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    The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-24 18:0

    In the first pages of The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope I was quite moved by the sense of truth Riley gives the life of her heroine. One feels the sense and substance of the heroines everyday life and her struggle. At the same time one sees the larger picture of social and economic depression event in the country. I talked with a mate who was raised on a farm and he quite admired the accuracy of Riley's creation.But I had been told that this was a novel of magical realism, and absorbed as I was by the realism of the book I wondered where was the "magic?" That question was answered soon enough and from that point the book really took off for me.I think it's best not to say too much about plot and hero development, except to say that the book caught and held me for two days.

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    The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve []  2020-1-16 15:18

    The story of Adam and Eve is the bedrock of the bedrock of Judeo-Christian-Islamic cultures. Most of us hear the tale of the Creation, the Garden,the Serpent, the Temptation, the Fall, and the Expulsion in one form or another in our earliest childhoods and again throughout our lives. For a lot of of us at some point it slips into the category of Legend, though we often search it re-emerging with fresh significance in ways that other legends like Pandora's Box do not. Stephen Greenblatt's survey of the tale through history (primarily Western Christian history) is well written and thought provoking, providing us with new insights into its continuing blatt begins his history with the Babylonian Captivity of the Jewish people after their conquest and expulsion from the land of Israel. Weeping by the waters of Babylon, the Jews were exposed to the chaotic religious beliefs of their captors, in which gods and goddesses cavorted, fought, and struggled for supremacy. In an effort to distinguish their own monotheistic worship the Jews made their own stories, relying on old teachings and traditions and sometimes borrowing ideas from the other peoples to whom they were exposed. Eventually these stories became the foundation for what is now known as the Old er on that foundation led to the rise of Christianity and Islam. Greenblatt does not spend much time dealing with Islamic traditions, his focus is on Western Christianity. He does a remarkable job of covering St. Augustine's influence on the development of Western theology and Adam and Eve's put in it, touches somewhat cursorily on medieval Christianity, then refocuses for another superb recapitulation of John Milton's influence. Moving from Milton through the Enlightenment, Greenblatt's next major emphasis is on Darwinism, finally finishing with a short epilogue dealing with chimpanzee societies in me may fault Greenblatt for being too cursorial, but given the breadth and importance of the topic his choice must have been between a multivolume work vs this relatively brief (300 pages plus another 100 of Appendices, Notes, and Bibliography) summarization. Although the book may be a bit short given its topic it is nevertheless full of necessary insights. The humanity of the story, the emphasis on Adam and Eve's freedom to choose, the sense of loss, and the odd re-echoes in our own world, where DNA evidence points to a common heritage for all of humanity are all beautifully covered in Greenblatt's attractive prose. A book to read and reread and ponder.

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    The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve []  2020-1-16 15:18

    Stephen Greenblatt’s book The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve (Norton, 2017) is hard to categorize. As I read over Greenblatt’s 2017 book, I kept looking back at the list of his previously published books and the list of books he has edited over the years. In addition, I kept looking at the acknowledgments (pages 321-324). In the acknowledgments, he says, “Part of the pleasure of pursuing this subject has been the incentive it gave me to venture outside the disciplinary orbit in which I ordinarily circle” (page 321). Yes, he does indeed “venture outside the disciplinary orbit in which [he] ordinarily circle[s].”Because Christians eventually incorporated the Hebrew Bible into the Christian Bible, I suppose that Greenblatt’s wide-ranging book could be categorized as a work in church history, albeit a rather expansive work in church any event, Greenblatt’s book contains a prologue, fourteen chapters, an epilogue, two appendices, acknowledgments, notes (many of which are discussion notes), a select bibliography, illustration credits, and an index.On page 297, Greenblatt says, “In a provocative book [The Genealogy of Morals] published in 1887, the German philosopher [Friedrich Nietzsche] argued that the crucial mechanism for the transformation of amoral ape-like monsters into moral human beings was pain – repeated remorseless infliction of pain. Punishment was the means by which the healthy, exuberant, violent energies of the dominant males – Nietzsche called them ‘the blond beasts’ – were gradually tamed. In the process, everything that those who had once ruled the earth regarded as amazing – the ruthless satisfaction of appetite, the swaggering insolence, the reckless blend of rapine and largesse, the unrestrained will to be the alpha male – was rebranded as evil. The mass of women and male weaklings who had once been gleefully dominated by the blond beasts managed to proclaim their values of self-sacrifice, discipline, and pious fear as good. The transformation – Nietzsche termed it a ‘transvaluation of values’ – was in result a successful slave revolt. It must have been led, he thought, by an extremely clever priestly caste seething with resentment. He identified this caste with the Jews and declared that their culminating invention, in celebrating diseased suffering over amoral health, was Jesus, the fresh Adam” (pages 297-298).Oddly enough, as Greenblatt info earlier in his book (pages 24-63), a certain number of ancient Hebrews had been relocated in Babylon. He says, “Abraham, the founding figure of the Jewish faith, began his life in nearby Ur” (page 24). But things did not go well for the Hebrew slaves in Babylon, to place it mildly. Eventually, the Babylonian Empire was conquered by the Assyrian Empire. But the anguish of the Hebrew slaves in Babylon found expression in certain key texts that eventually became part of the Hebrew blatt says, “If the Hebrew storyteller [of the story of Adam and Eve] intended to unsettle deeply held Mesopotamian beliefs, he succeeded brilliantly. He turned the ancient origin story upside down. What was triumph in Gilgamesh is tragedy in Genesis” (page 63). Of course, this is not exactly what Nietzsche meant by the “transvaluation of values.” But the Hebrew slaves exacted a kind of revenge in , on page 250 of Greenblatt’s book The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve, he sums up his survey of portrayals of Adam and Eve as “the effect of thinking of Adam and Eve as real” – instead of thinking of them, as Greenblatt himself does, as “a myth” (page 284). I agree with him that the story of Adam and Eve is a , the Canadian Jesuit philosopher and theologian Bernard Lonergan (1904-1984; doctorate in Catholic theology, Gregorian University in Rome, 1946 [conferral delayed by Globe Battle II]) has articulated the philosophical position that he styles as critical realism in his philosophical masterpiece Insight: A Study of Human Understanding, 5th ed. (University of Toronto Press, 1992; orig. ed., 1957). Lonergan differentiates his philosophical position of critical realism from what he refers to as naïve realism.What Greenblatt refers to as “the effect of thinking of Adam and Eve as real” involves what Lonergan refers to as naïve realism.A decade or more after the original publication in 1957 of Lonergan’s philosophical masterpiece, he worked out an essay titled “The Transition from a Classical World-View to Historical-Mindedness” (1966), which is reprinted in Lonergan’s book A Second Collection, edited by William F. J. Ryan, S.J., and Bernard J. Tyrrell, S.J. (Philadelphia: Westminster Press, 1974, pages 1-9).In Lonergan’s terminology in that essay, Greenblatt’s 2017 book The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve can be understood as an extended exercise in , the thought of the American Jesuit Renaissance specialist and cultural historian Walter J. Ong (1912-2003; Ph.D. in English, Harvard University, 1955) developed in a trajectory parallel to the trajectory of Lonergan’s thought about a classicist worldview. See Ong’s essay “World as View and Globe as Event” in the journal the American Anthropologist, volume 71, number 4 (August 1969): pages 634-647; reprinted in volume three of Ong’s Faith and Contexts (Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1995, pages 69-90).However, if Ong was familiar with Lonergan’s essay “The Transition from a Classical World-View to Historical-Mindedness,” I am not aware of any publications in which Ong uses the expression nversely, if Lonergan was familiar with Ong’s essay “World as View and Globe as Event,” I am not aware of any publications in which Lonergan uses the expression world-as-event sense of life to refer to the human condition before the world-as-view sense of life emerged in Western philosophical thought exemplified by Plato and Aristotle – which Lonergan refers to as the classicist worldview.But Ong + Lonergan = two overlapping terms + two non-overlapping terms = a trinity of terminology. Not the divine trinity. But perhaps analogous to the divine trinity, eh?Now, the story of Adam and Eve as a myth originated with people who had a world-as-event sense of life. When people who had basically a world-as-view sense of life interpreted the story of Adam and Eve, they tended to think of them as real, as Greenblatt t surprisingly, Greenblatt devotes three chapters (pages 163-230) to the British poet John Milton (1608-1674), who studied Ramist dialectic (also known as logic) at Cambridge University in Latin and who later in life wrote a textbook in logic in Latin based on Peter Ramus’ ’s massively researched doctoral dissertation centered on the French logician and educational reformer and Protestant martyr Peter Ramus (1515-1572). Ong’s dissertation was published, slightly revised in two volumes in 1958 by Harvard University Press: (1) Ramus, Method, and the Decay of Dialogue: From the Art of Discourse to the Art of Reason and (2) Ramus and Talon 1960, Ong served as president of the Milton Society of America. In 1978, Ong served as president of the Modern Language Association of America. In 1982, Ong and Charles J. Ermatinger translated Milton’s logic textbook in volume eight of Yale’s Complete Prose Works of John Milton (Yale University Press, pages 139-407); Ong’s introduction is reprinted as “Introduction to Milton’s Logic” in volume four of Ong’s Faith and Contexts (Atlanta: Scholars Press, 1999, pages 111-142).But in my estimate, Ong’s most necessary essay about Milton is not his magnificent introduction to Milton’s Logic, but his essay “From Epithet to Logic: Miltonic Epic and the Closure of Existence” in his book Interfaces of the Word: Studies in the Evolution of Consciousness and Culture (Cornell University Press, pages 189-212).Milton announces that his overall purpose in Paradise Lost is to justify the ways of God to man. His goal establishes a logical structure for his poem. By contrast, Homer’s announced goal of singing about the wrath of Achilles in the Iliad establishes no such logical structure for his anted, Greenblatt is not writing epic poetry. But he does announce his purpose: “This book is a life history of one of the most extraordinary stories ever told” (page 2). Note the modifying word here “a” – not “the.” A wee bit of Greenblatt, Ong is not writing epic poetry in his mature scholarly publications from the early 1950s onward. But does he tell us, as Homer and Milton do, what his purpose is in his mature scholarly publications? Well, in his preface to his 1977 book Interfaces of the Word (pages 9-13), he finally at long latest explicitly spells out his thesis (pages 9-10). Thank you very much, Father Ong. Better late than never.“[The thesis] is not reductionist, as reviewers and commentators, so far as I know, have all generously recognized: the works [by Ong] do not maintain that the evolution from basic orality through writing and print to [contemporary] electronic culture, which produces secondary orality [today], causes or explains everything in human culture and consciousness. Rather, the thesis is relationist: major development, and very likely even all major developments, in culture and consciousness are related, often in unexpected intimacy, to the evolution of the word from basic orality to its show state” (pages 9-10).Major developments after the Gutenberg printing-press emerged in the mid-1450s contain modern science, modern capitalism, modern democracy, the Industrial Revolution, and the Romantic Movement in philosophy and the arts.Even though Ong characteristically stops well short of making specific predictions about any likely major or minor developments that might emerge as a effect of the emergence of what he refers to as secondary orality, we should note here that the emergence of secondary orality has also brought forth the emergence of the Internet and social media – further permutations in the technologizing of the word. It strikes me as fair to say that the critical mass of these different permutations of the technologizing of the word will bring forth further developments in culture and the beginning, according to Ong, our human ancestors lived in basic oral cultures. To this day, a lot of people around the globe live in residual forms of basic oral cultures. However, with the advent of phonetic alphabetic writing systems in the ancient world, the thought and expression characteristic or basic oral cultures got written down. This writing revolution pinballed around ancient cultures. The pinballing of the writing revolution interacted with human freedom and creativity in certain ways – eventually producing the kind of abstract philosophical thought exemplified in Plato and Aristotle – the subject of Havelock’s 1963 book Preface to Plato (Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1963).The pinballing of the phonetic alphabetic writing system in ancient Jewish culture eventually resulted in the canonical texts in the Hebrew Bible – and the writing revolution continued after Christianity emerged historically and eventually produced canon of texts known as the Fresh Testament. The pinballing of the writing revolution continued throughout the roughly thousand-year period known as the Middle en the pinballing of the writing revolution went into orbit, figuratively speaking, after the Gutenberg printing press emerged in the mid-1450s. Greenblatt is aware of oral traditions (pages 16, 18, and 39) and of the emergence of writing systems (pages 17 and 40) – and especially of cuneiform writing (pages 39-63). He refers in passing to the King James Bible (pages 5 and 325) and to the printing press (pages 239 and 247) – a key touchstone in Ong’s ever, in my estimate, Ong’s most necessary essay overall is “Voice and the Opening of Closed Systems” in Interfaces of the Word (pages 305-341). In it, he opts for the option of what he refers to as “open closure.”Now, what Ong refers to as the world-as-view sense of life involves closed-systems thinking – as does what Lonergan refers to as the classicist worldview.What Ong refers to as the opening of closed systems of thinking involves what Lonergan refers to as historical-mindedness – as exemplified in Greenblatt’s book The Rise and Fall of Adam and my estimate, the American Jesuit theologian John Courtney Murray (1904-1967; doctorate in Catholic theology, Gregorian University in Rome, 1937) assimilated Lonergan’s terminology about the classicist worldview and historical-mindedness with astonishing alacrity. Murray had been instrumental in the Second Vatican Council (1962-1965) in the Roman Catholic Church. He drafted the Council’s Declaration on Religious Freedom. Subsequently, Murray discussed it in his article “The Declaration on Religious Freedom: Its Deeper Significance” in the Jesuit-Sponsored magazine America, volume 114 (April 23, 1966): pages 592-593. In his article, Murray uses Lonergan’s terminology. For example, Murray says, “It was the transition from the classical mentality to historical consciousness. . . . The whole document is permeated by historical consciousness” (page 592).Later in his article, Murray says, “A work of differentiation between the sacral and the secular has been effected in history. But differentiation is not the highest scene in human growth. The movement toward a fresh synthesis, within which the differentiation will at once subsist, integral and unconfused, and also be transcended in a higher unity” (page 593).No doubt Murray’s frame of reference here is the Roman Catholic Church, and no doubt the fresh syntheses worked out by Ong and Lonergan could contribute to the Church’s growth toward the highest scene envisioned by vertheless, in my estimate, Greenblatt’s book The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve may fairly be described as a contribution to the secular side’s growth toward the highest scene envisioned by Murray for the Church. I don’t mean that his book is beyond criticism. It can be r pointed criticism of Greenblatt’s book, see Marilynne Robinson’s incisive review of it in the Fresh York Times Book Review dated October 8, 2017, page 18. To whatever extent Greenblatt’s book may be uninformed, as Robinson claims it is in certain respects, those are shortcomings that Greenblatt can perhaps correct in subsequent publications – or perhaps others can correct them, as Robinson herself does by quoting a pertinent statement created by John Calvin (1509-1564) about Adam and vertheless, Robinson’s criticisms to the contrary notwithstanding, and my own criticism of Greenblatt for not discussing Ong’s acc of Milton’s closure of existence notwithstanding, Greenblatt’s book is a valuable contribution – a step in the right direction. To use a characterization that is famous is certain circles, it is “good enough.” It is not only a “good enough” step in the direction of the highest scene of growth envisioned by Murray, but also a step in the direction of Ong’s sweeping acc of Western cultural history in his mature work from the early 1950s , because Ong and Lonergan and Murray were Jesuits, I should point out here that the short book known as the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola (1491-1556), the founder of the Jesuits, contains a subsection titled “Principle and Foundation” (standardized numbered subsection 23.1-7). Basically, it is a statement of overall purpose roughly parallel to Milton’s statement of overall purpose. St. Ignatius Loyola’s statement of overall purpose establishes a logical structure for his instructions about how to proceed to engaged in guided imagistic meditations and reflections about one’s own life.I am borrowing Havelock’s terminology about imagistic thinking – in his 1963 book Preface to Plato, mentioned above. I would argue that imagistic thinking is relevant to Greenblatt’s repeated discussions of photos portrayed in different works of part of their Jesuit training, Ong and Lonergan and Murray, like all Jesuits, twice created a 30-day retreat in silence (except for everyday conferences with the retreat director) following the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola. One of his frequently repeated instructions calls for the app of the senses to the imagistic biblical stage that the retreatant is meditating on. In Greenblatt’s terminology, the app of the senses to each imagistic biblical stage would support create it true to the far as I know, the biblical stage of Adam and Eve in the garden is not included in the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola. However, the culminating exercise is titled Contemplation to Attain Love (meaning the love of God; standardized numbered subsections 230 to 237). The split focus is on oneself, on the one hand, and, on the other, all of God’s creation. (I have no idea why neither acc of creation in Genesis is not explicitly used in this exercise. But I am sure that St. Ignatius Loyola just recorded spiritual exercises that he himself had found helpful – under the guidance of one spiritual director or another.)Making such a 30-day retreat involves an inward turn of one’s consciousness – while one is wide awake. Jesuit spirituality involves an inward turn of one’s consciousness – while one is wide Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve, Greenblatt describes the blind Milton’s experience of writing (dictating to scribes) Paradise Lost – when he was wide awake, but after he had been visited during his sleep by a feminine figure that he regarded as his inner Muse. The Swiss psychiatrist and psychological theorist C. G. Jung, M.D. (1875-1961), would refer to Milton’s Muse as an anima figure in his blatt says, “Each night in the early hours of the morning, if we can believe him [Milton], he had in this inner globe of his [in his psyche] a female visitor. Milton called his nightly visitor Urania. The name was pagan, the ancient Muse of astronomy, but in Latin its literal meaning is ‘heavenly one,’ and she was for Milton the mysterious force within him that was enabling him at long latest to write the amazing epic poem that he had dreamed all his life that he was destined to write. . . . I think we must take Milton’s claim of celestial visitation, however strange it sounds, seriously. The Muse would come to him, as he place it, ‘unimplored’” (page 201).I agree with Greenblatt that we should take Milton’s claim seriously, because I agree with Jung that we have inner resources in our psyches that we need to learn how to access and draw on in our lives – perhaps even in our sleep. Had Jung been aware of Milton’s claim, I am sure that he would have been interested in it, because Jung was fascinated with H. Rider Haggard’s book She (1886) – as involving the inner feminine forces in the human psyche. In Greenblatt’s book, he repeatedly discusses misogyny (pages 6, 121-123, 125-127, 129-133, 136-137, 211, 220, and 342).In my estimate, the best method to proceed to study Jung’s thought is to read his 1,600-page commentary titled Nietzsche’s Zarathustra: Notes of the Seminar Given in 1934-1939 by C. G. Jung, 2 vols., edited by James L. Jarrett (Princeton University Press, 1988). (Ong was fascinated with Jungian thought.)Now, the Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius Loyola involve inviting certain inner resources in our psyches to speak to us, as it were. Time and again, he ends with the instruction for the retreatant to carry on a conversation with Jesus or Mary – that is, a two-way conversation back and forth in which the retreatant plays both sides in the conversation. Your guess is as amazing as mine as to how well Ong and Lonergan and Murray and other Jesuits have carried on such imagined , toward the end of Greenblatt’s book, he says, “For a lot of people today, including me, that story [of Adam and Eve] is a myth. . . . The Enlightenment has done its work, and our understanding of human origins has been freed from the grip of a once-potent delusion. The naked man and woman in the garden with the strange trees and the talking snake have returned to the sphere of the imagination from which they originally emerged” (page 284).In the epilogue (pages 285-302), Greenblatt says that “the focus on moral choice . . . lies at the heart of the Adam and Eve story” (page 299). Greenblatt says, “The Adam and Eve story insists that our fate, at least at the beginning of time, was our own responsibility. Millions of people in the world, including a lot of who grasp the underlying assumptions of modern science, continue to cling to the peculiar satisfaction that the ancient story provides. I do” (page 299).If Ong or Lonergan or Murray discusses the story of Adam and Eve in detail, I am not aware of it. But Ong was preoccupied with Darwinian evolutionary theory throughout his adult life – and his publications about it contain three essays in his 1967 book In the Human Grain: Further Explorations of Contemporary Culture (New York: Macmillan, pages 61-126) and his 1986 book Hopkins, the Self, and God (University of Toronto Press, esp. pages 16 and 157-159). But I don’t know if Lonergan was or if Murray was. But Ong and Lonergan and Murray accentuate choice and private responsibility – both of which are accentuated in Jesuit , in his discussion of Milton’s Paradise Lost, Greenblatt says, “What follows at the poem’s end are among the most attractive lines that Milton ever wrote. The lines [12:646-649] continue to express faith in divine providence but still more in freedom, the freedom that Milton believed God had conferred on the first couple, the freedom that still belonged to all humans” (page 230) – the kind of freedom recognized in Vatican II’s Declaration on Religious Freedom.

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    The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve []  2020-1-16 15:18

    This book provided a lot more than I expected, once I began reading it my enjoyment factor tripled. This is the Genesis story we all familiar with but goes much deeper than a literal reading. For those of you who fear critical reading regarding this Bible story, please settle in for a ride. The author takes you step by step of how this story has had a profound affect on ancient to modern societies. This book is very well written, you may or may not agree with his conclusions or examples but for myself, it was very lively and exciting.

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    The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-24 18:0

    This was like Benjamin Button, a film I truly enjoyed, at first I was thinking that I didn't think too much about reading this book, but as I continued to read more and more. I found a very amazing book, a spellbinding story very well written, one that should be a best seller for ages.

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    The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-24 18:0

    This book kept me enthralled from begin to finish. The story covered a lot of time but flowed well thru the decades of the lives of Evelyn, Adam and their family. I anticipated a science fiction twist which never developed. The story left the reader with the feeling that strange mysteries involving people should sometimes be accepted for the amazing that comes from them. The ending has left me looking for the ones I love in strangers faces. I will definitely read the works of Rhonda Riley again and highly recommend this book.

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    The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve []  2020-1-16 15:18

    The Rise and Fall of Adam and EveIf you are thinking about buying the Kindle version, be aware that the footnotes/endnotes are really screwed up. Normally, in the Kindle version, the zone in the text for a footnote is indicated with a footnote number. There are no footnote numbers or any other indication that the text has a footnote. The footnotes are at the end of the book in a section called Notes. You can go to a footnote in that section and there is a link that will take you back to the page where the text is located for that footnote. But there is nothing to indicate while you are reading text that any of the text has a footnote similar to the text. This is the screwiest thing I have ever encountered. I just don't understand why they could not have indicated that the text has a footnote similar to it so that the reader can then go to the Note section and search the footnote (a link from the text into the footnote would be better, but there should be at least something to tell the reader as he is reading the text that there is a footnote similar to the text).The footnotes are beautiful good, but you have to work method to hard to meaningfully correlate them while you are reading the text.I strongly recommend that readers consider this problem if they are, like me, avid footnote readers.And, I recommend to Amazon if they read these comments, that it fix that problem. I have contacted Amazon and as best I understand their nonresponse, they have no interest in fixing it. They should do better for this book.

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    The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve []  2020-1-16 15:18

    This book tells the story of the story of Adam and Eve. How it came about, how it was interpreted and how the story died. Through this story, a lot of essential questions are filtered: our origins and those of animals, whether all humans have a common ancestor, male-female relationships, the desire for knowledge, the paradox of an all-knowing God experimenting with Adam. Along the way, there are a lot of fascinating portraits, particularly that of John Milton. Also entertaining is how theologists and philosophers have tied themselves up in knots to come to terms with the truth (or lack thereof) of the Garden of Eden story.

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    The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-24 18:0

    An awesome premise turns into a book you cannot stop reading. Such insightful hero development, combined with magical prose and a bonus for storytelling.......this is a book you'll wish never to end, and will bring you to tears long before the final sentence. I can't wait to read more by this author.

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    The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-24 18:0

    I didn't think know. W if this was .sci first or the diary of Evelyn's mental breakdown. After all, a woman forming herself from the clay mud during a heavy rainstorm? Much stranger things happen, answered and causing shock among family and neighbors, even medical tests confirm that the woman looks but is not at all normal human, and the same is real of her altar ego Adam, and the kids of Evelyn. Lilting prose, descrptions of weather,animals,even childbirth are both lovely and terrifying, draw the reader in and repulse him. This novel

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    The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-24 18:0

    When I read the first few chapters, I wasn't sure what I had gotten myself into. However, I vowed to hold going, which was simple because this book is well written and the character's development draws you in. Evelyn & Addie then Evelyn & Adam. I did not connect with Addie, but I don't think I was supposed to. The reader connects with Evelyn & Adam and you are rooting for them and their girls the entire story. The story seems far-fetched with the singing, tones and how Addie came to be, but once you are reading, none of that matters.

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    The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve []  2020-1-16 15:18

    This is a brilliant survey of the history of thinking about Adam and Eve. Greenblatt does a marvelous job of summarizing and analyzing the Creation myths from the Ancient Near East that relate to the Genesis story of Adam and Eve and the Fall and showing how the biblical story responds to them. Greenblatt then proceeds through history to present how the story of Adam and Eve has been interpreted through the ages, offering a particularly brilliant acc of St. Augustine of Hippo's views that gave us the concept of original sin. He also survey the story's depiction in art through the centuries and gives us two terrific chapters on John Milton and his 'Paradise Lost.' He then goes on to more latest times, discussing Darwin, then more latest views. The book is a tour de force and a unbelievable ride. Anyone who is even remotely interested in the story of the origins of our species should read it. And reading it is simple and pleasant, as it is written in a clear, smart style that flows easily, making it at times a book that is hard to place down.

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    The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve []  2020-1-16 15:18

    I expected more from this book, especially from the Milton sections, which is the reason I bought it. This text, however, lacks the humor and insight of other Greenblatt writings. If you already read in comparative religions and/or history of rhetoric and philosophy, you won't search any fresh concepts or historical figures here. If you already read Karen Armstrong in religious studies, you won't be impressed by content depth here. If you've already read Walter Ong's "Chalise & the Blade," or any feminist interpretations of the Adam & Eve story, you won't be impressed by depth of insight blatt's Shakespeare book is excellent. This one, not so much.

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    The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-24 18:0

    I wasn't sure at first if I word continue - it was so various from what I usually read, but the difference captured me and I couldn't place it down. The author is a master storyteller. Attractive words of a cosmic wonder. I thought it could be true.

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    The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-24 18:0

    Wow -- what a unbelievable book! One of those special novels you can't place down and need to devour as quickly as possible but also wish to savor every word of. Thoughtful, inventive, fantastical while still somehow utterly true-to-life, and truly unique, I was thoroughly enchanted by every page. Enthusiastically recommended for anyone, but especially those who loved The Time-Traveler's Wife.

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    The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve []  2020-1-16 15:18

    The Pulitzer Prize winning author and Chaired Professor of Humanities at Harvard, Stephen Greenblatt, did himself proud casting “Adam and Eve” as a literary masterpiece, the compelling story that changed the globe as we know it; and he was not burned at the stake, beheaded, or flogged as were like-minded people in past centuries. Adam and Eve had their eyes opened after they ate the fruit from the Tree of the Knowledge of Amazing and Evil and I had mine opened regarding the suffering and evil the misuse of this mythology caused in the world: Centuries of enslaving, beating, and dehumanizing women because Eve ate the apple and convinced Adam to do likewise; justifying slavery when people distant from the supposed zone of the Garden of Eden were judged to be less than human; harsh institutionalized punishment for “thinking” people who dared to question this Bible-blessed tale of creation; and countless popular people achieving sainthood, public acclaim, and positions of power and wealth through blind loyalty to the literal interpretation of this longstanding description of our origin.Who cares that snakes don’t have vocal cords; that Adam and Eve learned to speak immediately as adults, “at birth”, without anyone having invented language; that all popular paintings of Adam and Eve present them having navels; that ancient records from Egypt and other parts of the globe showed large populations hundreds of years before Adam and Eve were said to be the first humans; or that fossil evidence shows extensive animal and marine life various from the species Adam named in the Garden? Answer: There were always a few “free thinkers” who believed God wanted people to explore truth. Perhaps the most interesting aspect of the book was Greenblatt’s accounts of the a lot of popular people who doubted the literalness of the story and either had to go along with non-debatable beliefs about what happened in the Garden of Eden or incur severe penalties for expressing their observations.

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    The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-24 18:0

    I loved this book- It had so a lot of twists and turns and the characters were beautifully drawn. Her prose was lyrical and I could feel in my marrow the emotions of the characters. Her descriptions of the mountains of North Carolina, and the water caves in Florida were breathtaking. A unbelievable read, and now- I'm lost. Not a lot of books measure up to this one!

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    The Enchanted Life of Adam Hope: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-24 18:0

    What a unbelievable story! It just kept pulling me in and I couldn't place it down. It was so different; not like anything I've ever read before. It was written so well that you could actually "feel" what the characters felt. Highly recommended.

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    The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve []  2020-1-16 15:18

    I was a small surprised by this book. I expected a discussion of the story of Adam and Eve, its historical interpretations, and the significance it still has on western thinking about our origins and our morality. And there is that, although Greenblatt discusses the keep that aspects of the story — original sin, the relationship between men and women, the dangers of pride, etc. — still have on western culture and morals less than I anticipated.What turned out to be more interesting was Greenblatt’s treatment of the story as an historical idea, especially its uneasy status between mythology and literal fact with the faiths that adhere to blatt starts with historical context. I learned a lot here. The story as told in the Torah dates to the 5th century BCE. The Enuma Elish, from as early as the 18th century BCE, and the Epic of Gilgamesh, going back as far as 2100 BCE, not only predate Adam and Eve in some respects, they also provide a base to which the story r example, in the Epic of Gilgamesh (the Sumerian creation story), man, once created, truly becomes man by joining the town of Uruk. Enikidu, the first man, becomes human by leaving the garden and joining the town — only by doing so does he become other than another wild mewhat similarly, in the Enuma Elish, the role of the town is emphasized as Marduk, the creator, approves the creation of the town of contrast, the story of Eden turns the relation between the garden and the town on its head — it is in the garden that Adam and Eve are their purist selves. It is only in their fallen state that they leave the garden, with their son, Cain eventually founding the town of Enoch. And of course, God punishes the town of Babylon with a proliferation of mutually unintelligible ere are other apparently deliberate positions or decisions taken by the story of Adam and Eve that answer to cultural and historical context — an insistence on strict obedience to God, pridefulness as sin, a hierarchical relationship between man and woman, the moral prominence of shame, and the status of labor as a punishment (although it does appear that Adam and Eve may have tilled the soil of Eden).Greenblatt discusses some of these aspects in depth, in historical interpretations given to them. He provides extended discussions of Augustine’s notion of “original sin” and of the historical treatment of Eve as primarily responsible for the fall.But it is his discussion of attempts at literal interpretation of the story that most engaged my interest, especially as attempted by Augustine and Milton, and aided by the artists of the ere appears always to have been a spirit of interpretation of the story, and of Genesis in general, as allegorical or mythological, rather than literally true. But the pressure to strengthen the faith of believers such as Augustine and Milton produced successive attempts to articulate and defend the story as literally true. And these attempts figure critically in an historical decline in the significance of the blatt believes that the story of Adam and Eve may be a victim of its own success — that is, it became vulnerable as it became believed in that literal sense. Through the efforts of Augustine, the artists of the Renaissance, and Milton, the story was pushed toward a modern kind of realism — literal factuality. Greenblatt writes, “The collective success of all of these efforts by believers — the triumphant fulfillment of the old Augustinian dream of a literal interpretation — had an unintended and devastating consequence: the story began to die.”It became topic to the same kinds of questioning that any factual acc is subject. What evidence stands for or versus its truth? What about the internal consistency of the story?Then, in this context, skepticism could grow roots. Where did Cain’s wife come from, if Adam and Eve bore only two children, he and Abel? Where did the inhabitants of the town that Cain founded come from? How could Adam have named all the animals of the globe in half a day? What should we create of the newly discovered peoples of the Fresh World, who apparently did not participate in the shame of nakedness that was the consequence for all humans of Adam and Eve’s transgression? What of the apparent age of the globe as implied by ancient documents of Greece and the Aztec artifacts discovered in the Fresh World?I suspect that Greenblatt is tracing also an increasing split in general between the mythical and the factual, a distinction that if not peculiar to the post-Enlightenment world, is at least more sharply drawn from that point forward. Those questions were always available to any literal interpretation of Genesis, but they were not asked in the same spirit in which they needed reduction to fact. Pre-Enlightenment, Augustine had certainly wondered about some of those same questions, and about the very idea of a talking snake, a magical tree, etc., but he took belief and faith as a challenge to be met. His literal interpretation of the story seems an aggressive expression of faith, rather than, in a later post-Enlightenment spirit, a sorting out of the blatt is clear that he thinks something is lost with the demise of the story’s standing, and I found his position at least somewhat persuasive. The story of Adam and Eve gave us a framework, if not always answers (or acceptable answers), to questions about freedom, knowledge, choice, innocence and guilt, responsibility, and much more. By contrast, the modern story of our descent from extinct hominins leaves those things largely me do draw social Darwinism from the ironically mythologized ver of evolution — “survival of the fittest” in Herbert Spencer’s words. Others look for the origin of human morality in our ancestors and closest relatives, the apes. But the former is cynical, reminiscent of Thrasymachus’s ill-fated ver of justice in Plato’s Republic — “the advantage of the stronger”. And the latter is, at best, unfinished business and seemingly a very messy story from which to draw guidance for moral ’s one thing to talk in generalities of an age of realism and fact. It’s another to present in some detail the evolution of one core component of western culture toward that age. By doing so, Greenblatt enables us to see, for better and for worse, how the role the story of Adam and Eve plays for us has changed.

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    The Rise and Fall of Adam and Eve []  2020-1-16 15:18

    Very comprehensive review of the origination and development of the story of Adam and Eve. Greenblatt writes with a somewhat informal conversational style which for me makes book very readable. He does an perfect job of presenting relevant material but doesn't beat you over the head with a particular agenda. I came away from the book with a feeling that I learned something.

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    The Essential Adam Ant []  2020-1-18 23:3

    Part of the fresh wave scene, adam and the ants took the uk by storm with such chart hits as "antmusic", "stand and deliver", and "kings of the wild frontier". He did not reach u.s. success until going solo with the no. 12 hit "goody two shoes" off the mate or foe lp. His success waned after that, delivering one final hit in "room at the top." All the aforementioned songs plus a lot of more are here, digitally remastered. The remastering is great, not overcompressed or "brick walled" like a lot of of today's remasters and fresh releases. An "essential" pick up for any fan of amazing 80's fresh wave music!!

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    The Essential Adam Ant []  2020-1-18 23:3

    I love Adam Ant and Ant Music. It is amazing to hear all of it on one compilation. It sounds amazing and it brings back a lot of memories. It's a fun CD. I recommend it to all Ant and 80's fans.

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    The Essential Adam Ant []  2020-1-18 23:3

    What is there to say about Adam Ant?... I know "I wish those who obtain to know me, To become admirers or my enemies".Well, Mr. Ant, I was an admirer back in 1980 and still am today! To me, your one of the most smart writers of music. Glad I purchased this, and thank you for all the unbelievable memories I have of your melody from back in the day [and today!].

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    The Essential Adam Ant []  2020-1-18 23:3

    okay

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    The Essential Adam Ant []  2020-1-18 23:3

    I don't know why Amazon labels this album as "clean". Did Adam Ant swear on the original recordings? Also I'm not crazy about reviewing a 'best of' album because they *should* be good. But some of these songs were released as singles only, so this is one method they can be part of an album (and obtain reviewed as such).That being said, this is a amazing album if you don't own any other Adam Ant and wish to relive all the songs you enjoyed in the 80's. Adam Ant place out some awesome melody in the short time that he was famous. Listening to this makes me think he was method ahead of his time. The bass lines and guitar work still keep up today. I'm sure a lot of today's melody is influenced by him. Nine Inch Nails covered Physical (You're So) and I suspect Panda Bear's layered vocals were influenced by some of this album's material. He wasn't the first to use 2 drummers but he perfected the art. My only complaint is in the production where the drums, despite their thunderous playing, don't really come booming out of my speakers like you'd expect. I want someone would remix/remaster it with some subsonic oomph to it. There are some parts of this melody that are painfully 80's sounding. But the perfect songs compositions with the innovative guitar work and drums more than create up for it.

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    The Essential Adam Ant []  2020-1-18 23:3

    Sometimes I a compilation and am disappointed because some of the tracks are from sources other than the well remembered original album. Not here. Most of his major toe tappers are included and are from the long-since lost vinyl versions I had.

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    The Essential Adam Ant []  2020-1-18 23:3

    Has all the essential melody a nominal Adam Ant fan needs; and some pleasant surprises too. Amazing for your 80's collection.

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    The Essential Adam Ant []  2020-1-18 23:3

    Amazing for Adam Ant fans.

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    The Essential Adam Ant []  2020-1-18 23:3

    This 80s girl missed her favorite singer that she only had cassette tapes of....it was time to replace them and bring back his tunes via CD.

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    The Essential Adam Ant []  2020-1-18 23:3

    From "Stand and Deliver" and "Prince Charming" to "Room At The Top" and everywhere in between a solid anthology. Was a unbelievable auditory trip down Memory Lane and would reccomend it for anyone who wants to obtain a taste of Ant Music!

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    King of the Road []  2020-1-23 3:24

    Great

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    King of the Road []  2020-1-23 3:24

    Love listening to Roger Miller music. Nostalgic. Brings back kid hood memories. Downloading the melody was so simple to do.

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    Rules of the Road []  2020-2-6 22:44

    This is the 2nd book I have read by Joan Bauer and the 2nd one I thought terrific. Although written for teens and young adults, as a mother I also appreciated the insight and reality of these books. life is hard but well worth fighting for. Her books with true problems seen from the perspective of a fallible human who learns to grow up despite - and because of - difficult circumstances.

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    End of the Road []  2020-2-4 10:28

    Such an interesting book. I started reading it casually and soon things got serious. I found myself reading it and then sitting in my vehicle in the parking lot because I couldn't stop reading. I had to know what was going on. Every time I though things may be getting settled down, here we go again with a fresh bit of drama. I also love to read about how life was during various times in various areas. I found myself getting attached to the characters. Amazing read.

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    End of the Road []  2020-2-4 10:28

    The storyline was O.K., although I kept waiting to hear about whatever happened to the dogs. Also, although I realize this novel is told from a child's perspective, I couldn't obtain past the numerous spelling and grammatical errors. I was never sure if the story was purposely written that way, or if it was the effect of not good proofreading.

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    Tess of the Road []  2020-6-11 19:20

    Tess Dombegh is the younger half sister of Seraphina, the winner of the two prior books set in this beautifully rendered globe of saints and dragons, and it is Tess's story we pick up in this next chapter. From the previous books, we know Seraphina's younger siblings mostly as bratty inconveniences for Seraphina to bear, but in this book, Tess is given her possibility to stand center scene alongside such richly developed supporting characters that it could certainly be read as a stand alone (though don't skip Seraphina and Shadow Scale altogether -- they are lovely as well).The story follows our "brat", Tess, as she begins to reject the incredibly stifling life she felt she deserved after committing heinous sins (the info of which are slowly revealed over the course of the novel). She has been lead to believe (as a lot of deeply fundamentalist religions convey) that her very existence as a woman is sinful in and of itself, and that she has committed the worst sin by "falling" as no amazing woman should. So, at age 17, facing decisions created for her by her deeply religious mother and her incompetent father, she strikes out on her own, finding company in her childhood quigutl friend, who sets an adventurous quest at her feet for them to follow. And follow she does, revealing her anything -but-sinful nature as she encounters a lot of brilliant characters along the is borders on a spoiler, but I feel it's necessary to mention a CW: this book with rape, shame, and ultimately, infant loss. While I'm no longer in a put where these types of storylines would destroy me, I found myself incredibly sad and tearful a lot of times as her story was revealed, and feel most responsible sharing that warning with those who may *not* be in a put to read such moving and detailed descriptions of without consent, without understanding consent, versus a very young teenager, and such info of premature birth/subsequent infant death.

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    Tess of the Road []  2020-6-11 19:20

    This is A Grade Rachel Hartman.I want I’d had this book when I was in my late teens/early ’s a unbelievable story about growing up and moving forward and just being in the world. Plus adventures! It is always a pleasure to visit this universe. I cannot wait for the next book.

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    Solace of the Road []  2020-7-28 19:15

    Solace of the Street is the second novel I’ve read by Irish author, Siobhan Dowd. In telling the story of a foster kid, Dowd in a lot of method ways treads on familiar ground. At the same time, Dowd has incorporated enough twists to create this a memorable story. She has also made an original character, for whom we deeply urteen-year-old Holly is in foster care. Everyday she thinks of running away. Miles away in Ireland is her mom, the excellent guardian. Through no fault of either of them, the two got separated and now must search a method back to each other. For Holly, leaving foster care would mean saying goodbye to Miko. He works at the foster care home and is one of the only adults to care for her. For her mom, reuniting with Holly might mean giving up a loser cause of other novels which I have read about foster care, it didn’t come as a surprise to me Holly was deluded about how excellent her mom was. I also knew that it was more than likely that one adult had tried to reach out to Holly since she landed in foster care and that Holly has been too badly damage to accept them. In other words, other than the unfamiliar zone of Ireland, the plot to a certain extent resembles other foster care books I’ve read.On one hand, that doesn’t matter. For one thing, there aren’t exactly an abundance of stories on foster kids. For another thing, the commonality in plots simply means Solace of the Street should be a fairly accurate depiction of foster care. Indeed, Dowd did take a kid rights training course and talk to a lot of social workers in Oxford. On the other hand, for several chapters, Solace of the Street didn’t feel like anything new. Thus, for a while I wasn’t sure if it would feel memorable.What I most appreciated is twofold. First, Holly is an original hero in her own right. While at a temporary placement, Holly takes a liking to a blond wig. With it, she finds herself able to take on a fresh persona, one that is several years old than her. With it, she feels that she’ll come out smarter than the adults around her and her peers. Yet underneath it, she’s still a scared and vulnerable fourteen-year-old, who is really no various from those around her. Second, Dowd ultimately does break fresh ground, in that she actually has Holly hit the road. Holly doesn’t remained resigned to the foster care system, bounce from one foster home to another, or even test to stick it out with her placement. The street arguably may not have ended up being as risky for Holly as reality might be, yet it still felt true enough. Holly ended up hitching some rides, but she also got stuck outside at night in the elements. As for the rides offered her, some came from sympathetic drivers and others from creeps. Along her travels, Holly found herself forced to think about the choices she was making and what she really wanted from tually, there is a third aspect which I appreciate about Solace of the Road. As with every novel Dowd wrote, it’s well-crafted with emotional resonance. When Dowd died in 2007 of breast cancer, the literary globe lost a bright talent.

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    Solace of the Road []  2020-7-28 19:15

    Honestly, I'm not sure how to approach this review. I'm sad because, to my knowledge, this is Siobhan Dowd's latest book. Both Bog Kid and Solace of the Street have been published posthumously, and I feel that although I still have a few books of hers to read that were published prior to these two, I am already internally mourning over the loss of such a amazing wd seems always able to search the excellent balance between telling the character's story in an engaging method and bringing the reader into an understanding of why the story is important, that it is more than simply a story about a person, but that there are larger elements at work, things that people should generally know about and empathize with, broaden their worldviews to understand and incorporate the messages that Dowd is so deftly communicating through her lace of the Street is no exception. At first I found myself irritated with the first person narrative of a young girl who is stricken with a difficult past and struggling with who she is and was as she begins her journey maturing into a woman. So often I wanted to reach into the story and say, "Please stop thinking this method and making these kinds of decisions. You're only going to end up hurting yourself." However, even that sentiment brought me the realization that Dowd is so masterful in her storytelling. Dowd wants us to feel that method in to present us the story, partner with us in our reading rather than just telling us something and giving us the simple answers. She forces us to grapple with a lot of of the same difficult aspects of life that Holly/Solace is going through.I often felt exactly the same method when reading Bog Child. Having grown up in America with two parents who loved me, I have no idea what a person in Holly's shoes is going through. Even now, I can't say that I truly know any more than I did before, but I will say that I have a stronger sense of empathy for people in Holly's position, or even Holly's mother, who often create decisions reacting to their circumstances rather than thinking things through and landing on the best possible choice. They create the best of what they have, and although they damage others in the process, it doesn't happen without a sense of self-awareness and self-loathing they must work through. Holly is a complex hero who feels very tangible. I wouldn't be too surprised if I actually met a `Holly' one day, and she turned out to be exactly the method that Dowd has described her. I recommend this book to all readers 12+.[...]

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    King of the Road []  2020-1-23 3:24

    A very fine compilation of songs covering various phases and stages of Roger Miller's career, - R.C.A./Smash recordings. The Bear Family people (German import) really have their act together, always releasing the best and rare hi-fidelity recordings possible. These twenty nine songs are at times off the wall, outrageous, most of all highly intelligent, featuring the ever so brilliant songwriting of Roger Miller. The R.C.A. sides feature, "Get Up Early In The Morning", - every man should do, "Burma Shave", "Lock,Stock and Teardrops", "Trouble On The Turnpike", featuring early versions of, "Fair Swiss Maiden", "In The Summertime", and Miller does a fine cover of Bill Monroe's, "Footprints In The Snow". The legendary Smash recordings feature naturally "King Of The Road", & "Dang me", "Chug-A-Lug", "Kansas Town Star" - my private favorite, "Do-Wacka-Do", "England Swings", "Engine,Engine #9",... All the wild, wild, best is here from "the genius", except it doesn't have my favorite Miller song, "WANDA IGUANA", now's the time for Roger Miller's complete Smash box set.

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    King of the Road []  2020-1-23 3:24

    I have fun listening to this music. Quality of the sound is very amazing . It was simple to online

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    Rules of the Road []  2020-2-6 22:44

    A witty story of self-realization. It's hard not to fall in love with the characters. Deals with tough problems such as alcoholism, recovery, divorce, enabling vs taking responsibility for oneself, and tough life choices. The protagonist's fast wit about her situation, perception of her feelings, and experiences created me laugh on nearly every page. Completely clean content in terms of sexuality/swearing/etc-- I will definitely be sharing this with my teens. A lot of perfect lessons inside, especially about self-worth, begin and vulnerable communication, etc. Enjoy!

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    Rules of the Road []  2020-2-6 22:44

    Buy a Joan Bauer book and you cannot go wrong. It is impossible. She puts sentences together with heart -- feeling, and you ache with characters, and laugh with them too. We love all her books. And despite having a 16 year-old who reads AP level in high school, on street trips during summer (from Michigan to Santa Fe or beyond), they create travel less mundane and a welcome reprieve from the drab literature pushed to sophomores and juniors.A bonus: the content is worth discussing later -- and Joan always imparts life lessons to readers. Hope Was Here we listened to in the vehicle via audio; this book, Rules of the Street we read together in the evening. It's a family centric book --- that delves into teen issues, adult problems too. By the way, find for Joan's www service and drop her an email if you like her writing. We did and guess what? Yes, she wrote back. Whether your teen is male or female, whether you are an adult or not quite at the age of "matriculation" -- trust me, you'll have fun Joan's books. There is something for everyone.

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    Rules of the Road []  2020-2-6 22:44

    Customer service , yes, but life lessons galore as well! A teen from a difficult family, wise beyond her years, learns how to speak up, and stand up, as she grows up in the globe of the shoe industry.

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    Rules of the Road []  2020-2-6 22:44

    heartwarming story for teens and sub-teens

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    Solace of the Road []  2020-7-28 19:15

    I'm having difficult finishing this book. I don't identify with Solace. Probably its setting isn't in my own country and it is hard to obtain used to her ver of English. I read a highly praised review and unfortunately created the error of ordering all the books Dowd wrote. I hope the others are more entertaining.

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    Solace of the Road []  2020-7-28 19:15

    Fifteen-year-old Holly Hogan bides her time in yet another foster home before running away again. With her silvery-blonde wig, she is transformed into the fierce and fearless Solace, bound for the green hills of Ireland to search her Mam. In what will regrettably be Siobhan Dowd's latest novel, her superb story forces you to relive the dreams and horrors of the girl's life.Ray and Fiona Aldridge, Holly's foster parents, were a joke. Holly's key worker, Miko, seemed to think they were amazing people, but she's just not comfortable around them. It should have been a foregone conclusion that she'd run. They're too squeaky clean and formal, a far cry from the kind of people she'd have picked. Fiona has a crooked bob and a fancy mantle clock, and Ray trims the hedges. They don't smoke, so Holly has to sneak up to her bedroom to smoke in secret. Their house is fancy, all wood..."posh and phony," as Holly calls it. Fiona wants to take her shopping and for Holly to use coasters (of all things!). Her foster mom couldn't have children of her own, so it seems Holly is now her pet project. Ray barely even speaks to her. It all makes Holly feel out of her element --- it's like they wish someone else but not the true her.But while they are strange people, there is one thing that's wonderful about the Aldridges: Fiona's wig. It's a silvery-blonde kind of magic that adds three years to Holly's age. With it on, she's not Holly anymore --- she's suave, risky and determined. She becomes Solace, the name of Mam's winning horse in a race. And Solace [email protected]#$%!&ing the road, not staying here another minute. She's off to search Mam in Ireland where they lived before. So with just a small and a few things stashed in her lizard purse, Holly/Solace walks out the door.On foot, Holly walks as Solace toward the A40. It's the street to freedom, she says, to Ireland, to Mam. She stops first at a glamour shop for a slinky dress and heels. And while the cashier is chatting away, she stuffs the dress in her purse: Easy. The shoes she knicks even easier; while pretending to look at something else, she just heads out the door. Now Solace is glamorous, beautiful, sleek and gorgeous. Ahead of her waits a fresh put every day: a bus ride, a dance club, a museum, a coffee shop. But always she runs back to the road.Holly walks for miles and miles and then she hitches. And all the way, she's scared stiff. Those heels she knicked are now blistering and slicing her feet to pieces. When it rains, the slinky dress sticks to her and freezes. There are times when vehicles seem to follow her and frightening men hover near. When she thumbs it, all she can think of is what truckers wish with her. She's only ever hoping she'll obtain by without getting hurt. But Solace is various --- fearless and ready, she points Holly back down the road."Gotta search somewhere to hole up. Homeless people wrap themselves up in cardboard and curl up under bridges and pee versus the walls like dogs. I didn't fancy it. I thought of better places. I created a list in my esCinemasShedsHouses where curtains aren't drawn, showing how the owners are on holidayChurches obtain locked up at night, like the one I'd tried earlier. Cinemas chuck you out after the latest show. Sheds are amazing but you have to break into them. Same goes for houses where the people are gone. Knowing my luck I'd obtain caught breaking in by the people at the wrong time."Holly runs into a few amazing souls who support her, and in her desperation, they seem to be her guardian angels. But the street gets harder and harder every day. She's "cash-free," completely alone and frantic. And there's always the question of what she'll search if and when she gets there --- that's the one thing Holly won't allow herself ing SOLACE OF THE ROAD has left me absolutely speechless --- it's one book I know I will remember. What an incredibly thoughtful, compassionate, beautifully written story of a young girl's heartache. It saddens me to have to say goodbye to such a commendable writer. To witness the full power of Siobhan Dowd's writing, you must experience it for yourself, from beginning to end. There is beauty in the story, yet her writing goes much, much deeper than that. Her work has the hallmarks of a literary genius.I urge you to go out and SOLACE OF THE ROAD. All proceeds go to Dowd's charity, which supports reading for disadvantaged kids. --- Reviewed by Melanie Smith

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    End of the Road []  2020-2-4 10:28

    I certainly wouldn't say this is a poor story and I enjoyed reading it...but it was a struggle. The story is told from the view point of Lil' Jim but occasionally it seems to just change point of view without any warning. That was just a minor annoyance though. I liked the idea of the story but some things were explained in amazing detail and others were just hinted at. It was occasionally a confusing plot line to follow.And to be honest, I'm not really sure why the whole Nathaniel/Klan subplot was brought in. There was never a time when I thought of Nathaniel as a possible villain nor does the Klan have any bearing on what's going on. The whole subplot could have been left out and it wouldn't have taken anything away from the overall tale. It actually might have provided opportunity to flesh out the Caldwell/Hall family story just a bit more. There were too a lot of other questions regarding that dynamic left open.But I guess if we're taking the whole story as being told by a 5th grader the loss ends and random tidbits (like piano playing Albert or Brother Mort) probably create more sense.

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    End of the Road []  2020-2-4 10:28

    Loved it, really held your interest, throughout. Didn't wish to place my kindle down once I started it.Happily the true murderer was overlooked

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    Tess of the Road []  2020-6-11 19:20

    This is a hard book to review, and I almost DNF’d more than once as the beginning is slow and painful. This is a darker view of the globe than that in Seraphina and Shadow Scale. The journey through this dark fantasy is worth the discomfort, e beginning feels like a selfish rant skewering religion as the cause of every evil, writhing with pontificating self-righteous saints who blame all sin on the depravity and sensuality of women. It feels overwrought and heavy-handed until you begin to feel the pain. The pain of listening and believing anyone who tells you that you’re the one to blame, that you deserve to be the victim. The pain of believing the messages condemning you even as you condemn yourself. The pain of accepting that blame and holding it tightly until it petrifies your soul and ravages your heart.If you’ve read Robin McKinley’s dark fantasy, Deerskin, you’ve felt a related pain. But here it is verbalized and blamed on the recipient until we feel the same hopelessness that Tess does as she contemplates a future that she destroyed when she was 13. She takes the blame and hammers it into herself, hoping to create amends by keeping herself pure, working to search her sister a husband, and defending her sister’s purity, so her sister will have the future that Tess threw away.Tess strikes out upon the Street with a closed mind. But as her feet eat down the miles, can she search herself and fresh tomorrows along the Road? There are dangers on the Road: brigands, earthquakes, quigutls, giant serpents, pirates, and hunger. Along the journey, Tess will learn about burdens: those we accept, those we hang onto, and those that we grow beyond.Heads up for adult themes, some violence, and general fooling around, all in the context of a dark fantasy about the human condition and growing beyond the boundaries that define and constrict us.I received this book as an Advanced Reader Copy (ARC) from NetGalley. My opinions are my own.

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    Tess of the Road []  2020-6-11 19:20

    Wow. As a young woman reading this book I was a small nervous that it was going to be targeted towards a younger audience, and while it is about a teenage girl, it strikes some amazing chords of the truth that young troubled women search in growing up. I feel like so a lot of young women have the same experiences that Tess has and while shes so unlikable in some aspects, I really feel like I felt the same kind of unlikable when I was Tess' age. I felt for her. This book was painful, but it was so beautiful. Highly recommend to young women who had problem finding their footing in the globe as youth/teenagers. Love it!

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    Rules of the Road []  2020-2-6 22:44

    Amazing reading for grades 4-6 keeps them wanting to continue

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    Rules of the Road []  2020-2-6 22:44

    Great

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    King of the Road []  2020-1-23 3:24

    A must have for melody lovers.I have everything from Miles Davis to Mongolian Throat singing to Vivaldi to Lead Zeplin. This is amazing melody too.

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    Tess of the Road []  2020-6-11 19:20

    This book is wonderful, but you have to go into it understanding that the protagonist is (intentionally) an unlikeable screw-up (with a heart of gold). To that end, I had a true problem with Tess at first. But since I love Rachel Hartman's other books, I gave it all of my attention and place my faith in her, and it off. Tess of the Street takes you on an awesome journey with twists you don't see coming, and gives you characters you shouldn't like but do anyway. One thing to hold in mind is that the fantasy elements here are very small—it's not a book about dueling wizards and spectacular feats of sorcery on every page. It's more about a girl coming to understand her put in the globe and that she's maybe not as huge of a screw-up as everyone has led her to believe.

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    End of the Road []  2020-2-4 10:28

    Although the book was reasonably amazing reading, jumping between an individual's prospective, and him, (Lil Jim), as the third person, was very distracting. Also the use of the word 'quite' instead of 'quiet' was annnoying. Not very well written.

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    Solace of the Road []  2020-7-28 19:15

    I believe this is a book for young teens & I want that had been more clear in the reviews. I did like it, though. I started it one evening & finished the next morning so there was enough to keep my interest & create me wish to know what happened. I really think it is written for young readers rather than adults but it is well written & I would recommend it for that age group.

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    Solace of the Road []  2020-7-28 19:15

    A heartbreaking small novel about a troubled girl who runs away from her foster home, donning a wig and creating a brave fresh identity for herself as she attempts to travel across England and search her mother in Ireland. With her past trauma gradually coming to light (and readers worrying about all the dangers that the teenaged heroine only sporadically picks up on), it's overall a rather bittersweet journey.

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    End of the Road []  2020-2-4 10:28

    This is written,"my pa says schoolin is a waste," (was worst for women,) "can believe doin this to a small girl the meanness in folks.....doing nothing but place a smile on people's faces." (I don't like to read when they damage kids,) Nathaniel and his dreams,go to college for colourful to be somebody.Queenies the dog,hurt to loose a dog like that.I'm have fun the otta stop,snot-nosed,git et hisself,haha,good elma

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    End of the Road []  2020-2-4 10:28

    This is s very for read, Zeata needs to write more novels like this one! Loved it.

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    Rules of the Road []  2020-2-6 22:44

    I think Joan Bauer is becoming my favorite YA author! I love every book of hers that I have read so far, and this one is no exception. The characters are bigger than life and the storyline is wonderful. The subplots (Jenna's grandmother with Alzheimers, her alcoholic father, etc.) are woven into the main story very skillfully and add extra depth. Jenna's private and social maturation are something to behold as she with her alcoholic father, relates both compassionately and honestly to the imperialistic Mrs. Gladstone, discovers her own private strengths and integrity, etc. Highly Recommended!

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    King of the Road []  2020-1-23 3:24

    I had forgotten a few of these songs on this Album (which is surprising) but was not disappointed with Roger Miller's Best. Mr. Miller is one of those few Artists that makes a complete Album of songs that you wish to hear over, and over.

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    King of the Road []  2020-1-23 3:24

    while the mercury box from 1995 is more thorough, this is definitely the most lovingly done roger miller collection. sounds as amazing as it ever will and the most informative liner notes on miller ever written. done two years before his life was chop too short. roger miller is my favorite songwriter.

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    King of the Road []  2020-1-23 3:24

    A must have for any devout Roger Miller fan.

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    Tess of the Road []  2020-6-11 19:20

    I loved this book. Beautifully written, excellent tone (occasional humor, tho it's not a comedy). It's a lovely, thoughtful, imaginative exploration of faith and how it can be contorted to hurt people who are still figuring out who they are and who they wish to be (Tess, in fact tries on several personas thru the text). And, how people can recover their faith, create it their own, and heal. It's at times lighthearted and at times darkly serious, not shying away from past trauma, and readers who struggle reading stories of abuse should tread carefully.I will say, after reading some of the other posted reviews, that while Tess of the Street is its own story, readers will probably have fun it more if they read Seraphina first. Seraphina lingers in more detail over the globe building, the role of dragons and the method dragons exist in this world, etc; Tess of the Street doesn't spend much time reiterating these globe building elements, so I can understand why some readers might have been frustrated. I love revisiting this globe and look forward to Hartman's next book!

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    Tess of the Road []  2020-6-11 19:20

    This book is on my favorites list! ❤️Tess Of The Street is what they call a hero driven story. Some will love it and some will hate it. I don't care because I love is book is about Tess journey. And of the ugly and unbelievable things that she goes the book for yourself and see if it's for you!I look forward to the next book and the next journey of Tess!Happy Reading!Mel ❤️

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    Tess of the Road []  2020-6-11 19:20

    Wow! Amazing book! If it had just been a swashbuckling adventure story with a plucky heroine, I'd have enjoyed it but there was so much more! It was also an extraordinarily accurate portrayal of a traumatized, sheltered girl finding out how to live outside of the societal expectations that rejected her. What do you do when all your options suddenly disappear and you feel utterly hopeless? How do you live every single day after someone you love betrays you and abandons you? This book is fabulous and with difficult subjects which are often neglected in YA lit, despite being of critical importance to today's young women. Read it!

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    Tess of the Road []  2020-6-11 19:20

    Oh, how I loved this book! The backstory unfolds a bit at a time, and leaves the reader hungry for more info as the story alternates between the past and the future. If you have read Seraphina and Scales, this story complements those books beautifully, but if you haven't read them, this book stands up well on its own.

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    Solace of the Road []  2020-7-28 19:15

    I struggled with this one, I truly did. I think the hardest part was I just didn't like Holly. I understand she's had a troubled youth, we search out just how poor towards the end of the book. But I didn't like her. She constantly lied and often for no reason at all. The person she became, Solace, after finding a wig in her foster care family's house was an even worse person. I've read stories about the American foster care and adoption system and from what I've read in this book the Brits have things handled so much better. Maybe it's just this slice of foster care life and it's worse elsewhere but Holly had her own room, decorated how she liked, a cell phone an iPod, clothes and friends. Life could have been far worse. Which she makes it by setting off on a delusion fueled journey to search her mother she believes is either looking for or waiting for Holly to present up. It isn't until the latest few chapters that we search out the truth of things and Holly becomes something less and more than she was. The ending left me a small disappointed it was a small too fairy tale like 'and they lived happily ever after.' for my tastes. It wasn't a horrible book but compared to 'Bog Child' the other novel I've read by her I found this lacking. . . something, some primary thing that turns a pile of words into something really worth reading. 'Bog Child' had it 'Solace' unfortunately didn't. I read it but I can't see myself recommending it or reading it ever again. It just didn't shine and that's too bad.

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    King of the Road []  2020-1-23 3:24

    This "Best Of" has quite a few songs I hadn't heard from other greatest hits & box sets and I was blown away by the quality of the songs that were fresh to me. If you are a Roger Miller fan and don't have this one, obtain it. It will go with any other albums you have and will support flesh out his back catalog since a lot of of his albums are sadly out of print. This guy has a rabid fan base and now I understand.

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    King of the Road []  2020-1-23 3:24

    My husband says this is the best cd I ever bought him. Yay! So now I hope to search another one to buy.

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    Rules of the Road []  2020-2-6 22:44

    Amazing story. However initially it drags a small bit with the detail of shoes stuff, but then it gets ree and a half abel Mendez

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    Rules of the Road []  2020-2-6 22:44

    This is a mandatory summer read for school. My son is enjoying it. He thinks the mom's notes are hilarious.

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    End of the Road []  2020-2-4 10:28

    I loved this uldn't place it down.I will definitely read more books by this ep up the amazing ni Healy

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    End of the Road []  2020-2-4 10:28

    I thought it was a very amazing book and had a lot of history.

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    End of the Road []  2020-2-4 10:28

    Recommend "End of The Road" to anyone with an interest in or connection with the Southern Applachians. Just had to hold reading.

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    Solace of the Road []  2020-7-28 19:15

    Book arrived promptly and as described, new. Would from this seller again.

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    Solace of the Road []  2020-7-28 19:15

    Life has not been exactly fair to Holly. She has grown up in a series of group and foster homes surrounded by social workers who say they care, but it certainly doesn't feel like they the story begins, Holly is headed toward a fresh home. A childless couple arranges for a few try visits and then decide they are willing to Holly a put in their lives. It should be the respond to Holly's dream, but her sights are set on finding her Irish mam and not relying on the kindness of ybe it's the constant disappointments over the years and the repeated caregivers who have abandoned Holly. Whatever the reasons, she doesn't feel that she can go through it again. After a short stay with the fresh couple and one heated outburst, Holly decides it's time to e stumbles across a blond wig that adds several years to her own almost fifteen, and when she looks in the mirror, she reinvents herself with a fresh name - Solace. Solace has the courage and the calm attitude required to strike out and search her e journey takes Solace (Holly) into a globe of roadside diners, truck drivers, and adventure spiced with bits of humor and potential danger. She's a girl in find of her past and, hopefully, a future filled with a promise of true family and true obhan Dowd, author of several other award-winning YA books, tragically died of cancer at age 47. SOLACE OF THE ROAD features her typical Irish flare with colourful characters leading less-than-perfect lives. She captures the loneliness and desperation of Solace as she searches for what most of us take for erican readers may search SOLACE OF THE ROAD a challenging read due to its definite Irish/British dialect and tone, but once they are caught up in the story, they will search it a rewarding read. Dowd's exceptional talent will be ed by: Sally Kruger, aka "Readingjunky"

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    Solace of the Road []  2020-7-28 19:15

    Holly Hogan hasn't had the best life. She was taken fromher home when she was very young and has been in and outof foster homes. None of those homes worked out, though,and Holly is done with them. When she is moved in withfoster parents again, she starts to remember the goodthings about her mother. That's the problem, she onlyremembers the amazing things. She puts on her foster mom'sblonde wig and hits the road, no longer Holly, but e wants to search her "mam." She wants to obtain those goodmemories back and she wants to hold them. And besides,Solace is various than Holly was. She is intelligent andattractive. As she travels the road, she meets kind peopleand some not-so-kind people. It's a struggle and she hasno money. Now that she is on the street as Solace, sheremembers the poor things about her mother. Will Solacebecome Holly again? Or, will she search her mam?Solace of the Street was a very amazing novel. It tells an awesome storyof a girl, who just wants things to be the method they usedto. Everyone feels that method at times so this story wasvery realistic. Siobhan Dowd did a very amazing jobdescribing the setting and the character's actions. It wasa very interesting, yet exciting novel, leaving mewondering what would happen next. I would definitelyrecommend this book to all readers who have fun any young-adult ed by a young adult student reviewerFlamingnet Book ReviewsTeen books reviewed by teen reviewers

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    Tess of the Road []  2020-6-11 19:20

    I feel like every time I read one of Rachel Hartman's books, not only does the writing obtain better, but what surrounds the writing gets better. I wasn't expecting this book to cover so much ground that it did, and I definitely think the author contacted the right sensitivity readers when she wrote about a paraplegic character. But that's perhaps not a amazing enough reason to read the book, so allow me explain why this book is so good!This book is all about Tess, a hero who I believe was named after another popular Tess, Thomas Hardy's Tess of the D'Urbervilles. Like Hardy's Tess, this Tess is a girl with a not good lot in life. She was taken advantage of by a man, and had her life slip out of her control before her eyes, and now she's mad and frustrated and snippy and rude. Tess has nowhere to go... until she decides to create her own method into the globe and goes on an adventure on The Road.I came in expecting this book not to be as mystical or magical as the books about Seraphina, if only because Tess is a normal girl without dragon's blood and no unique abilities otherwise. But I was wrong! Tess journeys with a quigult mate who is on a very spiritual pilgrimage and who lends a lot of fun and creativity to the story. And even the mundane parts of the story are very entertaining. Tess discovers more about herself and it's satisfying to watch her grow and change throughout the book.I very much enjoyed this book, and I'm very much looking forward to reading more of Tess's adventures. Super recommended!

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    Adam Smith: Father of Economics []  2020-1-19 22:9

    Well written acc of Smith's life and current relevance. Highly recommend

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    Adam Smith: Father of Economics []  2020-1-19 22:9

    More an intellectual biography than an acc of his private life which turns out to be rather dull and uninteresting. Norman writes with gusto about the ideas of the man and his influences, and does it with reverence but critically. Not being an economist, for me the book served as a amazing introduction to a man who wrote two books and spent his life perfecting them; an ideological framework that it is still relevant today.

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    Adam Smith: Father of Economics []  2020-1-19 22:9

    Although Adam Smith (1723-1790) is known as the "father of economics," I wanted to read this fresh biography because he is such a major figure in the Scottish Enlightenment. And even though I avoid economics like the plague, I even managed to learn a bit about this discipline as well. The author follows the same pattern of discussion as he did in his bio of Edmund Burke: first, 156 pages of strictly biographical material, and then two further sections on Smith's thought and the impact of his ideas. This is a lot of ground to cover in even a 334 page book, but the author (a Member of Parliament and Ph.D. in economics) pulls it off with only a few e best thing about the intro biographical section is that the author shows how Smith developed some of his key concepts and the context that gave rise to them. So the reader learns about such key concepts as the "impartial spectator," the "invisible hand," and his theory of moral sentiments by reviewing his writings and activities. This is not as real in the second section on Smith's thought which gets into some of his economic theories as well as the development of economic analysis up to the present. Here the reader [email protected]#$%! with concepts like "general equilibrium theory," "the principle of comparative advantage," and diminishing marginal utility, not in conjunction with Smith's own activities but basically as a lesson in economics. I particularly had problem with this approach in Chapter 7. By contrast Chapter 8 on Smith and markets (really a key concept for Smith) came through much clearer after a second reading. The final two chapters are basically defenses of Smith versus the charge that the nasty elements of contemporary capitalism were his doing as a effect of "The Wealth of Nations" (1776), which as the author demonstrates is somewhat ridiculous.A lot of the key figures in the Scottish Enlightenment interact with Smith and create appearances: David Hume; Lord Kames; Dr. Cullen; Gershom Carmichael; and Francis Hutcheson to name a few. I found the author's discussion of Smith's "the science of man" quite interesting, as well as his examination of how the little and impoverished Scotland of Smith's day gave rise to this enormous and influential intellectual outburst of the Scottish Enlightenment. So the book has much to in that it covers the setting of the Enlightenment, delivers an highly insightful biography of Smith, and also examines some necessary economic concepts similar to Smith and their impact. Much meat on these bones to poke through. The analysis is supported by 37 pages of notes, a nice bibliography, an index and a group of interesting illustrations, some in full color. Whether you are interested in economics, or Smith's life, or the Scottish enlightenment, there is much here to engage you.

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    Adam Smith: Father of Economics []  2020-1-19 22:9

    The "future of capitalism" is a subject of considerable current interest to general readers, academics, business managers and shareholders. A lot of of these latest books are outstanding. In to fully appreciate the "future of capitalism" a reader seeking to understand the history of capitalism through the life, ideas, intellect and intellectual history of Adam Smith and his works. This special biography is structured for today's reader interested in the mind, insights and influence of Adam Smith on economics and markets. This intellectual biography will be of amazing interest to all readers interested in the evolution of capitalism.

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    Adam Smith: Father of Economics []  2020-1-19 22:9

    “BY THEN, HOWEVER, THE GREATEST EARLY ANALYSIS OF THE DEEP causes of the American battle had already been out for four months. The Wealth of Nations was published in London on 9 March 1776.’’Interesting that the date of the American Revolution and Smith’s Economic Revolution are identical is not coincidence.“The sheer range, length and brilliance of Smith’s work render any summary inadequate. But the full title of the book gives a flavour of its contents: An Inquiry into the Nature and Causes of the Wealth of Nations. This is not an economic textbook, though it is full of analysis, lessons and information. Rather, it is a book about economic processes and economic development. Nations, it argues from a vast array of evidence, can be wealthy and prosperous, or not good and struggling. But national wealth is not merely circumstantial or divinely bequeathed, it is made by human hand. It is not a stock of currency or bullion, or indeed a stock of anything, but ‘the annual produce of the land and labour of any is is anti-mercantilism. And mercantilism can be considered as foundation cause of the American Revolution. This illustrates the wide range of both Smith’s book and Norman’s biography. Norman presents Smith’s thought with sympathy and respect. Doesn’t idolize Smith, but points out some contradictions and r example . . .“His remarks on value are confusing, and his cost-of-production theory and its cousin, the labour theory of value, proved to be a blind alley to most nineteenth-century theorists, and command small help today except among some Marxist economists. And there are central locations of modern economic theory—concerning demand, marginal utility, monetary policy, mass unemployment, the business cycle, to name a few—on which The Wealth of Nations has small if anything direct to say. Much of this is to be expected, since Smith wrote at the latest moment of the pre-industrial age.’’In fact, the labor theory of value is probably still used by a lot of people without conscious thought. Creates poor contrast . . .“These shortcomings are important, though they pale beside the breathtaking sweep and richness of The Wealth of Nations. And there is one thing that Smith gets triumphantly, monumentally right, that guarantees his put among the immortals: he sets himself to address the foundational question of how far the pursuit of individual self-interest through cultural and shop exchange can yield economic growth and socially beneficial outcomes.’’(many still can’t grasp importance)“That marks the moment at which economics starts to come of age. In posing this question, Smith highlighted the division of labour: one of the most extraordinary and necessary phenomena in all of human existence.’’‘Division of labor’ is wonderful source of wealth and prosperity! Smith nailed it!“More prosaically, he was also the first thinker to put markets, tournament and shop exchange squarely at the centre of economics. . . . But only Smith formed these ideas into a general theory, his ‘system of natural liberty’, explored its implications both for individual markets and for commercial society as a whole, and then applied his ideas to some of the key economic problems of the day. And, more than two centuries after his death, his analysis remains absolutely fundamental to mainstream economics.’’PART ONE: LIFEChapter 1 Kirkcaldy Boy, 1723–1746Chapter 2 ‘The Most Useful, Happiest and Most Honourable Period of my Life’, 1746–1759Chapter 3 Enlightened Interlude, 1760–1773Chapter 4 ‘You are Surely to Reign Alone on These Subjects’, 1773–1776Chapter 5 Working to the End, 1776–1790PART TWO: THOUGHTChapter 6 Reputation, Fact and MythChapter 7 Smith’s EconomicsChapter 8 Adam Smith and MarketsPART THREE: IMPACTChapter 9 Capitalism and its DiscontentsChapter 10 The Moral Basis of Commercial SocietyConclusion: Why it MattersNorman writing for serious, even educated reader. Not obscure or pedantic, but detailed, researched and comprehensive. Reader will need interest in economics, sociology, political thought, intellectual vertheless, well worth the om conclusion . . .“We need a fresh master-narrative for our times. We need better frameworks of public understanding, better explanations, better shared identities, through which we can come to terms with these issues. But, to make them, we must return to the dawn of our economic modernity, and to Adam Smith himself.’’What was the foundation of Smith’s ‘master narrative’?“But if Smith’s evolutionary acc cannot ultimately escape a broadly Christian moral ethos, there are at least other potential sources of moral inspiration available.’’Well . . . maybe other ‘potential sources of morality’. Maybe not . . .“Within this context, his egalitarian outlook demands in principle that all voices should be able to be heard, and as communications expand, so too does the Smithian capacity for sympathy. Norms may flourish and have value in a restricted social context, but they are always potentially topic to review, via the impartial spectator, in a context that is broader, more equal or more free. Human society and the institutions that compose it deserve respect, but this does not insulate particular societies from criticism for practices that are or would be condemned more widely. A degree of mutual recognition is not a moral free-for-all.’’Norman wants (demands) fresh basis for rules, norms. He honestly can’t even propose another, other than political power/influence. Well . . . he is a serving fteen color photographsOver two hundred referencesDozens of notes (linked)Detailed index (linked)

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    Adam Smith: Father of Economics []  2020-1-19 22:9

    I appreciated knowing more about the man. He was so much morethan the father of economics. His work, along with others pavedthe method for democracy as we know it to function.

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    Adam Smith: Father of Economics []  2020-1-19 22:9

    Lots of snippets about Smith’s life and friends, but very weak discussions about his two seminal works. The author seems to be trying to dismiss Smith rather than focusing on the influence his writings have had and the number of his ideas that still ring true. Don’t read this book. Read Smith in the original. You will obtain a much better return on your time.

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    Adam Smith: Father of Economics []  2020-1-19 22:9

    Amazing insights into a genius Scot

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    Adam Smith: Father of Economics []  2020-1-19 22:9

    For the non-academic this is an perfect book of introduction on Adam Smith. Throughout the book the author dismisses a lot of of the misunderstandings regarding his natural philosophy and elaborates a lot of of the myths regarding his economic principles and theories. He directly connects correctly his morals and ethics associated with his political economy.

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    Adam Smith: Father of Economics []  2020-1-19 22:9

    I decided to read Adam Smith after watching Jesse Norman’s impressive presentation on CSPAN’s Book TV. The first half of the book is a straightforward, chronological biography - Smith'’s life, works, and ideas. The remainder is an analysis of Smith’s writings with an emphasis on refuting misconceptions about his ideas on markets and capitalism and an explanation of the moral basis underpinning his thought. The book continues with a discussion of the current distortions and deviations from Smith’s conception of markets and capitalism. The concluding chapter, Why it Matters, extols the benefits of a healthy commercial society but is also a strong warning about its creeping subversion by crony capitalism, political dysfunction, rapid technological change, and evolving (decaying) social norms. Timely, scholarly, and readable, this book is highly recommended.

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    Adam Undercover, The Consortium Directive []  2020-1-11 19:26

    This was the second book about Adam the teenage undercover agent with the eidetic memory above average computer skills, now adding extra teens and more undercover work. Don't forget the far out technology and duck tape. A fun read!

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    Adam Undercover, The Presidium Files []  2020-1-16 1:58

    Amazing read. Pick it up for your child and they will love it.

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    Adam Undercover, The Consortium Directive []  2020-1-11 19:26

    Cover said Volume II, but inside was same Volume I that I had previously purchased and read.

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    Use our product reviews finder and generate tons of ratings & opinions on any item, shop product or service. Search, read and publish reviews for brands, TV shows, ebooks, gadgets, video games, meals, music, household items or movies. Would you like to rate recently purchased thing? Go ahead! Express satisfaction or sadness, describe own experience & identify strengths and weaknesses of the product. Write short or detailed review with a few clicks.

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