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    Aristotle: Eudemian Ethics (Cambridge Texts in the History of Philosophy) []  2020-4-5 18:14

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    For Strasbourg: Conversations of Friendship and Philosophy []  2020-11-1 18:17

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    Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe []  2020-1-11 19:19

    This book was a real, gut-wrenching portrayal of life as a teenager, of the growth experienced both physically and mentally. Ari, so used to being alone in the world, is found by the angel that is Dante. Dante opens Ari's mind to fresh ways of seeing the world, to emotional extremes that tug at the heartstrings and create one's heart soar like a sparrow. The two boys discover each other as well as themselves, searching for answers in a universe that so often keeps the truth close to its chest. They search that they see some of the answers in each other's e method that Dante sees the globe is enchanting in all of its positivity, in all of its golden, innocent glory. Dante seems to see the globe as it should be, and that makes him endearing as a character. Ari is a magnificent counter to this, an angry, curious boy who's father seems far from reach, who's brother seems to have been forgotten by his i and Dante entwine in their differences to make a match that flames in the darkness and lights the method to their adult lives. This lovable story of two mates who grow together in their a lot of questions about the lives they live is one of the best YA books that I think I will ever read. I hope that whoever reads this wonderful book loves it as well.

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    Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe []  2020-1-11 19:19

    I really enjoyed this book. It had a slower pace that created for a peaceful read. I assume most will go into this book thinking this is going to be a romance between Ari and Dante, but I think it's so much more about friendship and family. Ari is so closed up and pushes people away. His friendship with Dante changes him. I also loved seeing Ari's relationship with his parents. I love when families play an active part in a YA book, and both Ari and Dante's parents are necessary characters in this one.“I renamed myself Ari.If I switched the letter, my name was Air.I thought it might be a amazing thing to be the air.I could be something and nothing at the same time. I could be important and also invisible. Everyone would need me and no one would be able to see me.”There is something so true in Saenz's writing. It wasn't trying to be too poetic. Easy but piercing. I loved how attractive this coming of age story was. I loved Ari. He is introspective and reserved, but also passionate and fiercely loyal to those he loves.

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    Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe []  2020-1-11 19:19

    I did not like this book very much because I felt like it did a not good job of conveying the time and put of the novel's setting. I grew up in El Paso in the 1970s and 80s. It was a magical put in a lot of ways, almost none of that comes across in the book. How could the author miss describing what the mountains look like at sunset, the fury of a summer thunderstorm, the sights and smells of the desert? And for gods sake, the food??? Only mentioned in passing. The author also glossed over the challenges of being LGBT in the community during this era. Children who were suspected of being anything but straight were routinely bullied and as a effect LGBT youth were heavily closeted. The challenges that would have been faced by the main characters were grossly under represented. That said, Dante and Ari are compelling characters and I did have fun spending time with them. But this book could have been so much more.

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    Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe []  2020-1-11 19:19

    First person perspective quickly became a non-issue once I got a few chapters into this book. This is probably the best first person story I've l the feels. So, so a lot of feels. This story was so profound. I felt like I was Aristotle, or Ari to his friends. He was a lonely, lonely boy, and though I had amazing friends--great mates growing up, I remember feeling such an aching loneliness at times. I also remember being caught in my own personal battles and living inside my head, keeping so a lot of of my thoughts to i was a attractive boy who was confused not only about himself, but about the entirety of his family. His father returned from the Vietnam battle a shell of his former self--not that Ari would know that because he was born after his father returned from the war. It was as if whatever haunted his father was inherited by Ari. He grew up being so bothered by the fact that he didn't know his father because he wouldn't allow anyone in. He grew up as practically an only kid because his siblings were so much older than him. He grew up hating that his brother, who was in prison, was treated as though he didn't exist. He hated that there were so a lot of secrets in his family, yet he didn't wish to share any of his secrets either. There was so much anger and confusion roiling around inside of Ari. And it really came through in the writing. I just wanted to hug him, and I remember being him.And then Dante came into his life. Dante was such a polar opposite of Ari, but like a light in the otherwise darkness of Ari's mind. They were a strange pair, Aristotle and Dante, but they fit so perfectly together. Dante taught Ari to swim, and became Ari's first ever true friend, allow alone best friend. He immersed Ari int art, and books, and a various family life than he was familiar with. Dante created Ari feel things that he didn't wish to. He created Dante wish to share his mind, which was something Ari just didn't ing them fall in love... It was awesome and beautifully written. This was like a slice-of-life, but with a plot. I wasn't always certain they were falling in love. The author, in my opinion, hold me wondering. I figured Dante out beautiful easily, but Ari, as Dante called him, was "inscrutable". Just when I thought maybe he returned Dante's feelings I was like, oh maybe not. Even when Dante was beaten badly enough to be hospitalized, and Ari found out one of the boys who had done it, he went ballistic and returned the favor to the small punk. Maybe I'm just clueless, but I certainly would destroy anyone who damage my bestie, and I would definitely have pushed her out of the method of a moving vehicle. That's what besties do, or at least I thought so. Which is why it created sense to me when Ari continually said he hadn't done it on purpose, it had just been a reflex. Protecting people you love-no matter the manner of love--is a reflex. You don't think about it, you just do it. I honestly believed for the longest time, that Ari loved Dante as a friend. Their experimental kiss threw me off because the author tried very hard to create the romantic feelings seem one-sided...or as I said, I'm just clueless.I'm not doing very well on this review. This book has got me shooketh. It was just a attractive story, and I loved every page of it! It was sad and funny and exciting and heartbreaking. Dude, this book created me cry. Not full-on ugly cry, but I got misty and that's a amazing as tears when it comes to me. This book also triggered me a bit. But it was a me-thing. I was reminded, every time Ari thought about his father, of how much I miss mine. And like with a lot of other books on my shelves, I can't believe it took me so long to read this.

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    Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe []  2020-1-11 19:19

    Perfect read! I couldn't place it down. I've really been enjoying all the young adult books this year and this is no exception. This book manages to be deep, probing, and realistic, but not too fteen year old Aristotle, known as Ari, is a loner, all that changes however one summer he meets Dante at the pool and the two become inseparable. It's a complicated relationship, it starts to dawn on Ari that Dante likes him, like REALLY likes him. Ari tries to pretend that nothing is wrong but things but his inability to talk about issues muddles the situation. Ari is complicated young boy, he takes after his father who was in Vietnam and came back a changed and quiet man. He also can't support but wonder about his brother who has been in prison since he was four. Ari discovers that in to explore the secrets of the universe he must discover, himself, his complicated family, and his relationship with Dante.A truly amazing read, the characters are multi-faceted and real. You care greatly about them and you wish them to overcome their obstacles. I definitely plan on reading more from this author.

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    Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of Christendom []  2020-10-2 18:15

    First, the negative review is pure B.S.Dr. Bradshaw is not polemical and goes right to the basic texts (and I believe he did his reading and analysis in the original languages, though he explains his insights in plain English). Hence, his supposed "oversight" of the best western scholarship on his subject is a dubious charge, as Dr. Bradshaw's work IS the best western, secondary writing on his topic. Indeed, no need to bow to the clouded and prejudiced views of those who have gone ing on:Dr. Bradshaw's painstakingly documented and detailed demonstration and explication of the fundamental difference between the views about God held by the Christian East and West since the ascendency of Augustinian theology is a must read for all serious theologians, Eastern and Western, Catholic, Protestant, and Orthodox e first crucial point that Bradshaw argues, and which I believe he has demonstrated, is that Eastern Christianity used the language of the ancient Greek philosphy to go beyond the concepts and content of that philosophy to explain the fresh info about God offered by Christian revelation. More importantly, Bradshaw precisely demonstrates how Eastern Christianity employed Greek philosophical words and embued them with extended or fresh meaning(s) to explain that God is private and beyond conceptualization and, furthermore, that mankind can really participate in divine life without pantheistic absorption. Indeed, the notion that God as personal, not an idea, set of ideas, or an impersonal force of somekind -- and more, that man can participate in divine life without pantheistic absorption -- was entirely alien to pre-Christian Hellenic e second crucial point that Bradshaw argues, and I believe that he demonstrates, is that, after Augustine, Latin theology not only used certain terminology of ancient Greek philosophy but also conflated the God of Christian revelation with certain concepts from the content of prevailing Greek philosophy, thereby trapping God into a conceptual box, so to speak. Specifically, by limiting God to "being itself" in agreement with neoPlatonic philosophy--which is apparently self-evident to human logic, but contrary to the often mysterious traditions of authentic, aposrtolic Christian revelation--the Christian West developed an inauthentic, systematic theology--both in its Augustian neo-Platonic form and the subsequent, more-Aristolelian, Thomistic form). The blunt conclusion being that Western Christianity is based on a conceptual idol, not the unlimited God of Christian Revelation, but worse yet, an idol whose 'life' no man could ever participate ly, Bradshaw invites further scholarship and hard thinking about the chance that western theology (or perhaps more appropriately western intellectual idolatry) made the fertile ground for the Enlightenment and all the disaster it birthed: the genocidal Twentieth Century. Of course, the fact that the Christian East experienced no Enlightenment and no Reformation is not proof that the idiocyncracies of western theology caused those events, but it does place the question so to speak. And, Bradshaw pinpoints the dubious aspects of western theology that best help the view that post-schism western Christianity has planted the seeds of its own destruction and perhaps of the world.

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    Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of Christendom []  2020-10-2 18:15

    This is a very necessary and timely book. I found it very exciting and its implications far very broad terms, the book with the articulation and the implications of the historical development of the relationship between Christian faith (theology and spiritual life) and philosophy (or reason in general). The author points out the "important and urgent task" faced by historians of philosophy - to respond questions like: When and how the division between faith and reason occur? What was the turn in history that triggered such a division and was it inevitable? The specific approach that David Bradshaw undertakes is to consider the above questions in the light of the split between the Greek-speaking East and the Latin-speaking West. How did it happen that the division of faith and reason is a strictly Western phenomenon and did not practically happen in the Christian East? Bradshaw's motivation is expressed very clearly: "If we are to properly understand the long story of Western philosophy, we must take into acc of the eastern alternative."How does Bradshaw undertake his comparative study? First, he focuses on the formation of the two traditions up to the point in history where each of them had achieved a relatively definitive form - Thomas Aquinas in the West and Gregory Palamas in the East. Second, and here is what I found to be one of the most exciting point, he chooses the term 'energeia' as a connecting thread in his comparison. Energeia is a Greek word used for the first time by Aristotle (this determines the unique put for him in the title of the book) and usually translated as activity, actuality, operation or energy. It is a term that has been fundamental in Eastern Christian theology since the first centuries up to the show days. To be more precise, the teaching of the Greek Church Fathers on the relationship between man and God can be properly understood only if one knows the difference between "created" and "uncreated" and the difference between "essence" and "energy" in God (see for example John Romanides, An Outline of Orthodox Patristic Dogmatics, Orthodox Research Institute, Rollinsford, Fresh Hampshire, 2004). The chance and the ultimate destiny of human kind to participate in the uncreated energies of God, to be purified, illumined and deified in this show life, are a core teaching of the Eastern Christian tradition. The distinction between essence and energy, however, has long been recognized as one of the most necessary differences between Eastern and Western Christian thought. David Bradshaw shows how energeia, after its "invention" by Aristotle and the evolution of its meaning within the context of Neoplatonism, developed into two branches: "energies" in the East and "esse" (the Latin infinitive of "to be") in the West. Bradshaw does not focus only on Christian tradition and view earlier developments as a mere preamble to it. He believes this to be a distortion of history. His genericly (if I can call it that way) historical approach is in the heart of his argumentation. This is what makes Bradshaw's work academically sound and adshaw's analysis is impressive with its historicity, constructiveness, integrity, depth and far reaching implications. It underlines the continuous coherence of Byzantine theology with its roots in apophaticism which is understood as an inherently epistemological refusal to limit the truth to its rational definition by ignoring its experiential nature. Unsurprisingly, Thomas Aquinas' teaching is seen in the light of Augustine's legacy. Bradshaw, however, finds that Palamas, too, is best understood in the same method - as a reaction to Augustine's influence to Barlaam of Calabria. This approach to the understanding of Palamas' articulation of his teaching on the divine energies was previously ointed out by John Romanides [...] and is now more comprehensively developed by Bradshaw as another connecting thread in his adshaw finds that the differences between the Eastern and the Western traditions can be summarized in a single word: synergy. For the East the highest form of communion with the divine is not an intellectual act (as in Augustine) but sharing of life and activity. The emphasis was on the ongoing and active appropriation of those aspects of the divine life that are begin to participation. In the West, synergy played remarkably small role. Bradshaw finds that the major reason for that is, before everything, linguistic. Most of the Greek works articulating the notion of synergy were not translated into Latin. In addition, the Latin language did not terms as suitable as energeia to situate the meaning of co-sharing and partaking within a broader metaphysical context. Augustine's legacy of God's simplicity was too dominant in the West to let a distinction between God in what He is in himself (i.e., in his essence) and in what he is in his openness to creation (i.e., in his uncreated energies) leading to "a sense of distance between God and creatures, a kind of spiritual dualism artificially separating human body and soul, and a kind of naturalism expressed through the assumption that there is a sphere of natural reason independent of revelation."Bradshaw believes to "have treated the historical material impartially with the aim of arriving at a sympathetic understanding of both traditions within their own context" and, I believe, he has really done so. This, however, does not mean that he does not clearly express his own views which I would identify as "pro-Eastern." This makes me think of his work as a well articulated invitation for a constructive re-thinking of the history of Western Christianity in the light of its own origins in the times of the first centuries and of the first Ecumenical Councils when the the Church was One, Holy, Catholic and Apostolic. This rethinking seems to be critically necessary today when globalization is part of daily life. I search it also critically necessary within the context of the ongoing complex process of European integration.Well, what then is so exciting about using energeia as a connecting thread in the comparison of the Christian East and West? I think that energy is a very abused term. It is used in a lot of various contexts and, sometimes, with questionable meanings. Physicists, for example, tend to look at the meaning of energy in a mechanistic method - the capacity of a body or a system to perform work. Here is a paragraph from Richard Feynman (Six simple pieces, Addison-Wesley Publishing Company, Reading, Massachusetts, 1975): "There is a certain quantity, which we call energy, that does not change in the manifold changes which nature undergoes. ... [Yet] it is necessary to realize in physics today, we have no knowledge of what energy is." The concept of energy has some popularity in psychology, too. It was initiated by a Russian psychologist - V. M. Bekhterev - and his "Collective reflexology" published in 1921 and translated in English in 2001 (L.H. Strickland (Ed.), Fresh Brunswick, NJ: Transaction Publishers). For Bekhterev human "reflexes" were manifestations of energy output following transformations of energy input and thus the reflexes of individuals and groups might become explainable in the same terms applying to energy in physical systems. The specific meaning of energy, however, is far from being strictly , we can think that there is a well defined modern meaning of the term energy but, actually, there is not. I think that the book of David Bradshaw is an necessary systematic contribution to the clarification of the metaphysical understanding of the term energy in oyan TanevOdense, Denmark

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    Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of Christendom []  2020-10-2 18:15

    Dr. Bradshaw gets to the heart of the dissimilarity between Orthodox Christianity and Western Augustinian forms of Christianity: God as experienced in His energies vs God as apprehended rationally. Consequently, he focuses his book around the use of energeia from Aristotle through to Aquinas and Palamas. A difficult, but rewarding MUST read.

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    Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe []  2020-1-11 19:19

    I actually hugged this book after reading it. It's just such a attractive story. If you're looking for a hero driven coming of age story, you'd probably like this. The plot isn't that heavy, and the prose can be very sparse, so you certainly have to long the characters to have fun it. But it's nearly impossible not to love these two thing that impressed me about this story was the nuance in the relationship between Ari and Dante. There's so a lot of subtle moments in their friendship that it wasn't until the very end of the book when I realised how things would turn out. Ari himself wasn't sure how he felt, and the reader wasn't always sure either. I've rarely seen a friendship with so much depth.

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    Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe []  2020-1-11 19:19

    What a sweet, healing, much required book. The book follows the hero Aristotle as he learns to begin up and work through his family trauma, depression, and romantic attractions. It was really emotional at times, and I wasn't always encouraged by the method Aristotle handled LGBTQ topics, but I was really happy by the method the book ended. The author was very effective at portraying so a lot of tough feelings and experiences and bringing them all together for a satisfying conclusion. Also, I loved the cover art.

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    The ethics of the Greek philosophers, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle []  2020-6-11 18:31

    My Review is based upon the Original Book Published in 1903. I have not read the Classic Digitized Reprint!I recently became interested in the Greek philosophers, particularly the works of Plato and Socrates. This little book provided a very amazing starting point for studying the three Giants of the ancient intellectual world: Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. One of the unbelievable things about reading this particular vintage book is the fact that it was originally published in 1903, which, in my opinion, evidence that Amazing Works never grow old. The brief introduction, by Charles M. Higgins, a member of the Brooklyn Ethical Association, responsible for publishing this volume a charming and rare window into the 19th century. A real gentleman, Mr. Higgins, speaks of the age of advancing womanhood - writing that the greatest masculine intellects of the Pagan age were sitting at the feet of brilliantly educated women and learning from them. The names of Sappho, BC 660, and Myrtis, and Corinnna, the chief lyrie poet of Greece are mentioned in his tribute. Already, as a woman, I must admit, I was e book is based upon a lecture by Professor James Hyslop on The Ethics of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle: the points of the lecture are clearly laid out in a series of quotations from the best translations of the works of the philosophers who will be discussed, and this structures the book in a very user-friendly way. It provides a familiarity with each philosopher prior to taking the plunge into what I feared would be material too dense to comprehend. To my delight, it is both easily read and understood. It reads like a amazing novel. I never understood where the origins of mythological Atlantis had its beginnings, nor did I realize that the Golden Rule was one of Plato's Laws 400 BC.A friend, associate and contemporary of the author - Gertrude Ogden Tubby - wrote about him "It has never, either in academic groups or in general reading or acquaintance, been my fortune to come upon another so well versed as he in the history of modern philosophy, from the Greeks onward. Each thinker of the modern centuries was placed logically and chronologically, as similar to the development of modern thought, as naturally and familiarly in Hyslop's mind as a series of cardinal numbers in the average mind."The book has numerous illustrations including portraits of Pythagoras; Socrates; Plato; Aristotle; Epicurus; Empedocles; Aristippus, and Empedocles; and dialogues that contain their theories and philosophies.

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    Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe []  2020-1-11 19:19

    I read this for the #ReadProud challenge, Week is was a contemporary YA novel featuring Mexican-American teenage boys. It was a very quick read, with a lot of a lot of very short chapters - I have a weakness for short chapters, so I liked this a had unbelievable characterization, and angsty teens who came across as actual angsty teens and not some sort of novelistic cliché. I especially loved that (minor spoiler at the end*) - I had that experience (with being trans) where other people knew before I did, and it is not something I see in fiction a lot. I also liked that the parents were well-rounded people and characters in their own right.I also really liked the cover and the fact that 1. there was calligraphy on the cover 2. the calligrapher was credited (Sarah Jane Coleman).But there was one part where I did feel that the book kicked me in the jaw, and not in a amazing sense. This is a major spoiler, and it is about anti-trans hate crimes:(spoilers from here onward)The crime that the protagonist's older brother is jailed for is revealed toward the end as.... he killed a trans woman ("transvestite" - sic) worker in what seemed to have been a "trans panic" episode. Now. It is created amply clear throughout the book that the brother committed a true crime, so I was glad that it was revealed to be a true crime and he wasn't innocent. BUT. The fact that a lot of the plot involves the family coming to terms with his being in prison, AND the fact that out of ALL possible crimes, the author had to choose this one, really created me feel uncomfortable. I will also probably not pick up the upcoming sequel, because I really don't wish to see more 'coming to terms with' with that. This was just one paragraph in the book, but it really soured me on it. Without this paragraph, it would have been an simple five stars... but this changed the interpretation of an entire plotline, and in a method that felt gratuitious to me, especially seeing as this was the only time trans people appeared in the novel.and the minor spoiler from above:* - one of the characters had to be cluebatted about being gayMy usual disclaimer about where I got this book: I bought this one with my own money.

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    Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe []  2020-1-11 19:19

    I chose this book as part of a 30 Days of Pride Book Review project. This is that review:The issue with Aristotle Mendoza’s life was that it wasn't his idea. The book opens with Ari, a fifteen year old kid, starting out the summer of 1987, bristling with the very normal teenage feelings of boredom and abject misery. Then at the community pool Ari meets Dante, a child who, to Ari’s own mind, is completely his opposite. In fact, Ari doesn't think Dante is like anyone else he has ever met: A boy who is crazy about his parents, a boy who cried over the death of a bird, a boy who believed he could explore the secrets of the universe by studying the stars. Ari takes the reader along with him through this summer of friendship, and then into a confusing winter and then right back out on the other side into the summer again. It is a novel of transition, from boyhood to adulthood from strangers to friendship, from feeling inscrutable to is is a attractive ere is a staccato almost poetic rhythm to the prose, each chapter is a sparse stanza that transforms into a deeper emotional truth. This novel just feels like reading poetry. I liked holding the words in my head. I don't usually feel that method about young adult novels.And I liked Ari. I liked him as a human. You know how you can like a character, for all kinds of reasons, without liking them as a human being? I liked Ari as a human being. I liked his self-deprecating narrative voice, his humor, his view of the world. I liked the person he presented as and the person he was becoming. Which I think is important,because, “becoming”, or more acutely existing in that zone of transition was, to me, one of the strongest themes in this novel. Early on in the story Ari is re-reading a journal entry he wrote, which states, “ I don't like being fifteen. I didn't like being fourteen. I didn't like being thirteen. I didn't like being twelve. I didn't like being eleven. Ten was good…” Ari hates being a teenage guy, he hates the changes his body is going through, he hates other guys and he is afraid of becoming a jerk like the 18-year-old lifeguards at the pool. Because, maybe life was just a series of phases, as his mother suggested, and in a couple years he’d be just like them.He's worried that, in growing up, he will become a various person.A lot of times, in life, we accept it as a primary truism that people don't change. That there is no point trying to change someone or waiting around for someone to change because a person is who they are and people can't change. And maybe people don't change dramatically...or, you know, change who they are at their cores, but there is a very poetic truth to the idea that we all exist in a state of flux. That we are always in the process of becoming someone else, and that that process doesn't end with becoming an adult, who is no longer angry, confused, or capable of making huge hood as a process that is never quite finished is a strong theme.I really liked this novel, so the only thing I'm going to place in the negative column is the same old petty typo complaint. Typos are a fact of life, but I hate seeing them in published works… and I'll leave it at ..Do I recommend this novel? Yes, without hesitation, I do. You should read this attractive l that's left are my scales for this project. I've dubbed my first scale the Queer Counterculture Visibility Scale….Which, I created up, and placement onto which is based on my arbitrary istotle and Dante are both Mexican-American boys, struggling with what it means to be a part of that culture. In fact almost everyone in this book is Mexican-American and defining what that means to them. But I liked that one hero pointed out to another, on the topic of whether or not “Real Mexicans” liked to kiss boys, that liking boys was not an American ere isn't an in depth exploration of sexuality here, because that's not what this book is really about, nobody is getting out the Kinsey scale and weighing their attractions. So I can't speak to whether it contains the chance of bisexuality, but it doesn't exclude it, which I can appreciate. There was also a couple as peripheral characters. I'm going to place it at: 3 out of 5 starsGay is the most visible letter in the LGBT acronym, but at least we got to have fun some cultural diversity, and discussion of class problems as relates to that e second scale, I’ve just been calling the Genre Expectation scale. Basically I judge whether or not I feel this book went above and beyond the typical expectations for its genre. This is, for all intents and purposes, a young adult, coming of age story, of which I’ve read a hundred. But there was something moving and poetic about the method this particular story was wrought. The hero growth from seeming so much a kid in the beginning to seeming so much an adult in the end and the slow, bending, poetic method it got from point A to point B was moving in a method few YA books tend to capture. It expected more from its audience then most YA books, I think. I'm putting it at: 5 out of 5 stars It exceeded my expectations for the genre.

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    Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe []  2020-1-11 19:19

    Beautifully written coming of age book about friendship and family, and discovering a sense of self. The story of Ari and Dante really moved me, from the moment they meet at the pool as awkward adolescents to their hovering on the brink of self-realization as young adults. Each of the main characters has a distinct personality that grows and matures as the story unfolds, through well-written and attractive dialogue. The author has the talent to illustrate the boys’ emotions and changes instead of just describing them. The parents are also given real, complex personalities that figure into the story. I couldn’t place this down and was sad when the story ended.

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    The ethics of the Greek philosophers, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle []  2020-6-11 18:31

    Interesting

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    The ethics of the Greek philosophers, Socrates, Plato and Aristotle []  2020-6-11 18:31

    I recently became interested in the Greek philosophers, particularly the works of Plato and Socrates. This little book provided a very amazing starting point for studying the three Giants of the ancient intellectual world: Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle. One of the unbelievable things about reading this particular vintage book is the fact that it was originally published in 1903, which, in my opinion, evidence that Amazing Works never grow old. The brief introduction, by Charles M. Higgins, a member of the Brooklyn Ethical Association, responsible for publishing this volume a charming and rare window into the 19th century. A real gentleman, Mr. Higgins, speaks of the age of advancing womanhood - writing that the greatest masculine intellects of the Pagan age were sitting at the feet of brilliantly educated women and learning from them. The names of Sappho, BC 660, and Myrtis, and Corinnna, the chief lyrie poet of Greece are mentioned in his tribute. Already, as a woman, I must admit, I was e book is based upon a lecture by Professor James Hyslop on The Ethics of Socrates, Plato and Aristotle: the points of the lecture are clearly laid out in a series of quotations from the best translations of the works of the philosophers who will be discussed, and this structures the book in a very user-friendly way. It provides a familiarity with each philosopher prior to taking the plunge into what I feared would be material too dense to comprehend. To my delight, it is both easily read and understood. It reads like a amazing novel. I never understood where the origins of mythological Atlantis had its beginnings, nor did I realize that the Golden Rule was one of Plato's Laws 400 BC.A friend, associate and contemporary of the author - Gertrude Ogden Tubby - wrote about him "It has never, either in academic groups or in general reading or acquaintance, been my fortune to come upon another so well versed as he in the history of modern philosophy, from the Greeks onward. Each thinker of the modern centuries was placed logically and chronologically, as similar to the development of modern thought, as naturally and familiarly in Hyslop's mind as a series of cardinal numbers in the average mind."The book has numerous illustrations including portraits of Pythagoras; Socrates; Plato; Aristotle; Epicurus; Empedocles; Aristippus, and Empedocles; and dialogues that contain their theories and philosophies.

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    Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of Christendom []  2020-10-2 18:15

    Prof. Bradshaw has written a brilliant but readable book for serious thinkers. The topic itself is difficult, but Bradshaw does a masterful job of making it as plain as possible. The reader who perseveres will be rewarded with a clear and compelling contrast between two very various Gods: a Western God who can be rationally comprehended but only seen from some distance, in the Beatific Vision, and an Eastern God who is beyond comprehension but whose divine nature is not seen but shared, through participation in the divine energeia. Bradshaw clearly favors the latter, but the reader is left to judge for himself which view better fits the biblical testimony, in which we are called to be "joint heirs with Christ" (Rom. 8:17) and "partakers of the divine nature" (2 Peter 1:4). The book should be especially enlightening to Protestant and Evangelical readers, to whom the Orthodox teaching on "divine energy" sometimes seems bizarre. After they read this book, it will not seem e book also provides a scholarly corrective to the ignorant notion that the coming of Christianity meant the end of reason and the "closing of the Western mind." The truth is exactly the opposite. As Bradshaw shows, the neoplatonist school of late pagan philosophy was edging its method toward Christianity and ultimately approximated the Christian understanding of God with its own trinities of "the One, Intellect, and Soul" and "Being, Life, and Intellect." What neoplatonism lacked was a sense of divine personhood and a compelling reason to believe its own speculation. Christianity happy such deficiencies with an incarnate Christ, a convincing historical narrative, a rich liturgical heritage, and a welcoming human community, in addition to a theology that in time far surpassed anything the philosophers were capable of. Far from being the end of philosophy, Christianity was its e book should furthermore prompt readers to rethink the false dichotomy of philosophy and theology. As Bradshaw shows, the amazing Greek philosophical tradition of Plato and Aristotle was fundamentally theological. Take out the theology and the philosophy dies. The proof is in today's academy, where philosophy is taught as archaeology, a field of dead ideas of interest only to academics, leading students not to truth but to doubt and despair. No wonder that Christians themselves have taken to talking in terms of a Christian "worldview," when what they mean is what the ancients called philosophy. With this book and others like it, perhaps we can recover a better appreciation for the "Holy Wisdom" that enlightened the ancient globe before darkness entirely overtakes our modern one.

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    Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of Christendom []  2020-10-2 18:15

    This unbelievable book underrates itself in its modest title. Bradshaw virtually a deep and deeply interesting acc of Christian philosophy in the first millennium, with a serious and helpful look at the consequences in later medieval thought. These contain not only the schism, in which the West fell away from its spiritual unity with the central tradition of the Orthodox Faith, but also an impoverished understanding of the notions of power and energy. Though Philip Sherrard addressed some of these themes in his comparative works--still well worth consideration--, he did so far less accessibly than e Latin tradition is intelligently and even sympathetically discussed in a predominantly irenic spirit. Bradshaw manages to balance the prevailing atmosphere of Western ignorance and prejudice (well illustrated in a couple of the less sympathetic reviews here) with a lucid acc of the thinking of necessary but underemphasized figures in philosophical scholarship; e.g., the Cappadocians, St. Dionysius and St. Maximus. While there have been a number of helpful studies of these thinkers in latest years, they have been mostly concerned with what is now called spirituality, or with dogmatic theology. The unity of faith, practice and intellectual life which has prevailed in the Christian East has not been generally appreciated. Bradshaw appreciates it.I have shared this fine book with colleagues and students; they have always profited and appreciated its helpful treatment of an problem and of thinkers who are still far too small appreciated or ill understood in prevalent schools of philosophical scholarship. It is hard reading, but well worth the effort.

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    Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of Christendom []  2020-10-2 18:15

    The purpose of David Bradshaw's perfect book is to explain and evaluate the radically various understandings of the divine nature in the Greek East and the Latin West. The author begins by tracing the history of the Greek concept of energeia, a term coined by Aristotle to mean something like "energy" or "activity." Bradshaw then goes on to explain the central role of energeia in the development of eastern Christendom's understanding of the divine nature and how this development differed from the understanding of God that arose in the West. In the Christian East, a distinction is created between the ousia, or essence, of God, and the energeiai, or activities, of God. In the Latin West, however, the distinction between God's ousia and energeiai was not preserved. Instead, the Fathers of the Western Church, Augustine and Aquinas most notably, collapsed the two aspects of the divine nature together under the single term esse (the infinitive of the "to be" verb in Latin). The theological/philosophical meaning of esse approaches what the Greek Fathers meant by ousia, but the meaning of energeia was essentially outlining the objectionable but important implications of the West's conflated view of the divine nature, a view known as divine simplicity, Bradshaw argues that eastern Christianity's distinction between God's ousia and energeiai was certainly not intended to be an abstract theological or philosophical exercise in splitting hairs. Rather, what is often referred to as the "essence/energy distinction" is important if we want to preserve the transcendence of God's nature, while at the same time making it possible for human beings to interact with - and even participate in - the activities and life of God. He makes a strong and convincing argument.But fainthearted readers beware! The first half of the book can be tough-going at times - that is, unless you have fun reading Plotinus in your spare time. But even if you don't, the first few chapters are well worth the effort when you see the direction Bradshaw takes you in the second half of the book. If you hang in there, I promise you, your labors will be richly rewarded.

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    Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of Christendom []  2020-10-2 18:15

    Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of ChristendomDavid Bradshaw angered a lot of people with this, though when one looks at what is actually said, it's hard to see how Bradshaw said anything new. Even where he suggests fresh readings, he is not reconstructing the readings in any major way.A few words beforehand: this book cautions versus reading later concepts into an earlier word. Contrary to the nonsense at Credenda Agenda, the Eastern fathers' use of "energies" stems not from Plotinus (since Plotinus did not invent either the word or the concept) but rather was an older word that was continually reinterpreted around increasingly Christian istotle was the first to use this word, energia (or any of its semantic cognates). Aristotle's use suggests something along the lines of actuality and activity. Other thinkers took the word and gave it various applications, but the term itself did not have much of a philosophical impact until Middle Platonism (the biblical use of the term will be dealt with later).Plotinus makes several interesting suggestions. Plotinus expands energia from Aristotle's actuality to the intrinsic productivity of all things (77). Plotinus' Two Acts: Intellect comes from the One, leaving the one unchanged. The lower hypostasis goes forth from the higher hypostasis and looks to that higher hypostasis to attain being (81). The second act is the internal energia contemplating the return back to the higher lamas and Eastern theology in general have been accused of simply regurgitating Plotinus per salvation (cf. Doug Wilson's moronic essay to this title). But given that a lot of Eastern writers were saying related things before Proclus and Plotinus, and that later Eastern writers fundamentally changed key moves in Plotinus' system, it's hard to say that the Eastern view is simply neo-Platonic .The highlight of Bradshaw's book is the comparison between St Gregory Palamas and the Augustinian-Thomist synthesis. Bradshaw got in a small problem for this argument, but it's hard to see why, since Western authors have said the same thing. Bradshaw points out that for Augustine's view of divine simplicity (and truth in general), a number of reductios entail: if God's will and God's essence are identical, it's hard to see how God could have willed otherwise (since God's essence cannot be otherwise). Hence, a most radical form of fatalism. Thomas accepts this argument, but Bradshaw's critique focuses mainly on Thomas' inability to rise out of his presuppositions. He wants to have a form of participatory metaphysics in the afterlife, but this cannot square with his emphasis on the beatific vision.While it is real that Roman Catholicism espouses a form of synergism, it's hard to see how. Since Aquinas says that God wills all things in a single act of willing (which is identical with his essence), monsters cannot contribute anything to their salvation (or even spiritual life). Thus, all that remains is the relationship of grace manifested in an extrinsic and causal method (254). While inviting opprobrium from the academia (who do nothing in response but chant "De Regnon" and sneer "neo-Palamite"), Bradshaw has clearly outlined his case. Even accepting that he has misread Proclus and Plotinus at places, it can no longer be gainsaid that the theological vision of Augustine and Aquinas is fundamentally at odds with the Eastern fathers. And since Christianity came from the East, and developed its theological expression in the East; ergo....Addendum:About ten years ago Joseph P. Farrell advanced related claims, and the scholarly globe laughed at him, dismissing him because he believed in zone pyramids or something. The unspoken implication was that all rejections of Augustinian Triadology reduce to this same absurdity. David Bradshaw, writing from a peer-reviewed and university position, says exactly the same thing. However, his book was only published by Cambridge. Since then Andrew Radde-Galwitz (Oxford 2009) has gone even further. More importantly, his book was published by Oxford. The point in all of this is modern university scholarship is catching up to what Farrell said fifteen years ago. It's simple to laugh at Farrell. However, other academically-published authors are saying the same thing. Farrell's detractors are finding themselves increasingly marginalized.

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    Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of Christendom []  2020-10-2 18:15

    Not an simple read. Takes true effort.But worth any difficulty involved. It is a very serious work by someone who is both a philosopher by profession and an Eastern Orthodox Christian.He gives an intellectual history of "energeia", a very necessary term for the early Fathers, later Fathers, and also the Amazing Fathers of the latest millenium, such as St Gregory Palamas.

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    Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of Christendom []  2020-10-2 18:15

    This is an intellectually challenging work, but it is very clearly written and shows the method of the Fathers of the Church who walked with God constantly. Book knowledge is not enough, but this solid knowledge provides the method to walk in faith in the Living and Real God. The book with the concept of energy is all its historic nuonces, but then shows how the Apostle Paul and the amazing teachers who followed him in the East used the concept to support us grasp the Biblical experience of Our Lord Jesus and His doctrine of communion with the Holy Trinity. It also shows how conceptual blocks in some of the Western Fathers made a divide between theology and practice.

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    Aristotle East and West: Metaphysics and the Division of Christendom []  2020-10-2 18:15

    It is hard to search fault with such a magisterial work, and I must admit that my only quibble is with its title, for the book with so much more than Aristotle interpretation, extending to brilliantly addressing the great, perennial concerns of Western thought as such. I will test to explain this rather huge rst, as we examine our rich heritage from ancient Greek thought, we search certain "key words" that became woven into the fabric of Western thinking. Foremost among these is "logos," whose influence extends from Jewish (think Philo here) and Christian theology to the very concept of science, which depends upon the presupposition of different "logoi" to be found with the real, and giving us regional sciences such as bio-logy, psycho-logy, etc. Others are "physis," the self-emergence that we call "nature," and "nous," the amazing contemplative power that crowns human knowledge as well as being as a whole. But perhaps most neglected within intellectual history (at least in English language studies) is the great, fundamental word "energeia," which can be translated as energy, activity, actualization, actuality. Thomas Aquinas translated it as "actus," and it is under this guise that it is indirectly known in Western thought, rather like the light of the sun being reflected in the moon. But in the Byzantine East, the lost and nearly forgotten sister of Latin culture, "energeia" was pursued much more extensively and robustly, blossoming in the work of Gregory Palamas, born not long after the death of Aquinas. And here, in the amazing Byzantine tradition extending from Clement of Alexandria, through Maximus the Confessor in the seventh century, to Palamas in the fourteenth, are extraordinary riches of thought to be found. Bradshaw's book, then, is the first book in English to reconstruct and retrieve this long lost treasury of ideas surrounding one of the most important, and most neglected, key words in Western philosophy, previously known only as it was assimilated into the scholastic system of Thomas Aquinas.But there is more. Perhaps the greatest philosophical perplexity of all in the history of Western thought concerns the relation between the one and the many, the visible and the invisible, the same and the other, or in theological terms transcendence and immanence. For the sake of brevity, I will discuss only the latter. The issue is familiar. If the Absolute (or God) is utterly transcendent, how would we even know of His (its) existence. Radical monotheism (such as Judaism and islam) must address this concern. On the other hand, if God is completely immanent, then we are left with a most unsatisfactory pantheism, which must admit that all that is not good in the globe (notably the suffering of the innocent) is from some "higher" point of view excellent and divine, a step taken by the Ancient Stoics, Spinoza, and a lot of strands of Hinduism. Western theology and espistemology have generally taken a seemingly moderate position, saying that we cannot experience God, who must be known either through reasoning (Catholicism) or revelation (Catholicism and Protestantism), views that a lot of search less than credible today, as witnessed by the decline of the Abrahamic religions in the West. It is not accidental that a lot of search the natural globe a better source of inspiration, for here they feel that they experience something divine, something that the East has not hesitated to validate as the divine energies themselves!Proceeding from the concept of "energeia," then, the Christian East has arrived at a very various respond to the question of immanence and transcendence. The divine "essence" (ousia) is asserted to be radically transcendent and utterly mysterious, even to the highest angelic orders, thus preserving divine transcendence. At the same time the divine energies or activities "energeiai" surround us everywhere and reveal themselves to those whose hearts and minds are purified, i.e. they can and should be experienced. Hence the importance in the East of asceticism and monasticism, where the purification of heart and mind are systematically pursued: the laboratories, as it were, of is is exciting stuff, and it will be fresh location for many. Hence the bewilderment shown by some who have been educated in quarters where the Thomistic synthesis is assumed to be the latest word. But to those who read this book with an begin mind, a whole fresh continent of thought and spirituality will start to ly, a word about the two extremely negative reviewers. it is entertaining, if not edifying, to take a glance at the other reviews by these two curious figures. One of them seems to specialize in seeking out prominent authors (like Umberto Eco) and giving them one star reviews, as well as subjecting them to polemical rants. The overwhelming number of his review give one star, along with lots of vitriol. Perhaps better than beating the wife or kicking the dog. The other is even more peculiar. His other reviews evaluate such products as Mr. Clean Liquid Muscle All Purpose Surface Cleaner Gain Original New Scent, and Mead Filler Paper, College Ruled, and perhaps he should indeed stick to these. But he also has an especially enthusiastic review of a certain whip to be used in sado-masochistic practices, a "perfect beginner toy" since "a firm whack is just excellent for causing short-lived red marks." Who could create these things up?At any rate, I would urge those who are interested in the kind of intellectual and spiritual discovery that Bradshaw's book offers, to consider setting aside some time (a vacation perhaps) and rolling up their sleeves. The book is well-written and accessible, but there are so a lot of fresh (old) ideas here that it takes time and energy to assimilate them. However, those willing to undertake the voyage will search themselves rewarded beyond their expectation.

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts []  2020-1-22 22:23

    A amazing read. But it was published before the latest couple of books were out, so it's a bit incomplete it terms of the scope of the series.

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts []  2020-1-22 22:23

    Couldn't place it down! Turely interesting, all the method through. I believe that every Harry Potter reader noted these things as they read along. Three cheers, fantastic.

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts []  2020-1-22 22:23

    Some of the essays in this collection are better than others. A couple were fairly simplistic. The Ravenclaw section was beautiful good... all about metaphysics. Despite the inconsistent quality, it's a fun and rather simple read if you're a huge (really big) fan of the book series. In addition, I felt like I actually learned some things about classic philosophers as they compared their ideas to scenarios in the Harry Potter books. It beautiful much takes traditional philosophical arguments/ideas and uses examples of Harry Potter to supplement the chapters. Very fun and a amazing method to substitute mini philosophy lessons for someone who is no longer in school (and has read the HP series.)

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts []  2020-1-22 22:23

    Amazing for Potterphiles that wish to go beyond just reading Potter. Read this if you wish to freak people out with just how much geek you can pull from the series. Also read if you wish to take what you have loved and learn wisdom from it.

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts []  2020-1-22 22:23

    I read this book not expecting any amazing fresh philosophies or insights into old ones. I was pleasantly surprised. As a person that has read a lot of of the older philosophical texts, I know how hard it is to sometimes understand the reasonings and logic presented. I think this book presents its ideas in a very clear method that even the youngest audiences of Harry Potter would be able to have a amazing introduction to philosophical thought.

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts []  2020-1-22 22:23

    This book came to me promply. Since it is used I expected wear and tear, but the book is like new. Thank You

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts []  2020-1-22 22:23

    It feels as though they just took Harry Potter and threw philosophy in it. It was an interesting read but a few of the essays ended up feeling slower than nessisary, to the point I skipped the rest of the single essay. Unfortunatly, I did not have fun it, save for maybe one or two essays. Mine came without a book jacket, revealing un ugly brown hard cover underneath.

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts []  2020-1-22 22:23

    This book actually adds to Joannes already superbly developed characters. The authors of each essay included in this book have taken time to avoid making wrong hero judgements. The editors have placed the essay in an making it easier to understand the characters in the context of all the other characters. Snape is extremely complex and well defined here.Timbus ViolettProfessor Emeritus The University of The Grind

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts []  2020-1-22 22:23

    The value of this series is that it locations philosophical concepts in the context of a story. Often people are intimidated by philosophy because the language is so abstract and the context coceptual. Because these essays connect to a story, the writers remain much more concrete. The reader is able better visualize the conceptual and explore fresh ways of thinking about the globe and relationships that create it work.

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts []  2020-1-22 22:23

    My class book

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    The Basic Works of Aristotle []  2019-12-20 18:28

    Needed text for ethics class. Tough read. Often confusing, occasionally redundant but I suspect that's because so a lot of principals have been incorporated into western social philosophy as a whole. Wouldn't reread it if you me to, once is plenty.

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    The Basic Works of Aristotle []  2019-12-20 18:28

    Came in splendid condition, and is an perfect choice for anyone wanting to obtain into Aristotle's works. Necessary texts come complete, and some "not so important" texts come in portions, takin' out some unnecessary bits. Amazing amazing good.

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    The Basic Works of Aristotle []  2019-12-20 18:28

    The is amazing for such book. Just a small hard to understand. Wouldn’t recommend for philosophy reading beginners.

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    The Basic Works of Aristotle []  2019-12-20 18:28

    Amazing anthology work!

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    The Basic Works of Aristotle []  2019-12-20 18:28

    Okay, so almost nobody buys this book to "read" it. This is an English translation produced by a Fresh York university library of the original Germanic text of Aristotle which is his oldest known "complete works of". This is a reference text for people who study Philosophy, and because I study Philosophy I snagged the opportunity to this pre-loved book. The printing is of fine quality, the paper is lovely, and the overall condition of the work is good. This book has created life much easier for me, because I can use it to reference huge tracts of Aristotle in my papers, and has proved valuable in researching obscure course material on topics, such as "Metaphysics" - directly from the source (something not even a lot of lecturers actually bother to do) which allows the researcher to better understand both source and derivative material, and accurately emplace historical context on their own products. My private view on reading this material is that it is very old, densely packed, difficult to understand, and the lay reader will require some considerable grounding in both the known facts of Aristotle's life, as well as the topic matter he works with before attempting to tackle it on their own. This is very literally from the birth of Philosophy as a field of study, and Aristotle, like Plato, considers the field of Philosophy through the practice of pure reasoning from first principles to the be the absolute pinnacle of human intellectual achievement. Mostly dialectic in style, it is a amazing accompaniment to a "Complete Works of Plato" on any bookshelf. Be fairly warned though, if someone sees this on your bookshelf and questions you about it, attempting to talk about Aristotle's reasoning without having actually read any Aristotle will create anyone, however learned, look and feel like a pretentious fool. However, if you can obtain into it, there is SO much to love about Aristotle's philosophical work. The power of the man's mind is amazing, his reasoning skill is scalpel-sharp and rarely if ever does he waste words. The work (and wit) are of first-rate quality, throughout the entire text. This book can be opened to any page at random and provide enough to absorb, discuss, and research for amazing lengths of time.

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    The Basic Works of Aristotle []  2019-12-20 18:28

    Great

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    The Basic Works of Aristotle []  2019-12-20 18:28

    This book seems to be a collections of text files of Aristotle's writing. As far as I can tell there is no structure to how they are organized. I did not see a table of contents either so it is very hard to search the interesting writings in this collection.

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    The Basic Works of Aristotle []  2019-12-20 18:28

    Aristotle for a lot of amazing reasons remains the "grandfather" of philosophy and it's obvious to see why. These works include the basics of Aristotle's writing in a good, lucid translation. It goes without saying that understanding Aristotle is key to not only understanding Western history but also also globe philosophy in general. The truths that he spoke of 2000 plus years remains real and highly relevant to this day.

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    The Basic Works of Aristotle []  2019-12-20 18:28

    Decent on needed reading

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    The Basic Works of Aristotle []  2019-12-20 18:28

    Of Aristotle's works, I no critique; what could I say that has not been said more clearly and elegantly by reviewers more expert than I on the subject? Beyond the wonderful historical and cultural import of the works, the fact that the writings of a scientist and philosopher who lived some 2300+ years ago resonate so clearly with the modern reader speaks to their brilliance--even in the cases where philosophical and scientific advances created some ideas outdated. Instead, I critique this particular volume, which in my mind has several strengths and rengths: As others have noticed, this is the best one-volume compilation of Aristotle's works. In terms of cost and convenience that makes this an beautiful work. For someone interested in the full scope of Aristotle's works, this would be a nice ver to have.Weaknesses: I cannot read the original Greek to compare the translation to the original, but in English, the translation can come off as a bit dry, dated, and uninspired. For me, I also missed the lack of introductory material or other commentary on the works, which are quite difficult for the general reader. In retrospect, as I was interested in gaining in-depth exposure to some of Aristotle's "greatest hits" rather than the entire magnitude of his works, I probably would've been better off buying a smaller number of works separately. Greater cost would've been outweighed by the greater commentary which separate works could've provided. For people reading this material as part of a class, this might not be an necessary weakness, but it is necessary for readers like me attempting to gain some insight to the wisdom of Aristotle through independent study.A ver with definite pros and cons; I believe its utility depends on the intended usage and the existing familiarity with Aristotle's works of the reader. I believe this ver is very amazing on its own merits, but again as a more general reader looking for exposure to the philosophy of Aristotle, I don't know that this was the best ver for me. I am not too proud to admit that as a newcomer to Aristotle I would have enjoyed a small hand-holding as I navigated his philosophical realm for the first time; buying separate versions of his works might've been best. However, for the reader looking for a one-volume ver of Aristotle's works, this is the ver for you.

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts (Popular Culture and Philosophy Book 9) []  2020-7-26 18:58

    Couldn't place it down! Turely interesting, all the method through. I believe that every Harry Potter reader noted these things as they read along. Three cheers, fantastic.

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts (Popular Culture and Philosophy Book 9) []  2020-7-26 18:58

    A amazing read. But it was published before the latest couple of books were out, so it's a bit incomplete it terms of the scope of the series.

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts (Popular Culture and Philosophy Book 9) []  2020-7-26 18:58

    Amazing for Potterphiles that wish to go beyond just reading Potter. Read this if you wish to freak people out with just how much geek you can pull from the series. Also read if you wish to take what you have loved and learn wisdom from it.

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts (Popular Culture and Philosophy Book 9) []  2020-7-26 18:58

    This book actually adds to Joannes already superbly developed characters. The authors of each essay included in this book have taken time to avoid making wrong hero judgements. The editors have placed the essay in an making it easier to understand the characters in the context of all the other characters. Snape is extremely complex and well defined here.Timbus ViolettProfessor Emeritus The University of The Grind

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts (Popular Culture and Philosophy Book 9) []  2020-7-26 18:58

    I read this book not expecting any amazing fresh philosophies or insights into old ones. I was pleasantly surprised. As a person that has read a lot of of the older philosophical texts, I know how hard it is to sometimes understand the reasonings and logic presented. I think this book presents its ideas in a very clear method that even the youngest audiences of Harry Potter would be able to have a amazing introduction to philosophical thought.

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts (Popular Culture and Philosophy Book 9) []  2020-7-26 18:58

    This book came to me promply. Since it is used I expected wear and tear, but the book is like new. Thank You

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts (Popular Culture and Philosophy Book 9) []  2020-7-26 18:58

    My class book

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts (Popular Culture and Philosophy Book 9) []  2020-7-26 18:58

    Some of the essays in this collection are better than others. A couple were fairly simplistic. The Ravenclaw section was beautiful good... all about metaphysics. Despite the inconsistent quality, it's a fun and rather simple read if you're a huge (really big) fan of the book series. In addition, I felt like I actually learned some things about classic philosophers as they compared their ideas to scenarios in the Harry Potter books. It beautiful much takes traditional philosophical arguments/ideas and uses examples of Harry Potter to supplement the chapters. Very fun and a amazing method to substitute mini philosophy lessons for someone who is no longer in school (and has read the HP series.)

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts (Popular Culture and Philosophy Book 9) []  2020-7-26 18:58

    It feels as though they just took Harry Potter and threw philosophy in it. It was an interesting read but a few of the essays ended up feeling slower than nessisary, to the point I skipped the rest of the single essay. Unfortunatly, I did not have fun it, save for maybe one or two essays. Mine came without a book jacket, revealing un ugly brown hard cover underneath.

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    Harry Potter and Philosophy: If Aristotle Ran Hogwarts (Popular Culture and Philosophy Book 9) []  2020-7-26 18:58

    The value of this series is that it locations philosophical concepts in the context of a story. Often people are intimidated by philosophy because the language is so abstract and the context coceptual. Because these essays connect to a story, the writers remain much more concrete. The reader is able better visualize the conceptual and explore fresh ways of thinking about the globe and relationships that create it work.

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    Football and Philosophy: Going Deep (The Philosophy of Popular Culture) []  2020-7-17 19:28

    There were two terrific essays in this book: one about the college playoff system and one about the result of the NFL salary cap on competition. The rest of the essays were nothing special.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:9

    The Catalog Problem. The application is fine. The thing is, when I choose a topic, for example Metaphysics, and hit back, it should go back to showing By Branch/Doctrine's contents. Instead it shows A Fast History of Philosophy under By Branch/Doctrine. I hope you guys can fix this.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:9

    The application is not very nice. I mean the info about Philosophy is alright but other things I noticed are really poor and I've only been using it for 3 days. - The grammar, oh man, the grammar is so poor in this. Why? And more importantly how did you manage to do that? - There's no dark mode. - The ads. At the end of every chapter or section of a chapter, there's an ad. - The UI looks and feels like the developer has place in zero efforts.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:9

    OMG, This application really serves it's purpose completely. 💯 I've used a lot of apps before but this one is the BEST... ❤️ Thanks for the amazing Effort Developers 🔥

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    Why the silly nagging question "enjoying this app" that only allows 'Yes' or 'not really' as the answer. ???

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    First time user. Thorough, succinct and informative, with a clean User Interface. Amazing experience thus far.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    As love learner I really like the app. Great!

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    Exceptional and thought provoking application

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    easy and amazing

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    I'm not giving three stars because I think that the grammar is a serious question, if you need any support with this I can you. I'm not an expert, but it is easy things that will improve the app. You need to place source. But the idea is awesome, it really like it and when I sought the application I already downloaded it. The designer is also beautiful nice.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    I can't believe this is a app.. amazing so far, broadly but precisely, cover's lot of subjects

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    Absolutely love this application and it's been very helpful. My only suggestions would be maybe a small more textual organization, and more emphasis on the info of the content. Other than that, you guys did a amazing job 👍🏻.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    So far, it's simple to navigate. I like the categories, and breadth and depth of information.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    The best! It helps me a lot and refresh my undeestanding.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    It a amazing app, it simplify philosophy making it simple and fun to read

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    Highly educational. Go forth and dig in.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    Breaks down huge concepts for the laymen with an intuitive and elegant UI

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    Fun but very ery educational at the same time

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    Very useful. Compressed and factual

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    Organized really well, if you truly wish to learn and understand philosophy, then this application is definitley for you.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    Love this application so much

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    Without philosophy,oh that's true hell

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:9

    It's really useful and a short but rigorous presentation of philosophy. In my opinion, they could add Cioran, Blaga and Noica to their list. I understand they are less known than Nietzsche, but their work was awesome and you can learn so much from them.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:9

    More explicit than my text book easy and Claire and in basice english will be beter for sure.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    One of the best app in Google Play, it has an organized collection of the globe most popular philosophers and thinkers. I am Absolutely recommend for everyone who are interested about raise knowledge about how our globe are working.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    This is a amazing application but needs a lot of updates

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    Very amazing app. In simple bitsized format. Would reccomend

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    Amazing intro, & current, too.

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    Philosophy - Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Nietzsche. [App]  2020-6-9 13:10

    From what I have seen so far it contains a fairly huge library of info for free, which for one is beautiful amazing it could contain some more regarding some topics. But despite that it's a really amazing application and simple to use.

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