Read a short introduction to the hobby of amateur radio with pictures reviews, rating & opinions:

Check all a short introduction to the hobby of amateur radio with pictures reviews below or publish your opinion.

100 Reviews Found

Sort by: Most Accurate (default) | Newest | Top Rated

  • 0

    Useful review?

    Microscopy (A Short Introduction to the World of Science) []  2020-6-10 18:51

    It was like "Cliff Notes" for science with detailed pictures and reasonable explanations.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Microscopy (A Short Introduction to the World of Science) []  2020-6-10 18:51

    Very rudimentary and incomplete treatment of the subject. More like a grammar school report. Not worth downloading, even for free.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Microscopy (A Short Introduction to the World of Science) []  2020-6-10 18:51

    Although a bit incomplete in some aspects, I really enjoyed this book. There was a nice amount of info on the various types of microscopes. This book was short, simple, and informative.

    0  


    Add your opinion on a short introduction to the hobby of amateur radio with pictures or scroll down to read more reviews ↓

     

  • 0

    Useful review?

    Introduction to New Zealand animals: A short introduction to the unique wildlife of New Zealand []  2020-9-20 19:21

    I learnt about some birds i didnt know about and i am from fresh eds more illustrations and better quality illustrations. But a amazing fast read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Introduction to New Zealand animals: A short introduction to the unique wildlife of New Zealand []  2020-9-20 19:21

    The book is nicely structured, summaries well-written. You can obtain to any animal discussed in the book via a link. Even though it is inexpensive on Kindle, amazing public domain images of each animal would create it much better. (And for those that are extinct, an artist's rendering.)

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Think like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons []  2020-1-22 22:24

    Too repetitive. It feels like a unnecessarily long blog ally, the most useful part are the charts at the end.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Think like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons []  2020-1-22 22:24

    I highly recommend this primer on the commons. Bollier strikes the excellent balance in defining the commons by being straightforward without being simplistic. The commons emerges as a tangible path out of the crises we face that is beautiful, complex, and most of all, practical.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Think like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons []  2020-1-22 22:24

    This is such an perfect introduction and explanation of the Commons movement. I search it well written, with perfect real-life stories to anchor my understanding. Well done.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Think like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons []  2020-1-22 22:24

    An perfect overview of the commoning history, commoning culture, qualities, hopes, expectations and futures.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Think like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons []  2020-1-22 22:24

    This book is our future.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Think like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons []  2020-1-22 22:24

    Inspiring and well researched.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Think like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons []  2020-1-22 22:24

    Bollier reveals how the corporate globe has been encroaching and usurping the resources that were once held in Common by the citizens of Earth. If you wish to know how international corporations operate, this is a amazing book for you. Also, he gives us hope by showing how ordinary people are resisting these efforts by creating fresh commons. A very amazing read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Think like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons []  2020-1-22 22:24

    David Bollier does a masterful job of reminding us about the potential to manage shared resources collaboratively, without relying solely on markets or governments.Timely reading in the context of debates about Internet Governance.He shows that there is a third path that can support resolve debates about conflicts between property and liberty.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Think like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons []  2020-1-22 22:24

    Another method to look at life and the why and how it changed for just regular folk, that something we all miss...Good and thoughtful read

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Think like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Life of the Commons []  2020-1-22 22:24

    This is an awesome book. Very impressed.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A Short Introduction to the Sack of Rome A.D. 1527 (Illustrated) []  2020-7-26 20:54

    I love it! Benvenuto Cellini had quite a personality, so reading about a dramatic episode of Rome's history and learning his perspective of the matter is certainly thrilling and takes you back to Rome in 1527.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-18 19:30

    This book is full of really amazing info beginning with ancient medicine, Hippocrates, views of illness and treatments. Full of the innovators, such as Louis Pasteur. Provides the most necessary things to know about each subject or person. The book is very little about 4x6, so it's simple to carry around. Delivered on time

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-18 19:30

    An perfect introduction. We used this as the the textbook for an online learning course on the history of western medicine from Hippocrates to the show day, and it proved very satisfactory.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-18 19:30

    Amazing Thesaurus. Amazing Table of Contents. Unbelievable Information!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Philosophy of Law: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-13 20:4

    Wacks' created no secret that this was a very short introduction. It was difficult reading because it was very pithy and thing was repeated twice or expanded upon. The author however, gives us an perfect list of texts for further e study of the academic and philosophical locations of law are generally overlooked in traditional law schools. This is the topic matter that is the intersection of law and e book accomplished its purpose. For that reason I rate it highly.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Philosophy of Law: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-13 20:4

    This book does small to improve the reputation of jurisprudence as boring and far removed from the practical concerns of lawyers (and even, at least in the US, from those of a lot of law professors). Certainly one can learn things from it, but it won't be a particularly pleasant e author (RW) mentions in his introduction that even "sensationalist criminal trials ... that have become regular tv fare encapsulate features of the law that characteristically agitate legal philosophers" (@xiii-xiv). He would have done better to have illustrated the problems that agitate legal philosophers with exactly such real-life cases -- for example by organizing the book according to those agitating issues. Instead, most of the book is organized according to a much more ivory-tower principle, namely a tour of schools of philosophy (natural law, positivism, Dworkin's thought, and then brisk catalogs of a dozens of sociological and "critical" approaches); even the one chapter ostensibly organized on the basis of problems ("Rights and Justice") amounts to the same sort of sequential shlep (utilitarianism, law & economics, Rawls) .Aside from the inclusion of a few photographs and two text boxes (illustrating consequentialism and the Coase theorem), small effort seems to have been created to create this book vivid or appealing to a general reader without a law education, notwithstanding that a few may have soldiered through it. The discussion is dry and humorless. The fact that it mentions a lot of authors isn't necessarily a virtue. The latest two chapters offer short, for the most part puzzling descriptions of different schools of thought (although RW does spend a small more effort critiquing the Marxist approach). The sections on Derrida, Foucault and Lacan are too compressed to have been useful, and could have been omitted or lumped together in exchange for more elaboration elsewhere. No attempt is created to provide a bigger picture at the conclusion of any chapter, nor is there even the briefest of conclusions for the book as a whole. The book peters out like a stream disappearing into sand: its latest words are a 1-sentence description of an "offshoot" of critical race theory. There are plenty of other books in the VSI series that are fatter than this one, so lack of zone doesn't seem like an adequate excuse for this lack of suspicion is that RW's having written a large textbook on the field may have constrained his imagination to produce sort of a mini- or outline version, instead of starting from an entirely different, more user-friendly conception (more selective, more "applied"). This book isn't up to the standards of the VSIs on, say, ethics, democracy, or ideology (just to cite examples from philosophy). I read the book as preparation for teaching upper-level undergraduates in law & politics next semester; despite the pertinence of the subject and the convenient length, the odds are very low I'll recommend it as a supplemental text.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Philosophy of Law: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-13 20:4

    Jurisprudence, from the surface, is a tasteless subject. It distracts a lot of fold more than it attracts. However this little book softly lands you onto the subject. As you delve deeper, the topic becomes more and more interesting. Every serious student of jurisprudence will search this book greatly helpful to be initiated into the subject.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Philosophy of Law: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-13 20:4

    A concise jurisprudential introduction. Well worth a read for anyone fresh to the topic or studying jurisprudence in college. If it could have another title it would be Jurisprudence for dummies. For more in depth reading purchase the main text by the same eminent writer.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-18 19:30

    Really enjoyed this book. Only took a few hours to read it through. The author does a unbelievable job of maintaining a gentle view on the characters in history, giving credit where it is due without offering a lot of criticism. There is substantial editorializing, but this is most often rebuking other historians for attempting to invent narrative and incite controversy, when a easy retelling of the happenings is what most readers are after, and which the show author accomplishes most efficiently.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-18 19:30

    This was my first introduction to the History of Medicine. I have now read a lot of other -- and much longer -- books on the subject and I continue to be amazed by how much Bynum packed into this slender volume, without at all making it dense or difficult to read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-18 19:30

    Amazing book to read

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Philosophy of Law: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-13 20:4

    This is an awesome book to have on hand. It is succinct in defining the various philosophical approaches to law, who is similar and influence what, etc. I am taking a Philosophy of Law and Morals class (Phil. Major). This book, about the size of your hand is strong in an informative way. Strongly recommend it for anyone and especially students. You won't be disappointed.I bought it used. It was in brand fresh condition apply described in the sellers info. Amazing and affordable price with fast delivery.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-18 19:30

    I bought this for a college course, but it was very well written and interesting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-18 19:30

    A good, solid fast summary of the history of medicine.Understand that, if you are looking at this book (and have never read any others in this series), it is fairly short and you won't obtain a ton of info beyond the basics of the subject. That being said, for what it is it does a amazing job of giving an overview that is simple to read and stays on is is a amazing source for anyone interested in this subject.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Big Questions: A Short Introduction to Philosophy []  2020-11-8 18:12

    This is a amazing beginner's tutorial to philosophy. It covers several various locations of philosophy with info from several prominent philosophers. I don't really know much about philosophy so I can't give you an in depth review. Philosophy tends to raise more questions then it answers I'm finding. There are lots of questions for the reader to respond and ponder over. The book actually makes me wish to do further reading and research, so that's nice.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Philosophy of Law: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-13 20:4

    potable and handy. It is simple to comprehend and amazing for philosophy of jurisprudence.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Philosophy of Law: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-13 20:4

    This book was my first introduction to the "Very Short Introduction" series of inexpensive paperbacks published by Oxford University Press. The nice thing is that these books measure about 7 X 4.5 inches, so they create the excellent "plane" books, but yet are produced to the strict standards of OUP. I was just amazed at how much solid ysis is contained in the 107 pages of text in this volume, not to mention the "references" section, bibliography, and complete index. The author, who is emeritus at the University of Hong Kong, has essentially boiled down his comprehensive "Understanding Jurisprudence" volume (OUP, 2005, 350 pages) into this concise survey. There are also 15 illustrations and several boxed pages where a particular point is examined in a min e book is divided into 6 chapters. The subjects are Natural Law (Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Finnis and Fuller); Legal Positivism (Hart, Bentham, Austin, Kelsen, Raz); Law as Interpretation (devoted to Dworkin); Rights and Justice (Hohfeld, Posner, Rawls); Law and Society (Durkheim, Weber, Marx, Habermas, Foucault); and Critical Legal Theory (CLS, Unger, Lacan, Derrida, feminist legal theory, critical race theory). This is a lot to cover in a full-sized volume, but amazingly there is much solid ysis and discussion built into this little paperback. It is the excellent device for those wanting to refresh their familiarity with the jurisprudential field; it also serves as an effective and skillfully-written introduction for those fresh to the topic. There are a lot of extra interesting titles in this Oxford series that I plan to explore--what a amazing idea!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Philosophy of Law: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-13 20:4

    The Very Short Introduction... series has several advantages over other series that serve the same function of providing an introduction to a topic matter. The main advantage is physical size. Mr. Clark refers to it as the excellent "plane" book. That's true. But even better, it is a real pocket book. They fit easily into the back of one's jeans waiting for the odd moment to be pulled out and used. They can usually be easily read in a couple of hours.But that format has limitations. I search that the VSI volumes that are devoted to a single thinker are much more useful than the ones that cover a broad topic matter. (It inspires me to a poor pun. "A very short intro to a very huge subject" is almost Oxfordmoronic. O, never mind.)At best, when dealing with a topic matter as opposed to an individual thinker the VSIs are concise intros. But sometimes, as with the VSI to The Philosophy of Law the treatment seems shallow. Wacks is very amazing on some of his thinkers: Rawls, Dworkin, Hart, Weber, and Habermas are all fairly well done. Some of the others are not as well handled- I found his treatment of Locke, Marx, Foucault to be cursory at best. It felt like a survey of a take it for what it is. This volume is a very fast overview of a lot of thinkers (see Mr. Clark's review for a amazing listing). Some of these thinkers are necessary enough to deserve their own volume in the series (Locke, Marx, and Habermas). Others like Rawls and Dworkin deserve such treatment. Prof. Wacks has provided us with a fast and cheap method to orient ourselves to future reading in this field. I just cannot support but feel that he could have done better. That if he had taken the time to flesh out his presentation for another fifty or so pages that it would have been a much more useful member of the VSI family.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Philosophy of Law: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-13 20:4

    The philosophy of law is one of the few fields of philosophy that have remained legitimate in the sense that practical questions and contemplations are not eschewed. Too often philosophical debate wanders into conceptual hallways that could best be described as mazes, but one cannot obtain to their centers even with keeping one hand on the wall. One gets forever lost in the entanglement of concepts, with nothing ever settled, and if an idea is deemed to be practical it follows that it must be uninteresting or illegitimate.But legal reasoning is a requirement for human well being, and then the question arises as to what system of concepts best encapsulates it. A lot of questions arise when contemplating proper philosophical frameworks for legal contemplation, and a lot of of these are answered in this book, written of course for those readers who need a fast introduction to the topic matter. No reader would expect an in-depth discussion of the philosophy of law from this book, but there is enough in it to enable readers to investigate specialized subjects of e author begins the book by stating that the philosophy of law is "rarely an abstract, impractical pursuit", and he explains the (weak) demarcation between "descriptive" and "normative" legal theory. Because of its put in history, the author discusses the doctrine of natural law first, and this discussion sheds considerable light on why a lot of modern conservatives are committed to this philosophy of law: it seems to create legitimate the social hierarchies that these conservatives insist we e doctrine of legal positivism is then discussed, and in this regard the most interesting (and disconcerting) discussion is the "pure theory of law" of Hans Kelsen. The Kelsen theory is interesting since legal norms in this conception are all relational: any one particular norm must be justified or authorized by another norm, giving in the end a huge hierarchy of norms with a "basic norm" sitting on top of the hierarchy and representing a completely formal or hypothetical construct. One should not view it as arbitrary though, since its selection is based on whether or not the legal order is "effective". The author does not really elaborate on this notion, but the open-ended nature of his discussion motivates the reader to investigate this doctrine in more detail through outside reading.If read in the light of current controversies in the interpretation of legal statutes by the United States Supreme Court, probably the most interesting discussion in the book concerns the legal philosophy of Ronald Dworkin. Dworkin himself is very critical of latest decisions that have been created by the Supreme Court in the latest two years, but his criticisms in this regard are not brought out in this book. What is discussed is a conception of the law that seems "extralegal" in that it views legal contexts as being intertwined with moral and political ones. This makes legal reasoning more than just an app of rules, and forces the judge to consider the consequences that his edicts will have on the cause it is still in its infancy as a legal philosophy, considerations of jurisprudence brought about by discoveries in neuroscience are not discussed in this book. Called by some the "neuroscience of law" this branch of jurisprudence will probably not be taken seriously by the majority of legal philosophers for some time to come. This reviewer recommends the book by Brent Garland for those who wish to supplement the reading of this book by considering what is at the show time very exciting developments in both neuroscience and legal philosophy.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-18 19:30

    This is an admirably concise and interesting overview of a very broad subject covering the ancient globe to modern times. A amazing introduction for those who wish some primary background on a fascinating topic. The writing style is generally fluid, and the historical illustrations are a bonus. My chief criticisms are as follows: 1) occasionally a topic will call out for slightly more elaboration than is provided - for example, the concept of the "moral treatment" in psychiatric care was not really explained - though this is a very minor criticism since the book covers so much territory; 2) portions of the latest chapters feel a bit disjointed and lack the smooth flow that characterizes most of his writing, and 3) this book should be titled "The History of Western Medicine" since there is virtually no mention of happenings beyond Europe. The author acknowledges this in the intro, but a easy title shift would alert buyers that this volume will not cover the entire global picture. These are admittedly minor flaws and I otherwise highly recommend this as a fast read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-18 19:30

    Perfect summary of medicine.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Philosophy of Law: A Very Short Introduction []  2020-7-13 20:4

    Based on unbelievable books like Jonathan Culler's "Very Short Introduction to Literary Theory," I had come to expect more from the series. This book is poorly written, full of muddy, half-developed thought, and even includes several e book is organized as a more or less chronological presentation of major schools of legal philosophy (from natural law and positivism through critical legal studies), with the major thinkers in each school usually receiving their own brief sections. Unfortunately, these sections tend to consist largely of scattershot presentations of different doctrines asserted by the thinker. Small attempt is created to string the doctrines together into developed thoughts, or to suggest what issue the thinker hoped to solve by setting forth his or her doctrines, much less to locate the doctrines in a larger intellectual history.I found that if I was already familiar with the thinker being discussed, the book's presentation often contained subtly misleading phrasing; and if I was not familiar with the thinker, I came away still unclear about why the thinker had bothered to assert the various, vague statements about the law that had been summarily presented. One premise of the Very Short Introduction books is that it's not impossible to say something worthwhile about the significance of a philosopher's contribution to legal theory in even a single paragraph. But doing so requires work. It requires synthesizing the philosopher's claims and locating them in some context, not just throwing out a few vaguely connected, undeveloped doctrines. Those interested in getting a first impression of the philosophy of law would be better off visiting the Wikipedia pages of a few legal philosophers than buying this me specifics:This is the kind of book that offers a passage like the following -- "Raz actually postulates a stronger ver of the 'social thesis' (the 'sources thesis') as the essence of legal positivism" -- and then fails to define the "sources thesis." The thesis is evidently necessary enough to be mentioned three times in two pages, but is never defined.If you're like me, and you like your theses to be stated, you might search this book frustrating.Another characteristically frustrating passage: "Since Kelsen argues that the effectiveness of the whole legal order is a important condition of its validity of every norm within it,..." I can't even tell what went wrong in that sentence: is it a typo? Poor grammar? Unclear thought?(For more straightforward typos or grammar errors, see p. 37 ["by reference to three elements; efficacy, institutional character, and sources"], p. 55 ["Can I not have a duty without you (or anyone else) having a right that I should perform it."], etc.)The author also offers gratuitous, unsupported praise or scorn for different thinkers, such as the following throwaway remark about Critical Legal Studies: "Yet the possibilities of transforming the law seem frequently to be diluted by the destructive, even nihilistic, tendencies of some of the more dogmatic adherents of CLS." Really? Thanks for the tip! (No identification of these adherents is offered, nor any clarification of the sense in which they are "nihilistic," nor any clarification of how their nihilism might dilute the chance of transforming law.)Finally, the book includes a glaring omission that is apparently typical of philosophers of law who were trained in England. It makes no mention of the thought of (the German) Friedrich Carl von Savigny, and instead presents a lot of of Savigny's central ideas as though they were invented by (the English) John Austin, who in fact got the ideas directly from Savigny.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Big Questions: A Short Introduction to Philosophy []  2020-11-8 18:12

    An perfect primer on philosophical inquiry.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Big Questions: A Short Introduction to Philosophy []  2020-11-8 18:12

    A amazing and reasoned summary of necessary issues.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Big Questions: A Short Introduction to Philosophy []  2020-11-8 18:12

    Amazing book

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Big Questions: A Short Introduction to Philosophy []  2020-11-8 18:12

    Very useful for sophisticated and beginning students and for curious intellectuals.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Big Questions: A Short Introduction to Philosophy []  2020-11-8 18:12

    exactly what i required for my class

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Big Questions: A Short Introduction to Philosophy []  2020-11-8 18:12

    Bought the text for an online Philosophy class. Lots of amazing insight, however, the ideas and concepts can be somewhat confusing and contradicting at times though.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Big Questions: A Short Introduction to Philosophy []  2020-11-8 18:12

    This is a excellent primer for understanding philosphy: Both fundamentally and practically. Being in its 8th edition, that is testimony to its enduring quality and contribution to the education of philosophy student. The unfortunate flip side to this is that it still commands a high price due to the gouging of college students that have to buy the book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Big Questions: A Short Introduction to Philosophy []  2020-11-8 18:12

    This book was detailed and in amazing shape when I received it.I'm glad I ordered it;) I recommend it!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Big Questions: A Short Introduction to Philosophy []  2020-11-8 18:12

    This is an simple book to read and obtain introduced into the study of Philosophy. I service provided was amazing and ank lia Schafler

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Cheap Movie Tricks: How To Shoot A Short Film For Under $2,000 (Amateur Movie & Video Production, for Fans of The Filmmaker's Handbook) []  2020-6-14 18:37

    I think this book might have created a better impact if I hadn't already written, produced, and directed a short film. I look books on filmmaking with examples, images, illustrations, or realistic practices with "weight" and this was mostly a "checklist" of things to remember and even with that it was a "glossed" over. More of a "cheerleader" book for those getting started but nothing with "weight". If you wish a amazing book, check out Producer to Producer by Maureen Ryan.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Cheap Movie Tricks: How To Shoot A Short Film For Under $2,000 (Amateur Movie & Video Production, for Fans of The Filmmaker's Handbook) []  2020-6-14 18:37

    Amazing book. This book is for anyone that is interested in making a short film, or just wanting to gain some amazing tip for their next movie project. As a filmmaker, I found this book was fun and full of really helpful hints and tricks. I want i would have read it sooner.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Get on the Air...Now!: A practical, understandable guide to getting the most from Amateur Radio []  2020-8-23 18:30

    As a fresh Ham, I recently visited the Huntsville, AL Ham convention, where I met Don and purchased this book from him. It really helped me go from a reluctant rookie to ‘getting on the air’ with confidence.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Cheap Movie Tricks: How To Shoot A Short Film For Under $2,000 (Amateur Movie & Video Production, for Fans of The Filmmaker's Handbook) []  2020-6-14 18:37

    This is an perfect and worthy tutorial to getting started on a shoestring budget. There were a number of hints and recommendations that I have have created myself and quite a few that I learned and will now incorporate. It is worth the cover price for the organizational hints alone. Whether you are going to movie festivals, shooting for YouTube, or trying to up your android game with fun family/friend videos, this is a amazing book and needed reading.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Cheap Movie Tricks: How To Shoot A Short Film For Under $2,000 (Amateur Movie & Video Production, for Fans of The Filmmaker's Handbook) []  2020-6-14 18:37

    My title says it all. Some people, mostly the author's friends, may say this book is good, especially those few who somehow have fun his UTTERLY BORING attempts at humor (throughout the entire book!!!), but for the rest of us that aspire to create a film there are absolutely DOZENS of better books here on Amazon. This one was a true letdown.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Cheap Movie Tricks: How To Shoot A Short Film For Under $2,000 (Amateur Movie & Video Production, for Fans of The Filmmaker's Handbook) []  2020-6-14 18:37

    This book is excellent for anyone looking to create films. It covers every aspect of taking your concept from script to screen. This book is highly recommended for those who wish to obtain into filmmaking and/or wish to know step by step what goes into creating a short film. With Rickey Bird's years of cinematic experience you are in amazing hands as he tutorials you through the entire process of creating a short movie at a modest budget. Thank you Rickey for sharing your knowledge and love for movie with the world. Stay Hectic!!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Cheap Movie Tricks: How To Shoot A Short Film For Under $2,000 (Amateur Movie & Video Production, for Fans of The Filmmaker's Handbook) []  2020-6-14 18:37

    His book is full of information! It had a no-BS approach and gives you the appropriate info in a method that’s simple to understand, even if you are a beginning filmmaker. It walks you through the steps of making a movie from conception through budget, filming and marketing.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Get on the Air...Now!: A practical, understandable guide to getting the most from Amateur Radio []  2020-8-23 18:30

    Much overthinking here. Nothing in here that isn;'t available free on the internet... usually written better so don't waste your time or money.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Cheap Movie Tricks: How To Shoot A Short Film For Under $2,000 (Amateur Movie & Video Production, for Fans of The Filmmaker's Handbook) []  2020-6-14 18:37

    This book is more than just a book, it's a tool kit helping you begin from scratch with nothing and make a amazing film, shop it and enter into fests. There is more information on for more hints and tricks.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Cheap Movie Tricks: How To Shoot A Short Film For Under $2,000 (Amateur Movie & Video Production, for Fans of The Filmmaker's Handbook) []  2020-6-14 18:37

    I teach movie and video for high school students and am always looking for amazing ideas to teach that don't cost an arm and a leg. Not only are there a ton of really amazing ideas in this book, but the "looks" they give now let their short movies to be entered and compete into short movie festivals that will match the competition. My students really like the writing style in the book--the pace is quick and entertaining. Like most independent filmmakers, I don't have a lot of cash for my projects, and a minimal amount for my students (fundraising budget), and now this book helps even the playing field.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Get on the Air...Now!: A practical, understandable guide to getting the most from Amateur Radio []  2020-8-23 18:30

    Reading through it slowly. Describes me to a "T". I am newly licensed, buying first rig. Contains suggestions and recommendations. Not a huge book with endless technical terms. Very helpful !!!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Get on the Air...Now!: A practical, understandable guide to getting the most from Amateur Radio []  2020-8-23 18:30

    A waste of time, ham radio is not so complicated you need a book to figure it out. My daughter got on the air at age eight.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Cheap Movie Tricks: How To Shoot A Short Film For Under $2,000 (Amateur Movie & Video Production, for Fans of The Filmmaker's Handbook) []  2020-6-14 18:37

    This guy knows his stuff!! I've been a fan of Hectic Movies for years! I am excited to apply some of these cheap, but high quality, hints to my own filmmaking career!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Cheap Movie Tricks: How To Shoot A Short Film For Under $2,000 (Amateur Movie & Video Production, for Fans of The Filmmaker's Handbook) []  2020-6-14 18:37

    I rarely ever review a book until I'm done with it, but holy crap this is solid gold! So a lot of nuggets of info, so helpful for first time filmmakers! And it's an simple read with a lot of amazing humor in it. Bravo, Hectic Films!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Get on the Air...Now!: A practical, understandable guide to getting the most from Amateur Radio []  2020-8-23 18:30

    Don Keith's book: "Get on the Air," is an entertaining, fascinating venture into the exciting globe of amateur radio that will capture and maintain the attention of "hams to be," "new hams," and experienced radio amateurs alike. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in amateur radio or anyone who just wants to search out what ham radio is all about!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Get on the Air...Now!: A practical, understandable guide to getting the most from Amateur Radio []  2020-8-23 18:30

    I enjoyed this book very much. N4KC covers most of what current and prospective ham radio operators need to know and he does a amazing job of selling the hobby/interest. Don thinks and writes like I do, which created it more engaging. The second half is a comprehensive dictionary of amateur radio terms, abbreviations and slang, useful to all hams, fresh and old. I plan to loan this out to people who wish to learn more about ham radio.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Get on the Air...Now!: A practical, understandable guide to getting the most from Amateur Radio []  2020-8-23 18:30

    Unknown

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hamshack Raspberry Pi: A Beginner’s Guide to The Raspberry Pi for Amateur Radio Activities []  2019-12-23 20:7

    This book gave me a few to attempt d book for building me pleasant projects in the book.A speedy read and superb reference hotspot for setting up your Raspberry Pi with Amateur Radio similar so gives amazing references to more data to a portion of the eat read on the most proficient way to adjust a pi to your eat read ,Suggested...!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hamshack Raspberry Pi: A Beginner’s Guide to The Raspberry Pi for Amateur Radio Activities []  2019-12-23 20:8

    Amazing book with ideas for cheap ham radio activities.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hamshack Raspberry Pi: A Beginner’s Guide to The Raspberry Pi for Amateur Radio Activities []  2019-12-23 20:7

    While there was some material about setting up and securing the Pi that would be beneficial for a beginner, there was very small about actual projects in the book. Overall, I was not impressed with it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hamshack Raspberry Pi: A Beginner’s Guide to The Raspberry Pi for Amateur Radio Activities []  2019-12-23 20:8

    WHile the author provides the actual code for different ham radio projects, small to no info is given as to the hooup part.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hamshack Raspberry Pi: A Beginner’s Guide to The Raspberry Pi for Amateur Radio Activities []  2019-12-23 20:8

    I used product to support build a ham radio station

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hamshack Raspberry Pi: A Beginner’s Guide to The Raspberry Pi for Amateur Radio Activities []  2019-12-23 20:7

    I bought this before I bought the PI 4 ... I created my decision to buy the PI 4 based on this book. It just that delivery, amazing read, from primary beginner in PI to advanced this book delivers.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hamshack Raspberry Pi: A Beginner’s Guide to The Raspberry Pi for Amateur Radio Activities []  2019-12-23 20:8

    It flows easily. It is simple reading and has been a amazing help.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hamshack Raspberry Pi: A Beginner’s Guide to The Raspberry Pi for Amateur Radio Activities []  2019-12-23 20:8

    Lots of amazing information

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hamshack Raspberry Pi: A Beginner’s Guide to The Raspberry Pi for Amateur Radio Activities []  2019-12-23 20:8

    A beautiful primary introduction that is mostly composed of commands and no true innovative examples of what the Pi can do.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hamshack Raspberry Pi: A Beginner’s Guide to The Raspberry Pi for Amateur Radio Activities []  2019-12-23 20:8

    Amazing read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Laws of Thermodynamics: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-1-19 20:12

    Peter Atkins promises at the outset that this will not be a light read, and it isn't, at least not if you wish to really take it all in and much of it is fresh to you. Gibbs energy and Helmholtz energy are discussed, as are negative (below absolute zero) temperatures. For a very short introduction to the subject, it goes into considerable would need no more than an average grasp of High School math and science to follow the arguments completely, and not even that if you are just seeking a flavor of what the topic is about and are willing to settle for less than a thorough kins writes very well, with clarity, elegance and an infectious enthusiasm. There is certainly no lack of the latter - he describes these laws as 'a mighty handful' that drives the Universe, and claims that 'no other scientific law has contributed more to the liberation of the human spirit than the second law of Thermodynamics'. I'm not sure about that, but I do now appreciate the fundamental importance of these laws and how they are crucial to understanding how Nature works.[PeterReeve]

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Laws of Thermodynamics: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-1-19 20:12

    Having worked my method through most of this very short introduction to thermodynamics (I confess to having given up about halfway through its discussion of the Second Law) I conclude that thermodynamics does not lend itself to a very short introduction. The book clearly tries to give a simple, popularized explanation; those without much of a background in science, mathematics, or engineering, though, may quickly search it somewhat mystifying. There are a few principles that I think it managed to teach even me. But to obtain much more out of it apparently requires suitable prerequisites.I cannot blame the author for his book's inability to reduce a complex scientific topic to the level of a mere lawyer. Your mileage may vary. But be prepared for a fair amount of mathematics, often accompanied by the suggestion -- common in works of science but not, I would have thought, entirely appropriate for a "very short introduction" -- that, based on the equations you're presented, coming up with different other equations and understanding their import is a trifling thing that requires no explanation.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions Book 191) []  2020-1-22 19:30

    This is an admirably concise and interesting overview of a very broad subject covering the ancient globe to modern times. A amazing introduction for those who wish some primary background on a fascinating topic. The writing style is generally fluid, and the historical illustrations are a bonus. My chief criticisms are as follows: 1) occasionally a topic will call out for slightly more elaboration than is provided - for example, the concept of the "moral treatment" in psychiatric care was not really explained - though this is a very minor criticism since the book covers so much territory; 2) portions of the latest chapters feel a bit disjointed and lack the smooth flow that characterizes most of his writing, and 3) this book should be titled "The History of Western Medicine" since there is virtually no mention of happenings beyond Europe. The author acknowledges this in the intro, but a easy title shift would alert buyers that this volume will not cover the entire global picture. These are admittedly minor flaws and I otherwise highly recommend this as a fast read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions Book 191) []  2020-1-22 19:30

    Really enjoyed this book. Only took a few hours to read it through. The author does a unbelievable job of maintaining a gentle view on the characters in history, giving credit where it is due without offering a lot of criticism. There is substantial editorializing, but this is most often rebuking other historians for attempting to invent narrative and incite controversy, when a easy retelling of the happenings is what most readers are after, and which the show author accomplishes most efficiently.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions Book 191) []  2020-1-22 19:30

    Amazing Thesaurus. Amazing Table of Contents. Unbelievable Information!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Time: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-7-15 18:47

    I got this book because I thought it would be interesting to read about the history and evolution of time measurement. I was disappointed. It is written in at times confusing and imprecise language. The first sentence of Chapter 1, for instance, reads "the most fundamental unit of time-measurement is in most societies the period of the earth's rotation round the sun, which is normally known as a day" (1). Here, the term 'period' is vague in a method changes the meaning of the sentence. It could refer (more colloquially) to a period of time; as in the 'the period of time it takes for the earth to rotate around the sun' (which is...not a day, but a year). Or, more technically, it could refer to what astronomers call a 'rotation period' which is the amount of time it takes for an object to rotate around its axis of rotation. But, if he is referring to the earth's rotation period, why refer to the sun at all? It just seems confusing....The author also jumps around from describing time measurements in one society to those in another. Rather than explaining the practices or concepts through which Romans or Babylonians or specific Chinese societies measured time, he jumps from one society to the next from paragraph to paragraph as if all past societies are comparable because they are old. He has text boxes entitled items like "Ancient number of hours" as if the entire diversity of past human societies can simply be described as one thing called 'ancient'.Honestly, I only got a few pages in before recognizing that buying this book had been a waste of time.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Time: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-7-15 18:47

    If readers buy this book, as I did, expecting a short discussion of the historical development of the concept of time in physics, cosmology, psychology, sociology or philosophy then they will be disappointed. There is more about `time', per se, in Stephen Hawking's Brief History of Time, Henri Bergson's Time and Free Will, Heidegger's Concept of Time or Carl Honore's In Praise of Slow. There is not even very much about clocks here. I would suggest a more appropriate and accurate title for this book might have been the title of my e author is a scholar-editor at the publishing house so, although I know nothing of this particular aspect of time, I assume that the info herein is well researched and accurate. As such, it makes for fascinating reading and includes much info I was never aware of about the Babylonian, Hebrew, Baha'i and Chinese calendars, the dating of happenings from the year in which some central figure held office (used in Assyria, Athens, Sparta and Rome, the author tells us) and info of the Gregorian calendar and the dating of Easter.If this is the sort of info you seek, I know of no better book. If you wish to know something about the history of how scientists have viewed time, what psychologists have to say about how we view and use time and how this is linked historically to social changes, then you must look ard Jones is the author of The Globe as SpiritA Brief History of TimeTime and free will; an essay on the immediate data of consciousness

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Time: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-7-15 18:47

    I haven't seen any other works on the history of time, time-keeping, and calendrics. Well, any really, besides some on chronometers and sundials (and another one by this author). So, I was very excited when I picked this up. The scholarship in this work is unbelievable and well-referenced. Unfortunately, it's a very dense read, and the author has an unengaging style and a tendency to employ very long winded and very academic phrasing. He also uses too much jargon. This is a very atypical entry in the series which, otherwise, I really love. The main issue is that it's not really an intro (the only other "Intro" I've read that was less appropriately titled was Heidegger's equally non-introductory "Introduction to Metaphysics"). It's a monograph, not an y be of interest to some more academic types esp. in epistemology or history of ideas, but not for the educated lay reader that is the target of the VSI series. In short, well-researched and occasionally interesting in little doses, but not something you can read on your commute to work or at lunchtime.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Chemistry: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-2-6 22:8

    Very amazing reading for beginners in the field of sciences. As a lot of other books about the history of chemistry it has interestings aspect from prehistoric times to modern times. Highly recommended for teachers and students, like some other titles of this series... "A very short ...."I read the book in only one day.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Chemistry: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-2-6 22:8

    I'm enjoying it. It begins with early alchemy and walks through the days of early to modern chemistry. It is a well written, well edited, relevant, succinct text without being terse, that provides useful, and interesting, insight into the development of modern chemistry.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Chemistry: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-2-6 22:8

    Generally good, especially considering its length. However, while the books covers early modern and classical chemistry quite well, development of the modern chemistry is not very well explained. The near total omission of quantum chemistry is especially problematic.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Life: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions Book 193) []  2020-8-19 18:50

    Interesting book about the eras of life. I like the theories how dna and cells formed from a soup of natural chemicals in water heated by volcanic vents. He talks about how different life forms progressed through the ages from easy cells to corals, early sea creatures, walking onto land, the Permian extinction which killed 96% of all species, and of course humans. Was simple for a non scientist to understand. The only drawback is that it didn't have pictures of the life forms, plants and animals talked about, so I had to hold running to my computer for images.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Life: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions Book 193) []  2020-8-19 18:50

    As the title says, it is a very short introduction. Contents can satisfy just your curiosity about the history of life.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions Book 191) []  2020-1-22 19:30

    This book is full of really amazing info beginning with ancient medicine, Hippocrates, views of illness and treatments. Full of the innovators, such as Louis Pasteur. Provides the most necessary things to know about each subject or person. The book is very little about 4x6, so it's simple to carry around. Delivered on time

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions Book 191) []  2020-1-22 19:30

    A good, solid fast summary of the history of medicine.Understand that, if you are looking at this book (and have never read any others in this series), it is fairly short and you won't obtain a ton of info beyond the basics of the subject. That being said, for what it is it does a amazing job of giving an overview that is simple to read and stays on is is a amazing source for anyone interested in this subject.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Chemistry: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-2-6 22:8

    Review of ‘The history of chemistry: a very short introduction’ by William H. TATION: Brock, W. H. (2016). The history of chemistry: a very short introduction. Oxford: Oxford University er: Dr W. P. e book includes a amazing deal of info about chemistry in six short chapters and seven extra informative sections. The chapters are: On the nature of stuff, the ysis of stuff, gases and atoms, types and hexagons, reactivity and synthesis. Like other books in the series, this book is intentionally brief yet it manages to contain the essentials of chemistry’s long history. I like Brock’s perspective in the foreword where he points out that about three million people consider themselves chemists and they write 750,000 research papers annually. This is a large expansion in the past two hundred emistry’s beginnings are traced back to the stone age and the pigments required for cave paintings. Necessary events, changing theories, fresh techniques and instrumentation are unravelled up to the year 2003, providing the awesome story of chemistry’s development. It would be unbelievable if more of the chemists in the globe were more aware of their subject’s history. Books like this create that awareness easily available. A amazing read!!BILL PALMER

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Time: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-7-15 18:47

    The author obviously knows a lot about a large topic (covering several millennia) that is not simple to organize and explain in a coherent fashion. Most terms are not defined in a clear manner resulting in this reviewer's need to read Wikipedia articles on a lot of of the subjects covered. Here is a sample sentence from chapter 5 about Weeks and Seasons (concerning the alleged domination of a planet for every hour in the day. The Egyptians were the first think this way):"Since the 24 hours of the natural day accommodated three planetary cycles with three hours, and therefore three planets, left over, the next day was ruled by the next planet but two: after Saturn the Sun, after the Sun the Moon, and so on (see box)." Re-reading the preceding paragraphs and referring to the box did not support clarify what the author intended to the very least the book could benefit by providing tables to visually illustrate the often complex concepts that the text seemed inadequate to explain. The various calculations to determine the date of Easter, for example, were close to unintelligible. I enjoyed a lot of other books from Oxford University Press VSI series (30 so far). This was not one of them.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Time: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-7-15 18:47

    This isn't a history of our understanding of what time may be but rather a history of how humans divide and count time. It might have been better titled as a history of the calendar(s). We are so used to our standard system that we are unlikely to appreciate the a lot of conventions that had to be accepted to arrive at it. Do we use a tropical or siderial year? When does a day begin - sunrise, noon, sunset or midnight? How a lot of hours in a day? How a lot of days in a week, a month, a year? The book is divided into 7 chapters. The first deals with the day, its subdivisions and the standardization of time (and later time zones) necessitatied by railway timetables. The second deals with months and years and the differences between lunar and solar e third deals with the history of what we might call the Western calendar from the original Roman Republican calendar, through its reform by Julius Caesar to the adoption of the Gregorian calendar and the confusion caused by the reluctance of non-Catholics to accept the latter. Easter has a chapter all of its own. This may seem strange to anyone not familiar to its large significance in the history of the development of the Western calendar. In medieaval Europe the computus i.e. the calculation of the date of Easter was the most necessary calculation of the age. Before reading this chapter I knew the computus was complicated but I didn't appreciate just how complicated it was. Unfortunately the author (who is co-author of The Oxford Companion to the Year) doesn't conclude this chapter with a statement of the current rules for its calculation. Chapter 5 deals with the week - and the unsuccessful efforts of revolutionaries and reformers to change it - and the seasons. Chapter 6 deals with other calendars - the Jewish, the Muslim, the Gaulish, the Hundu, the Iranian, the Chinese and the Mayan. Given that this is a Very Short Introduction these can only be given brief summaries. The final chapter covers how we tag the years, again a surprisingly difficult thing to do before the rise of the BC/AD system. The book also has a bibliography, a couple of appendices and a very helpful glossary – given the highly technical style of the author.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Life: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions Book 193) []  2020-8-19 18:50

    A unbelievable journey

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Life: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions Book 193) []  2020-8-19 18:50

    In only around 150 pages, this book covers the whole story of life on earth. That's 25 million years per page!Briefly: biochemical reactions started 4 billion years ago, and genetic materals started to form as well - these provided the basis for single cell organisms to form; multicellular organisms then evolved, conferring the advantage of specialization of cells; skeletons soon developed and with them an explosion and establishment of all major animal groups (The Cambrian Explosion, c. 540 million years ago); afterwards, first plants then animals started to invade the land - including crucially forests and reptiles (The Carboniferous Period, c. 320 Mya); global warming then ensued, resulting in a large mass extinction in which 96 percent of all species were eliminated (The End-Permian Extinction, c. 250 Mya); the globe slowly got recolonized again - radiation of species occurred - and the precusor of mammals (the cynodonts) also came into en, a 10-km meteorite struck the earth, depleting sunlight via large dust clouds, killing off huge animals - significantly the dinosaurs as well - freeing the scene for little mammals to populate (The Cretaceous-Tertiary Event, c. 65 Mya). From early primates came monkeys, apes and finally e author emphazises the orthodox view that we humans are not the pinnacle of evolution, and evolution is not teleological. Yet he admits that we are special: "no other species on Earth, to our knowledge, writes book, or even reflects on the history of its own species." (page 146) - the reader can interpret and meditate upon this in his or her own markable - short and succinct. Five stars.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Laws of Thermodynamics: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-1-19 20:12

    As an individual that tends more to the side of the "soft" sciences, the necessary theorems that are foundational to the "hard" sciences can be extremely difficult to grasp or intimidating to even attempt to test to learn at the least, a freshman level of understanding of these laws. Needless to say, it is always amazing to at least try. Peter Atkins and his Very Short Introduction proved to be an perfect resource to support me to develop at the minimum, a clearer and foundational understanding of the Laws of e best thing about this book is that Peter Atkins was asked to write it. He does quite an awesome job as far as taking the esoteric and making it as understandable and the least intimidating that it can possibly be. He writes clearly and speaks about the concepts behind the laws in a method that translates the material into common true life scenarios. Another amazing thing about the book is that he always makes sure to remind the reader of the topics previously discussed as he moves on to the next topic. In other words, when starting a fresh topic or sub part of an overall subject, he reminds us of what was previously talked about and gives a very fast recap of the basics of that ere is one drawback though. This drawback probably has more to do with the reader than anything Dr. Atkins has done though. It is in the latest two chapters that things start to obtain more technical than the first part of the book. This may require some additional reading and backtracking through the book to create sure that you understand everything clearly enough to obtain out of the book and its descriptions everything that Dr. Atkins is trying to teach. This means then, that for the beginner, this part is slightly more difficult than the earlier parts. It is not anything that Dr. Atkins does, it is just that the material gets a small heavier.Another plus of the book is that Atkins provides his reader with an perfect small text that will provide you with the basics and a small more. The further reading section at the end of the book will also give the person wanting to know more the capability to search other books that Dr. Atkins has given his seal of approval is was truly a well thought out, clear, and actually approachable book considering the subject and my own background. This should be a amazing book for a person wanting to know about the Laws of Thermodynamics or a person especially looking for a fast refresher on things that they learned previously. It should also prove especially helpful to a student of chemistry, physics or biology to use as a fast resource.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Laws of Thermodynamics: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-1-19 20:12

    They say it is impossible to break the thermodynamics laws in this universe, everything else is uncertain; give it a try. You can see and feel thermodynamics making a cup of tea while reading this book. Hell of fun, right? Wait for it because this Atkins guy push the whole thing to another level of fun. Damn amazing teacher! For example, he started comparing work and heat at the molecular level to end the discussion making a connection with our civilization development. You will never forget the laws, never!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Laws of Thermodynamics: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-1-19 20:12

    This book aims to give a fast overview of fundamental concepts in thermodynamics. It achieves that less than 50% ...The selection of content is good, however the author did not apply adequate effort to show it in a readable method with clear details. The exact same material is covered in "Elements of Physical Chemistry" by Atkins and Julio de Paula. The language there is much more readable (probably due to the second author) with more expanded info and pictures. However it is still more focused on chemistry than physics and you still won't see the Clausius derivation of are the main issues of the "Very Short Introduction":- the Clausius definition of entropy is dumped on the reader without derivation. If you are curious how entropy appears in thermodynamics, you are out of lack, and this is typical for most chemistry books.- the energy diagrams of two connected heat engines are best illustrated with numerical values, as a lot of amazing physics books do, not with generic "Heat" which have various values for the two engines. The author completely forgets to mention that the energy flow is conserved on such a diagram so his first explanation of equivalence between Kelvin and Clausius statements will be lost on a lot of readers that see these diagrams for the first time.- at a lot of locations the text is unpleasant to read and hard to understand due to pretentious dictionary words and several thoughts crammed into a single convoluted sentence:"Whereas lesser minds might view the heat source as the crucial component, or perhaps the vigorously reciprocating piston, Kelvin - as we shall anachronistically call him - saw otherwise: he identified the invisible as indispensible, seeing that the cold sink - often just the undersigned surroundings - is essential".- some examples in the book are missing little info vital to their understanding. For example, the book fails to mention that when a chemical reaction "releases energy", the change of internal energy from the initial products to the final products at the same temperature is negative, and even cites it as positive: "When 1L of gasoline is burned it produces carbon dioxide and water vapour. The change in internal energy is 33 MJ ....". A lot of beginners will be lost by such a flip of sign in the First Law and will not be able to follow the explanation, which renders it useless. Another example was not explaining why the entropy change of a heat engine is not taken into acc when the total entropy change of the universe is calculated. Answer: a cyclic engine returns to the initial state of the same entropy.- the book is historically inaccurate on a few occasions. The formula for the efficiency of Carnot's engine was derived by Kelvin, not by Carnot as the book claims. Kelvin wrote a whole 40-50 page article on Carnot's book and was not "largely oblivious of Carnot's work" as Atkins claims.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Laws of Thermodynamics: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-1-19 20:12

    Professor Atkins comes across as an intellectual with a large command of the English language and I betting most of his communication is with his intellectual peers. However, from my poorly educated point of view his use of language is difficult to follow. I bought this book thinking it was written to people that wish a small more than a primary over view; and the book gives me that. I rate the books content and order in which the instruction is presented at five stars but the long sentences that have to be read and re-read are tough for me to follow. Is the book worth it - yes it is, and I would recommend it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Medicine: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions Book 191) []  2020-1-22 19:30

    I bought this for a college course, but it was very well written and interesting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Chemistry: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-2-6 22:8

    Fun short review of the history of chemistry up until the 1950s

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Time: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-7-15 18:47

    Life on Planet Earth reckons time by solar day/night and seasons and by lunar ever, solar days do not fit evenly into the solar year, nor do solar and lunar cycles match up erefore, human civilizations have struggled to invent mathematical models of time that reliably and consistently predict solar, lunar and seasonal activity for agricultural, astronomical and religious is book surveys why calendars are always kludgy and how civilizations have fudged their method around the asynchrony of day/night, month and year. While it spends more time on the Judeo-Roman (lunar-solar) calendar, there's lots of info about Chinese, Islamic, Mayan and other major calendar systems.

    0  



    Search Cloud

    About us

    Use our product reviews finder and generate tons of ratings & opinions on any item, shop product or service. Search, read and publish reviews for brands, TV shows, ebooks, gadgets, video games, meals, music, household items or movies. Would you like to rate recently purchased thing? Go ahead! Express satisfaction or sadness, describe own experience & identify strengths and weaknesses of the product. Write short or detailed review with a few clicks.

    Community

    Publish review of any item you find here, registration is not required
    Share own experience, point out the pros and cons, warn or recommend
    Search for opinions on any item, product or service, read tons of reviews

    Contact

    www.add-reviews.com

    Use contact form to reach us or write a message via email:

    [email protected]

    Describe your problem, share ideas or report a bug on the site.

    https://add-reviews.com/
    0856-458-386