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    American Legal Realism []  2020-1-22 1:52

    Periodically, interest seems to rekindle in the Legal Realist movement of the 1930's. Most recently, Wouter de Been, a Dutch scholar, has written "Legal Realism Regained: Saving Realism from Critical Acclaim" (reviewed on Amazon). This group of legal scholars who sought to reorient our thinking toward the nature and role of law, legal reasoning, law and the social science, and the role of legal language contains a lot of names still familiar today: Jermone Frank, Karl Llewellyn, Felix Cohen, William O. Douglas, Max Radin, Thurman Arnold and many, a lot of more. The Legal Realists are usually a subject in political science and law school courses on legal philosophy and legal history. This reader is designed to complement these courses and to create key material much more easily accessible. Following a brief introduction to the topic, eight chapters focusing on various aspects of the Realists. Each chapter has its own brief introduction by the editors. And necessary subjects are the focus of these chapters: antecedents (Holmes, Pound, Hohfeld); struggle over meaning (Pound, Llewellyn); contracts (Corbin); the "public/private distinction" (Hale, Jaffe, Cohen); legal reasoning (Hutcheson, Dewey, Cardozo, and Frank); law and social science (Brandeis, Hoebel, Cook, and Moore); and finally legal education and scholarship (Oliphant, Arnold and Rodell). Like any reader, this one suffers from some structural problems: the introductions are concise and not extensive; the articles (while being some of the most necessary examples of Realism) are limited to extracts; and one can always quibble that too much zone was given to certain articles and insufficient extracts are included for others. But all in all, this is a very fine collection. Each introduction has footnoted extra references, and there is a fine bibliography although somewhat dated since the book was compiled in 1993. This book will remain of amazing value as long as the subject of Legal Realism is alive and kicking.

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    American Legal Realism and Empirical Social Science (Studies in Legal History) []  2020-6-14 20:9

    In his latest book on Legal Realism, Wouter de Been devotes a chapter to discussing the Critical Legal Realist contention that the Realists had become mired to an inappropriate degree in social science, a mistake the crits set out to correct. Actually, very small had been written on the Realists and their efforts to employ social science until this 1995 study by John Henry Schlegel. The author's primary conclusion is that very few Realists engaged in true empirical social science research, and even they conducted it for a relatively short period of time. Therefore, any allegations or commendations about the Realists' utilization of empirical social science research ignores the fact that there really wasn't much. Schlegel concentrates on a few realist practitioners as he unfolds his story. These contain Frank, Oliphant, Cook, Moore, William O. Douglas, Thurman Arnold, and Charles Clark. He argues that largely by 1939, the Realist love affair with empirical research had e central characters in his narrative are Charles Cook and Underhill Moore whose activities are examined in detail, their involvement with John Dewey's views on empirical research reviewed, and their involvements at Yale Law School, Columbia, and the Johns Hopkins Institute recounted. A very interesting chapter, especially for those who have read Laura Kalman's exceptional "Legal Realism at Yale," with YLS and particularly the role of Dean Clark and W.O. Douglas. This chapter is a case study of how (1) realist empirical research was superficial and rejected by the true social scientists at Yale; (2) needed trained help personnel and folks to collect the data; and (3) when completed, really didn't contribute much. Then separate chapters are devoted to Moore at YLS and Cook at the Johns Hopkins Institute for legal research. A concluding chapter looks at empirical social science legal research since the end of WWII. While Schlegel is overly pessimistic in this final chapter, it does provide a amazing overview to the developments occuring during this period. All and all, an essential study of the legal realists for those who wish a complete picture of their activities--successful or not.

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    American Law and Legal Systems []  2020-1-22 1:52

    Amazing breakdown of the basics and medium level concepts for an intro to law class. Really enjoying this book so far.

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    American Law and Legal Systems []  2020-1-22 1:52

    Definitely as described would from them again!

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    The Antinomies Of Realism []  2020-1-31 18:21

    Amazing Quality of Product and Fabulous Service

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    American Legal History: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-1-17 22:3

    As the author of numerous legal histories, including the first volume of a fresh multi volume treatise on American legal history, Professor White is eminently qualified to write this volume for Oxford's Very Short Introductions series. Rather than surveying the development of American legal doctrine across a wide dozens of topics, though, White often chooses to focus on legal aspects of US history. The effect is an uneven treatment that will likely provide his readers with some interesting material while leaving them wanting more, even when the necessarily short nature of the work is considered.White devotes his early chapters to settlers' interactions with natives and the growth and development of slavery. He info how they used legal doctrines to define their relationships with both groups. It's not surprising, however, that they should do so. While law facilitated the desire of settlers to move west and push natives out of their way, there is nothing particularly interesting about the legal aspects employed in a lot of cases. Also, while law DID create slavery possible, it also created emancipation possible. White also goes into detail about the law's role in other developments in US history that illustrate that law has always played an necessary role in America's history, but does not always explain why the law developed as it e book improves when it moves to chapters devoted to specific locations of law such as property, torts, family law, and criminal law. Family law and torts are given amazing treatments, but property deserves a fuller explication of how a rapidly growing society led to the development of specific property doctrines and not others. In addition, there is virtually no coverage at all of constitutional law (the constitution is mostly mentioned as it touches on other matters, such as natives (Johnson v. McIntosh) or slavery (Dred Scott)), commercial law or civil procedure. On the other hand, for some reason, there is a nice treatment of the development of communications law from the days of radio to the show time. Intellectual property is mentioned only in general as facilitating innovation.A particularly interesting chapter covers the role that lawyers have played in society and the changing ways that they have been educated and developed to meet that society's changing needs from larger numbers of lawyer with less formal legal knowledge to today's highly trained but very narrowly focused specialists. Jurisprudential developments, however, are not covered at all and readers will search no mention of such subjects as law and economics, originalism, critical legal studies or gender similar scholarship.While the challenge of covering such an immense subject in such a short zone is daunting, White's success in some locations indicates that it can be done if a uniform approach is taken. His switching between a US historical narrative that discusses the law's role and a more traditional approach that looks at particular locations in isolation results in an uneven treatment, leaving the reader more knowledgeable in certain locations than others. But, ultimately it's hard to understand whether this book is about the law's role in American history or the history of American law.

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    An Introduction To the American Legal System (Aspen College) []  2020-1-22 1:51

    The material alone was amazing enough. Howevee the book looked like someone spilled coffee on it and some of the pages were stuck together. Had to seperate them carefully in fear they would tare

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    American Legal Systems: A Resource and Reference Guide, 2015 []  2020-7-11 19:38

    This book includes a wealth of significant info but so succinctly and usefully presented. It is a amazing respurce for anyone wanting a better understanding of our legal system and is equally appropriate as a college, law school or advanced studies textbook or reference guide.

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    American Legal Systems: A Resource and Reference Guide, 2015 []  2020-7-11 19:38

    It's good!

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    An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen College Series) []  2020-1-28 21:28

    very good, thanks.

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    An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen College Series) []  2020-1-28 21:28

    Book was informative but I created an A in the class without opening it too very often. I think the material in class helped me out more than anything. Use discretion.

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    American Legal History: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-1-17 22:3

    Just as the picture perfect.

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    An Introduction To the American Legal System (Aspen College) []  2020-1-22 1:51

    I ordered this book for my first Graduate Level class in law school. However, when it arrived the first 15 to 20 pages were torn out of the book. They were all available to read but I had to take then back inside to hold from losing them. Also, the book was highlighted from front to back which was very distracting..

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    American Legal Systems: A Resource and Reference Guide, 2015 []  2020-7-11 19:38

    brand new

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    American Criminal Courts: Legal Process and Social Context []  2020-1-27 21:22

    bought for my college student, had it not been okay, I would have heard

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    An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen College Series) []  2020-1-28 21:28

    amazing condition

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    An Introduction To the American Legal System (Aspen College) []  2020-1-22 1:51

    More of wha'ts wrong with the college textbook scam. Overpriced and useless general information you could have got from Goole.

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    An Introduction To the American Legal System (Aspen College) []  2020-1-22 1:51

    amazing condition

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    American Legal History: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-1-17 22:3

    Excellent!!!

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    American Legal History: A Very Short Introduction (Very Short Introductions) []  2020-1-17 22:3

    Distinct moments in the formation of american legal system are pointed and explained in this short book. The historical landscape and its reflections in the law are explained in to give the reader a comprehensive view of the field. With sections about natives tribes’ law, African-American traditions and distinct patterns of colonizations in America with its law developments, the book provides useful informations. Amazing overview. Readable introduction. Profitable reading.

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    American Legal Systems: A Resource and Reference Guide, 2015 []  2020-7-11 19:38

    This book is what I've been looking for and I'm satisfied to have found it here! Amazing service!!!

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    American Legal Systems: A Resource and Reference Guide, 2015 []  2020-7-11 19:38

    Really amazing book.

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    The Antinomies Of Realism []  2020-1-31 18:21

    What can I say; it's Jameson.

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    An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen College Series) []  2020-1-28 21:28

    More of wha'ts wrong with the college textbook scam. Overpriced and useless general information you could have got from Goole.

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    An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen College Series) []  2020-1-28 21:28

    👍🏻

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    An Introduction To the American Legal System (Aspen College) []  2020-1-22 1:51

    very good, thanks.

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    An Introduction To the American Legal System (Aspen College) []  2020-1-22 1:51

    👍🏻

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    American Criminal Courts: Legal Process and Social Context []  2020-1-27 21:22

    My vender was very responsive, and the text was simple to read.

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    American Legal Systems: A Resource and Reference Guide, 2015 []  2020-7-11 19:38

    Perfect , reader can understand the law without prior understanding how the law system works

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    An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen College Series) []  2020-1-28 21:28

    The material alone was amazing enough. Howevee the book looked like someone spilled coffee on it and some of the pages were stuck together. Had to seperate them carefully in fear they would tare

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    An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen College Series) []  2020-1-28 21:28

    I ordered this book for my first Graduate Level class in law school. However, when it arrived the first 15 to 20 pages were torn out of the book. They were all available to read but I had to take then back inside to hold from losing them. Also, the book was highlighted from front to back which was very distracting..

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    An Introduction To the American Legal System (Aspen College) []  2020-1-22 1:51

    Book was informative but I created an A in the class without opening it too very often. I think the material in class helped me out more than anything. Use discretion.

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    American Legal Systems: A Resource and Reference Guide, 2015 []  2020-7-11 19:38

    Very amazing and helpful if taking or going to school for law or wanting to know about law or lawyer

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    The Antinomies Of Realism []  2020-1-31 18:21

    Look, there's no question that Jameson is a serious and necessary thinker. But the fact remains that he is not a amazing writer; he badly needs an editor, and it seems as though he is too popular for someone to stand up and tell him when a sentence doesn't work. There are a lot of such sentences 's hard to know where to start with the issues with this book. The breadth of erudition is impressive, but often haphazard, and authors are mentioned with no apparent purpose except that they occurred to Jameson as he was writing. There is a sense of self-assured free-assocation throughout. That, combined with some truly atrocious writing, frequent inconsistencies and contradictions, leaves small to keep the book together.And the assembling of the book seems to have been as rushed as the composition. There are typos throughout, inconsistencies in citation, transliteration, and translation (in one paragraph, a town is referred to by its Czech and German names; if you didn't know already what he was talking about, you could easily be confused about what was going on).The theory of realism itself, such as it is, is a parade of trendy subjects in academia today, with small insight as far as I can tell, and a amazing of pomp. The part that would have been most useful to me -- the bibliography that captures the famously wide range of references -- is absent.

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    The Antinomies Of Realism []  2020-1-31 18:21

    This is not only an necessary book, carrying a thesis that begin a vital discussion to literary theory concerned with the nexus between history and literature, but it also comes in a attractive edition.

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    The Antinomies Of Realism []  2020-1-31 18:21

    Fredric Jameson at his best! Who else could bring such immense erudition to a conceptual analysis of what appears to be his first love: the novel? With his characteristic and brilliant deployment of philosophical and political ideas developed over a lifetime of critical observations, Jameson takes a backward look at the notion of what's the true in the novels of Walter Scott, Zola, George Elliott, Twain, Faulkner, Tolstoy and a lot of others. It's one of my own best books of the year.

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    The Yale Law School Guide to Research in American Legal History (Yale Law Library Series in Legal History and Reference) []  2020-1-27 21:8

    Cards on the table, John was kind enough to share preview copies of this with me for the course I've taught for the latest two years at Cornell Law. In addition to being the most comprehensive single tutorial to American legal history sources I've seen, it has proven to be a highly practical and simple to use resource for my students.

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    The Yale Law School Guide to Research in American Legal History (Yale Law Library Series in Legal History and Reference) []  2020-1-27 21:8

    Anyone interested in legal research, government documents, poli/sci will have fun this book. There is an amazing chapter that contains tables about the federal courts, including how court boundaries have changed over time! Also contains amazing tip on how to find Native American law; and much more.

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    The Yale Law School Guide to Research in American Legal History (Yale Law Library Series in Legal History and Reference) []  2020-1-27 21:8

    I thought I was beautiful knowledgeable about legal history research until I read this masterful tutorial written by a lecturer in legal research at Yale Law School. It reflects the immense impact of computers and internet on legal history research. The only issue is that this 340 page handbook discusses so a lot of research sources and techniques, that it is like going to the Strand Book Store--your eyes just glaze over with the multitude of topics discussed. However, the book is so well organized, and in fact plain interesting, that you are just overjoyed that so much valuable info is found between its covers, and at your fingertips. For not only does the author discuss research techniques, the reader also learns a lot about some necessary subjects in American legal history research.Each chapter includes some standard elements: a discussion of research techniques in different locations of American legal history--e.g., colonial law, the constitutional convention, and the administrative state--a "research example" where the author demonstrates how to research a subject under discussion, and a key section at the chapter's conclusion listing "Further Reading," "Important Sources Mentioned in this Chapter," and "Data Bases." A thorough index makes it a snap to locate any particular subject the reader is interested in.I found some of the most interesting chapters to be: "English Foundations", "Research Gets Organized" (West etc.), "Archives" (how to locate and use them), and "International and Civil Law in the United States." Each chapter is jam-packed with invaluable info as to research devices (more than you could ever imagine) and how to use them. This is not a book for light bedtime reading; rather, hold it handy as a valuable reference source where you do your writing and research. The author teaches an entire course on this material at Yale Law School; this book is almost like attending and benefiting from it.

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    The Nonsense Factory: The Making and Breaking of the American Legal System []  2020-1-17 21:49

    I liked reading this book because I feel that it is an perfect straightforward book to the point. It points out some of the deficiencies in the legal system and how some conditions can be improved. Some of the interesting facts that this book mentions contains the following information: Only 1% of police departments require a full four year college degree. Today, 60% of police officers in the 75 biggest police force cities live outside the cities that employ them. 22 states let people who aren't lawyers to be judges. Up to 97% of civil matters never reach trial. As far as the passing rates for the bar exams are concerned, the national average is 59% with CA having a low of 44% and Oklahoma having a high of 81%. Before the hourly (or six mins increment) system went into effect, lawyers billed a fixed flat fee for a particular legal service. The CA prison inmate to toilet ratio is 54 inmates to only one toilet. Lawyers comprise just 36.5% of Congress at the present. District Attorney offices have the options to prosecute moderately, over prosecute, under prosecute, and not prosecute at all. The book mentions about the advantages and disadvantages of arbitration. The author says that no real freedom exists when consumers have no practical choice but to sign a contract. Few people choose to be unemployed. The book's author claimed that Roman law forbade certainly gross unfair contracts. He also mentions about unconscionability. This is an perfect book which I recommend that people read since it is very straightforward and to the point.

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    The Nonsense Factory: The Making and Breaking of the American Legal System []  2020-1-17 21:49

    It has taken me several weeks to read this book and the content was mostly overwhelming to me and not that simple to understand as the author writes about the inadequacies with the criminal justice e main gist of the book, in layman's terms, is that the criminal justice system is screwed up. What we think of as justice is actually injustice. There are prejudices throughout, ridiculous laws (basically every one of us has done something illegal), people who do not have the legal education who are making decisions for the judges, police who continually use excessive force, government who cannot be held accountable for their misconduct unless they agree to be held accountable, ordinary citizens who have their property seized even before being proven guilty, evidence which is not foolproof being considered the holy grail of proof--even the biological kind ("meaning forensic science is a witness with an agenda"), etc., etc., ME EXAMPLES- If you pet your dog during a vehicle ride you are breaking the law in D.C. and will be fined.- If you do not have a law license or training, you can still work in a judge's chambers as a clerk and "deny a prisoner's rights, draft a death penalty opinion," etc.- "The prosecutor has more control over life, liberty, and reputation than any other person in America."- In one police raid mentioned, an innocent stepfather was killed because police used excessive force when they raided a house where the illegal step son lived. The cops firearm went off and the policeman was not held accountable.I tried to place what was said in layman's terms as I understood it. In reality, however, the text was too intense for me to grasp. We all know our justice system fails us and this book intended to prove that. However, it was proven in a method that was most difficult to read and which created it hard to remember. I can only recommend this for someone who is in the legal field or someone who has an acute interest in the criminal justice system and can handle a book with thousands of well-researched facts strung together in a somewhat informative method for an incredibly overwhelming topic matter.

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    Whose Monet?: An Introduction to the American Legal System (Academic Success Series) []  2020-1-15 21:12

    One of the dullest books I've ever read

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process 1: The Colonial Period []  2020-7-2 20:18

    This is a very interesting read. This book was purchased for a class.

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process 1: The Colonial Period []  2020-7-2 20:18

    Amazing product!

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process: The Colonial Period []  2020-6-27 19:1

    I bought this book on the reccomendation of my professor for a class in African American History. In addition to being an perfect reference book, it expresses the topic matter in a truthful and honest method without being prejudice. It combines both the known history taught in school with the unspoken stories of the colonial period, shedding light on the legal system, and its origin in the colonies. This book is a must have for anyone interested in the Law or legal studies.

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process: The Colonial Period []  2020-6-27 19:1

    Only half method finished but the in formation is so necessary to the understanding of American history and there is perfect documentation that I will be rereading this work and continuing to learn from it

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process: The Colonial Period []  2020-6-27 19:1

    Strong history. A must read if you wish to educate yourself about racism.

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    Whose Monet?: An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen Coursebook) []  2020-7-17 21:14

    Amazing for conceptualizing the basics process of a civil case. It was a requirement for 1L that was simultaneously enjoyable and informational.

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    The Nonsense Factory: The Making and Breaking of the American Legal System []  2020-1-17 21:49

    One of the most interesting, and provocative books to have been published this year on the state of the legal system in America. It comes at a critical time when the American democratic system has been exposed as so chaotic to be a role model, and now, Gibney is shining a bright light on the legal system. What is working in America these days? This book emphasises the innumerable laws that have made countless offences that the ‘U.S. Department of Justice, charged with the enforcement of federal criminal law, can’t even count the number of criminal provisions’. Gibney moves on to present how the criminal is enforced in a totally idiosyncratic way. And why is that? Gibney points the finger at the police and the courts. The system is broken even before it comes to them. Gibney explains why Congress, charged with making laws, has shirked its duty because it just cannot manage. So, who is making the laws in America? Gibney says that that function has fallen into the hands of corporations, lobbyists, and administrators. When cases do come to the courts, the judges cannot manage either. So, who is dealing with court cases? Gibney points to the law clerks – ‘people who are barely lawyers’. At the same time, Gibney observes, judges ‘are like Greek household gods, critical to the household but of small importance outside it’. Appellate judges, on the other hand, are superior gods – ‘the ones on whom senators, public interest groups, law professors, and reporters lavish their attention’. Gibney also scorns the duplicity in Chief Justice Roberts’ comment that a judge is like an umpire. At pages 155 to 157, Gibney explains why a judge is not an umpire. When he has just about finished with the business of the courts, Gibney proceeds to present how arbitration has taken away justice from the justice system of America. Every commercial enterprise has locked in an arbitration clause, he says. He points to the attempt by General Mills which tried to construe the mere opening of its Cheerios cereal box as ‘consent to arbitration’. Gibney then turns his attention to the training of lawyers, the practice of litigation, and the rules of evidence and procedure, all of which presenting a mountain for the litigant to climb. In criminal law, bail, or the absence of it is making people plea bargain. Jail without bail while waiting is the same as guilty without trial, Gibney says. He has a amazing to say about plea bargaining and the method prosecutors file a dozen charges on an accused for what is essentially the same set of facts, one offence. Gibney’s final chapter produces thoughts on what can be done. He begins with the recognition that law needs a lot of work for it to be respected – ‘Law cannot survive when people cease to believe in it’. This is particularly necessary when we consider his discussions on the instances the American presidents from Truman to Trump have violated the constitution. In the case of Truman, getting into the Korean Battle without approval, and likewise, Johnson in Vietnam, and Bush J, getting into the Iraq war, without the sanction of Congress.

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    The Nonsense Factory: The Making and Breaking of the American Legal System []  2020-1-17 21:49

    I do not think it has been read, so aside from the bottom of the dust jacket being very slightly warped upward, It's a Keeper!

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    The Nonsense Factory: The Making and Breaking of the American Legal System []  2020-1-17 21:49

    The author does a amazing job of detailing the absurdities that permeate our legal and justice system. That system seems to be a prime example of the Peter Principle - people rise to their level of incompetence. And the system itself has also risen to its level of incompetence. There are plenty of examples offered. One thing I noticed is a decided bias toward the left. He seems to think the right is to blame for everything. While that in no method invalidates the examples he has given, I just wish to point out the bias. As far as solutions, the author sets forth his but I have to say the limiting factor is what I mentioned before, that the Peter Principle is in effect. Our system has gotten out of hand in huge part because of the burden placed on it, and that human beings with all their faults are the ones in charge of administering it. As people are so imperfect, so goes the system. Trying to weed out corruption and everything else that has caused things to be what the author terms "the nonsense factory" by making more laws is absurd (although people will never stop trying); what is required is a change in culture. The problem is how to rein in human nature.If you're really interested in the subject, this book provides an in-depth exploration. Personally it was just too long and tedious for me and the book could have said the same thing in half the zone or less. The ideas are good, the findings valid, and like I said, if you're really interested then there is a wealth of info on the pages.

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process: The Colonial Period []  2020-6-27 19:1

    This is a very interesting read. This book was purchased for a class.

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process: The Colonial Period []  2020-6-27 19:1

    Outstanding coverage of an problem so necessary to the foundation of our democracy!

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    Whose Monet?: An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen Coursebook) []  2020-7-17 21:14

    The first sentence of chapter 1 alone got me hooked!

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process 1: The Colonial Period []  2020-7-2 20:18

    I bought this book on the reccomendation of my professor for a class in African American History. In addition to being an perfect reference book, it expresses the topic matter in a truthful and honest method without being prejudice. It combines both the known history taught in school with the unspoken stories of the colonial period, shedding light on the legal system, and its origin in the colonies. This book is a must have for anyone interested in the Law or legal studies.

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process 1: The Colonial Period []  2020-7-2 20:18

    Amazing book full of knowledge

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process 1: The Colonial Period []  2020-7-2 20:18

    Outstanding coverage of an problem so necessary to the foundation of our democracy!

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    A Legal History of the Civil War and Reconstruction (New Histories of American Law) []  2020-7-21 20:46

    I give this book 3 stars only because it highlights just how crooked activities can be cloaked in honorable and academic terms and 'sold' as admirable! The 14th Amendment was NOT passed legally and Reconstruction was an abomination! You can place lipstick on the pig all you want, but it is still a pig! Here this book brags about how our 'modern legal order' is based on all the shenanigans that went on after the war? If that is what it is based on, then no wonder we are in poor shape today!

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    Whose Monet?: An Introduction to the American Legal System (Academic Success Series) []  2020-1-15 21:12

    The first sentence of chapter 1 alone got me hooked!

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process 1: The Colonial Period []  2020-7-2 20:18

    I can't seem to place the book down. I set a mission to learn all about racism: how was racism created, out of all the cultures on earth, why was black people selected to be the slaves, why is racism still an problem in 2019, etc. It's true! You wish to hide a secret in plain sight? You write it in a book and [email protected]#$%!. This is my fresh hobby now.

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process 1: The Colonial Period []  2020-7-2 20:18

    An perfect book that is very informative and educational.

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process 1: The Colonial Period []  2020-7-2 20:18

    Strong history. A must read if you wish to educate yourself about racism.

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process: The Colonial Period []  2020-6-27 19:1

    Amazing book full of knowledge

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process: The Colonial Period []  2020-6-27 19:1

    One of the best books I have ever read. If you would like to read more about US history and the legacy of slavery, this is a really amazing read.

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    The Nonsense Factory: The Making and Breaking of the American Legal System []  2020-1-17 21:49

    Even as someone who was once a political activist with some fairly high level (if State, rather than Federal) access to the halls of legislative deliberation, this book was beautiful shocking in revealing just how much of a mess the American legal system truly is. While the author himself is clearly in favor of some form of ideal government that works, this book just as easily makes the case that anarchy would at least be preferable to the current system. Yet throughout, the author's acerbic wit is what makes the book such an enjoyable read - even as the critiques it makes present just how depressingly dreadful the current US legal system really is. Very much recommended reading. Just maybe test to do it in a put where plentiful alcohol is readily available. ;)

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    Whose Monet?: An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen Coursebook) []  2020-7-17 21:14

    System requires a review to read the rest of the book. Really really don't care for this feature of online purchases

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    A Legal History of the Civil War and Reconstruction (New Histories of American Law) []  2020-7-21 20:46

    This is a concise study of the birth of the American legal as we know it today. As historians have observed, the Civil Battle was a greater social revolution than the political break with Amazing Britain. This volume info the legal revolution that followed in its wake, abolishing slavery once and for all and completely altering the balance between the federal government, states and citizens by guaranteeing citizens, who now included newly freed slaves, federal rights versus state governments. There is also a fascinating discussion of the contradictions of the Confederate legal system, which, pushed by the necessity of war, was far more centralizing that the Confederate rhetoric of "states' rights" suggests.

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    The Nonsense Factory: The Making and Breaking of the American Legal System []  2020-1-17 21:49

    I currently serve as a mediator in my state’s court system and also have worked as an expert in local, state and federal courts so I had a semi-professional interest in this book. I found that the comments and criticisms leveled by the author to be valid despite his openly hostile bias favoring the left side of the political spectrum. This bias, which often grows tedious, manifests itself by him selecting examples ridiculing centrists or rightward individuals but it doesn’t in any method invalidate his comments. For example, he persistently lashes out with venomous hatred of Antonin Scalia and others including the current swing SCOTUS Justices Roberts and Gorsuch. Meanwhile, his only comment on RGB is something like she’s a superstar – a real phenom. He’s clearly star struck by I noted above, while the bias of this book is nakedly on display with the author openly proud of his persistent Silicon Valley/San Francisco style virtue signaling, I think this an necessary book for all to read since it brings to light much of what we who labor within the beast either know or sense. Here are some of a lot of examples which should signal to all that something’s beyond rotten within our legal body even knows how a lot of laws there are or what they all are. The DoJ in 1982 tried to document all of them and despite what was supposedly a valiant effort, failed to make a complete compilation. Since the early ’80s, the number of laws has proliferated at the federal level. That’s poor enough. Now add in the laws of all 50 states and the roughly 20,000 municipalities and you have, as a result, all of us being unindicted felons. If the government wishes to ‘get you’ it can by simply documenting what you thought were innocent actions and finding a law you violated from among this swamp of do’s and don’ts. For example, in MA, starting but not finishing the National Anthem is a gets worse. Consider the above are only laws passed by the legislature bodies. In addition, there are hundreds of thousands of laws (regulations) passed by unelected bureaucrats as part of the deep or administrative state’s taking power from the Constitutionally defined locations of government. Scared yet? Obtain this. Nobody knows how a lot of federal government agencies there are. Right now, deep state administrative personnel who most don’t even know exist are creating laws which can land you in gray rock prison for an indefinite period of this point, I’ve not even scratched 1% of this book’s contents which is why I think it mandatory reading for anybody who considers themselves a responsible citizen. I wholly disagree with the author’s suggested remedies because I think the outcome will be worse than what we have now and that’s saying something. However, this isn’t an zone where either the author or I both of who are, more or less, part of the system, should have the only opinions. This is a well-written light read if a bit long but clearly the author shortened the book to the minimum length required to obtain his notice across. It’s a book everybody should read. If you fail to even try, you’re simply an irresponsible citizen – I see it as that necessary which is why, despite my a lot of disagreements with the author’s positions, I rate this at a full five stars.

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    The Nonsense Factory: The Making and Breaking of the American Legal System []  2020-1-17 21:49

    If you’ve ever found yourself entangled in the morass of the legal system - or even if you just look around in 2019 and think “something’s wrong with our legal system” - then this book is for you. The author manages the seemingly Sisyphusion task of explaining and critiquing the modern American legal system in its entirety in a single volume—from the Courtroom Trials to Congress, Police to Prosecutors, Bureaucracies to Judges, Law Firms to Consumer Law, Law Schools to primary questions like “What is law, and what is it amazing for?” And most importantly, the modern, increasingly imperial, presidency. Not only does this book cover all these topics, but the author manages to create the street trip through the American legal system funny, memorable, and sometimes shocking. I highly recommend bney’s thesis, and thus the title of the book, is that if you think about the legal system as a factory, and the outputs of law (justice, fairness, efficiency, coordination) are its products, then our modern American legal factory is producing a defective product. For example, did you know federal courts conduct fewer trials in total number today than in the 1980s, even though our country has almost doubled in size? That 95% of criminal defendants plead guilty and never even go to before they are convicted? That even the government is unable to count how a lot of criminal provisions exist in federal law, which makes it easier for prosecutors to over-charge defendants with numerous related offenses? That almost any consumer contract you sign contains a mandatory arbitration provision that exempts you from being able to sue in court? That the average representative in Congress represented about 15,000 citizens in 1790 and represents 750,000 today? (No wonder we feel like they aren’t representative!) If nothing else, this book is an necessary contribution simply for collecting so much necessary and horrifying trivia about how our legal system is falling apart and putting all these facts in one volume. In that sense, this could almost function as a reference work.But what’s even more impressive is how well the author tells his story, and how funny and witty he is while telling it. The author’s diagnosis is that the law has grown so complicated that the different assembly lines in law’s factory no longer understand each other, and as a lawyer myself, I can attest to the truth of this. I know my own small sandbox of laws after a lot of years of study and practice, but have almost no knowledge about how, for example, to obtain a divorce, or apply for social security, or draft a contract, allow alone anything super high level like organizing a multi-national corporation. Gibney’s argument is that the law has gotten so complicated that one part of the law is no longer able to keep the other parts accountable, and each part creates its own exceptions for itself, and then these exceptions lead to arbitrary enforcement. This arbitrariness allows the government, the wealthy, and the savvy to navigate and manipulate the rules to obtain ahead at the expense of citizens at large. When basically no one who created leading up to the financial crisis went to prison, but hundreds of citizens go to jail because they can’t afford to a fine for improper lawn maintenance (seriously, this happens!), it’s hard to though the book is in one sense very depressing, the author tells the story with a lot of wit and levity, and it’s impressively bipartisan and even-handed: his argument is that the over-complexity and exceptions-to-the-rules is both what leads to bureaucratic red tape that hurts little businesses and also the police discretion that caused the abuses leading to the Black Lives Matter movement. No matter your politics, excessively complicated and arbitrarily enforced laws and rules damage everyone. And it makes it very hard to keep the Government accountable for anything, especially when every politician's solution is more rules and more laws. Probably the most persuasive and scary chapter in the book is the one on the modern Presidency, which the author argues has increasingly become imperial in character, through a combination of congressional sloth, presidential ambitions, and judicial enabling. In 2019, it’s hard to argue with that. (And remember how Republicans created this argument about Obama until the day Trump was elected, and now Democrats say it about Trump? Gibney’s diagnosis is that it’s the office of the Presidency itself, not just who happens to keep the office.)So who is the audience for this book? Every concerned citizen, for sure. Having just finished the book, it is clear to me that we need to create legal reform a top priority for the 2020 election and a priority for who we elect, from town dogcatcher to state governor. As a lawyer, I’d also say this book is a must-read for anyone who works in the law and occasionally wants to bang their head versus the wall: this will be a cathartic, deeply satisfying read. Finally, anyone who is thinking about law school needs to read this book so that they understand what they’re signing up for and so that they do not lose the forest for the trees: it’s so simple one you’re trained to “think like a lawyer” and to forget that the law exists to serve the people, not lawyers and judges, and the law’s job is to create people’s lives easier, not to train you to perform intellectual parlor tricks to achieve an “it depends” answer.An extremely important, funny, and urgent read.

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    Whose Monet?: An Introduction to the American Legal System (Academic Success Series) []  2020-1-15 21:12

    Amazing for conceptualizing the basics process of a civil case. It was a requirement for 1L that was simultaneously enjoyable and informational.

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    Whose Monet?: An Introduction to the American Legal System (Academic Success Series) []  2020-1-15 21:12

    Amazing book for 1Ls!

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    Useful review?

    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process: The Colonial Period []  2020-6-27 19:1

    An perfect book that is very informative and educational.

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process 1: The Colonial Period []  2020-7-2 20:18

    One of the best books I have ever read. If you would like to read more about US history and the legacy of slavery, this is a really amazing read.

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    A Legal History of the Civil War and Reconstruction (New Histories of American Law) []  2020-7-21 20:46

    Found this book so helpful in understanding more behind the ultimate failure of Reconstruction. Well written. Even I who is not an attorney, could understand the legal struggles and challenges that created Reconstruction an uphill war with small success.

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    Whose Monet?: An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen Coursebook) []  2020-7-17 21:14

    I came across this book purely by possibility and found it as engaging as any book that I have read, fiction or non-fiction, in latest memory. I know that it was written with first year law students in mind. I don’t think I would have been able to appreciate the unbelievable nuances in the law (so flawlessly and fascinatingly captured in this book) if it had been assigned reading back then, particularly when so a lot of other courses were competing for slices of my brain. However, I can imagine an entire college course based on this one book (not merely assigned reading) as something I would have highly enjoyed and found extremely om my perspective now, I recommend this book to attorneys and non-attorney executives who, while perhaps not specializing in civil litigation, frequently encounter it. As general counsel to a record label/motion picture producer/Broadway present financier, I have worked closely with outside counsel from the moment the threat of litigation appeared on the horizon through to the final appeal. Although I’ve been doing this quite awhile, I managed to learn (or re-think) something on every page of this book. For anyone who loves The Law, “Whose Monet” is a goldmine!

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    Whose Monet?: An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen Coursebook) []  2020-7-17 21:14

    Well written book, useful to 1st year students, the book is interesting but it repeats itself quite a bit and it nothing like a law school book. It's very simple nothing like a law school textbook

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    Whose Monet?: An Introduction to the American Legal System (Academic Success Series) []  2020-1-15 21:12

    I came across this book purely by possibility and found it as engaging as any book that I have read, fiction or non-fiction, in latest memory. I know that it was written with first year law students in mind. I don’t think I would have been able to appreciate the unbelievable nuances in the law (so flawlessly and fascinatingly captured in this book) if it had been assigned reading back then, particularly when so a lot of other courses were competing for slices of my brain. However, I can imagine an entire college course based on this one book (not merely assigned reading) as something I would have highly enjoyed and found extremely om my perspective now, I recommend this book to attorneys and non-attorney executives who, while perhaps not specializing in civil litigation, frequently encounter it. As general counsel to a record label/motion picture producer/Broadway present financier, I have worked closely with outside counsel from the moment the threat of litigation appeared on the horizon through to the final appeal. Although I’ve been doing this quite awhile, I managed to learn (or re-think) something on every page of this book. For anyone who loves The Law, “Whose Monet” is a goldmine!

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    Whose Monet?: An Introduction to the American Legal System (Academic Success Series) []  2020-1-15 21:12

    Well written book, useful to 1st year students, the book is interesting but it repeats itself quite a bit and it nothing like a law school book. It's very simple nothing like a law school textbook

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    The Nonsense Factory: The Making and Breaking of the American Legal System []  2020-1-17 21:49

    All of us have most likely had to with The Law, and have come away feeling just as roughed up and shaken down as if we'd had a run-in with some alley holdup thug, even for something as supposedly easy as preparing a will. Probably not even the gods can support those who obtain caught in the gears of corporate law, patent law, or the criminal "justice" takes us on a bushwhacking tour with gun and camera through law's current jungle, writing with crispy verve [or, as one of his professor's complained, "impertinence"].A book that confirms all one's worst suspicions. I like to think of it as a bracing call to action.

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    The Nonsense Factory: The Making and Breaking of the American Legal System []  2020-1-17 21:49

    This insightful and fair-minded book explores the history and foundations of our legal system and the serious systemic issues that have come to dominate our justice system, often creating grave injustices. I found the book beautiful engaging and simple to follow. It provides a amazing analysis of the challenges that exist and some ideas for solutions, although there isn't really an in depth android game plan for how we as a people might successfully push forward reforms that would improve the delivery of justice in our society. I think anyone seeking to address injustices in society would benefit from this overview of the roots of how the system that purports to help justice and an orderly society has been corrupted and manipulated in ways that are degrading our society.

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process: The Colonial Period []  2020-6-27 19:1

    I can't seem to place the book down. I set a mission to learn all about racism: how was racism created, out of all the cultures on earth, why was black people selected to be the slaves, why is racism still an problem in 2019, etc. It's true! You wish to hide a secret in plain sight? You write it in a book and [email protected]#$%!. This is my fresh hobby now.

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process: The Colonial Period []  2020-6-27 19:1

    Amazing product!

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    Whose Monet?: An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen Coursebook) []  2020-7-17 21:14

    Amazing book for 1Ls!

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    Whose Monet?: An Introduction to the American Legal System (Aspen Coursebook) []  2020-7-17 21:14

    One of the dullest books I've ever read

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    In the Matter of Color: Race and the American Legal Process 1: The Colonial Period []  2020-7-2 20:18

    Only half method finished but the in formation is so necessary to the understanding of American history and there is perfect documentation that I will be rereading this work and continuing to learn from it

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    A Legal History of the Civil War and Reconstruction (New Histories of American Law) []  2020-7-21 20:46

    Insightful, valuable, and a pleasure to ul Escott

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    Capitalist Realism: Is there no alternative? []  2019-12-20 18:34

    It took me a fairly long time and a second read to come up with an view on Fisher 's brief but fairly deep book. With amazing engagement with some of the major theorists of postmodern thought Fisher casts a picture of Capital as that which cannot be thought beyond. With deference to a number of the other reviewers, I think it is dismissive of his argument to say there are lots of alternatives. If one believes that, one should confront the argument directly. It seems to me that Capitalism does have an inherent blocking e provisional zone Fisher opens is in the development of full blown alternatives to Capitalism that grow out of the promises Capitalism makes and not only does not but cannot keep. Towards the end of this book Fisher gives a number of examples. Capitalism promises an end of bureaucracy, but we live in the most standardised globe imaginable. Capitalism promises joy for the individual, but we live in a globe of increasing affective disorder. We approach catastrophic ecological collapse. In this zone alternatives can be ain, with respect to other reviewers, I really do not care whether this is Zizek lite or otherwise. There is a well thought out argument here that deserves more engagement and less branding. A amazing book and heartily recommended.

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    Estimating Software Costs: Bringing Realism to Estimating []  2019-12-23 20:28

    This is full of practical info that will support me develop a more mature process to estimate development efforts

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    Estimating Software Costs: Bringing Realism to Estimating []  2019-12-23 20:28

    Although this book is quite thorough on the subject there are a few major drawbacks that created me give it only 3 stars:- The writing style is extremely repetitive. I think after the 30th times defining what "backfiring" is I stopped counting. Same with telling the history of function points analysis or how amazing it is. This and a lot of other things repeat every two or three pages. Taking out all the repetitions the book could probably be about one third shorter.- The individual chapters don't fit to each other, don't integrate with each other and don't make an overreaching arc. It seems like the individual chapters were once long academic articles and were just place after each other. This would also explain the repetition (mentiond above) as each "article" required to define terms again.

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    Spellcaster Academy: Magical Realism, Episode 1 []  2020-1-18 19:53

    What a fun small romp through a magic discovery plot line. A charming, believable and a compelling dual worlds eat vacation read. It was a fun escape, a guilty pleasure. Okay, -- I admit it was hard stop listening to!Enjoy!

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    Spellcaster Academy: Magical Realism, Episode 1 []  2020-1-18 19:53

    I really liked the book, but it felt to short. Alot of items was smashed into such a short amount that I was taking by surprise when it was over. I'm glad there is already more books in the works, I don't think I could wait long to search out what happens next.

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    Spellcaster Academy: Magical Realism, Episode 1 []  2020-1-18 19:53

    I like the parts where Josie got her magic, the guy and her cat. I didn't like it when people were ganging up on her because of being Morelli.

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    Spellcaster Academy: Magical Realism, Episode 1 []  2020-1-18 19:53

    pros: simple to follow story line. grabs you from the ns: episode one ended to fast. looking forward to episode 2

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    Capitalist Realism: Is there no alternative? []  2019-12-20 18:34

    Both beautifully argued and written, (although often dense in references that the weekend philosopher will not obtain - i.e. me) and awakening. However, I was hoping for the glimmer of the contemporary alternative, and in not finding one fear that the author couldn't quite break of capital realism either

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    Capitalist Realism: Is there no alternative? []  2019-12-20 18:34

    Tag Fisher's Capitalist Realism is probably one of the most necessary works of capitalist ontology I've read to this date. Capitalism, for Fisher, presents no other alternatives. It defines the very chance of an alternative system on it's own terms, and such an alternate chance becomes an impossibility. Fisher's use of the phrase "It is easier to imagine the end of the globe than it is to imagine the end of capitalism," sets the frame for the book. Fisher calls into question the fulfillment of happiness that capitalism promises: freedom from bureaucracy, a healthy mind, and a life full of liberty. In Fisher's world, bureaucracy has only increased in a horribly Kafkaesque fashion; mental health crises are not merely a chemical imbalance but something likely rooted in our anxious, exhaustive day to day lives, and workers are now more dependent on work than ever but have less stability than before. Fisher poses one of the most necessary questions in the philosophical discourse: "Is there no alternative?"

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    Estimating Software Costs: Bringing Realism to Estimating []  2019-12-23 20:28

    This book includes lots of useful data on the development process -- including productivity -- using both LOC and IFPUG Function Points. It contains primary rules of thumb for estimating schedules and effort. It is a amazing starting point for organizations that do not have their own historical data to base their estimates on. An perfect reference to have within reach if you work with measurement.

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    Estimating Software Costs: Bringing Realism to Estimating []  2019-12-23 20:28

    Managing the Black Hole: The Executive's Tutorial to Software Project RiskAnother comprehensive coverage of the topic from one of the "fathers" of professional cost estimating concepts and tools. Capers' activity based costing data is very useful and not otherwise available. His data on the impact of higher maturity on productivity and quality provide a useful basis for building a business case for process improvement. I have also found his data on defect containment rates for different forms of appraisal to be very helpful in evaluating alternative quality strategies.

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    Capitalist Realism: Is there no alternative? []  2019-12-20 18:34

    A remarkable piece of work. Instantly on my list of books everyone should read. A tad bit short (81 pages) for the of $12 in my opinion, but I have no regrets about the purchase, and no regrets about supporting the estate of Tag Fisher and his publisher, Zero Books.I want Tag to rest in the peace he never seemed to have found in life.

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    Capitalist Realism: Is there no alternative? []  2019-12-20 18:34

    It's a very impassioned read and he does create some quite extreme claims/statements, but it does really obtain you to feel a lot of the things he is railing against. What a crucial voice in understanding the globe we now live in. Want he was still around.

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