake video reviews and related movies:

    See Weiss Lake under water grave site on youtube.

     related image

    See Weiss Dam 50th Anniversary.wmv on youtube.

     related image

    See Massive Flood | Weiss Lake, Alabama | Feb. 2019 on youtube.

     related image

    See Flooding near Weiss Lake in Cherokee County on youtube.

     related image

    See July 4, 2016 || Weiss Lake || Cox Family History on youtube.

     related image

    See Weiss History on youtube.

     related image

    See Weiss Lake Flood 2015 - Leesburg/Chigger Farms Area on youtube.

     related image

    See Weiss Lake Flood 2015 - Cherokee Camper Park on youtube.

     related image

    Scroll down to see all opinions ↓

  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A History of Weiss Lake review []  2020-1-16 0:16

    Amazing book about our area. It arrived quickly and was as advertised.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A History of Weiss Lake review []  2020-1-16 0:16

    Very interesting and written in an simple to digest way

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A History of Weiss Lake review []  2020-1-16 0:16

    Loved the book. Wished for more private stories. A lot of of those folks are gone by now but write a sequel if you can.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A History of Weiss Lake review []  2020-1-16 0:16

    I live in Cherokee County, the home of Weiss lake. I was very young and didn't live here when the lake was filled. So I found the history very interesting.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A History of Weiss Lake review []  2020-1-16 0:16

    As a fresh resident of Cherokee County, I loved this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A History of Weiss Lake review []  2020-1-16 0:16

    I bought this for my boyfriend who frequently fishes this lake.He loved the images and was really excited about reading it.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A History of Weiss Lake review []  2020-1-16 0:16

    I have read this book with interest, however the picture and article concerning Snow Hill is incorrect. This is not Snow Hill that is shown in the book. The Snow Hill home belonged to the Williamson Estate and was originally saved from the waters by the construction of a dike around the property. However, it later burned. Aside from an error in some facts, the book is some amazing history of the area.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History's Aquarium: The Treasures of Fossil Lake review []  2020-1-12 18:24

    Amazing book on a amazing location!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    US History: Greatest Hits: 47 Stories in American History: From the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror (American History, US History Books) review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:3

    A fun fast read filled with a lot of facts that the average American would wish to know. Some of the work will reinforce what the reader already knows, but some of it will introduce the reader to fresh historical facts that may garner the interest if students of all ages.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    US History: Greatest Hits: 47 Stories in American History: From the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror (American History, US History Books) review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:3

    Short Reminders of History class!I loved this book! I don't know what some reviewers are talking about with historical inaccuracy. I did not search any. They must have been fixed by the time I read it. The stories are short and to the point (to the degree they are almost too short). Although the stories are simplified, I found them exciting and the writing was refreshing for a genre that can be extremely dry. Each story teases you with info and now I'm thirsting for more!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    US History: Greatest Hits: 47 Stories in American History: From the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror (American History, US History Books) review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:3

    Not a full-fledged history book, but more like anecdotes and short notes of the happenings (though not all of them) in chronological order. I had enjoyed reading the Revolutionary Battle and the Westward Expansion sections more than the later ones. In the Civil Battle section, Hatfields versus the McCoys was fun to read. The rest of the book didn't feel too original; still, it is a amazing book to acclimate newcomers to history, but it is not for history buffs.I had fun reading it, anyway, and I think it should be a amazing bonus for children in fifth and sixth grades.

    0  


  • 1

    Is this review useful?

    US History: Greatest Hits: 47 Stories in American History: From the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror (American History, US History Books) review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:3

    Very amazing selection of necessary happenings and stories of significant importance to our country. Happenings leading up to the revolution through Obama's election.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    US History: Greatest Hits: 47 Stories in American History: From the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror (American History, US History Books) review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:3

    I enjoyed the back stories to a lot of of the happenings you learn about in History class.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    US History: Greatest Hits: 47 Stories in American History: From the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror (American History, US History Books) review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:3

    Loved the History Review. There were several stories not taught in school. The book gives insights to how our country was founded and the struggles we have endured and overcome. As a country we need to learn from our past to support us resolve problems of today. Learn from our history.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    US History: Greatest Hits: 47 Stories in American History: From the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror (American History, US History Books) review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:3

    I have juust started loving history especially since 2008 when pres barac obama won the election. This has helped me fulfil some of my bucket list altho it's fueled me to wish more.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    US History: Greatest Hits: 47 Stories in American History: From the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror (American History, US History Books) review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:3

    I thought they would be contemporary accounts but they were Thayer's take on the events.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    US History: Greatest Hits: 47 Stories in American History: From the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror (American History, US History Books) review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:3

    Nice, fast reads for those times when you don't wish to stay up too late reading! Enjoyable and informative. Just what I wanted.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    US History: Greatest Hits: 47 Stories in American History: From the Revolutionary War to the War on Terror (American History, US History Books) review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:3

    This would be a amazing read for a 5 th grade teacher to share with their studentd, or have them read and discuss each story

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History Of Russia For Kids: A History Series - Children Explore Histories Of The World Edition review []  2020-1-10 19:49

    As I began teaching Russian history to older preschoolers I discovered how difficult an endeavor that is. This book tries unsuccessfully to lay out that history for younger children. Although presented as a picture book with just a sentence or two per page, the vocabulary is far too advanced for younger children, and complex words are not explained or even given context. Photographs and illustrations are not engaging for the age targeted, and do not illustrate well the main idea of the page. The history reads like a list of a handful of events, with the expectation that readers already have an understanding of globe history into which they can assimilate these events. Moreover the history presented here begins with the formation of Russia by "migrant peoples" and ends with the attack of Hitler in 1941. There is no mention of communism, the zone race, or the conversion to democracy (and the book was published in 2015). The latest third of the book has a list of Interesting Facts about Russia, not history, although one of the facts relates to the Russian zone exploration by I mentioned teaching Russian history to younger kids is a difficult task because it is so politically driven, and politics is such an abstract concept. However this book tries to move history along by telling young kids about battles and treaties, instead of focusing on the various forms of governments, significant people, and technological advancements, which would have been more interesting for the audience. It also seems to be confused on whether it's purpose is to lay out history or to show collection of facts. It's not really worth the purchase.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History Of Russia For Kids: A History Series - Children Explore Histories Of The World Edition review []  2020-1-10 19:49

    I bought a kindle ver and I am glad I did (not pay $10 for hard copy). The history facts are all scattered and not connected. I would not recommend this for a child or anyone.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History Of Russia For Kids: A History Series - Children Explore Histories Of The World Edition review []  2020-1-10 19:49

    So well done--beautiful pictures!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    The History of the Islamic Empire - History Book 11 Year Olds | Children's History review []  2020-1-17 23:43

    I am not sure who baby Professor is but they are distributing material that is incorrect. They have pictures depicting the Prophet PBUH as well as the Angel Jibreel. This is terrible! Please! to all of my fellow brothers and sisters, be wary of the material that you buy, there are always people out there trying to spread the wrong notice of Islam. This book is one of those books that should be removed permanently.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History Channel : History Documentaries review [App]  2018-3-21 21:9

    No Chromecast support, glitchy to watch, adds intrusive.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History Channel : History Documentaries review [App]  2018-3-21 21:9

    Amazing one....but need to modernize all programs.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History Channel : History Documentaries review [App]  2018-3-21 21:9

    Amazing but need to subjects place in order

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History Channel : History Documentaries review [App]  2018-3-21 21:9

    Watched one en when went to play the next it keeps stopping.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History Channel : History Documentaries review [App]  2018-3-21 21:9

    bad,, television not connect but ADS always work.. application prank

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History Channel : History Documentaries review [App]  2018-3-21 21:9

    Doesnt connect,perhaps the DB is brought down due to anti piracy problems

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History Channel : History Documentaries review [App]  2018-3-21 21:9

    Amazing but how time reset of ancient alien of india

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History Channel : History Documentaries review [App]  2018-3-21 21:9

    I am satisfied for this aap

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History Channel : History Documentaries review [App]  2018-3-21 21:9

    Love it!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Michigan Voices: Our State’s History in the Words of the People Who Lived It (Great Lakes Books Series) review []  2020-1-20 20:44

    So far I love this book. It's very fascinating with a taste of multiple kinds of peoples direct words from essays, news papers, books, letters or whatever. Is printed in order of time as the tales go on. Amazing bathroom read or night time story. Quality is also amazing with simple to read print, printed through Wayne State University Press. A excellent book to have for a Michigan History Collection.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Michigan Voices: Our State’s History in the Words of the People Who Lived It (Great Lakes Books Series) review []  2020-1-20 20:44

    Great!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Michigan Voices: Our State’s History in the Words of the People Who Lived It (Great Lakes Books Series) review []  2020-1-20 20:44

    Such a cool and interesting book with real to life articles about Michigan. Very cool.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Michigan Voices: Our State’s History in the Words of the People Who Lived It (Great Lakes Books Series) review []  2020-1-20 20:44

    The book arrived in excellent condition

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Michigan Voices: Our State’s History in the Words of the People Who Lived It (Great Lakes Books Series) review []  2020-1-20 20:44

    A lot of folks do not realize the rich history and necessary role Michigan played in our country's history. It was being colonized at the same time - and was every bit of a colony - as the original thirteen. Detroit was founded in 1701, just 19 years after Philadelphia, and has thrived (for better or worse) ever since.What makes this book such a search is that it is soley written in the hand and language of those early settlers, going back to 1665 when the French settlers were spreading God's word to the Indians and continuing through the Indian battles of Pontiac, the Revolutionary War, early settlements in the lower penninsula, the Civil War, through the automobile industry, up into latest e most interesting entries are those written by the easy folk trying to etch out a life in this wilderness, such as the life of a fresh school teacher in 1866 who writes of having 89 students in her one room schoolhouse, as well as the surveyors who wrote off Michigan as a water logged wasteland. The life of a logger, a first hand description of the sounds of the Civil War, the birth of the GOP in 1854, and into the electric light and telephone age of 1907. This book is a wealth of information, taking the reader back into time, visiting the early folks of our amazing state.A must for local history buffs and social historians.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [3rd Edition] review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:9

    I purchased this as a sort of supplemental reading for a survey class I'm taking. I was hoping this all-in-one history book would be easier for me to study from than my large textbook. It doesn't contain everything, of course, but it does do a amazing job of highlighting all the huge happenings in different points in history and even contains some info that other history books don't. I was surprised how much I learned from this. I really like how everything is laid out, it makes it very simple to follow. I especially like the section on Native Americans. Very concise. Overall I'd highly recommend this book by Adam Brown to anyone who wants to dip there toes in the history of the world.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [3rd Edition] review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:9

    Very amazing book to read - tells the history in a very clear method

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [3rd Edition] review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:9

    As the title implies, the author covers ancient to the post-Vietnam and cold battle era in this apters 1 through 3 were particularly interesting. The first chapter focuses on classical history, i.e. Greece and Rome. I found this chapter very helpful as it laid out Greek and Roman history in a linear fashion with a general overview in e second covers Asia, and dissects Chinese history without being overwhelming. Again, with a related fashion to the first chapter in both presenting the info and e third quickly goes over European and Russian history. This I was more familiar with, but still found helpful in sequencing historical e rest of the work was rushed and sparse on the details. That being said, this small book provided me with something that I lacked: a general knowledge of early history which now allows me to have fun and learn from more literature without confusion.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [3rd Edition] review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:9

    Globe History provides a amazing synopsis of globe history. I'd recommend this book to anyone who is looking to obtain an overview of a part of the globe they're not familiar with.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [3rd Edition] review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:9

    amazing

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [3rd Edition] review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:9

    This book of history is concise (107 pages), to the point, and astonishingly broad in scope, covering the significant players and happenings in Western and Eastern civilization from early history to show day. It’s a amazing survey, and highly recommended if you are unfamiliar with the material or wish to give it to your children to create them knowledgeable about the world. Basically, it covers the who, what, where, and when of the most significant historical happenings that happened. It consists of an introduction and six concise chapters covering ancient history (Greece, Egypt, Roman Empire, Constantine and Christianity); Asian history (India and its evolution, Korea, and China (multiple dynasties); European and Russian history from the Middle Ages through Napoleonic Europe; American history (Native Americans and regional history); Australian history (British colonization, influx from other sources, Australian politics); and major battles (WWI, WWII, and Vietnam).

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [3rd Edition] review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:9

    I was very surprised that such a short read would be packed with so much information. Usually the history books are filled with a lot of info that isn't interesting, but this one had info that was not only interesting, but info that you would remember and tell your mates and family next time you see them. This book is one of the history books that you will be excited to read and if you can place it down, will wish to pick up almost immediately to hold on reading. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in history but don't wish to read about all of the boring parts.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [3rd Edition] review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:9

    Didn't expect much so I wasn't disappointed.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [3rd Edition] review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:9

    Recommended!A complete history of the world, condensed into Tapas style blurbs and almost as appetizing. Brown takes readers on a sightseeing tour of the defining cultural happenings for humans. The timeline of happenings stretches all of the method back to Ancient civilizations and progressing through the Nixon's administration in the United States and the end of the Vietnam War. The greatest bonus that Brown's work gives to readers is a contemptible, overarching view of the happenings which have brought the globe to where it is today. Happenings are separated into little paragraphs and enlightens the reader to how a lot of cultures were affected by singular globe events. Recommended.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [3rd Edition] review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:9

    Amazing book. It is only 107 pages with so much history compacted into it. I think this book is amazing for kids to read as they learn various parts of history. This book has so much info that I had forgotten about. I'm not a huge history buff but because this book is little and had so much info it actually kept my attention. Amazing book for students or parents like me who need to remember happenings to support their children. I would recommend this to anyone especially history buffs and students learning fresh material. Amazing book to hold on hand.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [4th Edition] review [Book]  2018-2-12 18:1

    I purchased this as a sort of supplemental reading for a survey class I'm taking. I was hoping this all-in-one history book would be easier for me to study from than my large textbook. It doesn't contain everything, of course, but it does do a amazing job of highlighting all the huge happenings in different points in history and even contains some info that other history books don't. I was surprised how much I learned from this. I really like how everything is laid out, it makes it very simple to follow. I especially like the section on Native Americans. Very concise. Overall I'd highly recommend this book by Adam Brown to anyone who wants to dip there toes in the history of the world.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [4th Edition] review [Book]  2018-2-12 18:1

    This book of history is concise (107 pages), to the point, and astonishingly broad in scope, covering the significant players and happenings in Western and Eastern civilization from early history to show day. It’s a amazing survey, and highly recommended if you are unfamiliar with the material or wish to give it to your children to create them knowledgeable about the world. Basically, it covers the who, what, where, and when of the most significant historical happenings that happened. It consists of an introduction and six concise chapters covering ancient history (Greece, Egypt, Roman Empire, Constantine and Christianity); Asian history (India and its evolution, Korea, and China (multiple dynasties); European and Russian history from the Middle Ages through Napoleonic Europe; American history (Native Americans and regional history); Australian history (British colonization, influx from other sources, Australian politics); and major battles (WWI, WWII, and Vietnam).

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [4th Edition] review [Book]  2018-2-12 18:1

    I really loved how this book breaks down an overview of globe history. It covers periods of time through Egypt, Rome, Asia, India, Europe, Russia, America, and more.What is really amazing about this history book is that I have been able to give it to my son to support him have an overview of the history of the rest of the world. I like how concise the text is and the summaries of each era. It is a amazing homeschool resource or amazing for someone that needs a better understanding of the middle school son can read this book, but it wouldn't work well for my grade school kid to read on his own. It would be amazing for a read aloud session.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [4th Edition] review [Book]  2018-2-12 18:1

    Interesting and sometimes even engaging, but it reads like a rough draft and the author presents some controversial opinions as if they are well established facts. Then again, it's the history of the globe ins very little volume. You can't expect too much.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [4th Edition] review [Book]  2018-2-12 18:1

    I'm the typical person who didn't like history in school very much as a kid, but like it now. The cover caught my eye and I hoped the book would be as exciting as its cover's artwork. It was. It gave me the overview of Globe history for which I was looking. I came away from the material with one overwhelming fact; The globe has been at WAR with each other, from day 1 up until now. We are a WARING SPECIES. I'm not saying it is necessarily always bad........ it just is what it is. When I finished the book I felt like the book could just as easily have been, The Battles of the World. Anyway, the Globe seems to be a giant "chess game" and it was interesting to see how the android game has been played from ancient times.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [4th Edition] review [Book]  2018-2-12 18:1

    Well written and short chapters with all the important facts for a important fast understanding of globe history.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [4th Edition] review [Book]  2018-2-12 18:1

    I bought this book, as an extra tool for one of my classes and I must say I am impressed. I was able to be more informed about the subjects talked about in class and for studying for exams. Within these 100 pages I was able to get and learn so much more info that helped me in class. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn more about globe history, whether it have to do with a class your taking or if you just wanted to expand your knowledge. With such a amazing experience buying this book, I will definitely be buying more of these types of books.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [4th Edition] review [Book]  2018-2-12 18:1

    Dry as saw dust. Writing is cumbersome. I recommend “A small Hisory of the World” by E. H. Gombrick*****.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [4th Edition] review [Book]  2018-2-12 18:1

    Very amazing book to read - tells the history in a very clear method

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    World History: Ancient History, United States History, European, Native American, Russian, Chinese, Asian, African, Indian and Australian History, Wars including World War 1 and 2 [4th Edition] review [Book]  2018-2-12 18:1

    Expect it to be a mile wide but an inch deep - it's more of a general reference than a fleshed-out reads like a beautiful amazing high school term paper.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Young Henry Ford: A Picture History of the First Forty Years (Great Lakes Books Series) review []  2019-12-23 20:16

    Best book EVER, this is the true story of Henry Ford of how he really completely developed the car.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Young Henry Ford: A Picture History of the First Forty Years (Great Lakes Books Series) review []  2019-12-23 20:16

    I think it did not download some pages. For the most part a amazing read.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Young Henry Ford: A Picture History of the First Forty Years (Great Lakes Books Series) review []  2019-12-23 20:16

    This book is an perfect source on Henry Ford's family and the globe he was born into in Dearborn at the time. I bought this originally because it is one of the few books out there with info about my forebear, Conrad Ten Eyck, and the relationship between the Ten Eycks and the Fords. That said, it was a very interesting read and had lots of delightful historical tidbits on Detroit, Dearborn and the man who created the 20th century the century of the Automobile.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Young Henry Ford: A Picture History of the First Forty Years (Great Lakes Books Series) review []  2019-12-23 20:16

    Nice book amazing pics as well. Would recommend this to mates and makes a nice giftIf you know a Ford enthusiast !!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Young Henry Ford: A Picture History of the First Forty Years (Great Lakes Books Series) review []  2019-12-23 20:16

    well written

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    History Channel : History Documentaries 2019 review [App]  2019-2-17 13:21

    Not user frendly, constantly showing adds, there is no option to cast your screen to TV.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    The Lakes Handbook: Lake Restoration and Rehabilitation review []  2019-12-26 18:52

    Lakes Handbook: Lake Restoration and Rehabilitation, Volume 2 edited by P. E. O'Sullivan, by C. S. Reynolds, F. W. B. Bugenyi , Lyudmila Butorina, G. I. Cowan (Blackwell Publishing) in this handbook which focuses on conservation of lake ecology, experts address initially the primary value of lakes and the method human development has undermined the quality of sound of lake ecology. The volume is divided into five parts. The first part introduces the need for Lake restoration and rehabilitation. Part two provides regional case studies about lakes covering the North American Amazing Lakes the Lakes of northern Europe the amazing lakes of Asia in a discussion of the floodplains in subtropical South America. Part three addresses the specific human impact on lake ecologies especially on reservoirs and artificial lakes as well as a tropical shallow lakes and temperate shallow lakes. Part four addresses lake and catchments models with an emphasis on the quality of water and the nature of fist stocks present. Nutrient loading and phosphorus loaning as well as acidfied lakes are specifically addressed as a issue in lake rehabilitation. Part five concludes with in the United States and Sweden, East Africa and South Africa. Altogether this volume is a useful contribution to a wider understanding of the necessity of preserving our natural resources. The volume is most likely to be used in practical applications geology courses or biology courses but it also has a use for critiquing developmental plans and how they impact both natural and artificial freshwater resources.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Marijuana: A Short History (The Short Histories) review []  2020-1-17 21:55

    This brief history of the mild hallucinogen marijuana is written by John Hudak who researched the drug and has written an accurate acc of how it has been misrepresented for political and racist purposes since the early 20th century. Now, as we are well into the 21st century, marijuana still sits beside heroin and other risky drugs as a Schedule 1 drug. Makes one wonder why such a medically useful drug is still being misrepresented. Political and racist motives?!I would have given this small book five stars except it may not be the most exciting book you will ever read, but it will surely begin your eyes to the machinations of those who have something to gain by keeping a medically useful drug where it clearly doesn't belong.I suggest that you research marijuana (cannabis) yourself. Several states have approved its use for medical and recreational use. Meanwhile, such truly risky drugs like alcohol and tobacco can be bought at your corner grocery store. This proves that propaganda works. The moral here is that you must never create a judgment without first determining for yourself if it's real or this small book by a respected researcher to see the truth. The truth will set you free...if we can just vote the enemies out of office.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Marijuana: A Short History (The Short Histories) review []  2020-1-17 21:55

    Perfect book with a lot of facts. Should be needed reading in high school. This book, besides showing that cannabis is not the evil plant that politicians created it out to be (the medical community has repeatedly shown that it is not an evil, but a medically useful plant), explains how a few politicians with an agenda can mislead an uneducated public. The book shows how a few racist people in politically necessary positions can ruin the lives of a lot of people in their racist pursuits.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Marijuana: A Short History (The Short Histories) review []  2020-1-17 21:55

    A must read for everyone. After this, read "Smoke Signals: A Social History Of Marijuana" by Martin Lee. You start to understand that cannabis is a political weapon for greed and profit by drug cartels, law enforcement, lawyers, personal prisons. No one has ever died of an overdose of pot. Legalize it. Grow up American. And, I do not use.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Marijuana: A Short History (The Short Histories) review []  2020-1-17 21:55

    Casual read in about 1-2 week's time. A neatly organized, remarkably neutral yet engaging digest on one of today's most politically-charged hot button issues. Hudak expertly navigates the rich historical nuances of cannabis without getting lost in the weeds along the way.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Marijuana: A Short History (The Short Histories) review []  2020-1-17 21:55

    Amazing book for the history of weed. Very informative. You will be surprised to learn why hemp is under so muchscrutiny. Amazing read.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Marijuana: A Short History (The Short Histories) review []  2020-1-17 21:55

    Simple read that exposes the lies about cannabis

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Marijuana: A Short History (The Short Histories) review []  2020-1-17 21:55

    A concise and unbiased review of a very interesting subject.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Marijuana: A Short History (The Short Histories) review []  2020-1-17 21:55

    Interesting read. Well researched

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Marijuana: A Short History (The Short Histories) review []  2020-1-17 21:55

    This book provides a fairly well done history on how we got to our show situation and how, at least with marijuana, we may move forward in a logical and responsible manner.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Marijuana: A Short History (The Short Histories) review []  2020-1-17 21:55

    Very amazing book.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Lake Nipigon: Where the Great Lakes Begin review []  2020-1-20 19:47

    Enjoyed the information, but there was quite a bit of repeat. I've been on the lake about 10 trips, one week each. So, the history of the lake was very interesting.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Lake Nipigon: Where the Great Lakes Begin review []  2020-1-20 19:47

    A very readable overview of that mysterious huge lake on the map I always wondered about. I was reading for the early history of the zone and got a amazing feel for it.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A Little History of the World (Little Histories) review []  2020-1-22 21:27

    This is exactly what it says it is...a LITTLE history of the world....the size of the book alone should be an indicator of that. As a historian, a history teacher and a homeschool mom, I love this book when paired with more in depth material.I have read a lot of negative reviews ( go to the 1 stars for this especially) and have found almost to a T that they are all commenting on the fact that religion is brought into the telling. Religion is a part of history. It was everywhere until very recently and until this day and age, it has always been the color of stories and history books. The method that history is written and interpreted, the objectives that are brought into history - and they ALWAYS are - is called zeitgeist, or the spirit of the a nutshell, this is a lovely book meant for children. It is meant to appeal to their sense of wonder.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A Little History of the World (Little Histories) review []  2020-1-22 21:27

    Writing a history book on which every reader will agree is tantamount to impossibility. In this regard, I will not allow his perspectives affect my evaluation on this book as a history e author uses a easy and friendly language so as for the readers to learn the history readily. As was this text intended for young readers in relatively short length, a lot of historical memorabilia are omitted. However, I do think that is forgivable, given the short length and intended usage of it. This book is not textbook worthy, but a book to compliment history gely argued versus this book was the lack of contents of other worlds than the West. I do agree that the title of this book "a small history of the world" is a bit misleading in this sense. However, I ascertain that this is condonable as well, based on that fact that the author showed much efforts to cover the history of Asia and Middle and large, this is a amazing history book that is not just dry, nor boring. I recalled a lot of that I had forgotten since high school history class and learned some fresh things. Never have I felt bored all the method through the book, and it is very rare that I feel this method about a history book. I do plan on reading more books written by this author.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A Little History of the World (Little Histories) review []  2020-1-22 21:27

    Really fun and factual readLike stated on the title of my review, the book was pleasant and informative. The author begins around the time of the hominids, and descriptively info [their] life without communication, unity, laws, and material. Then he transitions to prehistoric times - that of the Neanderthals. This was the inception of communication (through paintings), language, man-made fire and tools. The periods discussed here are the Ice Age, the Stone Age, and the Bronze Age. In the proceeding chapters the author info the life of primitive civilizations living in Egypt, Mespotamia, Palestine and Israel. This is were religion formed, and historical religious prophets are spoken of such as Moses, David, Solomon and more. Around the time came the Phoenicians and the inception of the alphabet; therefore resulting in intelligible language. Other ancient civilizations are mentioned and expounded on, and same goes with their rulers (and influential figures). For example:Ancient China - the influence of Confucious and ruling of Shih Huang-tiPunics - HannibalRoman Empire - Julius ter the A.D. point, there was inception of superstition and the Dark Ages. There was Christendom, chivalry, cities and markets, merchants and knights. Throughout early times, the Arab globe came to be and had a powerful advantage on the globe intellectually and powerfully. Then came the fresh age, with fresh religions and fresh wars. Eventually we come to the enlightenment; a time of intellectual triumph in anthropoid history. Revolutions occurred, and so did Napoleon. Seas were crossed and America was founded, late of course, and local inhabitants were brutally slaughtered by the Spaniards. And eventually we obtain to modern times. The text transitioned fairly well and I enjoyed it much and learned a lot. To me it seemed that the author was of Christian faith, because of what looked like minuscule attempts at times to justify Christian actions. A small caveat for sure but overall there are a lot to learn from this short book on a large subject.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A Little History of the World (Little Histories) review []  2020-1-22 21:27

    I've read a lot of books about the general history of humankind. This one was definitely targeted towards 13 year olds but I still tolerated it. The only thing to hold in mind is it throws in a lot of random names, politicians, emperors, without describing them which makes happenings hard to track. Either eliminate names or flesh out the condly, be aware that this book's perspective is very EU-based; i.e. he focuses more on happenings in Europe or how they affected Europe rather than Asia or America.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A Little History of the World (Little Histories) review []  2020-1-22 21:27

    I gave this book to my 14-year-old son, who is very interested in globe history, as a Christmas gift. He devoured the entire book over his two-week Christmas break. He said this was the best book on globe history that he has ever read. As he read, he Googled and read about various parts of history within the book. I was very impressed. If you know a teen or older adolescent who is interest in history this is definitely the book for them.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A Little History of the World (Little Histories) review []  2020-1-22 21:27

    I'm still half method this book but it is one of my favorite books ever read. It gives people who know about history a new and fast reminder of some topics, and it also gives a amazing begin for those who are fresh into the topics. Simple to read for all ages, with a bit of humor, you can tell the author took time to use the proper vocabulary and to some precise research.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A Little History of the World (Little Histories) review []  2020-1-22 21:27

    This is a pleasant small book with a whole lot that is missing, but still plenty enough that's sewn together in a meaningful narrative to provide children of all ages with a thoughtful journey through the ages.Gombrich's respectful and conversational voice encourages you, the reader, to evaluate the history as it unfolds. This is a nice literary device to support the stories stick. The effect is not just a stack of stories, but rather a conversation that you're invited to participate in to envision history with your own values and imagination. It's thoughtful and educational history.If you don't know your globe history, and wanna learn some basics from a book, it doesn't obtain any more fun than this.Enjoy!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A Little History of the World (Little Histories) review []  2020-1-22 21:27

    When I saw Small History of The Globe in Amazon' website I knew (at once) it was the excellent one for me! I looked inside the book and I read all reviews about it. I orderd the illustrated edition and I Ifell in love with the book immediately. I bought another one and gave it to a mate as a gift. She loved it ing Amazon websites I discovered there is a CD edition of this book, and I ordered it too. It is exactly the same story in a beautiful amazing reading.Gombrich is a popular art historian and he wrote The Story of Art (a best seller). I strongly recommend you buy both Gombrich's books, if you are the kind of person who likes to have the best reference in your library.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A Little History of the World (Little Histories) review []  2020-1-22 21:27

    An perfect book to read and enjoy. I used it to explain a wide dozens of bits of history to my son. It reads as a series of shorts which also makes it a amazing commuter book. The latest chapter is particularly amazing as the man reflects on the history that he has seen. Very poignant. Buy it for yourself or as a gift. Any history lover or simply someone who loves to read will adore this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    A Little History of the World (Little Histories) review []  2020-1-22 21:27

    This book is a amazing read. It makes the globe history as fun to read like a amazing novel. But it emphasizes method too much on Europe. The title should be "A small history of Europe" to suit its contents.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Origins: How Earth's History Shaped Human History review []  2019-12-17 20:54

    If you're interested in your planet's astonishing evolution from red hot asteroid to green Eden, and haven't kept up with latest research into Earth's prehistory, you'll appreciate hearing from a science writer who has kept up, and can tell stories about it in prose worthy of Carl Sagan, Richard Dawkins, or Timothy e general theme is of how several billion years of tectonic plate collisions & volcanic upheavals have left their imprint on biological & human history all the method down to maps of current voting fault lines overlaid on maps of geological fault lines. The book has lots of maps, mostly made digitally by the favorite "new" fact is the revelation that ice age ice-dam collapses and their sudden catastrophic floods were not a one time happening like the scouring of the Columbia Basin after the instant drainage of prehistoric Lake Missoula when the ice dam collapsed at show day Dixon, MT. The ice ages (I just learned) had a lot of such collapses, sometimes repetitive. A much larger lake covering much of show Scandinavia generated a large flash flood that permanently sundered a substantial land bridge that once connected England to France. (Now there's a geological happening with true historical consequences.)One story--about islands--got shaky when the author stepped outside science narrative: In a footnote about the WW2 naval war of Midway, he attributes the lopsided US win to bombers flying from the Island. (The hurt to the Japanese task force came entirely from carrier-based dive bombers; The land-based massive bombers scored zero.)That's a goof anyone sequestered in academia surrounded by mountains of science papers could make. Not substantial enough to downgrade a finely written and very informative book.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Origins: How Earth's History Shaped Human History review []  2019-12-17 20:54

    Fascinating from beginning to end. Dartnell masterfully interweaves the story of Earth's geologic and climate history with that of the evolution of life on earth and of human civilization. However, I was disappointed that he could not control his need to indulge in the occasional modern day retrospective moralizing. For instance, pointing out that the "downside" of a sedentary agrarian society was a hierarchical society resulting in "inequality" as opposed to the "equality" of the hunter-gather society were everyone was starving equally. And also, that colonization and slavery was the unfortunate effect of the European's ability to sail across the oceans. Of course it was, but is it really important to point that out in a book like this? Predictably, the past cannot measure up to our enlightened standards.And even more disturbing was his latest chapter, "Coda". After the whole awesome and well-told story of the tremendous variations and upheavals in Earth's climate caused by geologic and cosmic forces over the millennia, he feels compelled to follow contemporary dogma by preaching about the urgent need to "decarbonize" our civilization. It's almost as though he didn't even read his own book. Other than these quibbles, I loved it.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Origins: How Earth's History Shaped Human History review []  2019-12-17 20:54

    I really wanted to like this book. It dealt with a topic I'm very interested in. And I don't wish to [email protected]#$%! or discourage people from reading it because I did learn from Dartnell's rendition of humanity's co-evolving relationship with Mother Earth.Dartnell’s narrative would have been much more interesting had he created the effort to inform the reader about ongoing disagreements and debates over how humans became humans. Had he exposed the reader to these contending theories and examined the evidence supporting them the reader would not be left with the impression that the science is settled on such questions. Instead, Dartnell overlooks major theoretical problems and conflicting empirical evidence in order to provide the reader with a single fuzzy, unconvincing explanation for the evolution of our hominoid ancestors.Dartnell never mentions the long-standing controversy between rival theories for how and why Homo sapiens and other hominoids evolved from our closest primate ancestors. Yet there are two major contending theories that couldn’t be much further apart. On one hand, there’s the savanna-based “man the hunter” theory of evolution as presented in famous anthropological works by Robert Ardrey, Lionel Tiger, Desmond Morris, and others. And then there’s its major rival, the aquatic ape theory (or waterside model) introduced by marine biologist, Alister Hardy, and extensively developed by Elaine e aquatic ape theory has been largely ignored and dismissed by the patriarchs of evolutionary anthropology, primarily because it wasn’t developed by anthropologists and its major proponent is a woman and a feminist. However, it has remained quite famous outside the discipline because it offers a brilliant and cohesive acc for the a lot of differences between hominoids and other primates that remain unexplained by the dominant r example, why are humans relatively hairless? Why are we the only apes with a porous bone structure that allows us to float & swim when other apes sink? Why are human babies born with a breath-holding reflex and a thick layer of body fat when other apes aren’t? Why do we have salt water tear ducts when our primate ancestors don’t? The aquatic ape theory accounts for these & a lot of other unexplained physical differences while offering a more logical explanation for our increased intelligence, erect posture, bipedal gait, tool-making proclivities, and vocal stead of exploring the empirical validity of these two theories, Dartnell avoids mentioning either of them while offering his readers a highly amended ver of the largely discredited savanna theory. Dartnell’s ver actually undermines the theory’s primary assumptions in order to acc for the mounting contrary evidence. He admits that our bipedal walk evolved before we left our forested habitats, but then he claims bipedalism “allowed us to see over tall grass” and minimized the zone our bodies were exposed to the hot sun. But why would we develop these traits if we were not living in a hot, dry, tall-grass savanna? He doesn’t en Dartnell admits that our hominoid ancestors never really emerged from disappearing forest ecosystems to live in a broad, grassy savannas. Instead he says we became hominoids while adapting to life in the Amazing Rift Valley. According to him, the valley funneled rainwater into vast mazes of rivers, streams, and “amplifier lakes.” Periods of limited rainfall alternated with wet ones that filled seven major lake basins in the Amazing Rift Valley. After reading Dartnell’s acc you wonder, “hey, what happened to the savanna?” The Rift Valley’s habitat of huge shallow lakes, rivers, and woods is much more compatible with the aquatic ape theory’s explanation for hominoid evolution than the old savanna theory. Yet Dartnell never mentions this theory or its a lot of advantages. I wonder why?Now the "small" stuff:Dartnell can be a bit flaky with the science. Here's two examples:#1) On page 82 he says, "The first real mammals emerged around 150 million years ago, but it was the mass extinction of species 66 million years ago, wiping out the dinosaurs, that allowed our mammalian ancestors to spread into the niches now left vacant by reptiles." But wait. Reptiles didn't go extinct, just dinosaurs , are dinosaurs reptiles? Well, officially, science still jams dinosaurs into an extremely elastic reptile category. And Darnell seems to adhere to this antiquated categorization without informing the reader that this is a disputed and inaccurate classification that distorts our understanding of both dinosaurs and genuine evolutionary and taxonomical terms, yes, dinosaurs can trace their ancestry back to their reptilian archosaur ancestors. But so can birds. In fact, aside from amphibians, most every terrestrial vertebrate, can trace their ancestry back to reptiles. Both mammals and birds evolved from reptiles. So are dinosaurs really reptiles? Not unless you alter the very meaning of the word reptile. Dinosaurs (and birds) differ from reptiles in several necessary birds, dinosaurs were warm blooded (endotherms). Reptiles are cold blooded (ectotherms). This is a major difference. In addition, reptiles, such as crocodiles and lizards, have legs that sprawl out to the side. Their thigh bones are almost parallel to the ground. They walk & run with a side-to-side motion. Dinosaurs, on the other hand, stand with their legs positioned directly under their bodies. A hole in the hip socket permits this upright stance. This posture allowed warm-blooded dinosaurs to run faster and with greater endurance than other reptiles that were the same size.During the Age of Dinosaurs there were typical cold-blooded reptiles living on the land and in the seas. While these reptiles lived alongside dinosaurs, they were ectotherms and did not have a hole in their hip socket and thus were not like dern birds are the closest living relatives to dinosaurs. They share a common ancestor with non-avian dinosaurs. In addition to being warm blooded like dinosaurs, they have features such as the three-toed foot and s-shaped neck, and therefore are best classified as modern dinosaurs. However, the current taxonomical classification system is built around modern animals and is not designed to facilitate extinct animals, so there isn’t really a clear-cut method to classify extinct dinosaurs. In morphology, some dinosaurs were more related to birds and some were more related to reptiles, but dinosaurs do not fit nicely within either group.#2) How potent a greenhouse gas (GHG) is methane? Dartnell tells his readers that methane's heat trapping result is over 80 times stronger than C02. However, the reality is actually much more confusing than this. When you investigate this problem you search a large discrepancy. Some scientists say methane is 23 times more potent than C02, others go as high as 85. Turns out the numbers vary widely primarily because of the various time frames used to measure & compare the impact of these two GHG's on Earth's atmosphere. Dartnell should have explained this & why he chose the way he did. For those who want to examine this in more detail see: FactCheck “How Potent Is Methane?”

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Origins: How Earth's History Shaped Human History review []  2019-12-17 20:54

    Perfect book with numerous insights clearly explained. Our earth seems like a ball of rock but instead is extremely dynamic. A living breathing, dynamic beast living in a dynamic solar system. It is tilted, wobbles inconsistently through an elliptical orbit and gets pulled by gravity of surrounding dynamic planets. This has made numerous hot and cold spells for billions of years. Land masses float, split, impact, coalesce and split again. Water seeps into the interior, through plate fissures, creating pressure for volcanic eruptions that spew out fresh minerals while colliding plates bury old e author makes a amazing case for heavy forces creating a dynamic world. Then at the latest few pages he pulls a global warming bunny out of his hat, as if to placate the global warming affectionatos that bought his book or maybe to cloudup his amazing case for throwing a lot of doubt about man-made and undesirable global warming. Still a super read. JimBene

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Origins: How Earth's History Shaped Human History review []  2019-12-17 20:54

    This is a amazing book to read before bedtime. Every night I learned about how tectonic plate movements influenced where civilizations formed, what people ate, and what sorts of technologies later developed because of this. I learned that the Spice Islands were incredibly small, and yet so necessary because of their special ecosystem. This book created me dream about life in the distant past when the Mediterranean Sea closed and opened again, and during the ice ages. It whetted my appetite to learn more about geology.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Origins: How Earth's History Shaped Human History review []  2019-12-17 20:54

    The author pulled together info from numerous fields; geology, archaeology, paleontology, anthropology, both current and historical work, to write this book. It is a amazing summary of what is known about humanity's history and pre-history. Having an interest in archaeology, this work was a very amazing summary of what is known about human development through the ages. And it was thoroughly enjoyable to read!!

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Origins: How Earth's History Shaped Human History review []  2019-12-17 20:54

    I'm an avid reader of nonfiction science and this is one of the best books I've encountered. The writing is amazing to amazing in my opinion. The book is breathtaking in its scope and ties together disciplines usually considered separately. My highest recommendation.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Origins: How Earth's History Shaped Human History review []  2019-12-17 20:54

    A book about the intersection of science and history? Almost everyone would agree that changes in Earth’s geology and climate over time have influenced human evolution and history. If you are interested in how and why, then this book could be for ate tectonics played a major role in the evolution of our species and our subsequent history. Hominoids evolved in East Africa in the latest 3 million years. This is the website of a major tectonic rift that caused the formation of mountain ranges on either side of a rift valley. These topographic changes caused a drying result that changed dense jungle into savanna and thus spurred the evolution of a bipedal species suited to this type of terrain. 2.6 million years ago earth entered the Quaternary period and the onset of current ice age cycles. This change was partially caused by the continual raising and concurrent erosion of the Himalaya mountain range over a of period 20 million years. Erosion off the range caused a reaction which gradually reduced the amount of CO2 in the air. When the concentration reached a critical tipping point an ice age was triggered. In addition to the influence of CO2 on climate there is also a 100,000-yr. oscillation cycle caused by changes in the earth’s elliptical orbit, tilt of the axis and wobble of the poles. This oscillation cycle causes periods of interglacial warming lasting approximately 20,000-yrs interspersed with ice ages lasting 80,000-yrs. The entire evolution and history of mankind has occurred during this period of reoccurring ice ages and interglacial periods. These periods have affected our migrations, where we settled and when different regions were habituated.Why were almost all ancient farming settlements in active tectonic zones? Why did the grasslands of Asia’s central steppes play a vital part in the history of Europe? How did England become detached from continental Europe? Why was the island of Cypress so vital to the economy of Europe in the bronze age? Why does a band of ancient seabed floor across the US south correspond to Democratic voting counties? Why are the mines for rare earth minerals that are vital components for semiconductors, magnets and LED screens found in only a few places, the major ones being in China? These questions and more are e part of the book that interested me the most was the section on the age of Oceanic exploration, the discovery of the prevailing easterly and westerly trade winds that are caused by the Coriolis effect. The fact that the Cape Verde islands were a Spanish location was vital for Columbus’s voyage to the Americas because setting out from the Cape Verdes place Columbus at a starting point right in the middle of the prevailing easterlies and the north equatorial current which carried his ships directly to the Americas. I’ve often wondered why the cities on the California coast were originally Spanish settlements. The Manila Galleon set sail from Acapulco loaded with Spanish silver from the mines further south. It caught the prevailing easterlies and current that carried it directly to Asia where the silver was exchanged for porcelain, silks, spices. To obtain back though it had to sail north to catch the prevailing westerlies which took it to the coast of California. Spain established the ports in California to service the Galleons before returning south. Wonder why was the slave trade so lucrative? It involves something called the north Atlantic triangle, a trade route that followed the winds and currents south from Europe to the coast of Africa. There the ships carried goods from Europe, exchanged them for slaves and then headed west across the Atlantic carried by the prevailing easterlies to the Americas. Picking up metals, sugar, coffee and spices in exchange for the slaves they then voyaged north to catch the prevailing westerlies back to Europe. The prevailing winds of the earth enabled the establishment of a global economy and the enslavement of 's been said that in order to know where you are and where you’re going, you need to know where you’ve been. This is a book that gives the huge picture of human habitation on the earth, how we have adapted to climate and geology, how we exploited earth’s resources, how and why we migrated and settled where we did. Now at this hinge point in human history, now more than ever we need perspective because we are now the major ecological force on earth. Our future could well be determined by what we do now and in the immediate future. JACK

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Origins: How Earth's History Shaped Human History review []  2019-12-17 20:54

    Dartnell's "Origins" is an engagingly written story of the causes and effects of Earth and human histories, and is an perfect example of the "big history" genre done well. However, he has created a fundamental geological error in his description of the origin of magma as the effect of plate subduction, and this mistake appears in at least two locations in the r example, in Chapter 5, on Page 145 in the section "Tectonic Sweat," he writes: "As oceanic crust is suducted, the water-bearing rocks of this descending plate are melted by the considerable pressure and temperature at depths of between 50 and 100 kilometres, while also being heated by the grinding friction as they slide underneath. This molten magma rises up into the overlying crust and pools into large subterranean chambers."He is attributing the formation of granite intrusions and volcanic arcs above subduction zones to the melting of the subducting plate itself. In fact, most such magmas do not effect from melting of the subducting plate, but from partial melting of the mantle rocks ABOVE that plate. This partial melting occurs when water liberated from the subducting plate rises into mantle rocks above the plate, where the melting temperature of those rocks is lowered due to the presence of that water.While I hope that any future editions will correct this error, with this exception, I recommend the book wholeheartedly.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Origins: How Earth's History Shaped Human History review []  2019-12-17 20:54

    Outstanding book! It describes how plate tectonics, geology, geographic features, climate, ice ages and large glaciers, plant and animal domestication, and the grand circulation ocean and wind currents all combined to influence the evolution of the human species and the development of human society. The are several really fascinating maps on these subjects. I found the maps of the continents as they existed hundreds of thousands of years ago during the Ice Ages to tens of millions of years ago to be especially interesting,The book also discusses other topics such as the formation of coal and oil, the formation of the different types of stone, and the areas of metal ores in the Earth's crust.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Scottish History: A Captivating Guide to the History of Scotland review []  2019-12-18 20:39

    It was very disappointing that they author left out a very key element of Scottish history - the overwhelming power of the clans and the guild chiefs. These men had far more power than the monarchy over their people. In addition, one of the most necessary and compelling wars was left out of this book, The War of Culloden, which destroyed the highlanders method of life. The merciless destruction and genocide by the English following this battle, as well as the famine brought Scotland to its knees, and made an undercurrent of enmity towards England that persists today. The only reason for these omissions that I can think of is that the author is English. If I could give this book less than 1 star, I would.

    0  


  • 0

    Is this review useful?

    Scottish History: A Captivating Guide to the History of Scotland review []  2019-12-18 20:39

    While this is in fact a captivating book, I missed a review about the clans, contributions, impacts, differences .. and the final episode of so, the influence of Scottish immigration in Canada, US.... based on the main waves of significant number of Scots who left.

    0  





    Search Cloud

    About Us

    We deliver reviews of items/services from multiple category. Find and read opinions on clothes, Tv Shows, ebooks, video games, meals, gadgets, services or household items. Would you like to rate your recent purchases on Amazon or Ebay? Or maybe something was not good enough and would you like to express your sadness? Do not wait and do this here! We give you the opportunity to attach URL going to item/service you want to review.

    Contact

    www.add-reviews.com
    [email protected]
    [email protected]
    P: (123) 456-7890

    Newsletter