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    guns of glory []  2020-5-21 22:34
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    Just played Guns of Glory on a phone application via mistplay reviews. Played this one with amazing interest as on the mobile you got the impression of controlling your characters on the ground level, helping catch pick pockets etc etc. Like all mobile ads this was misleading. Don't obtain me wrong the android game itself was addictive and you can spend hours playing (If you play via mistplay you can earn a fair few Amazon vouchers), but yeah false advertising? Really? Unfortunately this is a huge pitfall a lot of android games like these fall into. For example you can expect a nice create your kitchen safe android game but instead you obtain something quite various (garden scapes see add for application and play game)

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    clash of clans []  2020-5-11 22:47

    recommend amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing

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    The Souls of Black Folk []  2020-1-23 1:30

    The Souls of Black Folk was written at a time when books still had the power to sway public opinion and move people - and that was definitely the motive. This book is not merely descriptive, or a dry recitation of facts, but a elegant treatise whose intent is to sway the policy of its time. In the simplest of summaries, Dubois is laying his argument for how both policies and individuals should be shaped by and for African Americans in the decades not long removed from the civil war. It can be a tough read, because approximately a century and a half later, a lot of of the issues he addresses still plague our nation. Dubois was also an advocate for education, and it is also of interest how a lot of of the arguments regarding education could still be created today as well. The icing on the cake is W.E.B. Dubois is a marvelously poetic writer whose work gives one a feel for late 19th century America, particular the south. The Souls of Black Folk never feels dry, but rich despite the difficult subjects it raises, a lot of of which are still valid.

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    The Souls of Black Folk []  2020-1-23 1:30

    In these days of renewed uncertainty, when the social progress created seems precarious, it helps to see from where we've come. This book, a cornerstone of civil rights literature, deserves a new look. This was my first time reading it, to be sure, but I felt a deep and human connection with the globe it describes. Not because Blacks face the same challenges as 100 years ago, but that the mentality of people on all sides seems to have changed very little; the issues have only evolved with time as social and legal progress has been made. Yes, I'm white, but that doesn't mean I can't appreciate the magnitude of struggle. A lot of passages in this book are painful to read. Du Bois' writing at times approaches the level of poetry and abundantly conveys what he aspires to in his title. It's really hard for me to pick a favorite passage, but the latest chapter wouldn't be a poor choice. I also liked the touch of beginning each chapter with a poem and snippet of melody. If you haven't read it, you should; if you have, then read it again. The words and historical memory are required more than ever.

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    The Souls of Black Folk []  2020-1-23 1:30

    Amazing book. "the issue of the Twentieth Century is the issue of the color-line." turned out to be a prophetic statement. The Dharma, especially the Lojong Slogans tell us "Of the two witnesses, trust the first more". This means, see yourself though your own mind first, and take less heed of the views and opinions of others. And this is the central 'friction' in the minds of Black former-slaves and their offspring: They see themselves through the 'eyes' of the dominant culture; they are always watching themselves, reminding themselves to 'stay in line', be careful, be polite, dress passably but not too well, don't stand out, and so on.

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    The Souls of Black Folk []  2020-1-23 1:30

    One of the books pretenders quote but never read. Dubois wrote a amazing scholarly book, Black Reconstruction, this is largely opinion, but a very vivid snapshot of where Blacks a generation or two removed from slavery, were, especially in the south. It is overall depressing but that’s our history between 1877 and 1954/1965

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    The Souls of Black Folk []  2020-1-23 1:30

    This is an interesting book, very much of it's time, written 1903. It seems to be an explanation by DuBois of wht black people have been through both in slavery, "the veil", and after the war. He goes into much detail about the a lot of various kinds of segregation, physical, social, economic, etc. I cannot fault his information, and I, a white woman, can only agree with his feelings and opinions about what happened and what needs to happen. Especially relevant today with the shootings of young black youth in America. But this is a book, directed at white people, not blacks, neither then or now. Let's hope white americans read it.

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    The Souls of Black Folk []  2020-1-23 1:30

    I recently pulled this book up from my TBR pile and was merely going to browse through it until I reached a hotspot where I could something else. Instead, I ended up reading the book cover to its time (being published in 1903) this book was meant to be persuasive, a tool to support people understand and mollify or change their thought processes. I continued reading the book for an entirely various reason, based upon my love and fascination of history. In today’s world, this is definitely a revealing slice of history. It not only reveals another side to the United States during the 35 years after the Civil War, but also allows an understanding of the evolving problems in the 20th and 21st centuries.History is always best when similar by someone who lived during that era, and W.E.B. DuBois certainly qualifies. His words seek to enlighten rather than incite, and reading the book will provide the path leading to the incendiary speech of today. While I had some knowledge of the time period, this was my first introduction to the globe of the former slaves, and reading the timeline of happenings from 1865 to 1900 enabled me to draw my own lines form 1900 to the current ere are those who may incorrectly determine that this is nothing more than a treatise, one over a century old that should be allowed to gather dust or molder away. In an era where some think nothing of erasing our country’s history, this is one more example why we need to embrace our history, no matter whether it is positive or negative. Without looking back and correcting our errors, how can we ever expect to move forward? Five stars.

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    The Souls of Black Folk []  2020-1-23 1:30

    Regrettably, for me, this has been a long overlooked classic. I’ve read my share of the works of black American authors, such as James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison and most recently, Ta-Nehisi Coats. Not having read Du Bois seems to have been the functional equivalent of not having read Homer.William Edward Burghardt “W.E.B.” Du Bois lived a full productive life which spanned the long era of “Jim Crow.” He was born in 1868, and died at the age of 95, one year before the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, in Accra, Ghana, as a citizen of that country. He was the first African-American to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. His writings reflect a thorough grounding in the Greek and Roman classics, with references that were – at times, frankly beyond me. His prose is temperate, the “outrage” is left to the reader to conclude when the circumstances are described in measured terms, which often fully acknowledges the faults and predicaments of his own race. As the introduction says: “Du Bois achieves in his text a rare combination of pathos and dignity, presenting a portrait of black culture that commands respect.” For a lot of years he would teach at the Atlanta University complex, and writes fondly of the 100 hills of Atlanta, the trees, and the red clay soil of Georgia. His wry introspection is demonstrated in the opening paragraph, where he asks the topic e vast majority of these 14 separate but intertwined essays concern racial relations in the United States after the Emancipation and the year of publication, 1903. One in particular was not, which was reflective of his own experience, when his first-born son died in infancy. In the third essay he presents his arguments with Booker T. Washington, concerning the education of the Negro in “trade schools,” stressing the need for the classical education which Du Bois had, saying that they had “put up high schools and called them colleges.” “Mr. Washington represents in Negro thought the old attitude of adjustment and submission.” Washington asked them to give up three things – “Political power, Insistence on Civil Rights, and Higher Education of Negro Youth.” Du Bois was the one who insisted that all three were “musts.” Separately, Du Bois says: “for the South believed that an educated Negro to be a risky Negro.” From my own experience, Du Bois is only looking at a sub-set, since I would add that, in general, anyone who is both educated – and questioning in a substantive method – of either race, South or North, is considered both “dangerous” and “a problem maker.”The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, immediately established in the aftermath of the Civil War, and led by Major General Oliver O. Howard, from Maine, who Du Bois describes as: “an honest man, with too much faith in human nature, small aptitude for business and intricate detail” was another subject I was totally unfamiliar with. Du Bois describes the initiative of mainly white female teachers from Fresh England as “the 9th Crusade” for their efforts in establishing schools in the South, for both blacks and whites, after the Civil War. When the Freedman Bureau died, Du Bois describes its kid as the Fifteen Amendment to the other essays, he describes his experience as a student at Fisk University in Nashville, and his subsequent experience teaching in very rudimentary log cabins for black students, and how he was housed in the homes of the student’s parents. In another temperate essay, he enrages the reader with the story of my “namesake,” John Jones, a black who had serious problems, both North and South. In NYC, he purchased an expensive ticket to see an opera, was seated, enjoying the performance when an usher, every so apologetically explained that the seat had been previously sold, and he would have to move (he was seated next to a white woman, and her husband had complained). Of course we will your the usher explains. Jones decides to return to his native South, where the people seem more honest in their bigotry. There is a telling stage where Jones went to see “the Judge” who claimed he had “done so much for your people,” but Jones makes the mistake of going to the front door, and is rebuked for bringing those “uppity” Northern ideas back far the essay that was the most informative, and resonated the strongest was the one on Dougherty County, Georgia, at the west end of the “Black belt” in that state. In the 1880’s-90’s the population was approximately 10,000 blacks and 2,000 whites. Du Bois describes in detail the economics of growing cotton in that county, with its impact on the humans, and the mechanisms that were used to hold everyone in debt, and therefore under control (today, a lot of a college graduate would understand well). Consider just one fact: Cotton was 14 cents a pound in 1860 and 4 cents a pound in 1898. In the early ‘70’s I would travel to Dougherty County on business on a monthly basis, and was utterly oblivious to these central historical facts. ‘Tis more than a bit embarrassing. And then there is the matter of those formative experiences with two of the progeny from Dougherty County, each living on a various side of what Du Bois would call “the Veil.” Further heightened embarrassment that I did not know. Better late than…6-stars for Du Bois seminal perceptions.

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    The Souls of Black Folk []  2020-1-23 1:30

    The writing contains several dichotomies. Throughout the book a type of philosophy is expressed, noted by capitalized ideals, especially "the Veil" but also "Liberty" or "Progress", as if the man was introduced to ideas in a realm of more wealth and entitlement, perhaps a secret society, and such parts were not as soulful as the more primary and well-written descriptions of black people and their plight. Occasionally black people were called "shiftless" or "idle" which surprised me. It could be undetected by a casual reader because the book is written in a scholarly manner. However, revolting crimes of whites towards blacks or the general reality of black people of the time would be described in excellent clarity as well, even though the somewhat odd, "educated" philisophy remained interspersed throughout. Perhaps those notions helped him resolve himself as being educated, intellectual, maybe even wealthy as he rode in Jim Crow train cars, but it often seemed luciferian in nature to me, as if the wealth of the globe had a right to know what "enlightenment" is or to experiment on humble human beings or use them selfishly to gain more wealth, which is obviously not enlightenment. This was a very interesting read because of the dichotomies presented, nothing felt better than the down to earth descriptions of the reality of the times, and yet this man's soul was affected by the philosophies he mentioned and all people are affected by the vast array of knowledge and choices, amazing or bad. Imagine this person's struggle to merely be considered a human. Slaves and recently freed people then lived a horrifying oppression, yet to me the souls of black folk are beautiful, no matter what is chanically the book is missing the latest line. Now that is not a quality edition.

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    The Souls of Black Folk []  2020-1-23 1:30

    Are you a U.S. citizen? Read this. W. E. B. DuBois is a giant in your national heritage. He was the most politically influential black man in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; he was the Martin Luther King of his time. He changed history: born just a few years after slavery was outlawed, DuBois lived in a time when black people were routinely treated as less than human in every phase of American life. His tireless and strong campaigning for the rights of black people bore tremendous fruit within and beyond his lifetime. Mainstream history books usually give him a few paragraphs, if that. He deserves a chapter, not a paragraph. His name should be on the boulevards and avenues in our cities, his name should be spoken on a federal holiday commemorating the amazing victories for oppressed classes. Read this.

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    The Souls of Black Folk []  2020-1-23 1:30

    DuBois writes with compassion and understanding, yet he does not shy away from directly confronting readers: he makes them consider their conscious and subconscious biases and pre-conceived arguments on the race question in the United States in 1903. Sadly, the book is still relevant some 114 years since its original publication, but it is a thoroughly engaging and provocative read, and a haunting reminder of the work yet to be done towards healing and reconciliation.

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    The Compassionate Warrior: Abd el-Kader of Algeria []  2020-1-16 11:27

    Emir Abdul Qadir is amongst humanities greatest personalities. He showed the globe what Jihad really is. I have no doubt that if his life is promoted to both Muslims and non-Muslims the globe will be a more harmonious place. This book is a amazing start.

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    The Compassionate Warrior: Abd el-Kader of Algeria []  2020-1-16 11:27

    The Compassionate Warrior: Abd El-Kader of Algeria by Elsa Marston introduces readers to a noble leader, committed to his Muslim faith, but always in pursuit of intellectual knowledge and social justice. The Emir Abd el-Kader led the Algerians in their quest to become independent from Turkey and France in the nineteenth century. Marston's deft storytelling brings the Emir to life while her understanding of the culture and history frames the problems in a method that remains relevant to modern international conflicts. The Emir's wisdom in embracing the generosity, neighborliness and compassion at the core of Islam, Christianity and Judaism remains a shining example of hope for a more peaceful globe e illustrations, map of North Africa and the Middle East, glossary, timeline, bibliography, and links to educational materials on the publisher's www service and the Abd el-Kader Education Project www service turn this well-researched biography into a gateway to better understanding for young adult readers. I read the Kindle ver of this book.

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    The Compassionate Warrior: Abd el-Kader of Algeria []  2020-1-16 11:27

    In the early 1800s, a slowly declining Turkish empire abandoned Muslim Algeria and the Christian French moved in. Leading resistance to the French was a learned religious leader called Abd El-Kader. The story of his attempts to unite warring tribes in a proto-democracy, while maintaining faith in God and avoiding being cheated by treaties, seems as new and relevant today as it must have been then. English and American observers delighted in the exploits of the noble fighter because, after all, they didn't like the French at the time. But the French had better weapons and better-trained troops, and eventually they won. El-Kader the noble fighter then became El-Kader the romantic foreigner, held with his family and mates under house arrest in France while the government tried to determine what to do with him. Eventually El-Kader was moved to Damascus, where escalating tensions, religious and political, led to riots and the destruction of the Christian quarter. El-Kader the Muslim led efforts to save Christian lives and was rewarded, ironically, with medals, and even weapons of battle by foreign 's an exciting story, and one that would create a amazing movie. But it's also true, and through it all is threaded the honest faith of a learned and passionate believer. Author Elsa Marston tells the story with easy words and complex detail, building clear and eminently readable images, not just of events, but also of the people and globe behind them. The Damascus riots aren't just a stage where El-Kader can shine, but they're described through the eyes of history, geography, and politics, with all the troubles leading up to them and the questions of who could have seen or created a difference before the disaster. What could just be Muslim versus Christian becomes a much more nuanced event, and the Muslim character is a character not for his adherence to faith but for the wise and honest actions born of his faith.Elements of El-Kader's writing and beliefs are given throughout this book, building into a picture of a man who firmly believes in God, who is sure that God desires amazing for humanity, who sees behind the rhetoric, and whose vision of a globe where we can discuss differences without resort to violence is as relevant today as it was then. Believing that "generosity and neighborliness... are at the core of all religions," he maintains that "religious law is not fixed," just as a doctor's prescription for illness must change over time. He takes time to learn, gives time to strangers, and a timeless notice of religious hope. As such, he might truly be a character for our time, and we would do well to learn more of is is not a easy book, but it's an simple book to read. Ideal for middle-school and up, it fascinating relatable characters, an interesting story, deep analysis, well-researched history, and a well-reasoned approach to problems of faith and religious struggle. It's highly recommended.Disclosure: I was given a copy of this novel by the publisher with a request for my honest review.

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    The Compassionate Warrior: Abd el-Kader of Algeria []  2020-1-16 11:27

    In an age of increasing polarities between East and West, Elsa Marston brings Algerian fighter and Muslim spiritual leader Emir Abd el-Kadar to life for her readers, and does so in a method that builds bridges of understanding. Through a reasoned, honest and multi layered biography, Marston shows us a man who wars both for the independence of his people and for interfaith dialog between all ferring to the Emir's spiritual writings, Marston says: "Abd el-kadar reminds his readers that the holy book of Islam, the Koran, explicitly states that differences are good, that God purposely made people to be different. Diversity of human communities, with differing cultures and religious ideas, is one of God's a lot of blessings on humankind."It is a notice we would all do well to remember. Thank you Elsa bby Dahl Edwardson, author of Blessing's Bead and My Name is Not Easy, a National Book Award Finalist

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    The Souls of Black Folk (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2019-12-9 18:0

    This is an interesting book, very much of it's time, written 1903. It seems to be an explanation by DuBois of wht black people have been through both in slavery, "the veil", and after the war. He goes into much detail about the a lot of various kinds of segregation, physical, social, economic, etc. I cannot fault his information, and I, a white woman, can only agree with his feelings and opinions about what happened and what needs to happen. Especially relevant today with the shootings of young black youth in America. But this is a book, directed at white people, not blacks, neither then or now. Let's hope white americans read it.

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    Troubadours of Folk - The 60s Acoustic Explosion []  2020-1-31 9:44

    First, I should probably explain what brought me to this album. I am a large fan of Bert Jansch and John Renbourn(as well as Pentangle, of course). When I saw they were on here several times, I took a possibility that the entire album would be up to parr with their performances. [That, and I less than ten bucks for this.] What I found out about the British folk stage was very related to the American folk scene. In other words, just like there were traditional folk/protest artists in the U.S. (Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, Pete Seeger, John Baez, et. al.) and folk/pop artists (the Kingston Trio, The Serendipity Singers, The Fresh Christy Minstrels, et. al.), the same divisions existed in Britain. And this two-disc, two-hour-plus collection of 41 songs samples both styles.Of the former style, you obtain artists like Lonnie Donegan (Britain's "King of Skiffle") performing the standard "500 Miles Away from Home" and Dylan's "Farewell (Fare Thee Well)." In fact five other artists cover Dylan material, mostly in a pop vein, like the Ian Campbell Folk Group's rendition of "The Times They Are A-Changing" and The Settlers' ver of "Blowin' in the Wind," which in a blindfold try could pass for The Seekers. Not that it makes these songs any less enjoyable; it's just that it is very evident that the goal was to obtain on the radio. Even Nico (who I have always linked with the Velvet Underground) is here with a very pop-sounding ver of Gordon Lightfoot's "I'm Not Sayin'."But there are some true treasures here, too. The Dubliners (a much grittier band than their counterparts, The Chieftains) provide a rousing performance of "The Wild Rover." One of the largest treats is Jackson C. Frank's original ver of "Blues Run the Game." I'd always associated the song with Bert Jansch, but it's obvious Jansch owes a lot to the original. Frank's other contribution, "Kimbie," is almost as good. Roy Harper's two tunes are also quite good, especially enjoyable is his guitar work on "Goldfish Bowl." Mike Heron's "Frutch" by the Wonderful String Band is much folkier than the band's later material. Sandy Denny does a credible cover of the folk standard "This Train" from 1967 (a year before she would join Fairport Convention. The Fresh Humblebums' "Blood and Glory" is perhaps most notable for its most popular member, Gerry Rafferty (of "Baker Road Fame). Ralph McTell shows himself an accomplished guitarist on the instrumental "Blind Blake's Rag," and closes the album with the instrospective "Strets of London."On a private note, I enjoyed the comic tone of Hamish Imlach's "Cod Liver Oil and Orange Juice." [My parents served me that cocktail every morning for years as a child...blechh!!!]Overall, this is a delightful look at the folk era in Britain. My only complaint is that some of the song notes are very thorough, while others are non-existant. Also, the foldout CD booklet is awkward at best. But those are minor complaints when compared to the quality of the music. (Running Time - 61:46, 65:57) RECOMMENDED

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    The Souls of Black Folk (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2019-12-9 18:0

    The writing contains several dichotomies. Throughout the book a type of philosophy is expressed, noted by capitalized ideals, especially "the Veil" but also "Liberty" or "Progress", as if the man was introduced to ideas in a realm of more wealth and entitlement, perhaps a secret society, and such parts were not as soulful as the more primary and well-written descriptions of black people and their plight. Occasionally black people were called "shiftless" or "idle" which surprised me. It could be undetected by a casual reader because the book is written in a scholarly manner. However, revolting crimes of whites towards blacks or the general reality of black people of the time would be described in excellent clarity as well, even though the somewhat odd, "educated" philisophy remained interspersed throughout. Perhaps those notions helped him resolve himself as being educated, intellectual, maybe even wealthy as he rode in Jim Crow train cars, but it often seemed luciferian in nature to me, as if the wealth of the globe had a right to know what "enlightenment" is or to experiment on humble human beings or use them selfishly to gain more wealth, which is obviously not enlightenment. This was a very interesting read because of the dichotomies presented, nothing felt better than the down to earth descriptions of the reality of the times, and yet this man's soul was affected by the philosophies he mentioned and all people are affected by the vast array of knowledge and choices, amazing or bad. Imagine this person's struggle to merely be considered a human. Slaves and recently freed people then lived a horrifying oppression, yet to me the souls of black folk are beautiful, no matter what is chanically the book is missing the latest line. Now that is not a quality edition.

    0  


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    The Souls of Black Folk (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2019-12-9 18:0

    DuBois writes with compassion and understanding, yet he does not shy away from directly confronting readers: he makes them consider their conscious and subconscious biases and pre-conceived arguments on the race question in the United States in 1903. Sadly, the book is still relevant some 114 years since its original publication, but it is a thoroughly engaging and provocative read, and a haunting reminder of the work yet to be done towards healing and reconciliation.

    0  


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    Troubadours of Folk - The 60s Acoustic Explosion []  2020-1-31 9:44

    I had to purchased a pre-loved version, which I don't normally do, but, well worth the buy--different versions of golden oldies(majority, done well) and one or two not-so well knowns, !But for one, ever so slight aberration, on one track, buying a used CD wasnt such a poor option!

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    King Of The Hill [App]  2019-5-13 13:30

    WARNING!! DON'T YOU EVER DARE DOWN!OAD THIS APP!! ONCE IN YOUR DEVICE THE SCENERY IMPLIES THAT IT'S SOME SORT OF DRIVING GAME!! BUT ALL I SEE IT DOING IS PLAYING MUSIC!! NO TELLING WHAT OTHER SINISTER ACTIVITIES IT MIGHT BE UP TOO!!🤔😥💩💩

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    The Souls of Black Folk (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2019-12-9 18:0

    Regrettably, for me, this has been a long overlooked classic. I’ve read my share of the works of black American authors, such as James Baldwin, Richard Wright, Ralph Ellison and most recently, Ta-Nehisi Coats. Not having read Du Bois seems to have been the functional equivalent of not having read Homer.William Edward Burghardt “W.E.B.” Du Bois lived a full productive life which spanned the long era of “Jim Crow.” He was born in 1868, and died at the age of 95, one year before the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, in Accra, Ghana, as a citizen of that country. He was the first African-American to earn a Ph.D. from Harvard. His writings reflect a thorough grounding in the Greek and Roman classics, with references that were – at times, frankly beyond me. His prose is temperate, the “outrage” is left to the reader to conclude when the circumstances are described in measured terms, which often fully acknowledges the faults and predicaments of his own race. As the introduction says: “Du Bois achieves in his text a rare combination of pathos and dignity, presenting a portrait of black culture that commands respect.” For a lot of years he would teach at the Atlanta University complex, and writes fondly of the 100 hills of Atlanta, the trees, and the red clay soil of Georgia. His wry introspection is demonstrated in the opening paragraph, where he asks the topic e vast majority of these 14 separate but intertwined essays concern racial relations in the United States after the Emancipation and the year of publication, 1903. One in particular was not, which was reflective of his own experience, when his first-born son died in infancy. In the third essay he presents his arguments with Booker T. Washington, concerning the education of the Negro in “trade schools,” stressing the need for the classical education which Du Bois had, saying that they had “put up high schools and called them colleges.” “Mr. Washington represents in Negro thought the old attitude of adjustment and submission.” Washington asked them to give up three things – “Political power, Insistence on Civil Rights, and Higher Education of Negro Youth.” Du Bois was the one who insisted that all three were “musts.” Separately, Du Bois says: “for the South believed that an educated Negro to be a risky Negro.” From my own experience, Du Bois is only looking at a sub-set, since I would add that, in general, anyone who is both educated – and questioning in a substantive method – of either race, South or North, is considered both “dangerous” and “a problem maker.”The Bureau of Refugees, Freedmen and Abandoned Lands, immediately established in the aftermath of the Civil War, and led by Major General Oliver O. Howard, from Maine, who Du Bois describes as: “an honest man, with too much faith in human nature, small aptitude for business and intricate detail” was another subject I was totally unfamiliar with. Du Bois describes the initiative of mainly white female teachers from Fresh England as “the 9th Crusade” for their efforts in establishing schools in the South, for both blacks and whites, after the Civil War. When the Freedman Bureau died, Du Bois describes its kid as the Fifteen Amendment to the other essays, he describes his experience as a student at Fisk University in Nashville, and his subsequent experience teaching in very rudimentary log cabins for black students, and how he was housed in the homes of the student’s parents. In another temperate essay, he enrages the reader with the story of my “namesake,” John Jones, a black who had serious problems, both North and South. In NYC, he purchased an expensive ticket to see an opera, was seated, enjoying the performance when an usher, every so apologetically explained that the seat had been previously sold, and he would have to move (he was seated next to a white woman, and her husband had complained). Of course we will your the usher explains. Jones decides to return to his native South, where the people seem more honest in their bigotry. There is a telling stage where Jones went to see “the Judge” who claimed he had “done so much for your people,” but Jones makes the mistake of going to the front door, and is rebuked for bringing those “uppity” Northern ideas back far the essay that was the most informative, and resonated the strongest was the one on Dougherty County, Georgia, at the west end of the “Black belt” in that state. In the 1880’s-90’s the population was approximately 10,000 blacks and 2,000 whites. Du Bois describes in detail the economics of growing cotton in that county, with its impact on the humans, and the mechanisms that were used to hold everyone in debt, and therefore under control (today, a lot of a college graduate would understand well). Consider just one fact: Cotton was 14 cents a pound in 1860 and 4 cents a pound in 1898. In the early ‘70’s I would travel to Dougherty County on business on a monthly basis, and was utterly oblivious to these central historical facts. ‘Tis more than a bit embarrassing. And then there is the matter of those formative experiences with two of the progeny from Dougherty County, each living on a various side of what Du Bois would call “the Veil.” Further heightened embarrassment that I did not know. Better late than…6-stars for Du Bois seminal perceptions.

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    The Souls of Black Folk (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2019-12-9 18:0

    In these days of renewed uncertainty, when the social progress created seems precarious, it helps to see from where we've come. This book, a cornerstone of civil rights literature, deserves a new look. This was my first time reading it, to be sure, but I felt a deep and human connection with the globe it describes. Not because Blacks face the same challenges as 100 years ago, but that the mentality of people on all sides seems to have changed very little; the issues have only evolved with time as social and legal progress has been made. Yes, I'm white, but that doesn't mean I can't appreciate the magnitude of struggle. A lot of passages in this book are painful to read. Du Bois' writing at times approaches the level of poetry and abundantly conveys what he aspires to in his title. It's really hard for me to pick a favorite passage, but the latest chapter wouldn't be a poor choice. I also liked the touch of beginning each chapter with a poem and snippet of melody. If you haven't read it, you should; if you have, then read it again. The words and historical memory are required more than ever.

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    The Souls of Black Folk (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2019-12-9 18:0

    Amazing book. "the issue of the Twentieth Century is the issue of the color-line." turned out to be a prophetic statement. The Dharma, especially the Lojong Slogans tell us "Of the two witnesses, trust the first more". This means, see yourself though your own mind first, and take less heed of the views and opinions of others. And this is the central 'friction' in the minds of Black former-slaves and their offspring: They see themselves through the 'eyes' of the dominant culture; they are always watching themselves, reminding themselves to 'stay in line', be careful, be polite, dress passably but not too well, don't stand out, and so on.

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    Troubadours of Folk - The 60s Acoustic Explosion []  2020-1-31 9:44

    I expected to listen to this cd all the time because I really like folk music--that hasn't been the case. That being said, it is still a really amazing value for as a lot of songs as you obtain and contains one of my favorites, Girl from the North Country. Overall, I would recommend it to someone who enjoys really laid back folk music.

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    Troubadours of Folk - The 60s Acoustic Explosion []  2020-1-31 9:44

    ok

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    The Souls of Black Folk (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2019-12-9 18:0

    The Souls of Black Folk was written at a time when books still had the power to sway public opinion and move people - and that was definitely the motive. This book is not merely descriptive, or a dry recitation of facts, but a elegant treatise whose intent is to sway the policy of its time. In the simplest of summaries, Dubois is laying his argument for how both policies and individuals should be shaped by and for African Americans in the decades not long removed from the civil war. It can be a tough read, because approximately a century and a half later, a lot of of the issues he addresses still plague our nation. Dubois was also an advocate for education, and it is also of interest how a lot of of the arguments regarding education could still be created today as well. The icing on the cake is W.E.B. Dubois is a marvelously poetic writer whose work gives one a feel for late 19th century America, particular the south. The Souls of Black Folk never feels dry, but rich despite the difficult subjects it raises, a lot of of which are still valid.

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    The Souls of Black Folk (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2019-12-9 18:0

    Are you a U.S. citizen? Read this. W. E. B. DuBois is a giant in your national heritage. He was the most politically influential black man in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; he was the Martin Luther King of his time. He changed history: born just a few years after slavery was outlawed, DuBois lived in a time when black people were routinely treated as less than human in every phase of American life. His tireless and strong campaigning for the rights of black people bore tremendous fruit within and beyond his lifetime. Mainstream history books usually give him a few paragraphs, if that. He deserves a chapter, not a paragraph. His name should be on the boulevards and avenues in our cities, his name should be spoken on a federal holiday commemorating the amazing victories for oppressed classes. Read this.

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    Troubadours of Folk - The 60s Acoustic Explosion []  2020-1-31 9:44

    First, I should probably explain what brought me to this album. I am a large fan of Bert Jansch and John Renbourn(as well as Pentangle, of course). When I saw they were on here several times, I took a possibility that the entire album would be up to parr with their performances. [That, and I less than ten bucks for this.] What I found out about the British folk stage was very related to the American folk scene. In other words, just like there were traditional folk/protest artists in the U.S. (Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, Pete Seeger, John Baez, et. al.) and folk/pop artists (the Kingston Trio, The Serendipity Singers, The Fresh Christy Minstrels, et. al.), the same divisions existed in Britain. And this two-disc, two-hour-plus collection of 41 songs samples both styles.Of the former style, you obtain artists like Lonnie Donegan (Britain's "King of Skiffle") performing the standard "500 Miles Away from Home" and Dylan's "Farewell (Fare Thee Well)." In fact five other artists cover Dylan material, mostly in a pop vein, like the Ian Campbell Folk Group's rendition of "The Times They Are A-Changing" and The Settlers' ver of "Blowin' in the Wind," which in a blindfold try could pass for The Seekers. Not that it makes these songs any less enjoyable; it's just that it is very evident that the goal was to obtain on the radio. Even Nico (who I have always linked with the Velvet Underground) is here with a very pop-sounding ver of Gordon Lightfoot's "I'm Not Sayin'."But there are some true treasures here, too. The Dubliners (a much grittier band than their counterparts, The Chieftains) provide a rousing performance of "The Wild Rover." One of the largest treats is Jackson C. Frank's original ver of "Blues Run the Game." I'd always associated the song with Bert Jansch, but it's obvious Jansch owes a lot to the original. Frank's other contribution, "Kimbie," is almost as good. Roy Harper's two tunes are also quite good, especially enjoyable is his guitar work on "Goldfish Bowl." Mike Heron's "Frutch" by the Wonderful String Band is much folkier than the band's later material. Sandy Denny does a credible cover of the folk standard "This Train" from 1967 (a year before she would join Fairport Convention. The Fresh Humblebums' "Blood and Glory" is perhaps most notable for its most popular member, Gerry Rafferty (of "Baker Road Fame). Ralph McTell shows himself an accomplished guitarist on the instrumental "Blind Blake's Rag," and closes the album with the instrospective "Strets of London."On a private note, I enjoyed the comic tone of Hamish Imlach's "Cod Liver Oil and Orange Juice." [My parents served me that cocktail every morning for years as a child...blechh!!!]Overall, this is a delightful look at the folk era in Britain. My only complaint is that some of the song notes are very thorough, while others are non-existant. Also, the foldout CD booklet is awkward at best. But those are minor complaints when compared to the quality of the music. (Running Time - 61:46, 65:57) RECOMMENDED

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    The Compassionate Warrior: Abd el-Kader of Algeria []  2020-1-16 11:27

    Despite the fact that this work has been more or less designated as a YA book I can assure you that it will be of just a amazing an interest to adults as it is for the advanced young reader – the apparent target for this book.Having lived in the part of the globe where most of this biography takes put for a number of years and having had a father who was there during WWII I have a somewhat passing knowledge of Abd El-Kader of Algeria. The western world, i.e. Europe and the United States has been mucking about in this zone for well over 150 years now...actually longer than that. We continue to be there under one capacity or another and one of the major problems, if not THE major issue we have faced is an absolute complete misunderstanding to the peoples and their religion and customs which inhabit this part of the world. We must understand their history in to understand such as this by Elsa Marston are helping to build a firm and solid understanding; an understanding which must begin at an early age and be built upon over the years. Ask yourself – when I was in grade school or high school how much were we taught about North African history, the Muslim religion, the people, customs and laws? Not much I am guessing. And there in lays much of the issues we have on our hands even to this day.Abd El-Kader was a leader of outstanding quality. His is best known to the Western Globe due to the fact that his action saved the lives of thousands of Christians in Damascus during the civil unrest of 1860. But there is much, much more to the story of this special man than just that; he was an outstanding leader by any standards and quite involved in politics not only in his own land, but that of Europe, especially that of is was a fascinating time in globe history. Not only was a horrible civil battle looming in our own country, but the British were quite involved in S. Africa with the Boars, but also in Afghanistan (much like we are today), the Crimean Battle was fought and passed and the Western Globe was scrambling for empire. The author, Elsa Marston gives us a very scholarly look into these times and makes the tale quite interesting – almost to the point of being a page turner. She well covers the situation our globe was in at that time is a surprisingly low number of is is a amazing read; an informative read not only for the young, but for the adult, for which it should act as a amazing “seed book” to stimulate further n BlankenshipThe Ozarks

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    The Compassionate Warrior: Abd el-Kader of Algeria []  2020-1-16 11:27

    Elsa Marston's The Compassionate Fighter is an necessary book for young people or for anyone. Americans in general have gaping holes in their knowledge of the wider globe and the people who have created it what it is. They have access to a lot of books about worthy people such as Washington, Lincoln and King, but have small opportunity to learn about amazing individuals from other countries and cultures. This book helps correct e story of the 19th century Algerian, Abd El-Kader, is exciting, compelling and throught-provoking. From his fierce resistance to the French occupation of his country, through his struggles with exile and betrayal, to his heroic rescue of people who might have been considered his enemies, we learn of a man of a lot of dimensions who still has much to say to the modern rston's presentation of complex historical situations is refreshingly clear, but also sheds light on not dissimilar situations the globe faces today. Her analysis of of El-Kader's philosophic thinking is also enlightening and relevant. Examples are his contention that "God is one", that all religions are really worshiping the same God, and that both reason and faith are from God so "using religion to deny science and using science to deny religion are both wrong."Marston's book engagingly brings the sort of history lesson that all of us, of whatever age need to learn.

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    The Compassionate Warrior: Abd el-Kader of Algeria []  2020-1-16 11:27

    Interesting biography of a Muslim character and humanitarian who saved thousands of Christians during a horrendous massacre in 1860 Syria. Author Elsa Marston does an outstanding job explaining complex political situations and concepts, such as jihad. She also shows this broad slice of history from the decline of the Ottoman Empire, French and English occupation and influence in other countries, and the on-going revolution in France. I consider myself beautiful knowledgeable of history, but Marston taught me much I'd never heard nor read about, not just about El-Kader of Algeria, but also about European history and how it intertwined with North Africa and Middle Eastern history during the 1800s. I recommend this book for readers in middle school through adults.

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    The Compassionate Warrior: Abd el-Kader of Algeria []  2020-1-16 11:27

    Who knew nineteenth-century biography could be so exciting? Abd el-Kader was an Algerian freedom warrior who was a scholar and spiritual leader at heart. His attempts to unite his people versus the encroaching French colonials reminded me of thrilling tales of Medieval Welsh princes or Sigmund Romberg's romantic operetta, Desert rough it all, Abd el-Kader was a amazing diplomat, winning the respect of Christian priests and translators sent to spy on him. He treated French prisoners with human dignity that his own people did not keep when captured. Imprisoned by the French after giving himself up for exile, he was greatly admired by the English and North Americans, and eventually by the French themselves. (There is even a city in Iowa named for him!) The android games the French played to justify breaking treaties reminded me of our own American betrayal of our native population. Later Abd el-Kader emerges from the peace of exile in Damascus to rescue Christians targeted by religious riots, leading his Algerian cavalry into the town to escort thousands to safety. The accounts of religious violence might have come from today's is biography presents a character whose dream was peace and technological progress that would let his people to live comfortably and worship their God. One doesn't need to agree with Abd el-Kader theologically to pray for more Muslims and Christians to work together for the amazing of their e Compassionate Fighter is a complex and fascinating story. Written for young people, the book does not assume a prior understanding of French or Algerian history (which I didn't have.) There is a timeline and a glossary in the back as well as index and bibliography for further reading, and a number of striking photographs and paintings. The latest chapter summarizes Abd el-Kader's surprisingly modern vision for the globe from his own writings. The book should definitely keep the attention of young readers who will be wondering when the film is coming out.

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    The Compassionate Warrior: Abd el-Kader of Algeria []  2020-1-16 11:27

    Not long ago, I received an email from the Marketing and Publicity Coordinator of Wisdom Tales Press asking me if they could send me a complimentary copy of a children's book exchange for an honest review. I enjoyed it so much that I agreed to read and review another educational book from them. This review is the effect of that offer. The opinions here are from me alone, not influenced by others or for any monetary exchange or benefit. I read and review books as a hobby.If you are like me, you have probably never heard of Abd El-Kader of Algeria, yet in his day (1807-1883) his accomplishments were praise by Abraham Lincoln, the Pope, Napoleon III, his countrymen and Muslims through the ages. He is known for his brilliance, organizational skills, military strategies, leadership, open-mindedness and heroic actions, but best known for his forgivingness and kindness toward his former opponents and as the pioneer in interfaith dialogue.On June 14th, 1830, France invaded Algeria with the intent of destroying their culture taking over their property and flexing their "European superior" muscles. Though hopelessly undermanned and inexperienced the Algerians fought back versus overwhelming odds. Although they would inevitably fail, at twenty-four Abd el-Kader, like his father, a man of religion and learning--a marabout--came into his own during skirmishes and became a leader of the resistance to the French invaders, fighting a holy war--jihad--strictly within Islamic law and principles and would tolerate none less from his followers--some 80,000 by 1840 at the height of the their buildup.His humane treatment documented in standards for prisoner-of-war became the model for later international conventions throughout history.On December 22, 1847, Abd el-Kader, now the Emir, agreed to lay down his sword and surrender to the French who promised to him exile to Egypt in exchange for his agreement to never return to Algeria. Would the French betray him? Was this the end of the street for the Emir?Yes and no. A series of interesting happenings deprived him from complete freedom; however, his letters and influence on those in leadership saved and changed lives throughout the ages and as far reaching as his name sake, Elkader, Iowa where this remarkable and heroic human being's history is being e Compassionate Fighter is 142-pages of fascinating reading, that contains 14 photographs, chapter notes, a historic timeline, a glossary, a bibliography, index and biographical notes on author Elsa Marston and the Director of Middle East Connections and board member of the Abd el-Kader Education Project.I recommend this intriguing story to high school, college and adult students who are interested in reading about an unsung compassionate Muslim character who are virtually unknown in globe history classes in the annals of American education.I did not expect it, but this is a true gem. I had never heard of this necessary historically significant leader.I am glad I read The Compassionate Fighter and I bet you will be too.Enjoy!

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    The Compassionate Warrior: Abd el-Kader of Algeria []  2020-1-16 11:27

    Originally posted on Tales to Tide You OverAbd el-Kader was well known in his own time for his efforts to prevent the French colonization of Algeria, but became even better known and respected by opponent and mate alike for his acceptance and interest in people of all political and religious backgrounds. His very popularity caused him difficulties because it created him a risk in exile even when he had no intention of violating his word that he would never return.He was a complicated man, a thinking man thrust into the position of a leader in time of war, but his actions after surrender stand out with as much prominence as any he created harassing the French in is biography provides the background to understand the Emir's proving ground, but the focus is more on who he was and how he treated others because that's what an example to the modern world. It says something that so a lot of of the existing records of his life come from descriptions by those who met him across a battleground or negotiating table. Even as he refused an by the then king of France to go back rule Algeria because he'd given his word to another French government never to step foot in his birth country, so too did he expect others to keep to their promises, an honor he did not search in those responsible for carrying out the terms of his surrender.I'm jumping ahead in the biography to give a taste of what this telling offers. Will you see the dates of amazing wars within the pages: yes. Is that the theme that drives this particular biography: is biography looks at the ways in which Emir Abd el-Kader created choices that did not reflect either the brutality of the French or the circumstances facing his own forces during the conflict. Instead, he focused on the law of Islam, the pure notice of faith and treatment of others that a lot of warp to serve their purposes. Not the emir. He kept to the spirit as well as the letter, treating his prisoners with the respect due to them as fellow people. He did the same with his visitors, whether sent to spy on him in the guise of a translator or come to request a prisoner exchange, something the French later banned because they required to maintain the fiction of the Emir as a monster, not a amazing man.Whether you read about the emir to learn about the past or out of curiosity, this biography has more to in showing how a political and military conflict can play out. It a glimpse into the complex maneuvers as government policy shifts and where expedience or caution can undermine duty and is is no easy presentation for all that it doesn't have the length to go in depth on every aspect of this man's journey through the trials and tribulations of life. There's a lot to learn from what he dealt with, but more from how he dealt with the crises he faced.I enjoyed The Compassionate Fighter and hope this renewed interest helps bring his perspective in the modern dialogues facing us, especially on religious is book was provided by NetGalley in return for an honest review.

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    Troubadours of Folk - The 60s Acoustic Explosion []  2020-1-31 9:44

    The first thing you need to know about "Troubadours of Folk The 60s Acoustic Explosion" is that this 2-CD set is devoted entirely to British artists. The most recognizable name in the collection is Donovan, who has three early songs on the first disc, including his cover of Buffy Sainte-Marie's "Universal Soldier." However, the chief attraction of this collection remains the unfamiliar songs by artists chiefly unknown to American audiences. My folk melody collection, while beautiful extensive, was limited to American artists, and although I recognized Sandy Denny from "The War of Everymore" on Led Zeppelin's "ZOSO" album, it was decades before I got around to checking out her work with Fairport Convention and her solo recordings (definitely in the better late than never category). "Troubadours of Folk" is a superb introduction to most of the British folk artists from the Sixties that you need to know ere are some familiar songs beyond Donovan's "Catch the Wind," such as Nico's cover of Gordon Lightfoot's "I'm Not Sayin'." But more often you will recognize the song but not the artist covering it, as is the case with the Dubliners' doing "The Wild Rover" and "Blackwaterside" a tradition song done by Bert Jansch that Jimmy Page would do on Led Zeppelin's debut album (the flip of this would be recognizing the name Roy Harper but not ever having heard any of his songs before, which is rectified by having both "Goldfish Bowl" and "Big Fat Silver Airplane" on these discs). Not surprisingly there are several covers of different Bob Dylan songs: "The Times They Are A' Changin'" by the Ian Campbell Folk Group, "Farewell (Fare Thee Well") by Lonnie Donegan, "Blowin' in the Wind" by the Settlers, "Long Ago Far Away" by Black Country Three, and "Girl from the North Country" by Josh Macrae. All of these appear on the first disc, and you will note that the forty-one tracks are arranged chronologically, starting with Donegan's "500 Miles Away From Home," which dates all the method back to 1963, and ending with perhaps the most successful English folk song, Ralph McTell's "Streets of London."The covers of Dylan by obscure English artists is interesting, but it is the original works that are ultimately where your judgment of this album are to be made. You may actually have heard Jansch's "Needle of Death" or Maish Imlach's "Cod Liver Oil nd Orange Juice," but that might be just about this for the rest of this collection. There are several gems, especially on the first disc, where you have Jackson C. Frank's "Blues Run the Game" and "Dirty Old Town" by the Ian Campbell Folk Group. There is something rather quaint about hearing British artists singing American folk songs like the traditional "John Henry," by John Renbourn, and the Ludlows doing "Ev'ry Time (When We Are Gone)." The second disc is not as powerful overall and I have to wonder if there were restrictions having to do with getting permission, because there is only one track by Duncan Browne, "Dwarf in a Tree (A Cautionary Tale)," which is not what I would consider a first tier example of his work. I think my suspicions are confirmed by Denny only having a rare solo recording created the year before she joined Fairport Convention. But then, to be fair, that seminal British folk group does not really need the introduction that artists like Matt McGinn, Archie Fisher, and Mick Softley require to an American e liner notes by Colin Harper provide a brief look at each of the artists and most of the songs included on these 2-CDs. Harper sees the early folk movement in Britain as starting with the broadly American sound of its earlier practitioners and material to was clearly influenced by the skiffle boom of the Fifties (the opening track is by Lonnie Donegan, the king of skiffle). Donovan dominates the liner notes, but there is enough about everybody else to at least give you a sense of their identity as folk artists. Overall, I search the first disc in this collection to be a 5, while the second comes in at a 4. I could easily place together a single disc from this collection that would be the best compilation of British folk melody from the Sixties around, but then "Troubadours of Folk" already has that distinction. More importantly, this collection serves as a excellent introduction to that part of the folk movement of the Sixties. After listening to these songs you should not be surprised if you are motivated to track down more work by Ralph McTell, the Wonderful String Band, the Ludlows, Duncan Browne, or any group in which Sandy Denny showed up to sing.

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    Troubadours of Folk - The 60s Acoustic Explosion []  2020-1-31 9:44

    These acoustic folk tunes are simply the best of an ere are a lot of amazing folkies on this double CD ese amazing songs are not like the modern corperate tunes,thrown on the is 2-cd pack is the ecletic bevy of the 60s folk e best known musical troubadour of knavery presented is the lovable Donovan,with three tracks on the the first e songs performed span the entire 60s t just before the electrified invasion by the Beatles and the neo-converted Bob ese are audio gems that can only be appreciated by real fans of true poetic music.

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    The Souls of Black Folk (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2019-12-9 18:0

    I recently pulled this book up from my TBR pile and was merely going to browse through it until I reached a hotspot where I could something else. Instead, I ended up reading the book cover to its time (being published in 1903) this book was meant to be persuasive, a tool to support people understand and mollify or change their thought processes. I continued reading the book for an entirely various reason, based upon my love and fascination of history. In today’s world, this is definitely a revealing slice of history. It not only reveals another side to the United States during the 35 years after the Civil War, but also allows an understanding of the evolving problems in the 20th and 21st centuries.History is always best when similar by someone who lived during that era, and W.E.B. DuBois certainly qualifies. His words seek to enlighten rather than incite, and reading the book will provide the path leading to the incendiary speech of today. While I had some knowledge of the time period, this was my first introduction to the globe of the former slaves, and reading the timeline of happenings from 1865 to 1900 enabled me to draw my own lines form 1900 to the current ere are those who may incorrectly determine that this is nothing more than a treatise, one over a century old that should be allowed to gather dust or molder away. In an era where some think nothing of erasing our country’s history, this is one more example why we need to embrace our history, no matter whether it is positive or negative. Without looking back and correcting our errors, how can we ever expect to move forward? Five stars.

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    The Souls of Black Folk (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2019-12-9 18:0

    One of the books pretenders quote but never read. Dubois wrote a amazing scholarly book, Black Reconstruction, this is largely opinion, but a very vivid snapshot of where Blacks a generation or two removed from slavery, were, especially in the south. It is overall depressing but that’s our history between 1877 and 1954/1965

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    The Queen of Nothing (The Folk of the Air #3) []  2020-1-18 19:36

    SpoilersI can’t obtain over the climax. It’s gotta be one of the stupidest trilogy climaxes in the history of so disappointing:The reveals and repercussions of what transpired in book 2 turned into nothing dan’s trick. Jude’s exile. Taryn’s betrayal. Locke’s wickedness. Madoc’s looming threat. SO MANY AWESOME THINGS TO WORK WITH HERE. But it was all handled in the lamest method possible in this so disappointing:Cardan, one of the most compelling characters in the series turned into this super boring boy who was just plain so disappointing:The tension and chemistry between Jude and Cardan was gone, just GONE. Their romance turned into something that felt. . . silly. SO disappointing:The ending! Given how this series started allow me just say that I did NOT sign up for a CUTE finale ok?!I wanted epic! I wanted something that was equal parts devastating and triumphant, something that’d create me feel like I’d been holding my breath for chapters at a t this fluffy, cheesy crap.AND NOW WE NEED TO TALK ABOUT THE SNAKE cause listen. Everything so far in this series has felt very thought-out and deliberate. It was like Holly Black had been carefully putting all her pieces into position in the previous books. Girlfriend had a PLAN. I thought something really brilliant was getting ready to unfold with this latest book.Turns out her plan was snake creature and I just cannot is ending was lame. I’m disappointed. If I was being fair I should probably give this book 2 stars cuz it’s not horrible like how some other books are just plain poor but given how excited I was for this thing and my high expectations and how much I wanted to love it nah 1 STAR

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    The Queen of Nothing (The Folk of the Air #3) []  2020-1-18 19:36

    What has Jude, in all three books, been fighting for?...She began with the goal to prove others she has what it takes to survive the fae world—but as each book unfolded, we could see Jude’s heart: justice for the oppressed, to hold evil at bay, to eventually place a fair ruler on the throne/or be a fair ruler, etc. She’s merciful, often giving characters second chances, forgiving those who are remorseful, who would normally be chop down in cold blood for their past sins. Though she wars well, it’s never for the sake of cruelty itself, but for some better end, to war off the darkest, bloodiest forces scrambling for power, to do what is best for all. This is Jude. This is what we know of her: justice, fairness and kindness toward the oppressed beings in the fae globe (human slaves, and other fae servants), forgiveness for those who mess up and are sorry for it, all amazing things....she fits the “savior” mold quite well, doesn’t she?And yet it took one measly sentence—one brutal, horrific, flippant, foolish sentence the author slipped in for the sake of supporting political happenings in our world, I suppose—to create Jude and the glory of her championing cause come crashing down around me like a felled china cabinet during an earthquake, and those shiny precious teacups it once held protectively now lay in sharp, ugly shards at my e three sisters and their small brother are reclining after a major confrontation near the end of the book. Vivi confronts one of them, who is pregnant, “You don’t have to have this baby....I know in Faerie, kids are rare and precious, and all that, but in the mortal world, there’s such as thing as an abortion.” To which Jude chimes in her fae, their babies are “rare and precious....and all that”. Wow. “And all that”...as though it’s nonsense to consider a kid as precious....Of course—not for humans, we discard ours like warts, like ank you, Author, for reminding me of the brutal, murderous, cruel race I belong to. Thank you for reminding me that the “savior” role Jude so quaintly fit into was just that...a role, and she and her sisters are in fact just human after all.Every day we rip apart hundreds of thousands of innocent, helpless humans limb from limb, crush their brains with medical tools, burn them alive with saline injections. All while knowing they feel the pain. All while knowing their small hearts were beating just moments before. And this is how it was treated in this book...so coldly, so cruelly. RIGHT after the heroine and her family stopped the villains of the story from causing battle and needless bloodshed—this is what the novel boils down to? Help for the slaughter of an innocent baby?? And how oddly merciful Jude was hours later, doling out sentences on the villains, so lenient in her judgement of those who killed and did cruel things for the sake of you not see how backwards this all is? Are we so blind?! Yes. Yes we are. And I am tired of it. And I will not cower and pretend I didn’t see it.I want I could have my and time back.

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    The Queen of Nothing (The Folk of the Air #3) []  2020-1-18 19:36

    ...Dramatic title, but here's my two cents anyway. No spoilers!I was a large (YUGE) fan of TCP and TWK. So naturally, come 9 pm when this baby hit my Kindle, I dropped everything and and gobbled it up in about 6 hours, and that's with some distractions thrown in.I won't obtain into detail but this book has some serious pacing issues, especially towards the end. There's also some major characterization problems. We're given a plot twist in the beginning that's never really elaborated on, a MAJOR plot twist that is rushed and fizzles out anticlimatically, and the romance between our beloved Jurdan here leaves a lot to be desired (minor spoiler: The ending for me was very out of character).While I was appreciative the author got this book out a couple months early, I think I'd rather have waited longer, especially if it meant getting a better written book out of it.

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    The Queen of Nothing (The Folk of the Air #3) []  2020-1-18 19:36

    PART I: REVIEW3.75 Stars"Greetings, Your Majesty, you betraying toad." - JudeI don't know how to even ATTEMPT to write a spoiler-free review for this book but I tried. I don't wish to say too much but I also wish to tell you every small thing I'm thinking right now after finishing TQoN.Did I like it? Hell yeah, I did. Overall it was great. But 3.75 stars mean that there are still some things I'm not completely happy with.Just going to throw a few things out there.➤ Anticlimactic. And therefore a small expectations were probably too high. In comparison to TCP and TWK, you won't feel such a wide range of emotions anymore. Problems from the previous two books aren't true problems anymore. There were things that got solved too easily and quickly in my opinion and others that took too long. A lot of answers were also RIGHT THERE for us to grab and when they got resolved all I could think was "Wait, that's it? That easy?"➤ e pacing was a thousand times better than in book two. I was immediately sucked into the story and I liked Jude quite a lot in this latest installment. Cardan didn't have as a lot of scenes as I would have liked but oddly enough I didn't mind. THAT MUCH. The few that he had were awesome, and I gobbled up everything I could whenever he created an dan puts up a hand. "No, no, enough. It's all too tedious to explain. I declare this meeting at an end." His fingers create a flicking gesture towards the door. "Leave us. I tire of the lot of you."I have a long method to go before I can manage that level of shameless arrogance.➤ You know how I felt after reading this book? Completely SPENT. So much has happened; you THINK you KNOW in which direction the happenings are taking you and then you realize you had absolutely no idea. My disappointment with certain things? It was nowhere to be found anymore after finishing. This long, long journey Holly Black took us on just created me feel entirely drained. I can't decide if everything that happened was genius or just plain messy.I know my review sounds very negative but hold in mind that I DID have fun it. I think I'm even experiencing a book hangover. After finishing, I felt lost somehow. All I've done the first half an hour or so was to mindlessly scroll through social media while contemplating life at the same time haha. It was weird, lol but I was certain, I LIKED THE RT II: BOOK TALK, BEST TO BE READ AFTER FINISHING THE BOOK (SPOILER!)***— Locke's death. ANTICLIMACTIC. I remember writing a friend, with whom I did a buddy read, that this could be a trick. That Locke's just playing one of his android games again and wants to push Jude's story for his own entertainment. Sounds plausible, right? Well, turns out TARYN got the privilege of killing that annoying pest AND WE READERS WEREN'T EVEN THERE TO WITNESS IT AND BATHE IN ITS GLORY. Totally unsatisfying and LAME. It feels a small like we were robbed.— Taryn, another pesky thing/issue that got resolved too quickly. She stirred up so much problem in TCP and TWK and now what? Everything's fine again? She did nothing to repentant for the things she did in the past. She's pregnant, gets Locke's estate and lives happily ever after? Possibly even with the Ghost? W T H? She was punished for absolutely NOTHING. How can that be?There are soo a lot of bloodthirsty readers out there who wanted retribution. Some suffering, torture. Death? Guess we don't obtain be fair, I'm exaggerating right now. I'm not feeling as strongly about this anymore as I did in the beginning, because over the course of this book all my negative feelings towards Jude's opponents just vanished. Locke's and Taryn's poor deeds just faded into the background. All in all, this specific issue left me with very mixed feelings. Though I definitely didn't like it while reading, it feels like in the end, all these things didn't matter anymore.— Madoc. What the heck was that? I was so not impressed with his capitulation and his punishment.— The solutions were all written right there! 1. The cliffhanger from TWK. I felt a small dumb after getting the explanation because it was so simple 🤦‍♀‍ but then knowing THAT (how simple the answers could be) created the solution to Cardan's issue very obvious. Spill blood=kill Cardan, but that didn't mean that my heart didn't stop there for a few seconds when Jude really did take his head off lol.— Why did it take so long for Jude and Cardan to be reunited? I'm so sad. They spend so much time apart and when they finally DID meet again, it wasn't enough. I wanted moore! If Holly Black gave them a small bit more time together, where the focus was only on them, I would have been happy with my next point.— I'm not very satisfied with the turn of happenings near the end. It was unexpected, you know? I anticipated battle or a war between Madoc and Cardan/Jude. And what did I get? Cardan became a serpent and the whole plot suddenly centered around saving Cardan, and Jude's love for e word "desperate" is not a 100% fit but Jude was all about "I can't live without Cardan" and "the only method to have him by my side is to bind him to me, the rest (i.e. Madoc and his army) doesn't matter".After not getting any couple-time for what feels like ages, this sudden turn was... weird. It felt like Holly Black tried to squeeze everything (i.e. romance+enemy issue) into the latest few chapters to then, conveniently, tie everything up in a nice small package.

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    The Queen of Nothing (The Folk of the Air #3) []  2020-1-18 19:36

    Whelp. About to create me some opponents here as I espouse some negative views on a most beloved series. I’m not even sure this review is for the readers here or more for myself as a therapy session but here we go.Spoilers ahead.I could cry. Seriously. I have long awaited this final installment. I have thought about this book almost every day for an entire year! Never have I EVER been so excited to read something. I even bought unique editions and signed copies of these rst off, allow me state. I knew that Jude and Cardan’s relationship was beautiful toxic in the past and though they ended up together in these books, I just didn’t see a relationship that I could root for by the end. They were both flawed and I hoped that once the story concluded, that they could mend those broken pieces within each other, but I was ultimately disappointed. We see a moment where Cardan essentially confesses to enjoying making Jude fear him (even though he’s ashamed to admit it). It should never be anyone’s desire in a relationship to create the other person uncomfortable or fearful. This was disgusting to me. We see in that same scene, Jude strike Cardan across the face in a moment of anger. I HATE when people who claim to love each other in books strike one another. If it had been Cardan striking Jude, there’d be hell to pay. Jude is forced later on in the story to create a choice about whether to control Cardan again like she did in book two or to set him free. She truly wrestled with this decision even up until the final moments before she decided to do the right thing. She KNEW that Cardan would hate her if he was enslaved again as a mindless being under her control. He trusted her to create the right decision and she had gall to deliberate on what was the right choice. Jude’s flaw has always been to be drawn to the enticement of power and we can see that most clearly in this moment where she deliberates when even love hangs in the e book also felt like it was ramping up towards this conflict with Madoc but the final climax seemed to fall flat to me. Most of the book I felt bored with the pacing and there didn’t seem to be as a lot of twists in this story as the books previous. I really missed the exciting “What just happened??” moments from ly, I’m exhausted with authors pedaling political stances in fictional books, especially ones that are super divisive and in this case, horrifying. There is a moment where the sisters are talking about Taryn being pregnant and they test to persuade her that if she wanted to end her pregnancy, she’d be fine to do so; that babies are often unwanted, often aborted, as if that somehow justified such a wicked act. They told her if she wanted to end her baby’s life through abortion she’d be more than justified, praised even. Jude makes a comment that she’d chop off anyone’s hands who’d disagree. In that moment, Jude became the villain and I couldn’t look at her the same. She was worse than Madoc or Balekin who killed their wife and killed their siblings. She encouraged a mother to slay her own child. This is obviously a hot button problem in our country and I don’t need a book preaching to me about how I should feel about any issue, but especially this ly, all I can say is that I can only feel ashamed for the time and I spent investing in this series.

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    The Queen of Nothing (The Folk of the Air #3) []  2020-1-18 19:36

    I stayed up all night reading this book. I am utterly exhausted. It was a amazing and fitting end to Jude and Cardan's story. I really love the bit of prologue that delved into Cardan's early years. Without giving much away, I adore the interactions between these two main characters and I honestly want they had spent more time together. Taryn kind of redeems herself. Vivi gets what she's always wanted. Oak is Oak and still a small kid. The only true problem I had with this book is Cardan's small trick and Jude's reaction.!!!!!!!!!!SPOILER!!!!!!!! I knew by the ending of book 2 how Jude could/should/would return from her exile, and I'm just wholly confused on why she didn't. Cardan gives her a line about how she'll be in exile until a ruler of Faerie grants her pardon, and she thinks she's done for because Cardan will never pardon her because of how she tricked him. But Cardan isn't the only ruler of Faerie. She even says it. "I'm queen of Faerie." She could have pardoned herself at any time and avoided the whole sleeping on Vivi's couch thing. Cardan didn't even deny it when she said it, because he can't lie, and all through this book, it was mentioned that if no respond was given it was basically a confession. If I, a mere mortal, could have figured out that small loophole within seconds of reading that interaction, I don't at all understand why Jude, a small seed grown in the goblin soil of Elfhame, did not. I personally would have loved for her to drop that small bombshell on Nicasia and mommy dearest right there on the beach and have had book three be all about Jude adjusting to queendom and dealing with the problem of Madoc, rather than half the book be about lamenting her exile and pretending to be her sister. Jude is clever. She's smart. She's a warrior. In every instance she is fighting to hold herself safe and in power. But just this once when she really needs to present backbone she just lets herself be packed off to the mortal globe like she has none? It just seemed unnecessary.Other than that, I really enjoyed this series, and I hope we will see Jude and Cardan in future work, even if it's a snippet or two, like with previous characters from Holly Black's fae books.

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    The Queen of Nothing (The Folk of the Air #3) []  2020-1-18 19:36

    The Good: we finally got the long-awaited conclusion to the e Bad: Rushed, underdeveloped plot that fails to deliver on every front.I waited SO impatiently for Amazon to deliver this book. When it finally arrived I immediately tore into it. And then I stopped. And I stopped. Took me 5 days to finish this book and I barely created it. The title sounded so awesome after the ending of Wicked King. Queen of Nothing. Yeah. I was really hoping for a lot more of what that title promised. The book felt rushed, relationships changed on a whim and were accepted as is. And the plot ... there wasn’t a huge shocker like there was in the first two books. It just kind of meandered back and forth with small excitement. Very disappointed ☹️

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    The Queen of Nothing (The Folk of the Air #3) []  2020-1-18 19:36

    This book was everything I wanted it to be and more. First off, Holly Black’s writing is effortless. It is so smooth, it hardly feels like you are reading, but more so experiencing the story. The book primarily focuses on Jude and while I [email protected]#$%! featured more of her witty banter with Cardan, it was important for Jude to fully grow, to cast off doubts, and become a person wholly her own. Not Madoc, not Cardan, nor her sisters. Jude is a hero who means well, wants what is best for herself and those she loves, and isn’t afraid to obtain down and dirty doing it.We pick up with Jude in the mortal realm after being banned. Although she is now High Queen, she is also highly stuck and has resorted to grunt work to obtain by. Her twin, Taryn, shows up seeking her help, and versus her better judgment and in line with what her heart truly desires, Jude decides to do it. She decides to pretend to be her sister and jump back into the land that she loves and lost. While there, she is deceived, kidnapped, manipulated, and forced to create a not good decision. She learns what it is she truly desires and what she is truly created of. She is a queen and it’s about time people is is a story that delivers on the ending and, as I like, wraps it up well and favorably. My only disappointment is that this trilogy has come to an end.

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    The Queen of Nothing (The Folk of the Air #3) []  2020-1-18 19:36

    I loved... okay love these books. The suckered me in from the very first chapter of series. I wasnt sure what I expected coming into this latest book. I was hopeful, though that Holly Black would kick it out of the park and deliever and epic adventure filled ending to this awesome series. Unfortunately, I was disappointed. First starters it felt rushed. A lot of things were left unfinished and I just cant support but feel like she wasnt really sure how she wanted to end it, so she just went for it. Was it bad? Absolutely not. It just didnt give me that satisfying feeling you obtain when you finish a amazing series. Highly recommend this series though, it really is magical. She be prepared to feel a small bit of that icky tug of disappointment when you finish, as this latest book will leave you with questions and thoughts that arent entirely good.

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    The Queen of Nothing (The Folk of the Air #3) []  2020-1-18 19:36

    3 stars because of the rest of the series.I loved the first two books, I had super high expectations for this one. But there was too much telling, not enough showing, sort of like it was the outline of a book that hadn't been fully filled in yet. There were amazing moments don't obtain me wrong, but not nearly the same amount of feeling and connection as in the first two. I didn't care about the plot nearly as much as I had before, it was predictable. I kept waiting for a twist to surprise me like I've gotten used to, but it never happened. It also wrapped up a small too perfectly for my taste, and left some beautiful huge unanswered questions.A lot technically happened in this book.... but it still felt like it lacked substance. I don't know if it was the pacing or the lack of actual conversation between characters...I don't know. There were more scenes of Jude getting dressed in extreme detail than there were of her and Cardan actually having a conversation. The worst part is that there are so a lot of scenes that they're together or in the same put where dialogue would have fit perfectly, but instead we just obtain inner monologue and they just say nothing until they part ways.I think I'm mostly disappointed because this book could've been epic, but it was just sort of like a closing chapter that lasted 300 pages.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air Book 1) []  2020-1-8 19:10

    You guys this book broke me in the best ways possible. At first, The Cruel Prince shocked me with its grim and gruesome first chapter. But then I was slowly dangled into the cruel politics of the fairy world. At first, I liked the story, but I felt like something was missing. My stubborn self craved so much more than family history and fae politics. Plus I was not a huge fan of the sister dynamics that were wearing down on my latest nerve.BUT…BAM!Once I got to the 150ish page mark, I could not place this book down. I was engrossed with the storyline’s darkness, the espionage, the secrets, the twists, and OHMYGOD that ending!The Cruel Prince is a gorgeous and gritty read. It’s simply a stunner from the attractive cover to the special characters and all the unexpected plot twists. This book has everything from mouth-dropping scenes, several punch in the gut romances, and the most unforeseen betrayal that had me gasping for more pages.I am floored that this book did a 180 on me and I cannot wait for book two. If there is one book that I highly recommend that you TREAT YO SHELF to this year, please for the love of all fairies pick up The Cruel Prince. You will not regret it.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air Book 1) []  2020-1-8 19:10

    Enigmatic and bold, The Cruel Prince was a gripping fantasy novel about three sisters growing up in the land of Faerie with the man who killed their parents. Brimming with complex characters and political conspiracies, the story played out in a dramatic fashion from beginning to end. The writing–skilled in engulfing the reader into the globe and in keeping a suspenseful plot–grew upon itself with each fresh chapter and created it impossible to place down.Jude was an unusual leading character; a flawed heroine shaped by her environment but daringly unapologetic in her need to war back. She was a product of a decade spent proving her worth to a guardian and kingdom that represented the destruction of the life she once knew, and yet for a girl who wanted nothing but to belong, her journey to finding it would take everything she has. With each sister having chosen a various path in coping with the difficulties of being mortal in an immortal land, their paths converged to a tension-filled crescendo that changed the entire android game and then kept on the first in a planned trilogy, The Cruel Prince not only laid the groundwork for more, but had enough development and action to feel like a full story on its own. Heroines like Jude don’t frequent fiction often, but when they do, their stories cannot support but stick with you. And though the romance aspect was slight, I’m anxious for how it’ll blossom as the story continues. Black’s masterful storytelling made an enchanting read, one that I cannot wait for more of.

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    The Wicked King (The Folk of the Air Book 2) []  2020-1-16 1:47

    I devoured book 1 but had a really hard time starting this based on some of the reviews, but ohmygawd I need book 3 asap!!!! It is currently 6:30 am and I just finished after starting this at 9:30pm. I could not stop reading. Such a amazing series so far but literally my heart is broken and I don’t even know what I wish to happen in book three I’m so torn! I just hope there is some other schemes that give me the ending I wish so badly but fear someone has been untruthful even when they aren’t suppose to be able to lie...

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    The Wicked King (The Folk of the Air Book 2) []  2020-1-16 1:47

    Black reminded readers why we loved the first book and her writing with this sequel to The Cruel Prince. It left me happy and satisfied and with a gaping hole that can only be filled when the next book comes out. The ending left me just as surprised if not more than the previous book’s ending.I love Cardan. His hero development was awesome and it explained more about who he is, why he acts cruel, and who he wants to be. I was surprised to see him displayed more in-depth and very curious to see where he would end up (still am, especially after that ending!). He needs Jude but hates that he does. I loved how he became more responsible and took to the crown in a method that was just and yet retain his flair.Jude is a powerful female protagonist who starts on the bottom and forces her method up using nothing but her own wits and training. There may be a romance, but she proves over and over again that she will not be a damsel in distress. She uses her mortal advantages perfectly and gains thing I hate about this series is the lack of healthy relationships. I obtain it though- how can you create a book stay real to its culture if everyone cared for each other and never betrayed one another. Jude and her sisters may be similar by blood, but time and time again they present that nothing matters except their own private best interests. It’s safe to say that I hate Taryn and Vivienne.I cannot truly explain how much I loved reading this book but what I can say is read it! I read it in a few hours because I couldn’t place it down.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air (1)) []  2020-1-16 11:40

    Holly Black returns to the globe of faeries with her newest release, The Cruel Prince! And wowzers…this was epic!! I was actually quite thrilled to learn while reading that this is still the same fae globe we knew from Tithe, just in another part/region! I’ll touch on that more in a bit! Needless to say, this is the book I’ve been waiting for without ever knowing it!When Jude was seven, she witnessed—along with her sisters—her parents murdered by a faery. Turns out, Jude’s mother was once married to a faery named Madoc and ran away one day with who would be Jude’s father. Her sister, Vivi, is actually Madoc’s daughter, while Jude and her twin, Taryn, have another. Madoc takes the girls back to faerie with him and from then on, Jude’s life would be changed forever.Jude has always struggled with being in faerie. She wants so much more for herself than what is expected from a human living there, which is either servitude or being married off to a faerie that fancies humans. Her sister, Vivi longs to go back home in the mortal globe while her twin, Taryn wants to search love and happiness within faerie. Jude knows what she wants for herself though and that is to earn knighthood with the realm that she lives in. Though knighthood for a human is laughable among her peers.Jude senses her dreams coming real when Dain, the soon-to-be king comes to her and asks her to basically be a spy for him. When he receives the crown, she will be granted knighthood just like she always wanted. Though Jude does have a few enemies, namely the peers that like to torment her. Let’s just say that faeries are not ordinary bullies. Especially ones who do not like ere was quite a bit of politics and history at play here, I’ll admit sometimes there was an overflow of names, it was a tad more confusing since some of the names being thrown around were from characters that have previously died. So when they are first mentioned and then pop up some hundred pages later, it was hard to search the connection to the moment in time. Stepping back I can just understand the happenings in the past enough to apply them to the present, but yeah, there were a few befuddling moments for me throughout, but nothing that ever kept me from reading on!This story really enraptured me! I loved Holly’s Tithe that I read some years ago (for the first time) and it beautiful much cemented my intrigue with the fae. It’s hard to differentiate what we know from faeries from Disney vs almost anything else! For the most part in the sense of literature, we know that faeries can be devious. The faeries here are no different. Most have no love for humans and having two in their realm doesn’t create most of them satisfied at all. Such as Cardan, Jude’s most vicious bully, and one of the faeries who could be king as well. Then there’s Locke who doesn’t seem as poor as the rest, but for me that sent its own set of red flares up! Needless to say, never trust the fae!Holly does throw in just the tiniest bit of romance in this one, but it’s almost immediately challenged by the end! It definitely makes one wonder what will be in shop next for Jude and…someone! I feel like by book two I can better explain my feels over this romantic element. It’s hard to describe without getting into info and possible spoilers, but yeah, it’s e ending was quite astonishing as well, though I sort of anticipated something like this happening, but I guess my thoughts went astray and I missed what was meant to happen but didn’t. If I haven’t confused you yet there, then yay! Basically plans were created and changed and then changed again and I somehow missed the first change. There were several sets of plans going before one was decided upon! Lol!! Things are left at a very tense moment. Nothing cliffhanger-y per se, but ultimately tense indeed!! I cannot wait for the next installment! Holly Black weaves a tale of magic, adventure, and intrigue that will leave you spellbound!Overall Rating 5/5 stars

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    The Cruel Prince: The Folk of the Air, Book 1 []  2020-1-14 19:20

    Holly Black returns to the globe of faeries with her newest release, The Cruel Prince! And wowzers…this was epic!! I was actually quite thrilled to learn while reading that this is still the same fae globe we knew from Tithe, just in another part/region! I’ll touch on that more in a bit! Needless to say, this is the book I’ve been waiting for without ever knowing it!When Jude was seven, she witnessed—along with her sisters—her parents murdered by a faery. Turns out, Jude’s mother was once married to a faery named Madoc and ran away one day with who would be Jude’s father. Her sister, Vivi, is actually Madoc’s daughter, while Jude and her twin, Taryn, have another. Madoc takes the girls back to faerie with him and from then on, Jude’s life would be changed forever.Jude has always struggled with being in faerie. She wants so much more for herself than what is expected from a human living there, which is either servitude or being married off to a faerie that fancies humans. Her sister, Vivi longs to go back home in the mortal globe while her twin, Taryn wants to search love and happiness within faerie. Jude knows what she wants for herself though and that is to earn knighthood with the realm that she lives in. Though knighthood for a human is laughable among her peers.Jude senses her dreams coming real when Dain, the soon-to-be king comes to her and asks her to basically be a spy for him. When he receives the crown, she will be granted knighthood just like she always wanted. Though Jude does have a few enemies, namely the peers that like to torment her. Let’s just say that faeries are not ordinary bullies. Especially ones who do not like ere was quite a bit of politics and history at play here, I’ll admit sometimes there was an overflow of names, it was a tad more confusing since some of the names being thrown around were from characters that have previously died. So when they are first mentioned and then pop up some hundred pages later, it was hard to search the connection to the moment in time. Stepping back I can just understand the happenings in the past enough to apply them to the present, but yeah, there were a few befuddling moments for me throughout, but nothing that ever kept me from reading on!This story really enraptured me! I loved Holly’s Tithe that I read some years ago (for the first time) and it beautiful much cemented my intrigue with the fae. It’s hard to differentiate what we know from faeries from Disney vs almost anything else! For the most part in the sense of literature, we know that faeries can be devious. The faeries here are no different. Most have no love for humans and having two in their realm doesn’t create most of them satisfied at all. Such as Cardan, Jude’s most vicious bully, and one of the faeries who could be king as well. Then there’s Locke who doesn’t seem as poor as the rest, but for me that sent its own set of red flares up! Needless to say, never trust the fae!Holly does throw in just the tiniest bit of romance in this one, but it’s almost immediately challenged by the end! It definitely makes one wonder what will be in shop next for Jude and…someone! I feel like by book two I can better explain my feels over this romantic element. It’s hard to describe without getting into info and possible spoilers, but yeah, it’s e ending was quite astonishing as well, though I sort of anticipated something like this happening, but I guess my thoughts went astray and I missed what was meant to happen but didn’t. If I haven’t confused you yet there, then yay! Basically plans were created and changed and then changed again and I somehow missed the first change. There were several sets of plans going before one was decided upon! Lol!! Things are left at a very tense moment. Nothing cliffhanger-y per se, but ultimately tense indeed!! I cannot wait for the next installment! Holly Black weaves a tale of magic, adventure, and intrigue that will leave you spellbound!Overall Rating 5/5 stars

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air Book 1) []  2020-1-8 19:10

    There's a couple things you should realize about this book before deciding to read it. 1) The reviews are a small over-hyped. I was looking for something to support me with my book withdrawal after finishing SJ [email protected]#$%! trilogy. This book kept showing up as a recommendation and I finally bit the bullet and downloaded a sample. It didn't grasp my attention at the time and I didn't bother buying it, instead I read some other books in lieu of this , it's been a while since I downloaded the sample but my thoughts did go back to this book from time to time. Something about it DID intrigue this brings me to point #2. The first half of the book isn't the greatest. You will probably dislike all of the characters which is a major frustration. You can definitely obtain into the feel of the globe and stay there, a testament to the author's ability to amazing writing but the 3 sisters, Jude, Taryn, and Vivi feel like they have no personalities at all. The author tries to convince us in a particular chapter that Jude has been through a lot and gives you a glimpse into the twisted method of faeries. This is supposed to reinforce our thoughts that Jude is only a lowly pawn with a predestined life filled with misery and misfortune. This is why she is dull and non-responsive to her own feelings and at wasn't completely supportive enough to justify how bland Jude was. Her inner monologues were thoroughly lacking in regards to bringing the story to life.Once you hit the second part of the novel, that's when things start to pick up the pace and the book becomes a real page turner. It's as if someone else penned the second half of the novel. Someone who breathes in life and vigor to the plot. Jude becomes sharper, smarter, wittier. I have some problems with that as she was not exactly like that during the first half of the novel. And how she concocts a masterful plan and predicts the outcomes is a small above what I thought she was capable of within such a limited time of playing the Fae game.Certain elements and plots come to light. It makes you abhor certain characters even more and makes you wish to search out what some characters are ultimately up to. And some even manage to redeem themselves, although not entirely just yet. There is a lot of potential here for the next novel and I am really looking forward to seeing what Cardan will do to Jude after what goes down at the end of the novel. I also wish to know what Locke's endgame is. Real to what he says earlier, he is indeed a trickster; a very dirty one at that. Will Jude also be punished for her crime of murder? How will that (literally) be uncovered?I primarily read adult novels and I do appreciate a amazing dollop of romance. If this was an adult novel, I would be expecting quite a few feisty and interesting scenes between Cardan and his fresh 'master', Jude. *Sigh*. One can only wish.If you are on the fence about this novel but do have fun YA novels with plot twists, conspiracy, and revenge then I would recommend this book to you. Just do yourself a favor and give yourself time to obtain to the turning point in the novel. I promise, it gets much more intriguing.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air Book 1) []  2020-1-8 19:10

    DNFThis just isn't the book for me. I looked at this book so a lot of times since it was published and finally decided to give it test because I heard the representation of elves was really cool. My first thoughts from the first fifty pages is fairies are not elves. Large difference there. I see the teenage angst and bullying coming and I am not the least bit interested in that story so I stopped reading.But honestly, my largest problem is I can't stand books written in show tense. It just seems so wrong to me. Every single 'is' and 'says' takes me out of the story. I know there is technically nothing wrong with this, but its not for me.

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    The Cruel Prince: The Folk of the Air, Book 1 []  2020-1-14 19:20

    You guys this book broke me in the best ways possible. At first, The Cruel Prince shocked me with its grim and gruesome first chapter. But then I was slowly dangled into the cruel politics of the fairy world. At first, I liked the story, but I felt like something was missing. My stubborn self craved so much more than family history and fae politics. Plus I was not a huge fan of the sister dynamics that were wearing down on my latest nerve.BUT…BAM!Once I got to the 150ish page mark, I could not place this book down. I was engrossed with the storyline’s darkness, the espionage, the secrets, the twists, and OHMYGOD that ending!The Cruel Prince is a gorgeous and gritty read. It’s simply a stunner from the attractive cover to the special characters and all the unexpected plot twists. This book has everything from mouth-dropping scenes, several punch in the gut romances, and the most unforeseen betrayal that had me gasping for more pages.I am floored that this book did a 180 on me and I cannot wait for book two. If there is one book that I highly recommend that you TREAT YO SHELF to this year, please for the love of all fairies pick up The Cruel Prince. You will not regret it.

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    The Cruel Prince: The Folk of the Air, Book 1 []  2020-1-14 19:21

    Enigmatic and bold, The Cruel Prince was a gripping fantasy novel about three sisters growing up in the land of Faerie with the man who killed their parents. Brimming with complex characters and political conspiracies, the story played out in a dramatic fashion from beginning to end. The writing–skilled in engulfing the reader into the globe and in keeping a suspenseful plot–grew upon itself with each fresh chapter and created it impossible to place down.Jude was an unusual leading character; a flawed heroine shaped by her environment but daringly unapologetic in her need to war back. She was a product of a decade spent proving her worth to a guardian and kingdom that represented the destruction of the life she once knew, and yet for a girl who wanted nothing but to belong, her journey to finding it would take everything she has. With each sister having chosen a various path in coping with the difficulties of being mortal in an immortal land, their paths converged to a tension-filled crescendo that changed the entire android game and then kept on the first in a planned trilogy, The Cruel Prince not only laid the groundwork for more, but had enough development and action to feel like a full story on its own. Heroines like Jude don’t frequent fiction often, but when they do, their stories cannot support but stick with you. And though the romance aspect was slight, I’m anxious for how it’ll blossom as the story continues. Black’s masterful storytelling made an enchanting read, one that I cannot wait for more of.

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    The Wicked King (The Folk of the Air Book 2) []  2020-1-16 1:47

    I've been waiting for this book since I finished the first one waaaaay back when that one first came out. I stayed up all night reading, and oh, it was delicious. I have bags under my eyes and I don't even care; it was well worth the few hours of sleep I missed out on.******************************************************SEMI SPOILERS***************************************************************I knew where this book was going from the first few pages. Knowing the end-game didn't create the journey getting there any less exciting, though, and for that I'm grateful. Sometimes (a lot of the time) knowing the end of something makes it totally boring and not worth finishing, but there are so a lot of twists and betrayals and schemes going on between all the players of Elfhame that we hardly know where to look half the time, allow alone look at the items not being explicitly shoved in our faces. So, that being said, here's the e Wicked King picks up almost exactly where The Cruel Prince allow off, right in the middle of it all, exactly where Jude had been angling to be. She's now the power behind the throne, the real ruler of Elfhame, which Cardan takes every opportunity to point out. She spends a lot of the book fighting to hold a step ahead of everyone else, because as Madoc warned her when she was little, attaining power and holding on to it are two various things. I search the relationship between Jude and nearly every hero in the book intriguing, but perhaps her relationship with Madoc most intriguing of all. This is the guy who murdered her parents (book 1) and spirited her away to faerie and raised her as his daughter (to the best of his ability, which, let's face it, wasn't great), who tried to use her as a pawn and ended up being played. Now he's watching all her angles and looking for a method to wrest the power she stole from him back. There are few things more interesting than a mentor and pupil going head to head over a live android game of chess to see who comes out the winner. At least to me, it's one of my favorite plot points.When Jude is not grappling with all the issues that arise (a tentative war, being kidnapped, betrayal, betrayal, betrayal, finding a method to hold her keep on all the power she's accumulated) she's semi-struggling with her feelings for Cardan. Mostly she's struggling to figure out how to prevent her growing feelings for him from causing her to lose her power over him. She's on a precarious ledge, this girl, and she's juggling too a lot of pieces.And Cardan. I love this boy-king. I'd read an entire series dedicated to him, if we were so allowed that joy. I won't obtain into all the plot points involving him because they really are entertaining and enjoyable to witness for yourself, but let's just say he really starts coming into his own. As much fun as he is verbally sparing with Jude and as tortured as he is fighting his attraction to her and as a twisted as he is thanks to his brother and his upbringing, he is at his most intriguing and formidable when he starts acting like the royal he actually is. Even being earnest and honest and trying so hard to be amazing in a globe that doesn't value good, he really is a power to be reckoned with when he puts his mind to it, and it is sexy as hell. Who doesn't love power plays, right?Vivi still sucks; what she did to Heather was cruel, perhaps even more so because she didn't intend it that way.Taryn still sucks; I have no idea why Jude doesn't just ignore her or banish her.Oak is still adorable.Locke deserves to be banished to the Undersea and Nicasia's bed for eternity. Nicasia needs to obtain over Cardan and realize that he's just not that into her.**********************************************************SPOILER*******************************************************************At the end of the book, Jude is banished from Elfhame. Then she spends time sitting on her sister's couch mopping about how she got played. BUT SHE LITERALLY HAS THE ANSWER SHE NEEDS IN HER FREAKING HAND. Cardan spent the entirety of this book dropping not so subtle remarks about Jude being the real ruler of Elfhame, telling her he trusted her, trying to obtain her to trust him, and basically having her back, and she's freaking pouting in the mortal globe that her now-husband kicked her to the curb. Except did he really? He said until the crown pardons her she was exiled to the mortal world. Well, hello girl, you were the one running faerie from the get-go and you just got crowned Queen by marrying the object of your desire. He gave her the tool she required to lift her banishment five pages before he banished her. She could have pronounced her time served right there on the beach in front of Orlagh and gone about her business running things with no unnecessary maybe-drama. He even "smiles at her oddly" and doesn't deny that she is in fact Queen of Faerie. If I were Cardan I would be very disappointed in my fresh bride for being so damn dense in that moment. This is the one thing that irritated me about this book, and I'm glad it happened in the latest few pages, and super angry it happened in the latest few pages lol. Jude is supposed to be so intelligent and clever she out maneuvered some of the largest players in Elfhame to gain the position as Queen of Shadows and then she just accepts the fact that she's banished? Why?***********************************************************SPOILER END*************************************************************Overall, I loved this book. It's going to be heartache waiting for the next one.

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    The Wicked King (The Folk of the Air Book 2) []  2020-1-16 1:47

    **4.5 Stars**The stakes in The Wicked King were understandably interminable and yet each one was equally surprising. With its layered plots and schemes, this second installment kept me on my toes while desperately hoping for one amazing thing to go smoothly, but it wouldn’t be a Holly Black novel without the recklessness of its characters all vying for the power of the crown. The guise of its promises ripped through our beloved characters with small thought to the consequences and it was marvelous.While the first quarter of the story was relatively slow and unlike the verve of The Cruel Prince, the story finally found its stride when Black’s genius way of intertwining hero arc with political intrigue and conspiracy started catching steam. The beloved and flawed characteristics of Jude continued to grow in depth as the story explored the edge of likeable and unlikeable, and watching the darkness of retaining power consume her was as hard to watch as it was impossible to place down. While the exquisitely confusing connection shared between Jude and Cardan grew, the players around them took advantage of their distraction, and there are no words to explain how on edge I was throughout the entire second half because of e Wicked King examined the concept and nature of trust with a harshness that created it devilishly good. The abundance of cunning and backstabbing was only limited to the imagination of its writer, and I reveled in the twists and turns until the very painful latest one. It will be in that daze that I spend the next year impatiently waiting for what’s the come.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air (1)) []  2020-1-16 11:40

    You guys this book broke me in the best ways possible. At first, The Cruel Prince shocked me with its grim and gruesome first chapter. But then I was slowly dangled into the cruel politics of the fairy world. At first, I liked the story, but I felt like something was missing. My stubborn self craved so much more than family history and fae politics. Plus I was not a huge fan of the sister dynamics that were wearing down on my latest nerve.BUT…BAM!Once I got to the 150ish page mark, I could not place this book down. I was engrossed with the storyline’s darkness, the espionage, the secrets, the twists, and OHMYGOD that ending!The Cruel Prince is a gorgeous and gritty read. It’s simply a stunner from the attractive cover to the special characters and all the unexpected plot twists. This book has everything from mouth-dropping scenes, several punch in the gut romances, and the most unforeseen betrayal that had me gasping for more pages.I am floored that this book did a 180 on me and I cannot wait for book two. If there is one book that I highly recommend that you TREAT YO SHELF to this year, please for the love of all fairies pick up The Cruel Prince. You will not regret it.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air (1)) []  2020-1-16 11:40

    Okay, first allow me say that this was my first Holly Black book. Well, it certainly won't be my so, allow me point out that I hardly liked anyone in this book...until halfway through the story.Jude is a mortal girl living in Faerie. She has to live under the same roof of the man she should hate the most. She also has to endure the wrath of the royal faeries. She lives in constant pressure, being bullied by the most handsome and cruel primce of the land and his petty companions.Jude hates prince Cardan. She has no words to express how much she detests him...And the feeling is mutual.But Jude is ambitious and instead of a normal, mortal life, she wants glory and a high position in court. She is a force to be reckoned with with a sword and soon someone realizes that she can serve his ught in a web of faerie intrigue, Jude will come to realize how not everything is as it seems.I loved the writing. It was easy and yet it fully described this risky faerie world.I did not like Jude. At all. I obtain why she is the method she is but I could not relate to her. I found her reckless and I found her bravado a bit ever, I loved how the other characters were portrayed. I loved how the author did not jump into the usual fantasy cliches and I loved Cardan's character. He was mean, arrogant and yet there was a vulnerability about him that captivated me. He was so intersting, indeed. I loved Vivi, Jude's faerie sister and I seriously disliked Taryn, her mortal e book kept me on my toes and I did not expect that ending!!! I cannot wait to see what Cardan does next and I am very curious to see how Jude's hero will be short, I am hooked! Is it 2019 yet???

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air (1)) []  2020-1-16 11:40

    Enigmatic and bold, The Cruel Prince was a gripping fantasy novel about three sisters growing up in the land of Faerie with the man who killed their parents. Brimming with complex characters and political conspiracies, the story played out in a dramatic fashion from beginning to end. The writing–skilled in engulfing the reader into the globe and in keeping a suspenseful plot–grew upon itself with each fresh chapter and created it impossible to place down.Jude was an unusual leading character; a flawed heroine shaped by her environment but daringly unapologetic in her need to war back. She was a product of a decade spent proving her worth to a guardian and kingdom that represented the destruction of the life she once knew, and yet for a girl who wanted nothing but to belong, her journey to finding it would take everything she has. With each sister having chosen a various path in coping with the difficulties of being mortal in an immortal land, their paths converged to a tension-filled crescendo that changed the entire android game and then kept on the first in a planned trilogy, The Cruel Prince not only laid the groundwork for more, but had enough development and action to feel like a full story on its own. Heroines like Jude don’t frequent fiction often, but when they do, their stories cannot support but stick with you. And though the romance aspect was slight, I’m anxious for how it’ll blossom as the story continues. Black’s masterful storytelling made an enchanting read, one that I cannot wait for more of.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air (1)) []  2020-1-16 11:40

    The hype surrounding The Cruel Prince is beautiful extraordinary. Everywhere I looked someone was mentioning The Cruel Prince in some capacity. Whether it was through a review, about the characters, about the author or their overall love for the series. The reviews had the same sentiment with glowing five stars. With this much love, I thought it must be good! To my surprise, I didn’t fall in love with this book like everyone else and found myself in the minority.Unpopular opinion incoming. Boy, was this novel problematic. I’m going to begin with the title. With a title such as ‘The Cruel Prince’, one would assume that The Cruel Prince (Cardan) would mean the story was centered around the prince or the prince would at least play a significant role in the book. However, there was neither. The novel is actually narrated by Jude, a human girl who was taken to Faerie at the age of seven and was raised among the gentry as if she was a fair folk princess. At this point, I had a feeling it wasn't going to bode well when I realized how misleading the title en we had the heroine Jude. Oh how I hated Jude. Jude despised the fair folk and yet she desperately wanted to be one of them. Hypocrite much? She often mentioned how cruel and selfish the gentry were but she literally did everything in her power to be just like them or crueler…believing it created her better than them. It’s not an admirable trait nor something to aspire to. Jude had a @#$%!y personality to start with but it got worst when she joined a secret organization and became a spy for a strong fair folk. All the secrets went straight to her head. She went around threatening people and went as far as murdering a fair folk because she thought she was untouchable (she claimed self-defense but let’s obtain true she wanted to slay him). She never felt remorse for her actions and had small to no care for the consequences (and of course it helped that she hid all the proof). A lot of readers saw Jude as a strong, [email protected]#$% heroine and her actions as self empowering. But she was not. Jude was nothing more than a disgusting and despicable human being. How anyone can like her is a mystery to fore I read The Cruel Prince, I saw people ‘shipping’ Jude and Cardan. Readers normally ‘shipped’ couples they loved, so again, I assumed Cardan and Jude were a couple. And huge shocker, they were never a couple! From the moment the two characters met, all I felt was the loathing, animosity and frustration between the two. Every exchange and interaction thereafter between Jude and Cardan resulted in either the characters insulting one another or physically attacking one another. I was baffled. Why would readers approve of this? In an early scene, Cardan shoved Jude versus a wall/or tree and proceeded to choke her and tell her how beneath him she was. The male hero was literally emotionally and physically abusive to the female hero and yet readers found this behavior acceptable…and I dare say, romantic? It’s not cute or romantic. It’s sick, revolting and unacceptable. It may be a fantasy novel and everything was fake but when true people begin romanticizing it, there’s definitively a problem. And the book is marketed to teens no less. I love a amazing fantasy novel, I even love faeries but this book is not appropriate for children. I am surprised the book was approved and published because it was absolute e writing was not any better. Reviewers praised Black for her lyrical prose and even dubbed her as the Queen of Faeries but I didn’t see it. The writing wasn’t attractive or lyrical. It was easy and primary as they come. The globe building and characters were poorly developed and in my opinion unremarkable and unlikable. I’ve read far better faerie novels with complex globe building and multifaceted characters; and best of all they didn’t romanticize abusive/unhealthy e Cruel Prince was one of the worst book I’ve read in the latest couple of years. It seriously boggles my mind how a lot of people love this book. As I mentioned, the writing was average, the globe building unimaginative, the characters unlikable but it was still nothing compared to an aggressor disguised as a love interest and violence and cruelty disguised as bravery and strength. That's messed up and twisted if you asked me. And If you haven’t read this book yet, do yourself a favor and skip it. It’s not worth your time or your money.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air (1)) []  2020-1-16 11:40

    If you didn't believe in the fae globe before you read a Holly Black faerie story, you will after you read this book. Her characters and the beautifully deceptive faerie globe create you feel as though you've stepped into a globe of true create believe. The Queen of the Fae doesn't need faerie fruit to enchant you. Black lores you in with her enchanting writing, mesmerizes you with story, and makes you want you could create a bargain with the fae just so you could obtain the next book in this series.Oh this book, and all it's book feels. I absolutely LOVED this book. It's a delightfully intriguing, sinister at times, and down right wicked at other times, story full of cunning characters, Faerie Princes, and human sister's who have been raised among the Fae in their brutal world. In essence, it's a Holly Black masterpiece!This story doesn't lack in family and friendship dynamics, faerie politics and their court dynamics, surprising political alliances, deception, betrayal, and unpredicted plot twists. Not to mention well written characters whom who love, love to hate, and are completely shocked by. Black's faerie characters and their globe are just as I would except them to be. Jude is definitely my favorite hero of this story.Jude is one of those lead characters who's will and strength I want I emulated. It's unbreakable. What makes Jude so simple to connect with, is her vulnerability in the Fae world. Humans never fair well there, but she and her sister have. Jude is as fierce as she is vulnerable. I love that about her character. Her vulnerability is turned into an unbreakable will power, and inner strength no one can trump. Not even her "adoptive" family, or the crazy hell bent Faerie Prince who despises her. I love how everything she's forced to endure, molds her into a cunning, calculated hero that should not be underestimated. It wasn't hard for me to root for her from the obtain go.I'm at a loss for words when it comes to Jude to and the faerie Prince Cardan. Oh are their scenes interesting. I wasn't excepting that turn of happenings that created me realize that maybe the two of them have more in common than I thought. The surprising turn of happenings also created be realize that while the Fae may be bound to do or not do something, Jude is cunning enough to out intelligent even them, and their centuries old, unbreakable customs, to place her plan into action. It is seriously AWESOME, though I'm a bit worried about what's to come in the next book. There's always a when it comes with the faeries.OH MY WORD, THAT ENDING! Yes this deserves all caps, because THAT ENDING. *Insert incoherent words* Holly Black proves once again why she's the Queen of the Fae. She is the queen of storytelling, hero development, globe building, deception, and making readers weep. Oh this book is all the book feels wrapped up in a attractive cover, and an addicting storyline that will leave you wanting so much.

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    The Cruel Prince: The Folk of the Air, Book 1 []  2020-1-14 19:20

    The hype surrounding The Cruel Prince is beautiful extraordinary. Everywhere I looked someone was mentioning The Cruel Prince in some capacity. Whether it was through a review, about the characters, about the author or their overall love for the series. The reviews had the same sentiment with glowing five stars. With this much love, I thought it must be good! To my surprise, I didn’t fall in love with this book like everyone else and found myself in the minority.Unpopular opinion incoming. Boy, was this novel problematic. I’m going to begin with the title. With a title such as ‘The Cruel Prince’, one would assume that The Cruel Prince (Cardan) would mean the story was centered around the prince or the prince would at least play a significant role in the book. However, there was neither. The novel is actually narrated by Jude, a human girl who was taken to Faerie at the age of seven and was raised among the gentry as if she was a fair folk princess. At this point, I had a feeling it wasn't going to bode well when I realized how misleading the title en we had the heroine Jude. Oh how I hated Jude. Jude despised the fair folk and yet she desperately wanted to be one of them. Hypocrite much? She often mentioned how cruel and selfish the gentry were but she literally did everything in her power to be just like them or crueler…believing it created her better than them. It’s not an admirable trait nor something to aspire to. Jude had a @#$%!y personality to start with but it got worst when she joined a secret organization and became a spy for a strong fair folk. All the secrets went straight to her head. She went around threatening people and went as far as murdering a fair folk because she thought she was untouchable (she claimed self-defense but let’s obtain true she wanted to slay him). She never felt remorse for her actions and had small to no care for the consequences (and of course it helped that she hid all the proof). A lot of readers saw Jude as a strong, [email protected]#$% heroine and her actions as self empowering. But she was not. Jude was nothing more than a disgusting and despicable human being. How anyone can like her is a mystery to fore I read The Cruel Prince, I saw people ‘shipping’ Jude and Cardan. Readers normally ‘shipped’ couples they loved, so again, I assumed Cardan and Jude were a couple. And huge shocker, they were never a couple! From the moment the two characters met, all I felt was the loathing, animosity and frustration between the two. Every exchange and interaction thereafter between Jude and Cardan resulted in either the characters insulting one another or physically attacking one another. I was baffled. Why would readers approve of this? In an early scene, Cardan shoved Jude versus a wall/or tree and proceeded to choke her and tell her how beneath him she was. The male hero was literally emotionally and physically abusive to the female hero and yet readers found this behavior acceptable…and I dare say, romantic? It’s not cute or romantic. It’s sick, revolting and unacceptable. It may be a fantasy novel and everything was fake but when true people begin romanticizing it, there’s definitively a problem. And the book is marketed to teens no less. I love a amazing fantasy novel, I even love faeries but this book is not appropriate for children. I am surprised the book was approved and published because it was absolute e writing was not any better. Reviewers praised Black for her lyrical prose and even dubbed her as the Queen of Faeries but I didn’t see it. The writing wasn’t attractive or lyrical. It was easy and primary as they come. The globe building and characters were poorly developed and in my opinion unremarkable and unlikable. I’ve read far better faerie novels with complex globe building and multifaceted characters; and best of all they didn’t romanticize abusive/unhealthy e Cruel Prince was one of the worst book I’ve read in the latest couple of years. It seriously boggles my mind how a lot of people love this book. As I mentioned, the writing was average, the globe building unimaginative, the characters unlikable but it was still nothing compared to an aggressor disguised as a love interest and violence and cruelty disguised as bravery and strength. That's messed up and twisted if you asked me. And If you haven’t read this book yet, do yourself a favor and skip it. It’s not worth your time or your money.

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    The Cruel Prince: The Folk of the Air, Book 1 []  2020-1-14 19:21

    Rating: 4.2/5“Most of all, I hate you because I think of you. Often. It’s disgusting, and I can’t stop.”This dark modern fairy tale follows Jude as she traverses her fresh home within the High Court of Fairy. Her half-older sister and twin sister were gruesomely taken away from her still warm but dead bodies, killed by their sisters’ unknown father, the high general to the King of Faerie. They knew their sister was various with her tufted ears and slitted eyes, but as young kids do, accepted her as their doc, the Fed Cap General adopts the two fully human twins as his own: to be raised with his very reluctant and resentful heir and their older sister Vivi. Unlike Vivi, Jude and her twin sister Taryn become accustomed to their fate even as far as wishing to be the very Fae that relentlessly torments them. Vivi wishes for the life of a human with her female human lover. Taryn desires to marry into the Fae globe and will sacrifice anyone to create this happen. Jude dreams of a life in armor, fighting and protecting the fae she highly regards. As these three war for their dreams, in the eyes of Jude, a lot of sacrifices, betrayals, and suffering will occur.“What could I become if I stopped worrying about death, about pain, about anything? If I stopped trying to belong? Instead of being afraid, I could become something to fear.”At first, I dislike Taryn’s and Jude’s acceptance of their position and desire to be one of the Fae. They, without choice, live with the very man who killed their parents in cold blood. Jude’s older sister Vivi held onto the reality of her surroundings and never desired to be a part of the fresh world, even though she is the only one of the three accepted. As I read I gained excitement and respect for the method Jude adapted to her environment, the will she built, and the desire to defeat instead of emulating the Fae around her. Extremely unlike Taryn, she grew discontent with they cruel treatment bestowed upon them and decided if she can’t join them, beat them. That she did, while also exploring her rather odd relationship with Prince Cardan.“I am going to hold on defying you. I am going to shame you with my defiance. You remind me that I am a mere mortal and you are a prince of Faerie. Well, allow me remind you that means you have much to lose and I have nothing. You may victory in the end, you may ensorcell me and damage me and humiliate me, but I will create sure you lose everything I can take from you on the method down. I promise you this is the least of what I can do.”Prince Cardan is the youngest of the a lot of kids to the Fae King. As the youngest and rather rebellious he is cast out of the direct family and is needed to ally with his rather cruel older brother Balekin. Cardan is the whipping boy to Balekin and has resulted in a rather distorted personality for Cardan. He finds himself ruining those he loves and bullies as he is bullied. His saving grace is his desire not to slay as is simple for his other siblings. He harbors an attraction to Jude possibly in an accumulation of her ability to disagree with him, her stubbornness, and later her ruthlessness. I do believe some of her attraction to him stems from devaluing herself, his honest albeit less than character, and her learning of the torment he also faces.“I have lied and I have betrayed and I have triumphed. If only there was someone to congratulate me.”To read the full review: inksmudgeddreamer.wordpress

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    The Wicked King (The Folk of the Air Book 2) []  2020-1-16 1:47

    Power is so much easier to acquire than it is to keep on to.**REVIEW MAY CONTAIN SPOILERS**So.I have been waiting for this book to come out since right after the release of the first book, the Cruel Prince, which blew me away.I bought the book yesterday and finished it by midnight latest night, though not because it is a short book. It is just *that* good. I couldn't place it down, and I found myself staying up method later than I should to [email protected]#$%!.First thing's first.Jude - conniving, murderous, Jude. I love her as a character, I love the angst she brings to the table. But most of all, I love that she is a female lead who manages to have a love interest that isn't the whole focus of the rst and foremost, Jude is a schemer. Her romantic interests are second to her desire to succeed in her plotting, whatever the cost, which I think is great. Too often, the love interest takes over the whole story and the plot is lost; that isn't an problem in this story, and it is primarily because Jude is such a powerful hero with blinding focus, however detrimental this one-path mindset might be to her in the end. She is dynamic, and I feel that from the Cruel Prince to the Wicked King, she really grew as a hero in a lot of ways, while remaining the same morally grey Jude we knew and love from dan - THERE ARE NOT ENOUGH WORDS for me to describe my love for this character, who is all sorts of messed up and wicked in ways one couldn't even start to explain. His hero also grew exponentially in this book, and we learn a lot more about him as a person - including small glimpses into his past, snippets of tips that don't quite complete a puzzle so we are still left guessing at the very end, when he pulls the rug out from under the readers with a twist I'm sure nobody saw coming!Taryn - I wasn't very impressed with her in the Cruel Prince, especially after her betrayal of Jude with the foxy Locke, but boy has that changed. From Jude's perspective, Taryn has always been the agreeable sister, the one who did her best to blend in and not be noticed so as to avoid conflict. However, I've found that reading from Jude's perspective has led to a lot of surprises with the other characters, as Jude frequently misjudges her peers. Taryn is no exception, and we see another side to her in this book - one just as conniving, if not moreso than her twin. Paired with the tricky Locke, the two may prove to be a formidable power couple in the next book, and I have my suspicions about how far Taryn's involvement goes in regards to the more shocking revelations in this book. All this to say, you've impressed me, Taryn. What are you up to?!Locke - Well, there's definitely something going on here. He's sly, he's got his hand in a few various cookie jars, and from the Cruel Prince, we saw that he likes to make as much drama as he can possibly orchestrate. After some happenings in this book (looking at you, forest stage with Jude), I am almost certain that Locke is more involved than he seems to be from Jude's perspective. He's playing his own game, and perhaps one with his fresh bride Taryn....But I guess we will have to wait for book 3 to figure out just what it is.Anyways, I have so much more to say about this book but I can't seem to obtain the words out. My head is a M E S S, I am suffering from book hangover. I feel like I will be biting my nails for the next year as I eagerly await the next installment after a not-quite-but-almost cliff hanger of an ending.S.O.S., someone save me. The cruel prince has destroyed my soul.

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    The Wicked King (The Folk of the Air Book 2) []  2020-1-16 1:47

    I pre-ordered book 2 after reading The Cruel Prince. And I’ve been counting down till January 8th and now I finished it in less than 48hours. Soooooooooo goood, I’m sooo sad because I have to wait for the next book. You will not be disappointed with book 2, it’s a page turner and it’s got everything: tension, unexpected twists, amazing characterization, consistency from book 1 with the characters (loveeee it), and much more. Ofcourse there another book so I’m not worried about the begin ended questions I have. But I’m just soooo excited for Holly and this series. I guess I’ll be counting down this the next bookkkkkkl in the series. Ok I really need to sleep a small before work (ps: I couldn’t place it down so I read through the night, ha ha ha).

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air Book 1) []  2020-1-8 19:10

    If you didn't believe in the fae globe before you read a Holly Black faerie story, you will after you read this book. Her characters and the beautifully deceptive faerie globe create you feel as though you've stepped into a globe of true create believe. The Queen of the Fae doesn't need faerie fruit to enchant you. Black lores you in with her enchanting writing, mesmerizes you with story, and makes you want you could create a bargain with the fae just so you could obtain the next book in this series.Oh this book, and all it's book feels. I absolutely LOVED this book. It's a delightfully intriguing, sinister at times, and down right wicked at other times, story full of cunning characters, Faerie Princes, and human sister's who have been raised among the Fae in their brutal world. In essence, it's a Holly Black masterpiece!This story doesn't lack in family and friendship dynamics, faerie politics and their court dynamics, surprising political alliances, deception, betrayal, and unpredicted plot twists. Not to mention well written characters whom who love, love to hate, and are completely shocked by. Black's faerie characters and their globe are just as I would except them to be. Jude is definitely my favorite hero of this story.Jude is one of those lead characters who's will and strength I want I emulated. It's unbreakable. What makes Jude so simple to connect with, is her vulnerability in the Fae world. Humans never fair well there, but she and her sister have. Jude is as fierce as she is vulnerable. I love that about her character. Her vulnerability is turned into an unbreakable will power, and inner strength no one can trump. Not even her "adoptive" family, or the crazy hell bent Faerie Prince who despises her. I love how everything she's forced to endure, molds her into a cunning, calculated hero that should not be underestimated. It wasn't hard for me to root for her from the obtain go.I'm at a loss for words when it comes to Jude to and the faerie Prince Cardan. Oh are their scenes interesting. I wasn't excepting that turn of happenings that created me realize that maybe the two of them have more in common than I thought. The surprising turn of happenings also created be realize that while the Fae may be bound to do or not do something, Jude is cunning enough to out intelligent even them, and their centuries old, unbreakable customs, to place her plan into action. It is seriously AWESOME, though I'm a bit worried about what's to come in the next book. There's always a when it comes with the faeries.OH MY WORD, THAT ENDING! Yes this deserves all caps, because THAT ENDING. *Insert incoherent words* Holly Black proves once again why she's the Queen of the Fae. She is the queen of storytelling, hero development, globe building, deception, and making readers weep. Oh this book is all the book feels wrapped up in a attractive cover, and an addicting storyline that will leave you wanting so much.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air Book 1) []  2020-1-8 19:10

    Holly Black returns to the globe of faeries with her newest release, The Cruel Prince! And wowzers…this was epic!! I was actually quite thrilled to learn while reading that this is still the same fae globe we knew from Tithe, just in another part/region! I’ll touch on that more in a bit! Needless to say, this is the book I’ve been waiting for without ever knowing it!When Jude was seven, she witnessed—along with her sisters—her parents murdered by a faery. Turns out, Jude’s mother was once married to a faery named Madoc and ran away one day with who would be Jude’s father. Her sister, Vivi, is actually Madoc’s daughter, while Jude and her twin, Taryn, have another. Madoc takes the girls back to faerie with him and from then on, Jude’s life would be changed forever.Jude has always struggled with being in faerie. She wants so much more for herself than what is expected from a human living there, which is either servitude or being married off to a faerie that fancies humans. Her sister, Vivi longs to go back home in the mortal globe while her twin, Taryn wants to search love and happiness within faerie. Jude knows what she wants for herself though and that is to earn knighthood with the realm that she lives in. Though knighthood for a human is laughable among her peers.Jude senses her dreams coming real when Dain, the soon-to-be king comes to her and asks her to basically be a spy for him. When he receives the crown, she will be granted knighthood just like she always wanted. Though Jude does have a few enemies, namely the peers that like to torment her. Let’s just say that faeries are not ordinary bullies. Especially ones who do not like ere was quite a bit of politics and history at play here, I’ll admit sometimes there was an overflow of names, it was a tad more confusing since some of the names being thrown around were from characters that have previously died. So when they are first mentioned and then pop up some hundred pages later, it was hard to search the connection to the moment in time. Stepping back I can just understand the happenings in the past enough to apply them to the present, but yeah, there were a few befuddling moments for me throughout, but nothing that ever kept me from reading on!This story really enraptured me! I loved Holly’s Tithe that I read some years ago (for the first time) and it beautiful much cemented my intrigue with the fae. It’s hard to differentiate what we know from faeries from Disney vs almost anything else! For the most part in the sense of literature, we know that faeries can be devious. The faeries here are no different. Most have no love for humans and having two in their realm doesn’t create most of them satisfied at all. Such as Cardan, Jude’s most vicious bully, and one of the faeries who could be king as well. Then there’s Locke who doesn’t seem as poor as the rest, but for me that sent its own set of red flares up! Needless to say, never trust the fae!Holly does throw in just the tiniest bit of romance in this one, but it’s almost immediately challenged by the end! It definitely makes one wonder what will be in shop next for Jude and…someone! I feel like by book two I can better explain my feels over this romantic element. It’s hard to describe without getting into info and possible spoilers, but yeah, it’s e ending was quite astonishing as well, though I sort of anticipated something like this happening, but I guess my thoughts went astray and I missed what was meant to happen but didn’t. If I haven’t confused you yet there, then yay! Basically plans were created and changed and then changed again and I somehow missed the first change. There were several sets of plans going before one was decided upon! Lol!! Things are left at a very tense moment. Nothing cliffhanger-y per se, but ultimately tense indeed!! I cannot wait for the next installment! Holly Black weaves a tale of magic, adventure, and intrigue that will leave you spellbound!Overall Rating 5/5 stars

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air Book 1) []  2020-1-8 19:10

    I'm always tentative about book about the fae. With the exception of books by Sarah J Maas, they tend to all be dark, twisty, and absolutely no fun. Sadly, this one ended up being just that. I'm sure some people will love all of the dark, cruel machinations in this book, but it just left me disappointed. None of the characters were sympathetic, except maybe Vivi. Not an enjoyable read at all for me.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air Book 1) []  2020-1-8 19:10

    Rating: 4.2/5“Most of all, I hate you because I think of you. Often. It’s disgusting, and I can’t stop.”This dark modern fairy tale follows Jude as she traverses her fresh home within the High Court of Fairy. Her half-older sister and twin sister were gruesomely taken away from her still warm but dead bodies, killed by their sisters’ unknown father, the high general to the King of Faerie. They knew their sister was various with her tufted ears and slitted eyes, but as young kids do, accepted her as their doc, the Fed Cap General adopts the two fully human twins as his own: to be raised with his very reluctant and resentful heir and their older sister Vivi. Unlike Vivi, Jude and her twin sister Taryn become accustomed to their fate even as far as wishing to be the very Fae that relentlessly torments them. Vivi wishes for the life of a human with her female human lover. Taryn desires to marry into the Fae globe and will sacrifice anyone to create this happen. Jude dreams of a life in armor, fighting and protecting the fae she highly regards. As these three war for their dreams, in the eyes of Jude, a lot of sacrifices, betrayals, and suffering will occur.“What could I become if I stopped worrying about death, about pain, about anything? If I stopped trying to belong? Instead of being afraid, I could become something to fear.”At first, I dislike Taryn’s and Jude’s acceptance of their position and desire to be one of the Fae. They, without choice, live with the very man who killed their parents in cold blood. Jude’s older sister Vivi held onto the reality of her surroundings and never desired to be a part of the fresh world, even though she is the only one of the three accepted. As I read I gained excitement and respect for the method Jude adapted to her environment, the will she built, and the desire to defeat instead of emulating the Fae around her. Extremely unlike Taryn, she grew discontent with they cruel treatment bestowed upon them and decided if she can’t join them, beat them. That she did, while also exploring her rather odd relationship with Prince Cardan.“I am going to hold on defying you. I am going to shame you with my defiance. You remind me that I am a mere mortal and you are a prince of Faerie. Well, allow me remind you that means you have much to lose and I have nothing. You may victory in the end, you may ensorcell me and damage me and humiliate me, but I will create sure you lose everything I can take from you on the method down. I promise you this is the least of what I can do.”Prince Cardan is the youngest of the a lot of kids to the Fae King. As the youngest and rather rebellious he is cast out of the direct family and is needed to ally with his rather cruel older brother Balekin. Cardan is the whipping boy to Balekin and has resulted in a rather distorted personality for Cardan. He finds himself ruining those he loves and bullies as he is bullied. His saving grace is his desire not to slay as is simple for his other siblings. He harbors an attraction to Jude possibly in an accumulation of her ability to disagree with him, her stubbornness, and later her ruthlessness. I do believe some of her attraction to him stems from devaluing herself, his honest albeit less than character, and her learning of the torment he also faces.“I have lied and I have betrayed and I have triumphed. If only there was someone to congratulate me.”To read the full review: inksmudgeddreamer.wordpress

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    The Cruel Prince: The Folk of the Air, Book 1 []  2020-1-14 19:20

    There's a couple things you should realize about this book before deciding to read it. 1) The reviews are a small over-hyped. I was looking for something to support me with my book withdrawal after finishing SJ [email protected]#$%! trilogy. This book kept showing up as a recommendation and I finally bit the bullet and downloaded a sample. It didn't grasp my attention at the time and I didn't bother buying it, instead I read some other books in lieu of this , it's been a while since I downloaded the sample but my thoughts did go back to this book from time to time. Something about it DID intrigue this brings me to point #2. The first half of the book isn't the greatest. You will probably dislike all of the characters which is a major frustration. You can definitely obtain into the feel of the globe and stay there, a testament to the author's ability to amazing writing but the 3 sisters, Jude, Taryn, and Vivi feel like they have no personalities at all. The author tries to convince us in a particular chapter that Jude has been through a lot and gives you a glimpse into the twisted method of faeries. This is supposed to reinforce our thoughts that Jude is only a lowly pawn with a predestined life filled with misery and misfortune. This is why she is dull and non-responsive to her own feelings and at wasn't completely supportive enough to justify how bland Jude was. Her inner monologues were thoroughly lacking in regards to bringing the story to life.Once you hit the second part of the novel, that's when things start to pick up the pace and the book becomes a real page turner. It's as if someone else penned the second half of the novel. Someone who breathes in life and vigor to the plot. Jude becomes sharper, smarter, wittier. I have some problems with that as she was not exactly like that during the first half of the novel. And how she concocts a masterful plan and predicts the outcomes is a small above what I thought she was capable of within such a limited time of playing the Fae game.Certain elements and plots come to light. It makes you abhor certain characters even more and makes you wish to search out what some characters are ultimately up to. And some even manage to redeem themselves, although not entirely just yet. There is a lot of potential here for the next novel and I am really looking forward to seeing what Cardan will do to Jude after what goes down at the end of the novel. I also wish to know what Locke's endgame is. Real to what he says earlier, he is indeed a trickster; a very dirty one at that. Will Jude also be punished for her crime of murder? How will that (literally) be uncovered?I primarily read adult novels and I do appreciate a amazing dollop of romance. If this was an adult novel, I would be expecting quite a few feisty and interesting scenes between Cardan and his fresh 'master', Jude. *Sigh*. One can only wish.If you are on the fence about this novel but do have fun YA novels with plot twists, conspiracy, and revenge then I would recommend this book to you. Just do yourself a favor and give yourself time to obtain to the turning point in the novel. I promise, it gets much more intriguing.

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    The Cruel Prince: The Folk of the Air, Book 1 []  2020-1-14 19:20

    DNFThis just isn't the book for me. I looked at this book so a lot of times since it was published and finally decided to give it test because I heard the representation of elves was really cool. My first thoughts from the first fifty pages is fairies are not elves. Large difference there. I see the teenage angst and bullying coming and I am not the least bit interested in that story so I stopped reading.But honestly, my largest problem is I can't stand books written in show tense. It just seems so wrong to me. Every single 'is' and 'says' takes me out of the story. I know there is technically nothing wrong with this, but its not for me.

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    The Wicked King (The Folk of the Air Book 2) []  2020-1-16 1:47

    Lacked depth between Carden and Jude. I thought as the second book in this series, the author would build the romance and affection between characters, which would have led to the end being more of a surprise vs expectation. Jude's hero is written as if she is a 12 year old boy playing a live video game. She is an 18 year old Women, who displays no passion or ambition other than waiting for her younger brother Oak to grow up. It makes absolute no sense that as a human with no magic capabilities she continues to conquer and slay these warriors. Very disappointed that this book is listed as an adult Dystopian Romance, but written as a pre-teen sci-fi.

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    The Wicked King (The Folk of the Air Book 2) []  2020-1-16 1:47

    The Wicked King, Holly Black’s highly-anticipated sequel to The Cruel Prince, is as intoxicating and heart-stopping as its predecessor as Jude tries to keep on to power in a globe that makes android games out of crushing mortals. Five months have passed since the end of The Cruel Prince. As Cardan, the fresh High King of Elfhame, sits on the throne, his topics are unaware that it is Jude, a mortal girl who grew up in Faerie, pulling the stings, having orchestrated both his crowing and his vow to obey her every command. But with such a young ruler on the thrown and his older brother Balekin in prison, there are those in Faerie who believe a weak king and an alternate heir leaves room for another coup. Jude must search a method to counter the machinations of those hoping for a power grab while also keeping a vexing, yet alluring Cardan in check. With small allies on her side, Jude is tested at every turn and when she discovers someone in her confidence has betrayed her, it becomes even more imperative that she search a method to keep on to power.Faerie is a globe built on deceit. The Folk cannot lie, but they can manipulate, they can twist the truth and hide their real motivations. Jude has grown up in this globe and has had to figure out how to survive when every Fae sees her as weak and vulnerable. She has become a force to be reckon. In this sequel, I loved seeing the shift in her relationship with Madoc, her ‘adoptive’ father. He raised Jude and Taryn to look out for themselves in this globe of Fae, but he never quite imagined that either would grow up to influence his globe in such a dramatic way. Madoc, like most Fae, puts his own desires first, but since these often clash with Jude’s own wishes, it pits them versus one another and I love that they both manage to push the other to their limits. I also really enjoyed Jude’s shifting relationship with Cardan. Black writes the Folk in such a method that the reader is forced, like Jude, to sift through words and actions in to search the truth underneath. There’s always another layer to a hero that I thought I had figured out. After this novel, I feel like I have a better understanding of who Cardan is and what his motivations are. Jude and Cardan’s relationship is fraught with mutual contempt, but also a fascination with one another. In this second book, both take steps to understanding each other better and I see so much potential for an alliance between the two built on actual trust if they could only obtain of my favorite things about The Folk of the Air series is how Black continues to raise the stakes. Jude was able to manipulate Cardan in to place him on the thrown instead of her small brother Oak, but in this novel, she doesn’t have an opportunity to rest. Power is fleeting in the Faerie world, especially for those who can’t stay vigilant. Jude is pushed physically, emotionally, and mentally in The Wicked King. She succeeds only when she is able to stay several steps ahead, but there is always the chance that as a mortal, she is ill-equipped to the task. Female characters who wish power for power’s sake are few and far between in fiction, so it’s refreshing to obtain a hero like Jude whose motivation is to gain as much power as possible and who can’t support but delight in her newfound authority. Also there is something truly satisfying about seeing Jude, a mortal girl, obtain the best of these mythical beings.Holly Black’s The Wicked King is a sequel that will no doubt delight fans of the first novel, its twists will hold readers on their toes, and its ending will have them begging for the next installment.

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    The Wicked King (The Folk of the Air Book 2) []  2020-1-16 1:47

    The Wicked King by Holly Black was much better than The Cruel Prince. Black expanded on the globe of Faerie, taking the reader into various parts of the realm. The globe building was more focused and made a more dynamic vision of Faire than the first book.Jade became the person hinted at in the first book—strong, defiant, a risktaker. She no longer bowed to the fae populous instead, crafting ingenious ways to exist as a mortal in a magical realm. She became devious, cunning, and unfettered by her limited abilities which allowed growth in her character. Her ability to slay without much remorse became her strength, and the only method she could compete and conquer her magical enemies. I liked the cold, calculating method that Jade created her moves in this den’s hero arc was also satisfying. The petulant, entitled, cruel prince matured, gaining insight beyond just himself. He learned, from Jude, how to play the game, how to manipulate those around him and gain what he wants through strategies and stealth rather than bullying. His darkness became less a burden and more a e story also exploded, taking us into a literal chess android game between all the factions of the faerie world—where trust is broken, allies change with each move, and betrayal is the weapon of e Wicked King was really good, and I am very interested in continuing the series as I wish to see how this fresh dynamic between Jade and Carden plays out. I recommend reading these books.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air (1)) []  2020-1-16 11:40

    There's a couple things you should realize about this book before deciding to read it. 1) The reviews are a small over-hyped. I was looking for something to support me with my book withdrawal after finishing SJ [email protected]#$%! trilogy. This book kept showing up as a recommendation and I finally bit the bullet and downloaded a sample. It didn't grasp my attention at the time and I didn't bother buying it, instead I read some other books in lieu of this , it's been a while since I downloaded the sample but my thoughts did go back to this book from time to time. Something about it DID intrigue this brings me to point #2. The first half of the book isn't the greatest. You will probably dislike all of the characters which is a major frustration. You can definitely obtain into the feel of the globe and stay there, a testament to the author's ability to amazing writing but the 3 sisters, Jude, Taryn, and Vivi feel like they have no personalities at all. The author tries to convince us in a particular chapter that Jude has been through a lot and gives you a glimpse into the twisted method of faeries. This is supposed to reinforce our thoughts that Jude is only a lowly pawn with a predestined life filled with misery and misfortune. This is why she is dull and non-responsive to her own feelings and at wasn't completely supportive enough to justify how bland Jude was. Her inner monologues were thoroughly lacking in regards to bringing the story to life.Once you hit the second part of the novel, that's when things start to pick up the pace and the book becomes a real page turner. It's as if someone else penned the second half of the novel. Someone who breathes in life and vigor to the plot. Jude becomes sharper, smarter, wittier. I have some problems with that as she was not exactly like that during the first half of the novel. And how she concocts a masterful plan and predicts the outcomes is a small above what I thought she was capable of within such a limited time of playing the Fae game.Certain elements and plots come to light. It makes you abhor certain characters even more and makes you wish to search out what some characters are ultimately up to. And some even manage to redeem themselves, although not entirely just yet. There is a lot of potential here for the next novel and I am really looking forward to seeing what Cardan will do to Jude after what goes down at the end of the novel. I also wish to know what Locke's endgame is. Real to what he says earlier, he is indeed a trickster; a very dirty one at that. Will Jude also be punished for her crime of murder? How will that (literally) be uncovered?I primarily read adult novels and I do appreciate a amazing dollop of romance. If this was an adult novel, I would be expecting quite a few feisty and interesting scenes between Cardan and his fresh 'master', Jude. *Sigh*. One can only wish.If you are on the fence about this novel but do have fun YA novels with plot twists, conspiracy, and revenge then I would recommend this book to you. Just do yourself a favor and give yourself time to obtain to the turning point in the novel. I promise, it gets much more intriguing.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air (1)) []  2020-1-16 11:40

    DNFThis just isn't the book for me. I looked at this book so a lot of times since it was published and finally decided to give it test because I heard the representation of elves was really cool. My first thoughts from the first fifty pages is fairies are not elves. Large difference there. I see the teenage angst and bullying coming and I am not the least bit interested in that story so I stopped reading.But honestly, my largest problem is I can't stand books written in show tense. It just seems so wrong to me. Every single 'is' and 'says' takes me out of the story. I know there is technically nothing wrong with this, but its not for me.

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    The Folk Music of Hawaii - Sons Of Hawaii []  2020-1-18 23:2

    Classic Gabby et al. I love the sound of my peoples music. I would this for a bonus in the future.

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    The Sound of Austria: A Treasury of Alpine Folk Music []  2020-1-23 2:56

    Hard to search German Austrian CD's here in US, so was delighted, am always searching for amazing CD's with something other than just the standard Beer drinking songs. This is really amazing music

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    The Folk Music of Hawaii - Sons Of Hawaii []  2020-1-18 23:2

    Amazing cd.

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    The Sound of Austria: A Treasury of Alpine Folk Music []  2020-1-23 2:56

    Reminds me of Austria and the traditional melody one hears while in the Alps. Very nice CD. Quality is good

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    The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill []  2020-1-17 5:2

    This pressing for the vinyl album is poor - bits of vinyl were stuck and it wouldn’t even fit over the spindle. Unbelievable album, not good pressing. :-(

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    The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill []  2020-1-17 5:2

    Awesome from begin to finish. I can play the entire album and not wish to skip a single song. It's one of the best albums recorded. I would say it shares a likeliness to that of Michael Jackson's 'Thriller' in terms of wanting to play it over and over from begin to finish and loving every song. I've played it for years. I bought it for my girlfriend and she fell in love with it right away.

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    The Haunting of Hill House []  2019-12-18 21:26

    I read this after watching the film and series because I read that this is supposedly one of the best scary novels out there. Wrong. It is filled by repeating sentence “ Journeys end in lovers meeting “. Nothing ever created any sense at all. Not even remotely scary. The ending was atrocious.

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    The Haunting of Hill House []  2019-12-18 21:26

    This is one of Shirley Jackson's most well known works mainly because it was created into a movie. Actually the 1960s ver is more accurate to the book than the recent movie version. But on to the story.Hill House is a large pile of bricks and mortar that was built in the late 1800s. There is much tragedy attached to the house starting with a carriage accident that occurs as a young wife comes to her fresh house only to be killed when the horses are startled and the carriage upturns. The young daughter of this marriage is brought up in this curious put and ultimately dies here. Her caregiver commits suicide by hanging herself from a circular staircase. There are a lot of rooms, hallways, and lots of tales about ghostly apparitions, noises, and so forth.A professor, Dr. Montague and his squad decide to investigate the reports of paranormal activity in this house. In addition to his team, his invitees contain two women---Theodora a spirited theatrical type and Eleanor, a mousy insecure woman. The other invitee is Luke, a distant relation of the owner of the house. The other people in the story consist of a housekeeper/cook and the caretaker---kind of spooky people in their own right!As everyone arrives and settles in and becomes acquainted it soon becomes apparent that there is definitely a presence at Hill House and it's not a friendly one. There are "cold spots" in the library, and during the night banging on Eleanor's bedroom door. Theodora moves in with Eleanor, but the noise doesn't stop. Then there is a notice on the wall "Help Eleanor Come Home" Is this a trick played by one of the guests? Or is there a force in the house that is compelling Eleanor to be a part of it? The other guests are sympathetic to Eleanor, but she becomes more and more delusional and hysterical which culminates in her being asked to ere is mystery, drama, and suspense around every corner. Shirley Jackson shows a lot of creativity and imagination in her writing of this book. Her descriptions of the house and grounds are so realistic that you almost picture yourself in the midst of the scenery. She brings out the cruelty of humanity in her descriptions of the characters, especially Luke and Theodora who play on the fears and weaknesses of Eleanor. And in the end, maybe the lesson to be learned is this: there are inherently evil aspects of nature that should just be left alone and Hill House is one of them!

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    The Haunting of Hill House []  2019-12-18 21:26

    When I was a pre-teen, I watched the reruns of the 1963 movie, The Haunting, based on this book. So scary and so compelling. I’m sure much of the nuance was over my head at that stage. At that time, my only knowledge of Shirley Jackson was as the author of Raising Demons. I had no idea who she really was until years later. October is the excellent time to visit the original Haunting of Hill House.Dr. Montague, paranormal “scientist” tries to recruit people who have been known to have psychic experiences to come and stay at Hill House. Only two women follow through. The fourth member of the party is the nephew of the show owner, who will some day inherit Hill House. The house is known for psychic phenomena. The two women are very different. Theodora is young, confident, and carefree. Eleanor, the main character, has led a sheltered life caring for her elderly mother. Once her mother dies, she moves in with her overbearing sister. She goes to Hill House as a method to escape her life. The foursome experience some strange happenings while at the house. There are also the odd caretaker and cook/housekeeper, who always leave before dark. The three young people appear to have shifting alliances and shifting tension. Partway into their stay, they are joined by Dr. Montague’s odd ball wife and her “companion,” the headmaster of a boy’s school. Strange happenings continue, culminating in a is book can be read on a few levels. You can have fun it for the slow burn thriller that it is. There is no gore. The story is creepy rather than overtly scary. You can also read this as a psychological (more in the Freudian sense) thriller. Are there tips of lesbianism between the two female characters? Is there really a haunting or is everything event in Eleanor’s damaged psyche? How much was Eleanor controlled by her mother and now her sister? I gave this four stars for a too slow build and too much ambiguity. However, I think that some readers will think these same qualities are what makes this a 5 star classic. Though I did not give this 5 stars, I remain a fan of Shirley Jackson (both her work and her private life) and plan to do a deep dive into more of her other work.

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    The Haunting of Hill House []  2019-12-18 21:26

    I read so a lot of things about this author being amazing and the book being horrifying. I waited and waited for something scary to happen, in the story. It never did (for me). I feel like I wish to ask for my back, on the book. It was a total disappointment.

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    The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill []  2020-1-7 19:27

    Disappointed to place this on and search out that it is an edited "clean" ver of the album. This should be mentioned in the description.

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    The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill []  2020-1-7 19:27

    This is by far the greatest album to ever grace the earth. Lauryn Hill knows what's up and isn't afraid to back down. She's a strong woman with a strong voice.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air Book 1) []  2020-1-8 19:10

    The hype surrounding The Cruel Prince is beautiful extraordinary. Everywhere I looked someone was mentioning The Cruel Prince in some capacity. Whether it was through a review, about the characters, about the author or their overall love for the series. The reviews had the same sentiment with glowing five stars. With this much love, I thought it must be good! To my surprise, I didn’t fall in love with this book like everyone else and found myself in the minority.Unpopular opinion incoming. Boy, was this novel problematic. I’m going to begin with the title. With a title such as ‘The Cruel Prince’, one would assume that The Cruel Prince (Cardan) would mean the story was centered around the prince or the prince would at least play a significant role in the book. However, there was neither. The novel is actually narrated by Jude, a human girl who was taken to Faerie at the age of seven and was raised among the gentry as if she was a fair folk princess. At this point, I had a feeling it wasn't going to bode well when I realized how misleading the title en we had the heroine Jude. Oh how I hated Jude. Jude despised the fair folk and yet she desperately wanted to be one of them. Hypocrite much? She often mentioned how cruel and selfish the gentry were but she literally did everything in her power to be just like them or crueler…believing it created her better than them. It’s not an admirable trait nor something to aspire to. Jude had a @#$%!y personality to start with but it got worst when she joined a secret organization and became a spy for a strong fair folk. All the secrets went straight to her head. She went around threatening people and went as far as murdering a fair folk because she thought she was untouchable (she claimed self-defense but let’s obtain true she wanted to slay him). She never felt remorse for her actions and had small to no care for the consequences (and of course it helped that she hid all the proof). A lot of readers saw Jude as a strong, [email protected]#$% heroine and her actions as self empowering. But she was not. Jude was nothing more than a disgusting and despicable human being. How anyone can like her is a mystery to fore I read The Cruel Prince, I saw people ‘shipping’ Jude and Cardan. Readers normally ‘shipped’ couples they loved, so again, I assumed Cardan and Jude were a couple. And huge shocker, they were never a couple! From the moment the two characters met, all I felt was the loathing, animosity and frustration between the two. Every exchange and interaction thereafter between Jude and Cardan resulted in either the characters insulting one another or physically attacking one another. I was baffled. Why would readers approve of this? In an early scene, Cardan shoved Jude versus a wall/or tree and proceeded to choke her and tell her how beneath him she was. The male hero was literally emotionally and physically abusive to the female hero and yet readers found this behavior acceptable…and I dare say, romantic? It’s not cute or romantic. It’s sick, revolting and unacceptable. It may be a fantasy novel and everything was fake but when true people begin romanticizing it, there’s definitively a problem. And the book is marketed to teens no less. I love a amazing fantasy novel, I even love faeries but this book is not appropriate for children. I am surprised the book was approved and published because it was absolute e writing was not any better. Reviewers praised Black for her lyrical prose and even dubbed her as the Queen of Faeries but I didn’t see it. The writing wasn’t attractive or lyrical. It was easy and primary as they come. The globe building and characters were poorly developed and in my opinion unremarkable and unlikable. I’ve read far better faerie novels with complex globe building and multifaceted characters; and best of all they didn’t romanticize abusive/unhealthy e Cruel Prince was one of the worst book I’ve read in the latest couple of years. It seriously boggles my mind how a lot of people love this book. As I mentioned, the writing was average, the globe building unimaginative, the characters unlikable but it was still nothing compared to an aggressor disguised as a love interest and violence and cruelty disguised as bravery and strength. That's messed up and twisted if you asked me. And If you haven’t read this book yet, do yourself a favor and skip it. It’s not worth your time or your money.

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    The Cruel Prince (The Folk of the Air Book 1) []  2020-1-8 19:10

    Okay, first allow me say that this was my first Holly Black book. Well, it certainly won't be my so, allow me point out that I hardly liked anyone in this book...until halfway through the story.Jude is a mortal girl living in Faerie. She has to live under the same roof of the man she should hate the most. She also has to endure the wrath of the royal faeries. She lives in constant pressure, being bullied by the most handsome and cruel primce of the land and his petty companions.Jude hates prince Cardan. She has no words to express how much she detests him...And the feeling is mutual.But Jude is ambitious and instead of a normal, mortal life, she wants glory and a high position in court. She is a force to be reckoned with with a sword and soon someone realizes that she can serve his ught in a web of faerie intrigue, Jude will come to realize how not everything is as it seems.I loved the writing. It was easy and yet it fully described this risky faerie world.I did not like Jude. At all. I obtain why she is the method she is but I could not relate to her. I found her reckless and I found her bravado a bit ever, I loved how the other characters were portrayed. I loved how the author did not jump into the usual fantasy cliches and I loved Cardan's character. He was mean, arrogant and yet there was a vulnerability about him that captivated me. He was so intersting, indeed. I loved Vivi, Jude's faerie sister and I seriously disliked Taryn, her mortal e book kept me on my toes and I did not expect that ending!!! I cannot wait to see what Cardan does next and I am very curious to see how Jude's hero will be short, I am hooked! Is it 2019 yet???

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    The Cruel Prince: The Folk of the Air, Book 1 []  2020-1-14 19:20

    I'm always tentative about book about the fae. With the exception of books by Sarah J Maas, they tend to all be dark, twisty, and absolutely no fun. Sadly, this one ended up being just that. I'm sure some people will love all of the dark, cruel machinations in this book, but it just left me disappointed. None of the characters were sympathetic, except maybe Vivi. Not an enjoyable read at all for me.

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    The Cruel Prince: The Folk of the Air, Book 1 []  2020-1-14 19:21

    If you didn't believe in the fae globe before you read a Holly Black faerie story, you will after you read this book. Her characters and the beautifully deceptive faerie globe create you feel as though you've stepped into a globe of true create believe. The Queen of the Fae doesn't need faerie fruit to enchant you. Black lores you in with her enchanting writing, mesmerizes you with story, and makes you want you could create a bargain with the fae just so you could obtain the next book in this series.Oh this book, and all it's book feels. I absolutely LOVED this book. It's a delightfully intriguing, sinister at times, and down right wicked at other times, story full of cunning characters, Faerie Princes, and human sister's who have been raised among the Fae in their brutal world. In essence, it's a Holly Black masterpiece!This story doesn't lack in family and friendship dynamics, faerie politics and their court dynamics, surprising political alliances, deception, betrayal, and unpredicted plot twists. Not to mention well written characters whom who love, love to hate, and are completely shocked by. Black's faerie characters and their globe are just as I would except them to be. Jude is definitely my favorite hero of this story.Jude is one of those lead characters who's will and strength I want I emulated. It's unbreakable. What makes Jude so simple to connect with, is her vulnerability in the Fae world. Humans never fair well there, but she and her sister have. Jude is as fierce as she is vulnerable. I love that about her character. Her vulnerability is turned into an unbreakable will power, and inner strength no one can trump. Not even her "adoptive" family, or the crazy hell bent Faerie Prince who despises her. I love how everything she's forced to endure, molds her into a cunning, calculated hero that should not be underestimated. It wasn't hard for me to root for her from the obtain go.I'm at a loss for words when it comes to Jude to and the faerie Prince Cardan. Oh are their scenes interesting. I wasn't excepting that turn of happenings that created me realize that maybe the two of them have more in common than I thought. The surprising turn of happenings also created be realize that while the Fae may be bound to do or not do something, Jude is cunning enough to out intelligent even them, and their centuries old, unbreakable customs, to place her plan into action. It is seriously AWESOME, though I'm a bit worried about what's to come in the next book. There's always a when it comes with the faeries.OH MY WORD, THAT ENDING! Yes this deserves all caps, because THAT ENDING. *Insert incoherent words* Holly Black proves once again why she's the Queen of the Fae. She is the queen of storytelling, hero development, globe building, deception, and making readers weep. Oh this book is all the book feels wrapped up in a attractive cover, and an addicting storyline that will leave you wanting so much.

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    The Cruel Prince: The Folk of the Air, Book 1 []  2020-1-14 19:21

    Okay, first allow me say that this was my first Holly Black book. Well, it certainly won't be my so, allow me point out that I hardly liked anyone in this book...until halfway through the story.Jude is a mortal girl living in Faerie. She has to live under the same roof of the man she should hate the most. She also has to endure the wrath of the royal faeries. She lives in constant pressure, being bullied by the most handsome and cruel primce of the land and his petty companions.Jude hates prince Cardan. She has no words to express how much she detests him...And the feeling is mutual.But Jude is ambitious and instead of a normal, mortal life, she wants glory and a high position in court. She is a force to be reckoned with with a sword and soon someone realizes that she can serve his ught in a web of faerie intrigue, Jude will come to realize how not everything is as it seems.I loved the writing. It was easy and yet it fully described this risky faerie world.I did not like Jude. At all. I obtain why she is the method she is but I could not relate to her. I found her reckless and I found her bravado a bit ever, I loved how the other characters were portrayed. I loved how the author did not jump into the usual fantasy cliches and I loved Cardan's character. He was mean, arrogant and yet there was a vulnerability about him that captivated me. He was so intersting, indeed. I loved Vivi, Jude's faerie sister and I seriously disliked Taryn, her mortal e book kept me on my toes and I did not expect that ending!!! I cannot wait to see what Cardan does next and I am very curious to see how Jude's hero will be short, I am hooked! Is it 2019 yet???

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    The Wicked King (The Folk of the Air Book 2) []  2020-1-16 1:47

    Don't ask me why, but I thought this was a duology. However, The Wicked King did not disappoint. Jude is just as conniving and just as much a liar as before. She has a whole kingdom on her shoulders and the strain begins to show. Cardan hasn't been helpful and the story begins months into their reign. I think I really appreciated the clash of their characters. Cardan obviously isn't satisfied about being controlled by Jude, but there are moments where they seem to forget that their versus each other. The book takes a couple of turns and the part 2 was what disappointed me. Jude is a mortal in an immortal globe and so I suppose showing her weakness is showing that she isn't invincible. It was sort of an inevitable event, yet that part moved slowly, then things sped up. The ending came with a bang and two twists. I read that ending over and over, testing out the words, because although fae can't lie, they can deceive and I wanted to see if I could pull that out from the words. Now I have so a lot of questions, because we are just as ignorant as Jude. We don't know the rules of Faerie so when something momentous happens, I wish to know why and what she can do about it. You'll just have to read it to know what I mean, but if you search yourself questioning what happened and what can be done, just know that I'm in the same boat.

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