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    Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    This is an impeccably researched and referenced acc of the Theranos saga. As a long-time observer and sometime competitor of Theranos I watched this tale unfold whilst working at a couple of established IVD companies. Everyone I knew who had ever developed an assay or instrument knew this was smoke and mirrors, impossibly too amazing to be true. What I never suspected was just how personally dishonest EH had been, and for how long the complex deception was maintained. Whilst I've met a few egregious individuals working for huge companies, there are enough checks and balances (QA/RA, Med/Sci Affairs, CLSs and other specialists etc) in put to stop harmful devices getting out the e topic matter - developing devices and assays - is a complex dry topic, difficult to write engagingly about. But JC does a workmanlike job and I read this in one go after its midnight Kindle release. My only nit to pick is the not good editing: there are so a lot of uses of '....named....' as in 'an engineer named John Smith' or 'a restaurant named Joe's Bar' that it got irritating. Find/replace 'named' with a comma would have worked fine in most cases. The text was also repetitive - eg '...an award named after Channing...' gets at least 2 mentions. But not enough to lose a star.Kudos to the amazing people at Theranos who had the courage to obtain the story out and for JCs persistence into a headwind of legalistic intimidation. I've heard Theranos is now a case-study for MBA students: this book should be needed reading for anyone thinking about 'disrupting' the medical devices industry. There are lives at stake.

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    Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    An engrossing, extremely well-researched book, clearly and effectively presented.While it's sometimes frustrating that Mr. Carreyrou was unable - for obvious reasons - to interview Elizabeth Holmes and gather her own recollections of the happenings recounted here, one finishes 'Bad Blood' with a comprehensive understanding of the whole deception - and a reasonable understanding of this woman whose not so well-laid plans came crashing down to cidentally and personally, I was struck repeatedly by all the ways Elizabeth Holmes resembles - of all people - Donald Trump. It isn't merely that both seem to possess an unparalleled narcissism but even more, that both were/are able to easily spout a revolving litany of lies in furtherance of their own self-interest with no regard for ultimate consequence. Both made/make demands of loyalty central to people's employment - and then dispose of these underlings once they're no longer of use. (The length of the list of those fired at Theranos is only rivaled by the number of people tossed out of the Trump administration during its first year and a half.) Both managed - for a while at least - to convince countless people who should have known better that they possessed expertise which clearly they did and do not.Anyway - :) - stunning, tremendously entertaining and enlightening acc of this heavy debacle.

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    Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    Very interesting read about the fraud that is Elizabeth Holmes. For those of us in the clinical lab industry, we knew that all the tests she claimed could be performed accurately and less expensive from a capillary sample was just simply not true. It was just a matter of time for the truth about her and the impossibility of what she claimed, to finally be revealed. Amazing investigative reporting John Carryrou!

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    Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    I started this book and could not place it down. It's a horrifying real story of a driven entrepreneur whose only overriding goal was to become insanely rich. And she would do anything, any unimagineable thing, to obtain there.Elizabeth Holmes leveraged her family's high profile connections to draw in early investors and supporters, who were not very inquisitive on details, nor very skeptical in nature. Drawing on the amazing name and reputation of these early supporters, she was able to build an impressive roster of other supporters with stellar reputations in tech and venture capital circles. From there, it was just a matter of scene managing the house of cards she was building.Holmes crafted a Potemkin village that had fooled investors, customers, and visiting dignitaries. Her product demonstrations were outright theater, staged managed illusions worthy of David Copperfield. Theranos employees in on the ruse were assured it was just temporary, until the actual product could be perfected and the results repeatable. That day would never come. Those on the outside who also worked in this field had well founded and grave doubts about how Theranos could be touting a product that seemingly defied both logic and physics. Their suspicions, proven to be correct, was that it was too amazing to be true.Without a trace of guilt or regret, she induced strong tech workers to leave lucrative careers at other major tech firms, giving up millions in stock options, to come work for Theranos, surely knowing the whole thing would collapse one day. When skeptical board members asked to see data affirming the effectiveness of their product, Holmes would defer, saying those papers were in perpetual legal review. Some employees, when they were no longer useful to her, or deemed disloyal, were immediately and unceremoniously marched is is a true life thriller, the story of someone who is a real diabolical film villain. Holmes is portrayed vividly as a paranoid sociopath who could also be disarming, charmingly manipulative, utterly ruthless and devoid of conscience. This is a tale of corporate greed and lack of regulatory oversight gone all awry.

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    Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    Read this cover to cover in a day. Absolutely fascinating and riveting. Having worked in Silicon Valley for 35+ years I am not surprised by any of it - the passion, the hype, the deceit, the vanity, the greed, and the willingness of the smartest people on the Planet to topic themselves to a toxic and demeaning culture led by power hungry attention seeking sociopaths. There are a lot of stories just like this one that will never be written about. Perfect journalism - a must read.

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    Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    Excellent! Read it in one day. Well written and reads like a John Grisham book but frighteningly true. Proof that investigative reporting is so critical.

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    Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    A very well done research on the Theranos fraud. Kudos to those putting their stories out there.

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    Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    One of the best business books of all time. Amazing work of research and investigation. Wonderful story as amazing as it gets. Amazing work by John Carreyrou must read for anyone interested in technology.

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    Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    I read this book in one day. I had read some articles and/or saw TV shows on Theranos and Elizabeth Holmes, but my knowledge was beautiful general. Once I started the book, I could not place it down. I canceled lunch with a mate so I could continue reading. I ordered pizza for the family so I could continue reading. The story is interesting and shocking. It is a story that every Board should read because ultimately it failed in its oversight responsibilities - which seems to be a recurring theme with debacles that could've been prevented with true oversight.

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    Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    Totally engrossing -- it reads like a movie.

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    Summary & Analysis of Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup | A Guide to the Book by John Carreyrou []  2020-1-21 21:30

    Amazing reading

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    Summary & Analysis of Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup | A Guide to the Book by John Carreyrou []  2020-1-21 21:30

    Read full book and plan on reading this to review before meeting

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    Summary & Analysis of Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup | A Guide to the Book by John Carreyrou []  2020-1-21 21:30

    Lacks specifics. More like they took the dust jacket and expanded it

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    Summary & Analysis of Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup | A Guide to the Book by John Carreyrou []  2020-1-21 21:30

    Very informative.

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    Summary & Analysis of Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup | A Guide to the Book by John Carreyrou []  2020-1-21 21:30

    I am satisfied to learn about the availability of these summaries. Often I wish to know the primary content and hard data from technical locations but do not need to know the details. At the same time this provides me with enough info that I can go to the source and gain more info that I search I wish or need.

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    Summary & Analysis of Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup | A Guide to the Book by John Carreyrou []  2020-1-21 21:30

    I read this instead of purchasing the book, which I knew I'd read only once. It was a book club choice, and told me what I need to know in to participate in the group discussion.

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    Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley [Book]  2017-11-3 18:2

    Chaos Monkeys is amazing. You should it 's a far-reaching, detailed, and honest acc of Antonio García Martínez's career path -- starting with quant work at Goldman, then to an existing startup, then to his own startup, and ultimately to some of Silicon Valley's giants. He dives into true situations, naming names and disclosing the inside stories that fill every industry but are (unfortunately) rarely talked about. He's a brilliant, entertaining writer and his actions over the past few years provide him plenty of fodder to hold you rcía mixes sordid stories and palace intrigue with in-depth, highly readable explanations of how advertising technology, startups, venture capital, and more actually work. Don't skip these sections in the book -- they're just as amazing as the shock-factor stories and constant literary ain, you should it. Once I picked it up, I couldn't place it down.

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    Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley [Book]  2017-11-3 18:2

    An unflinching and perhaps overly honest view into the globe of the Silicon Valley startup, this book gives a rare view into the globe of a startup st battle stories from the life of a startup founder are only told in passing: an anecdote over drinks, a post-mortem in a blog post, commiseration over lunch. What is uncommon is the entire story of a startup, told from begin to finish, warts and all.I highly recommend this book if you have ever worked with or for a startup, are thinking of founding your own startup, or are simply curious about life in the Silicon Valley.

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    Desi Land: Teen Culture, Class, and Success in Silicon Valley []  2019-12-18 20:21

    DesiLand is a amazing work by Salani Shankar. She spent time between 1999-2001 in Silicon Valley-an zone with a rapidly growing South Asian population. She spends time with a dozens of South Asians. They differ in locations such as economic standing from people working from security guards to executives. This paints a broader picture of South Asians in Silicon Valley who are often viewed solely as Engineers and IT professionals. She looks at people who migrated directly from South Asia as well as Fiji-Indians. This can affect their ethnic identity. Religion is also discussed, looking at how religion (whether it be Hinduism, Islam, Sikhism or Christianity) affects people. Muslims are often shown as being the most conservative (such as the treatment of daughters-not being allowed to go to a high school prom...). Muslims are also shown as being the most affected by 9/11.A huge chuck of the book is devoted to second generation and 1.5 generation (those who moved to the US while growing up). The book discusses how they interact with different social circles such as different peers of school, the larger Indian community... It also shows how they adjust to life after high school, such where they go to college and their attitudes towards arranged marriages.

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    Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley [Book]  2017-11-3 18:2

    After getting about a third of the method through, I did not wish to like this book... as others have noted, the author is not a like-able person. Nonetheless, there is no denying the author is an adept storyteller, and perfect laymen interpretations of the otherwise complex inner workings of online advertising and the venture capital ecosystem. He is the rare breed that can communicate and excel in both the technical and expressionist worlds. While I don't always agree with his toxic, sociopathic leanings, I do share much of the author's worldview, and his nihilistic interpretation of Silicon Valley is quite refreshing. What is not clear in the book is why the author drank the Fb Kool-Aid in the first place, which seemed out of hero considering his sober, pragmatic approach to SV otherwise. With all his hero flaws, in the cultish confines of Fb and Silicon Valley, it probably takes a personality like Martinez's to tell it like it is.

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    Desi Land: Teen Culture, Class, and Success in Silicon Valley []  2019-12-18 20:21

    Magic happens when a work from academia transcends the straitjacket of social science jargon and floats across the page like literature: the characters are given life; the setting is vividly rendered; and the dialogue is memorably fresh. Shalini Shankar pulls her rabbit out of the Silicon Valley hat she calls Desi Land. "In one sense, Desi Land resembles Disneyland, a constructed zone of imagination and wonder ... On another level, Desi Land is reminiscent of Dixieland, a put of tremendous creativity and talent but also deep-seated racism and prejudice in the American South."Shankar's ethnography of teenagers living in and around Fremont, Calif., is a sympathetic portrait of boys and girls attempting to construct their own reality from homes that carry forward identity expectations from India, Pakistan, Fiji, or Bangladesh. Outside these homes, she takes the reader to shopping malls where consumption defines success, and to schools that assume that all Indian students are part of an academic model minority."California, Here We Come, Right Back Where We Started From" is the title of the opening chapter, in which psychological, social, economic, and geographic context is established. While the hilly landscape of the Bay Zone has remained constant, "over the span of a century, desis have moved up in status, from being undesirable, racially non-White immigrants to sought after residents whose ambiguous racial status skews closer to White." In huge part, this shift parallels the Valley's transformation from the "Prune Capital" to the "High-Tech Capital."Many successful Northern Californians will relate to quotes such as, "It's so cool how we live in Silicon Valley--we control the world!" But they may not be aware of class distinctions inherent in the following negotiation of rural and urban lifestyles: "On the weekends we chill with our grandparents in Yuba City, or with aunts in Sacramento, or in San Jose. We visit family a lot, I have lots of cousins, some are older and done with high school. But we all kick it together." Regardless of whether Desi Land's students are upper class or middle class, populars or geeks, FOBby or FOBulous, their close-knit families are foundations to which they "Living and Desiring the Desi Bling Life," Shankar takes her anthropological eye to shopping malls such as Valley Fair, Eastridge, and Oakridge. This chapter, which "takes a closer look at how desi teens and their families define and desire aesthetic tastes through their engagement with consumption and material culture," has an academic tone. Shankar appears to be perched on the shoulders of scholarly giants such as Roland Barthes, Jean Baudrillard, Thorstein Veblen, Pierre Bourdieu, and Arjun Appadurai; or perhaps the scholars are looking over her shoulder. As a cultural critic, Shankar seems to gently say, "tch, tch" to the status and prestige that is conferred upon owners of shiny vehicles and sparkling is disapproval is palpable in a hilarious situation where Shankar is pulled aside by two of her teen-aged students, Meru and Jasbir:"Meru squealed, `Come on! You have to come with us see the fresh baby and CLK!' and led me to her aunt's house. After congratulating her aunt and uncle on their baby, I quietly admitted to Meru and Jasbir that I could not remember who CLK could be from the a lot of Kapoor family happenings I had attended. Highly amused, Jasbir exclaimed, `Who? What are you talking about?' Meru laughed, `The CLK! The Mercedes Benz CLK convertible ...' [The CLK] received nearly as much adoration and attention as the fresh baby who joined the family around the same time."The heart of the book is in the three high schools where Shankar explores "Desi Fashions of Speaking," "Being FOBulous on Multicultural Day," and "Remodeling the Model Minority Stereotype." While pseudonyms are used to afford the topics of this study some measure of privacy, Fremont's high schools are most likely identifiable by those living in the community. This may have presented some risk to the students who were interviewed, but for the reader this risk-taking is a highly rewarding method of translating academic concepts into the true world. One understands that code-switching is alternating between various languages based on conversational setting, and code-mixing is the combination of multiple languages in one conversation. Here are two examples: Amahl comments, "I talk to my parents in Urdu, but not my brothers. I don't really speak it with mates at school. Sometimes with cousins." Neetu elaborates, "We place our `ings' and `eds' after every action--I was `dekhing' (looking), I was `sunning' (listening)."Desi Land goes a level deeper when it examines the consequences of speaking in languages other than English. Abhijeet's bilingual pride is evident as he asserts, "I feel comfortable speaking in Punjabi with friends. If you wish to say something behind someone's back, it's amazing for that or for joking. Some guys tease you about being a FOB or something like that, but ... having a second language is cool." However, Mr. Lopez, a school administrator, has a various response: "Because of their English, they beautiful much stay by themselves, which hurts, because they speak their own language and they don't speak in English and they don't obtain any better." These students, characterized as FOBs ("Fresh Off the Boat"), are often place into English as a Second Language classes, even if they are second- or third-generation Americans quite proficient in English. Because they don't fit into the "model minority" stereotype of academically high-achieving and socially integrated Indian Americans, these students are marginalized. Reflecting an inherent racism, these "FOBby" individuals take a back seat to the more dominant "FOBulous" students who use their social capital to establish visibility and of the joys of reading Shankar's book is exposure to emerging verbal practices. While younger readers may be familiar with desi teen talk, those less familiar might be surprised by the linguistic creativity of phrases that borrow freely from famous culture. Readers of all ages are sure to take pleasure in self-recognition or new-awareness of the non-English and "new-English" language: "desi" (member of South Asian diaspora), "kickin' it" (spending time together with friends, usually apart from family), "bling" (flashy objects such as luxury cars, houses, clothing, or jewelry), "tight" (cool, hip), "geeks" (students who are academically focused, especially toward math, science, or engineering), "DL" or "Down Low" (secretly doing things), "hella bank" (lots of money), "FOBby" (unfashionable in dress, in oiled hair, or in language), "FOBulous" (urbane, sophisticated, tight).Although Shankar, herself a desi, may not create hella bank from this book, and probably won't be able to acquire much bling from its royalties, she sure seemed to have been kickin' it in the begin and on the DL. It's really tight that she didn't just write about the FOBulous kids, but also the FOBby and geeky review initially published in India Currents

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    Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley [Book]  2017-11-3 18:2

    Chaos Monkeys is a bargain, since you are really getting four books in one. First, our lucky reader is treated to a Sherman-style total battle on the vanities and conceits of the tech elite. For the hater in all of us, it is uncompromised, savage delight. He particularly takes aim at noxious myth of meritocracy in the valley. As anywhere, those educated at the right places, and taught the right diction and manner of speaking rise to the top. For whatever reason, people in silicon valley seem to need reminding of this fairly often, perhaps more than most.Another skewered vanity is that the work being done there is “changing the world.” The nirvana of being millions while doing meaningful work is the final privilege being sought by the waves of wall road refugees making their method out west. Only the most self-deluded really it, and as Antonio shows, those often happen to be working at the most influential and strong companies. Is Fb really changing the world? Without question, but when Fb uses the language of historical figures, implicitly placing itself on the same podium as Cato the elder, say, it is both creepy and pathetic. Furthermore, the same gulf between the windfalls of the upper echelon and the rank-and-file is still e second book is a detailed, unsparing deep-dive into the trenches of the ad tech industry. Just for that, it is worth reading if your job has any remote connection with online. You will come away with more awareness of how pixels convert to dollars. This theme occupies most of the second half of the book. If anything, the vivid metaphors he uses to describe the otherwise dull and esoteric info of identity matching and attribution will serve you well anytime you must summon a complete picture of this complex web in your head. Even non-specialists will search fascinating the descriptions of how personal data is collected and sold, not to mention probably realizing they have been worried about the wrong kind of privacy ird, there is a marvelous how-to tutorial for aspiring entrepreneurs hidden between the diatribes. Antonio managed to meet a lot of of the key players in the industry. His detailed accounts of a lot of of these meetings (confrontations) a special behind-the-scenes vantage which a lot of manuals for silicon valley success avoid, so the authors can remain in amazing stead with the figures involved. In addition, there is another method that Chaos Monkeys serves as an perfect preview of what entrepreneurship entails. Other how-to books are so smitten with the idea of entrepreneur as Character that they often fail to convey the tedium, anxiety and chaos that are most of the day-to-day realities for any entrepreneur. These other books mention that building a company is hard and stressful, but often seem shy to mention exactly why, beyond executing a poor idea, or a linear increase in working hours. In reality, the unspoken “hard” part of any startup is not the actual hours involved, or the idea, or execution, but rather the unwavering conviction you must have to hold at it when things are totally falling apart. The struggle to convince yourself, your investors and your customers that your vision of the globe is the correct one is constant battle versus entropy, counterfactuals, competitors or self-doubts. Any of these must be swallowed, digested, shat out, and freeze-dried as more grist for your pitch mill. Every entrepreneur will immediately recognize what Antonio unabashedly portrays: the dreadful gulf between the inward awareness of all the chaos and flux at the startup, while preserving the outward photo of polish, and optimism. In fact, the delusion of performing world-changing work as an entrepreneur (even when you’re just building a s***ty analytics panel) is so pervasive, it cannot be solely attributed to narcissism. The book makes the point that this delusion is actually an emotional coping mechanism to endure the aforementioned doublethink on a everyday ly, we are given an intimate, unsentimental portrait of Antonio’s tortured psyche. While I wouldn’t necessarily advocate “praying for Antonio’s soul,” as a previous reviewer stated, his relentless self-deprecation and raw honesty balance out some of the selfish decisions he makes in the book. He is extremely well read, and I suspect this background informs a somewhat tragic theme of the book— for a certain type of person, the only hope that can lift the cynicism and misanthropy of early life disappointment is to undergo a meaningful quest with loyal companions. There aren’t a lot of of those quests around anymore, unfortunately, nor is there a surfeit of loyal companions in the sort of locations and professions that demand one’s full faculties. In the book, a lot of characters and causes fail to meet this high bar, of course. I suspect more than a few failed idealists will search a kindred spirit in Antonio, despite the caustic tone throughout. That said, there is plenty here to be offended about, if that is your sort of thing. Some of the criticism is justified. For example, there is some objectification of women that could have been omitted. However, if that is your ONLY take-away, then you are precisely the sort of self-important, thin-skinned windbag that is rightfully skewered in Chaos Monkeys.

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    Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley [Book]  2017-11-3 18:2

    This books reads like a biography of Antonio Garcia Martinez's life from the mid 2000's until he left Facebook, in 2014. As commonly happens with auto-biographies from people with otherwise unremarkable lives, it feels like the author is compelled to over estimate his role in certain events, to over criticise certain situations and to, in general, exaggerate things for the sake of making his e first part of the book is very well written, interesting and relevant, especially if you are connected in anyway to the Silicon Valley/ Venture Capital world. AGM describes how he moved from finance to join a start-up, how he then left that start-up to found his own company, his relationship with investors, co-founders and acquires. This has some really necessary and relevant lessons to anyone involved with starting a company. I recommend this book based on this first part e second part of the book is only relevant to those who either are interested in the specifics of Fb as a company/ culture on in online marketing. There are too a lot of unnecessary details, too much time spent on characters who are irrelevant to the overall story and it reads as something overly bitter, as is common when one writes about a negative happening in the wake of it happening, without allowing time for cooler heads to prevail.Enjoyable read, but in no method a masterpiece.

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    Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley [Book]  2017-11-3 18:2

    This is basically 2 books in one, as some have correctly observed. The first part chronicles Mr. Martinez's path from Wall Road to a Silicon Valley employee, and then on to the creation of a startup and all the dynamics that go along with that: partners, fund-raising, pitching, and ultimately the company's "acquihire". Plenty of talk of his private life along the way, providing a lot of chuckles. Both parts have some nice twists, but the reason you wish to read this book is just the deep intellectual writing .. something you do not obtain in other books of this type. The second part of the book, after the acquihire and subsequent job-change, is a "deep-dive" into the storyline of Facebook's internal advertising projects and partnerships as that behemoth went from a personal company to public. Antonio gives you very detailed info on how ad technology works (and doesn't in the case of Fb at the time), and really does a amazing job keeping your interest and providing amazing entertainment. The not good reviews for this book all seem to be from people that really don't obtain it. The book is truly a unbelievable read.

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    Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley [Book]  2017-11-3 18:2

    First of all AGM is a fine author and if you wish to learn how finance works in Silicon Valley you should pick this book up for cond, if you wish to know how a Fb product manager, in a three person team, who brings in unimaginable amounts of revenue with respect to any single Fortune 500 employee can obtain fired without cause, you need to read this ird, if any commenter thinks AGM's attitude is the one that needs to be checked, you seriously missed the entire theme of the book.

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    Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley [Book]  2017-11-3 18:2

    I worked at Fb from 2010 until 2015, and until now I have never seen the inner machinations as accurately portrayed as they are in 'Chaos Monkeys'. Fb very carefully maintains a public relations campaign (almost more internally focused than external) to convince the globe it is the best put to work… ever. In reality it is just like any other huge company, with plenty of political intrigue, infighting, silo-building, and collateral damage. Sure, the mini-kitchens have organic bananas, and pistachios that stressed slobby engineers neither have to shell, nor leave a pile of shells littered all around the floor... but in reality they are shackled to an oar, pulling to the endless beat of a drum. Code. Code. Code. It is all here… the creepy propaganda, the failed high-profile projects, the surreal manager/staff relationships, the cultivated cult-like atmosphere, the sharp divide between the have-it-all, and the "hope to have enough to escape" staff. The bizarro globe of inside FB, around the IPO. I was there and experienced a lot of of the same corporate happenings and milestones myself. Antonio Garcia Martinez captures it all at's only the latest half of the e rest is a tale of escaping from startup hell, making a go at reaching startup heaven, then making to salvage it all when reaching the critical trial-by-fire that every startup must face: die, execute flawlessly, or ere are some who will search the tone, the voice, or the political incorrectness of both to be too harsh to digest. I've already seen that in a few of the reviews here. To them I say "grow up"... place on your huge boy/girl pants and read this for the story. The tale it tells. The facts it presents. The data with which it backs it all up. Because it is all true. The exposition of complex systems are described using appropriate, and facile metaphors. A lot of of the standard Fb tropes ("stealing/selling your data", "Zuck is evil", etc.) are explained for the misleading baloney that they are. Best of all it describes how the advertising media really operates, going back to the dawn of it, and how Facebook, Google, et al are merely extensions of a system that has existed for two centuries. It is worth the for that lesson alone, all wrapped in a great, and real r myself, having lived through much of the same experience at Fb (from onboarding, the devotion, the cynicism, to the inglorious, frustrated exit bungled by one of the legion of Facebook's incompetent and narcissistic manager corps) I found myself going from laughter, to nodding agreement, to gut-wrenching bouts of PTSD as I turned the pages of 'Chaos Monkeys'. Now I no longer have to justify myself to people who ask me why I left Fb - I can just tell them to read this book, since it explains it better than I ever could.

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    Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley [Book]  2017-11-3 18:2

    If you are remotely interested in startups and tech you should read this book. This is Liar's Poker crossed with Silicon Valley, with a smattering of Hunter S. Thompson-esque ruminations about life, capitalism, and will either love or hate Martinez's voice (I found myself doing both at various parts of the book). I'm sure a lot of people are going to obtain hung up on some offhand sexist comments or the dirt thrown at Facebook's execs (and I'm sure that Martinez could have avoided both while keeping the book interesting). The true gems in the book, however, are the tangents that Martinez takes to describe in a really easy method some fairly technical concepts. For example the method that he describes online advertising and why it is related to security trading is really well this book if you wish to see how the Valley works from someone who was in there, drank the koolaid, but have the clarity of mind to obtain out of there and write about it.

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    Chaos Monkeys: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley [Book]  2017-11-3 18:2

    If Antonio Martinez never writes another book, he will still go down as the author who best captured the Zeitgeist in the hottest (dare I say central?) industry of our ch like Michael Lewis’ debut a short 26 years ago, this is the story of a young graduate who lands a seat at the high table without having formally been invited, makes the most of it, keeps his sanity and lives to you follow him from the Vampire Squid to Adchemy, you cheer for him when he persuades two engineers to leave and support him set up AdGrok, you do the math alongside him when he’s to Twitter and Fb at the same time, you pitch FBX (Facebook Exchange) with him to Sheryl… I guess I’ve spoilt it enough, let’s leave it may cringe at language that would create Matt Taibbi blush, but the profanity is always a propos and would certainly never be out of put at the series of workplaces where this drama unfolds. The author’s writing is truly mesmerizing, constantly reminding me that no matter how hard I test I shall never be able to write as well as the truly rtinez’ command of the English language is only bettered by his grasp of the nowadays high tech business of persuasion and his ability to convey the basics to the reader. Now I’ve read Chaos Monkeys I have some faint idea of how it all ’s to hoping that he’s got more books in him.

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    Desi Land: Teen Culture, Class, and Success in Silicon Valley []  2019-12-18 20:21

    This book is interesting, thought-provoking, and incredibly accessible. Shankar draws on extended fieldwork to depict the lives of Desi teens in vivid terms. she explores necessary problems of immigration and diaspora, language use, multiculturalism, and the difficulties faced by youth who search themselves with a range of choices about how to go about being Desi in the US today.

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    After On: A Novel of Silicon Valley [Book]  2018-4-13 18:0

    This book took some slogging through at the beginning, but the effort off with an enjoyable ride. Tech-y if, like me, you know how to create technology work, but no idea how or why it works, but not so much so that I couldn’t follow most of it through context. This book will create me think a bit before I blindly “accept” on the next user agreement to flash on a screen.

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    After On: A Novel of Silicon Valley [Book]  2018-4-13 18:0

    These days we hear luminaries from Stephen Hawking to Elon Musk debate whether AI will become humanity's greatest achievement or final catastrophe. But no one has ever predicted the scenario that unfolds in After On. But once you read it, it dawns on you that it might just unfold this method -- in a future full of brilliance, absurdity, pettiness, sex, and hilarity. You won't ever check Fb with innocence again. And Fb just found its next playbook.

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    After On: A Novel of Silicon Valley [Book]  2018-4-13 18:0

    I ain't no Charles Henry Higginsworth III..., but I LOVED this book! If you caught that reference you have surely already read this book... If not, read the damn book so you DO obtain the reference (kind of a Catch 22 proposition)!So now in an effort to create this review more traditional/helpful, allow me say this... I LOVE this book (oh wait, I already said that). Like Rob Reid's latest book, "Year Zero" I was so intrigued by the story and the audio incarnation of the book that I actually bought and read the printed ver (no eBook baby... The true thing). The book starts off very self-aware. It even challenges you to finish the 570 pages that it takes to complete the story. It is a bit slow to begin and pointless in some places, but stick with it and [email protected]#$%!. There is a way to the madness (and pointlessness)I was delighted to see that "After On" takes put in the same universe as "Year Zero" yet is in no method a sequel or even a prequel. It was fun to see several characters from "Year Zero" pop up in the story as well, but if you have never read the previous book, it would not hinder your enjoyment of this thought-provoking much as I love the book, I am curious to see how it will stand over time. Being a work of speculative fiction in the immediate present, it could date itself very quickly, but I do not think so. There are a few very ham-fisted literary tricks that amount to not much more than gimmicks sprinkled throughout the story, but they are not so intrusive as to ruin the book in the slightest. It's a small bit slow to Build, but rest assured, very small time is wasted. Every bit of it is necessary to the story. Apparently throwaway observations/comments do come back at the end to play in necessary part in the resolution of the storyline.

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    After On: A Novel of Silicon Valley [Book]  2018-4-13 18:0

    This starts as good, funny commentary about Silicon Valley, then dives into problems like the ethics of mass technology, surveillance, emergent consciousness, fundamental physics, and alistic, and often funny...

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    After On: A Novel of Silicon Valley [Book]  2018-4-13 18:0

    Special plot, interesting characters and a amazing education on social nedia, espionage, personality development and moreI will be re-reading this book because it is so concentrated with amazing stuff, I know I nissed some thingDon't even test to speed up the audio. I did that and my brain begged for mercy!

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    After On: A Novel of Silicon Valley [Book]  2018-4-13 18:0

    Didn’t think Rob Reid could top the cleverness of Year Zero, but he has. I highly recommend the audiobook ver (I alternated between that and this Kindle version).

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    After On: A Novel of Silicon Valley [Book]  2018-4-13 18:0

    I want i was capable of writing a review as clever as Charles Henry Higgensworth III, but alas i am not. For the prospective reader of this book all I can say is DO IT, your time will not be wasted.

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    After On: A Novel of Silicon Valley [Book]  2018-4-13 18:0

    Read by amazing voice actors, very entertaining novel, amazing meal for modern DND campaigns. And the After On podcast is a amazing feed to be subscribed to.

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    After On: A Novel of Silicon Valley [Book]  2018-4-13 18:0

    After writing a book about attending business school, then one about the founders of the Internet, and then a sci-fi comedy; Rob Reid stays real to form by avoiding any form with his fresh book, After On. Reading a pre-release copy, I had no spoiler result from book blurbs or reviews so I kept wondering - is it a thriller, a near future sci-fi, or maybe a horror novel? It turns out to be a bit of each, combined to make a amazing story while raising fundamental, and sometimes frightening, concerns about humanity's technological path. He mixes today’s cutting edge tech with current social, legal and engineering directions and it can be r people in the tech world, characters they know will frequently emerge. Or characters they think they know. Zuba is my favorite, resembling some of the brightest people I’ve ever met. I’m trying to not identify too closely to some of the scum characters, but they are not really farfetched. And Pugwash lives! (Don’t test to parse.)Finishing the story leaves you second-guessing all kinds of current research and services. Is this site's Terms of Service really acceptable at all? What choice have we? How far lost is our legal system? How irrelevant or just misguided is our government? Should we clamp down on tech now? How could we? How much of a crap shoot is our future really? Not meal for thought, more like a e idea of a super AI has some very intelligent people alarmed. Stephen Hawking warned, “The development of full artificial intelligence could spell the end of the human race.” Elon Musk mused that “we are summoning the demon.” Read After On for an alternative scenario.Disclosure: Rob’s a friend, I read an early copy, and I'm enjoying the final version.

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    After On: A Novel of Silicon Valley [Book]  2018-4-13 18:0

    Brilliant and compelling prose took me through Silicon Valley in style. This book not only informs, but amuses. The author, clearly a Silicon Valley insider, has a delightful sense of humor, and this reader loved every page.

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    Chaos Monkeys - Revised Edition: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley []  2020-1-29 9:32

    I worked at Fb from 2010 until 2015, and until now I have never seen the inner machinations as accurately portrayed as they are in 'Chaos Monkeys'. Fb very carefully maintains a public relations campaign (almost more internally focused than external) to convince the globe it is the best put to work… ever. In reality it is just like any other huge company, with plenty of political intrigue, infighting, silo-building, and collateral damage. Sure, the mini-kitchens have organic bananas, and pistachios that stressed slobby engineers neither have to shell, nor leave a pile of shells littered all around the floor... but in reality they are shackled to an oar, pulling to the endless beat of a drum. Code. Code. Code. It is all here… the creepy propaganda, the failed high-profile projects, the surreal manager/staff relationships, the cultivated cult-like atmosphere, the sharp divide between the have-it-all, and the "hope to have enough to escape" staff. The bizarro globe of inside FB, around the IPO. I was there and experienced a lot of of the same corporate happenings and milestones myself. Antonio Garcia Martinez captures it all at's only the latest half of the e rest is a tale of escaping from startup hell, making a go at reaching startup heaven, then making to salvage it all when reaching the critical trial-by-fire that every startup must face: die, execute flawlessly, or ere are some who will search the tone, the voice, or the political incorrectness of both to be too harsh to digest. I've already seen that in a few of the reviews here. To them I say "grow up"... place on your huge boy/girl pants and read this for the story. The tale it tells. The facts it presents. The data with which it backs it all up. Because it is all true. The exposition of complex systems are described using appropriate, and facile metaphors. A lot of of the standard Fb tropes ("stealing/selling your data", "Zuck is evil", etc.) are explained for the misleading baloney that they are. Best of all it describes how the advertising media really operates, going back to the dawn of it, and how Facebook, Google, et al are merely extensions of a system that has existed for two centuries. It is worth the for that lesson alone, all wrapped in a great, and real r myself, having lived through much of the same experience at Fb (from onboarding, the devotion, the cynicism, to the inglorious, frustrated exit bungled by one of the legion of Facebook's incompetent and narcissistic manager corps) I found myself going from laughter, to nodding agreement, to gut-wrenching bouts of PTSD as I turned the pages of 'Chaos Monkeys'. Now I no longer have to justify myself to people who ask me why I left Fb - I can just tell them to read this book, since it explains it better than I ever could.

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    Chaos Monkeys - Revised Edition: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley []  2020-1-29 9:32

    This is basically 2 books in one, as some have correctly observed. The first part chronicles Mr. Martinez's path from Wall Road to a Silicon Valley employee, and then on to the creation of a startup and all the dynamics that go along with that: partners, fund-raising, pitching, and ultimately the company's "acquihire". Plenty of talk of his private life along the way, providing a lot of chuckles. Both parts have some nice twists, but the reason you wish to read this book is just the deep intellectual writing .. something you do not obtain in other books of this type. The second part of the book, after the acquihire and subsequent job-change, is a "deep-dive" into the storyline of Facebook's internal advertising projects and partnerships as that behemoth went from a personal company to public. Antonio gives you very detailed info on how ad technology works (and doesn't in the case of Fb at the time), and really does a amazing job keeping your interest and providing amazing entertainment. The not good reviews for this book all seem to be from people that really don't obtain it. The book is truly a unbelievable read.

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    Chaos Monkeys - Revised Edition: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley []  2020-1-29 9:32

    Chaos Monkeys is a bargain, since you are really getting four books in one. First, our lucky reader is treated to a Sherman-style total battle on the vanities and conceits of the tech elite. For the hater in all of us, it is uncompromised, savage delight. He particularly takes aim at noxious myth of meritocracy in the valley. As anywhere, those educated at the right places, and taught the right diction and manner of speaking rise to the top. For whatever reason, people in silicon valley seem to need reminding of this fairly often, perhaps more than most.Another skewered vanity is that the work being done there is “changing the world.” The nirvana of being millions while doing meaningful work is the final privilege being sought by the waves of wall road refugees making their method out west. Only the most self-deluded really it, and as Antonio shows, those often happen to be working at the most influential and strong companies. Is Fb really changing the world? Without question, but when Fb uses the language of historical figures, implicitly placing itself on the same podium as Cato the elder, say, it is both creepy and pathetic. Furthermore, the same gulf between the windfalls of the upper echelon and the rank-and-file is still e second book is a detailed, unsparing deep-dive into the trenches of the ad tech industry. Just for that, it is worth reading if your job has any remote connection with online. You will come away with more awareness of how pixels convert to dollars. This theme occupies most of the second half of the book. If anything, the vivid metaphors he uses to describe the otherwise dull and esoteric info of identity matching and attribution will serve you well anytime you must summon a complete picture of this complex web in your head. Even non-specialists will search fascinating the descriptions of how personal data is collected and sold, not to mention probably realizing they have been worried about the wrong kind of privacy ird, there is a marvelous how-to tutorial for aspiring entrepreneurs hidden between the diatribes. Antonio managed to meet a lot of of the key players in the industry. His detailed accounts of a lot of of these meetings (confrontations) a special behind-the-scenes vantage which a lot of manuals for silicon valley success avoid, so the authors can remain in amazing stead with the figures involved. In addition, there is another method that Chaos Monkeys serves as an perfect preview of what entrepreneurship entails. Other how-to books are so smitten with the idea of entrepreneur as Character that they often fail to convey the tedium, anxiety and chaos that are most of the day-to-day realities for any entrepreneur. These other books mention that building a company is hard and stressful, but often seem shy to mention exactly why, beyond executing a poor idea, or a linear increase in working hours. In reality, the unspoken “hard” part of any startup is not the actual hours involved, or the idea, or execution, but rather the unwavering conviction you must have to hold at it when things are totally falling apart. The struggle to convince yourself, your investors and your customers that your vision of the globe is the correct one is constant battle versus entropy, counterfactuals, competitors or self-doubts. Any of these must be swallowed, digested, shat out, and freeze-dried as more grist for your pitch mill. Every entrepreneur will immediately recognize what Antonio unabashedly portrays: the dreadful gulf between the inward awareness of all the chaos and flux at the startup, while preserving the outward photo of polish, and optimism. In fact, the delusion of performing world-changing work as an entrepreneur (even when you’re just building a s***ty analytics panel) is so pervasive, it cannot be solely attributed to narcissism. The book makes the point that this delusion is actually an emotional coping mechanism to endure the aforementioned doublethink on a everyday ly, we are given an intimate, unsentimental portrait of Antonio’s tortured psyche. While I wouldn’t necessarily advocate “praying for Antonio’s soul,” as a previous reviewer stated, his relentless self-deprecation and raw honesty balance out some of the selfish decisions he makes in the book. He is extremely well read, and I suspect this background informs a somewhat tragic theme of the book— for a certain type of person, the only hope that can lift the cynicism and misanthropy of early life disappointment is to undergo a meaningful quest with loyal companions. There aren’t a lot of of those quests around anymore, unfortunately, nor is there a surfeit of loyal companions in the sort of locations and professions that demand one’s full faculties. In the book, a lot of characters and causes fail to meet this high bar, of course. I suspect more than a few failed idealists will search a kindred spirit in Antonio, despite the caustic tone throughout. That said, there is plenty here to be offended about, if that is your sort of thing. Some of the criticism is justified. For example, there is some objectification of women that could have been omitted. However, if that is your ONLY take-away, then you are precisely the sort of self-important, thin-skinned windbag that is rightfully skewered in Chaos Monkeys.

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    Chaos Monkeys - Revised Edition: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley []  2020-1-29 9:32

    I had a hunch I was going to like this book, and I was not aos Monkeys takes you through the culture, the contradictions and, as the title would suggest, the chaos in which Silicon Valley is apparently wrapped. Antonio Garcia Martinez makes a charming guide: funny, literate and with a rakish sense of humor that gives this insider’s acc a kind of immediacy and true emotional punch. I got the kind of lift from reading this book that I once did when reading the rollicking prose of Tom Wolfe, who was also a chronicler of the earliest corporate cultures that defined California and the Valley. Martinez, like Wolfe, keen cultural observations that spring from our very human strivings and persistent is book delivers a lot. We learn much about Antonio’s private life, his history, his loves (several women and a couple boats), his avocations, his strengths (which contain his bonus for writing and other forms of persuasion as well as his canny negotiating powers) and his weaknesses (his impulsiveness and his willingness to shade the truth a bit when it serves his purposes). But this acc is hardly a highly varnished one, and he casts his critical capacities inward on several occasions. We might prudently reserve some suspicions about the strict veracity of a gifted story-teller like Martinez, but I search this acc has the ring of truth and he holds the mirror close to the his own face.But the book is also a compendium of information, anecdotes and private portraits of an necessary stage in American business history. All this, of course, relates to the “obscene fortune and random failure in Silicon Valley” advertised in the book’s subtitle. Though a lot of reviewers damn this aspect with faint praise, calling it gossipy, I myself found it substantive, detailed and instructive about a slice of entrepreneurial and investment activity that is not really well known or understood by a lot of who might like to know. What’s involved in a bona fide start-up? What are the aims of venture capitalists, who variously smile or frown on these endeavors? When the corporate development types from Twitter and Fb come calling, what are they seeking and what are they offering? Martinez reliably spills the beans in this regard, naming names, pegging salaries and calculating compensation packages out over two-, three- and four-year time horizons. Enquiring minds wish to know. And in the end there is really more random failure than obscene fortune. And I think Martinez would likely agree and especially as it applied to him a sort of footnote (and, by the way, Martinez likes footnotes very much, as do I), allow me advise the potential reader that this book also takes a fairly deep dive into advertising technology. And this, too, is really a huge economic and business story of our time. Begin your newspaper (or however you take your news these days) and you’ll likely read about the disruptive influence of the Internet, mobile technology and all things digital on those reliable engines of the 20th century economy: media and advertising. It’s a story literally told daily. Old models are rapidly shrinking and fresh ones shape-shifting at the show moment. A lot of think Google and Fb own this future, although that’s probably premature. Create no mistake about it though; Martinez knows this stage up close and personal. He was toiling everyday for several years, working simultaneously at both the work of destruction and the act of creation, in the very belly of the beast. I venture an opinion that there are few people who know more about this brave fresh globe of digital persuasion than Antonio Garcia tom line: This book has been my favorite summer read by far. It entertained as it informed. I heartily recommend it.

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    Chaos Monkeys - Revised Edition: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley []  2020-1-29 9:32

    It's an interesting read as most reviews indicate is basically two books in one. The first "book" is about the globe of Silicon Valley incubators and little start-ups. That takes up the first half of the story. The tale is close to reality as anyone involved in the SV start-up globe can attest. It is full of the excess, hype, positioning, politics, back-stabbing and intrigue that is so commonplace. Somewhere in that mix is technology most of which is not even close to revolutionary but likely to be useful to someone. The trick is to create that "someone" seem like a really huge someone who is dying to spend a lot of money. Then after getting investors to in ... hold selling. This is all well and entertainingly covered in the book. The second "book" covers the author's life at Fb pre- and post-IPO. Like all companies, Fb has its own dysfunctionalities. The dysfunctionalities that the author experienced at Fb were not the sort he felt comfortable with. He also felt like his ideas were far better than anything Fb came up with and that they were idiots for not listening to him. Maybe they were but they, as he begrudgingly indicated, seemed to do OK pursuing a various approach. Because the second half seemed to be more about "how stupid Fb was" and "how intelligent he was", it served to be far less entertaining and enlightening than the first half mostly because I didn't care that he was being ignored and that he felt like he didn't fit can read this book two ways - especially the first half. It can be consumed as an expose showing the shallow nature and hollow core of the Silicon Valley gold rush or a "how to" book for fledgling entrepreneurs going after the incubator and investor dollars. And then you can skip that second create the call.

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    Chaos Monkeys - Revised Edition: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley []  2020-1-29 9:32

    An unflinching and perhaps overly honest view into the globe of the Silicon Valley startup, this book gives a rare view into the globe of a startup st battle stories from the life of a startup founder are only told in passing: an anecdote over drinks, a post-mortem in a blog post, commiseration over lunch. What is uncommon is the entire story of a startup, told from begin to finish, warts and all.I highly recommend this book if you have ever worked with or for a startup, are thinking of founding your own startup, or are simply curious about life in the Silicon Valley.

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    Chaos Monkeys - Revised Edition: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley []  2020-1-29 9:32

    Antonio does a amazing job sharing his story and being transparent about the behind the scenes of tech companies. There are really three parts to this book:- working for your typical VC backed startup (where some founder manages to create you believe you'll strike it rich...more often than not things go method south).- building a team, forming a company and raising (where the founder has to navigate a really broad gray zone between truth and lies) - as well as drive to an exit- working at Fb between 2011-2013 in an zone that was getting no love from Tag Zuckerberg (Which covers a rocky pre/post IPO span).All the parts were perfect in their own regards but what sets this book apart in my opinion is that the protagonist stays the same - so we obtain to see how his actions change (or don't - he's really a brat begin to finish ^_^) over time. The internet is full of "how to begin a company" or "10 steps to raise a venture round" but this book is about the life of a human being growing through his career and experiencing personal/professional victories and defeats.

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    Chaos Monkeys - Revised Edition: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley []  2020-1-29 9:32

    Chaos Monkeys is amazing. You should it 's a far-reaching, detailed, and honest acc of Antonio García Martínez's career path -- starting with quant work at Goldman, then to an existing startup, then to his own startup, and ultimately to some of Silicon Valley's giants. He dives into true situations, naming names and disclosing the inside stories that fill every industry but are (unfortunately) rarely talked about. He's a brilliant, entertaining writer and his actions over the past few years provide him plenty of fodder to hold you rcía mixes sordid stories and palace intrigue with in-depth, highly readable explanations of how advertising technology, startups, venture capital, and more actually work. Don't skip these sections in the book -- they're just as amazing as the shock-factor stories and constant literary ain, you should it. Once I picked it up, I couldn't place it down.

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    Chaos Monkeys - Revised Edition: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley []  2020-1-29 9:32

    Were it not for the chance of legal complications, Chaos Monkeys could have been titled “Fear and Loathing in Silicon Valley.” It is a special blend of high stakes gambling, sex, alcohol and hubris. For those willing to wade through technical detail, it shows how Internet applications like Fb and Google convert pixels into dollars. For the rest of us, the story of the excruciatingly hard work and intense drama that go into both a startup company and the internal machinations of an established, aggressive hi-tech company provide plenty of rcia Martinez is obviously widely read. His well chosen chapter heading quotes and references to disparate sources create that clear. His writing is articulate, quick paced, intense and focused. The fact that he names names and gives an insider perspective to well known happenings makes the story an especially interesting one.Having been sucked in, ground up and spit out of the Silicon Valley madness, Garcia Martinez is talking about taking off on a circumnavigation aboard his sailboat. One cannot support but wonder if he can create the change from the pressure and quick pace of his old existence to the new. I hope so.

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    Chaos Monkeys - Revised Edition: Obscene Fortune and Random Failure in Silicon Valley []  2020-1-29 9:32

    After getting about a third of the method through, I did not wish to like this book... as others have noted, the author is not a like-able person. Nonetheless, there is no denying the author is an adept storyteller, and perfect laymen interpretations of the otherwise complex inner workings of online advertising and the venture capital ecosystem. He is the rare breed that can communicate and excel in both the technical and expressionist worlds. While I don't always agree with his toxic, sociopathic leanings, I do share much of the author's worldview, and his nihilistic interpretation of Silicon Valley is quite refreshing. What is not clear in the book is why the author drank the Fb Kool-Aid in the first place, which seemed out of hero considering his sober, pragmatic approach to SV otherwise. With all his hero flaws, in the cultish confines of Fb and Silicon Valley, it probably takes a personality like Martinez's to tell it like it is.

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    Silicon Valley Stories: A sampler of startups, stories, and lessons learned []  2020-4-16 18:0

    Silicon Valley Stories captured me immediately, like a amazing novel, forcing me to read it cover to cover, breaking only for lunch. Beguelin tells us stories that go from the early 80s to today, following his evolution as an engineer and a human being, which goes hand in hand with the evolution of the Internet we know. There is a lot to learn from his experience and—as a startup founder myself—I want I had the opportunity to read a book like this, years e book takes an interesting approach, where any chapter can live independently from the rest, like a blog post, making it simple to read them our of order, if you like, without losing Beguelin lives in Puerto Rico and is working on an "Artisanal Startup," a concept I like a lot. Hopefully, a fresh book will come, sooner or later, about this fresh chapter of his adventurous life.

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    Silicon Valley Stories: A sampler of startups, stories, and lessons learned []  2020-4-16 18:0

    Getting to know the in's and outs of Silicon Valley from a first hand perspective. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book! Kudos to the author.

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    Silicon Valley Stories: A sampler of startups, stories, and lessons learned []  2020-4-16 18:0

    I've an unfair advantage to most readers, I've actually met and worked alongside Adam (but oddly, at various companies at the time, his startup was incubating within the startup I was then at, Jigsaw).Anyway, my favorite part of the book (so far) is his description of dollar cost averaging, in reverse. I think this is a VITAL piece of solid, easy reasoning if you're ever playing the startup android game and you're torn about some stock or holding onto it. And really, why wouldn't you wish to play the game? Sure, it's a ton of work, but really, anything is and the is you obtain to work with amazing, hilarious, silly, playful yet tremendously talented folks who really truly believe we are all here to change the universe (hopefully, for the better)! Granted, it rarely happens, but don't you think it a attractive thought and at least you should try? Somewhere in your soul, it helps to always have faith that you were place here for a reason, and what better reason than to create The Universe (or for starters, your neighborhood) a better place, and in doing so, have a possibility at getting rich (whatever your definition of that is, be it a fancy car, a nice house, amazing vacations, a attractive wife/husband, unbelievable friends, eating delicious food, drinking expensive wine, creating attractive products, writing that the majority of the globe uses (knowingly or unknowingly), etc).Adam walks you through one person's journey from his special vantage point, but one that I, as a fellow traveller of 101, 280, and Sand HIll Road, can have fun and tangentially, relate to. It's a thrilling ride with ups and downs, but honestly, without the thrill of rising and falling, it'd be a really tame ride, wouldn't it?Adam builds on the ethos of Steve Jobs...that feeling that when we're growing up, we're told we should live a nice life, not bang into anything too hard, don't create too much noise. But once you look around, listen, and realize that everything was built by other people, older people, people out of touch with modern ways, and you too can build and create fresh things better, more hip & cooler things, you feel an energy, a connection to the globe that you can't shake and wish to make fresh things that other cool people can use and love! And once you realize that, you'll never be the same. That is the spirit of Silicon Valley. And that is what is in this eat book Adam, thank you for putting pen to paper!

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    Silicon Valley Stories: A sampler of startups, stories, and lessons learned []  2020-4-16 18:0

    Beguelin's Silicon Valley Stories is entertaining and educational. I bought this book to learn about some of the ways startups seek funding and to learn from Beguelin's failures and successes. Highly recommend.

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    Silicon Valley Stories: A sampler of startups, stories, and lessons learned []  2020-4-16 18:0

    A really interesting read. In some ways Adam’s story parallels mine (I live in Silicon Valley still), so it’s fascinating to see another perspective and insight on the comings and goings of all these startups, a couple of which I was involved in too.

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    Silicon Valley Stories: A sampler of startups, stories, and lessons learned []  2020-4-16 18:0

    This book popped up on my Amazon suggestions and I am glad I purchased it. Read this in a few days, couldn't place it down. We all heard mega success stories of silicon valley moguls but what about the ones didn't create it to the top? If these silicon valley stories were fiction it'd be hard to believe, yet these are all real stories. Very inspirational.Easily a five star, definitely a must read.

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    Silicon Valley Stories: A sampler of startups, stories, and lessons learned []  2020-4-16 18:0

    Interesting and entertaining look behind the curtain. Dr. Beguelin shares his most perfect adventures. Highly recommended.

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    Silicon Valley Stories: A sampler of startups, stories, and lessons learned []  2020-4-16 18:0

    I'm a fan of the TV present Silicon Valley and I've always wondered how realistic its portrayal is of the actual Silicon Valley. Now I know! In Silicon Valley Stories Beguelin puts you beside him in the front seat of the roller coaster ride that was the go-go dot-com frenzy of the mid-90’s. Keep on to your hat — it's quite a ride!

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    Silicon Valley Stories: A sampler of startups, stories, and lessons learned []  2020-4-16 18:0

    An accessible and Special insight into an industry that can easily overwhelm the common man. The book reads very well, and keeps you engaged. Its a modern storybook for a modern industry.I've only just begun and already I've learnt quite a bit.I would definitely recommend this as your next read. 5 stars 👍

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    Silicon Valley Stories: A sampler of startups, stories, and lessons learned []  2020-4-16 18:0

    I am a fan of bio’s and this one has to be one of my favorites. Explains difficult industry ideas in a easy way. Super entertaining and engaging. Learned a lot! Recommend it highly.

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    A Pack of Blood and Lies (The Boulder Wolves Book 1) []  2020-1-20 19:29

    A thrilling wild ride that has me howling for more! I wasn’t sure what to expect when I started but it surpassed all my expectations. While it started a small slow and took a couple chapters to really hook me, once it did, I DIDN’T place it down until the end. The darker elements, the friction and chemistry between characters, and the mystery and twists left me stunned and craving more. Wildenstein’s writing is perfect and her talent for info further enriched the story and characters for me. If you like wolf shifters or paranormal romance, this is a must read!

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    A Pack of Blood and Lies (The Boulder Wolves Book 1) []  2020-1-20 19:29

    I can’t wait for the next book. I can’t believe all the crap this package has been through . Partly because of a evil alpha. I wish to know what’s A’s issue.

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    A Pack of Blood and Lies (The Boulder Wolves Book 1) []  2020-1-20 19:29

    “Women don’t lead packs of men; it’s emasculating.”Pack of Blood and Lies by Olivia Wildenstein is about a young woman who was forced with her mother to leave the werewolf package she was born to as a child. After her mother dies, she is dragged back to her package by her uncle and his family. When the pack’s alpha dies, she decides to throw herself into the tournament to become the fresh alpha. The story is filled with mystery, overcoming misogyny, and even some romance. Parts of this story were a bit rough for me, and maybe even a tad slow. I am interested in the story overall though and intend to read the next book. I give it 3.5 stars.

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    A Pack of Blood and Lies (The Boulder Wolves Book 1) []  2020-1-20 19:29

    This story is magnificent from beginning to end. The characters are well written and evoke some seriously intense love and hate and confusion emotions; the story flows at a pace that alternates well between steady and breathtaking and you can feel that it’s been well planned because the execution is n we begin with the cover? It’s so attractive and you feel the tone of the drama to come but I’m here to tell you that it doesn’t come close to the web of intrigue that unfolds on these pages.I love a amazing heroine and I’ve been so privileged to read some wonderful books with heroines who are strong, feisty, intelligent and caring; who have so much heart and back it up with perseverance and endurance and physical capabilities and stamina. Ness has been through more hell than any girl should have to endure in her lifetime, but thanks to who she is at the core of her, she doesn’t just fade into a corner and give up, letting the globe trample her down, she’s a warrior and the lessons her parents have taught her have stood her in amazing stead for being not just a survivor, but a e supporting characters are well developed and, in some cases, you have fun them; in others, you can’t stand them at all and then there are those who leave you utterly conflicted right until the very am is one such character; you’re not really sure if he is a product of his father’s lack of nurturing spirit, or if he has his own nature separate to the evil one that was his fathers. He is a well written hero because of the confusion he inspired in me as a reader – boiling down to the fact that he has his own demons and secrets to with. You desperately wish him to be better but again, that web of intrigue keeps you tied in and it does often feel like you’re hoping versus all reason to hope.I feel that this book highlights the importance of motivation. Because truthfully, it’s not always a case of people being inherently amazing or bad, or doing amazing or poor things, but rather, that they create choices and act based on what those motivators at being said though, there were moments where Ness could definitely have had some clarity about people and their motivations if she dropped the blinders of her own motivations for a moment and closer attention to what was in front of her. But, I said she was awesome, I didn’t say she was perfect!The blurb tells you exactly what the premise of the story is so I don’t want to repeat it but I do wish you to know that this is a book worth reading if you’re looking for intrigue, mystery, a slow burn, a heroine who doesn’t give up and a story that shows the changes that people can create when they stop accepting and begin understanding the positive power of allowing change. There is no cliffhanger, but there is unfinished business, including a small “huh, what was that?” right at the end and so now we wait (not so) patiently for the next book in the series.

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    A Pack of Blood and Lies (The Boulder Wolves Book 1) []  2020-1-20 19:29

    I was hopelessly hooked from page one! With a sizzling slow burn romance, fully fleshed out secondary characters you'll adore, and a fiercely powerful but human heroine, I dare you to read this book and not fall head-over-heels in love.

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    A Pack of Blood and Lies (The Boulder Wolves Book 1) []  2020-1-20 19:29

    The reason I purchased this book was because I read an offered preview and it was beautiful good. The protagonist, Ness has a huge chip on her shoulders but it's understandable considering the things that happened to her family. I was enjoying the storyline until the author decided to throw in a plot twist that is not substantiated anywhere in the book prior to Ness's "date". From out of nowhere, all of a sudden the 17 years old minor is also an escort? If she had met Heath after returning to Boulder, that would be a huge but it was never mentioned. Not the fact that she knew Everest's girlfriend since they worked for the same agency.I had to lower my rating of the book after reading that. We readers do have brains. You can't just toss something in and expect us not to notice.

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    A Pack of Blood and Lies (The Boulder Wolves Book 1) []  2020-1-20 19:29

    This series was amazing! I loved the tension between the female hero and all of her male counterparts. Ugh Liam is a man that most women dream for. This is a fresh author and series for me and I already love this globe so much!

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    A Pack of Blood and Lies (The Boulder Wolves Book 1) []  2020-1-20 19:29

    WOW! If I could give this book ten stars I would. I loved every second and every word of this book. I cannot wait for more from both this couple and this world. As a lover of shifter stories I have read quite a few that seem to follow the same outline and they tend to obtain a bit stale. This book was anything but: it had passion, action, mystery, well developed characters and a plot that will absorb the reader. I will test to do my best in this review to explain just how much I loved this book, but I think that the only method is to this story and experience it for yourself!The story starts out with Ness, a seventeen year old whose life is about to take a drastic turn. She lives in LA with her chosen (adoptive) grandmother (Evelyn) trying to create ends meet after her mother has died. One night, after a long shift as work Ness and Evelyn search themselves in a minor hostage situation. Ness’s Uncle, Aunt and cousin Everett have come to collect her and bring her back into the fold. They live in Colorado and are part of the Bolder Shifter Clan. She was kicked out six years ago when her father was murdered and the package would not allow her join. I should mention that she is the only female shifter I guild and wanted to be a part of the pack, but was tting back to her old life, Ness finds herself face to face with some people she would rather not re-meet and she has to learn how to live this fresh life. She decides to jump back in and throws her preverbal hat into the ring to become Alpha, going up versus her nemeses Liam. When Ness moves back to Bolder she meets Liam, the son of the latest Alpha and a man she is determined on taking down. With a growing hatred for him, she tries to out wolf Liam and take his coveted Alpha status away from him, out of pure loathing. Small does she know that Liam will become her real love and she will have to war for more than just Alpha, she will have to war for those she loves.I loved both Ness and Liam and found myself so absorbed into the story that I stayed up till one am to finish (I would not place the book down for anything)! I also loved the method this author introduced the reader to the secondary characters, we meet them just as Ness does and we obtain to be a part of her reintroduction to this life. I also loved the diversity of the characters, they each stood out so much that you never were at a loss to remember who you were interacting with. There were characters that I dislike and others that I was unsure of, but mostly I loved them.Without giving away more (because it is worth discovering for yourself), this story has everything a reader would wish in a shifter story. This is method more than a YA romance story; it is a story of not judging others before knowing them, trusting those you love, and becoming who you wish to be regardless of those around you. The story is complete and whole, but written in a method that the sequels will continue the larger plot lines. I would love to spend more time when Ness and Liam and I hope that their story is not over yet. I wish to be inside this globe and there is no method any reader can have fun this book without devouring it. This is my first read from this author but will not be my last. I highly recommend this book and cannot wait for more! This is one of my top thee books of the year and a fresh favorite!!RE-READ: Second time around and it hasn't lost any of its charm. Still a ten star read!! Allow me say this… I can count on ONE hand the number of books that I've re-read in my time. This, this is one of them. The story draws me in until I am breathing right along with the characters; until I myself become a Bolder wolf. I just can't obtain enough. I bought this in eBook form and paperback (and seriously considering hardback as well) I know I am going to re-read it again and again! Nothing but PURE LOVE for this book.

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    A Pack of Blood and Lies (The Boulder Wolves Book 1) []  2020-1-20 19:29

    This book was awesome and so hard to place down! As someone who's been reading romance novels for 8 years, I can tell you that this book has definitely earned a spot on my top 10 favorite list. The twists and turns were very well done and had me sitting on the edge the whole time. Can't wait to read the next book!

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    A Pack of Blood and Lies (The Boulder Wolves Book 1) []  2020-1-20 19:29

    Amazing book! Olivia Wildenstein has upped her android game from the lost guild trilogy! A Package of Blood and Lies was a very well written book that kept me asking questions. This not good girl Ness has had a rough life I only hope things work out for her I think she’s been through enough! If you like Olivia’s other book you will love this one. Already pre ordered book 2! Can’t wait!!

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    Springfield Confidential: Jokes, Secrets, and Outright Lies from a Lifetime Writing for The Simpsons []  2020-2-6 19:38

    I like learning about the amazing show. Unfortunately, I have to learn from a guy who never fails to print other people's positive comments about him. And his disdain for people who aren't fellow liberals is beautiful typical. At one point he as much as states that he wished Trump had died. Imagine an author saying that about Obama? Oh, the humanity. How about leaving your hate-filled politics at home and just write about the Simpsons show?

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    Springfield Confidential: Jokes, Secrets, and Outright Lies from a Lifetime Writing for The Simpsons []  2020-2-6 19:38

    I want that Reiss spent more time writing about The Simpsons and not attempting to be so glib. There are some amazing nuggets about the show, but far too often he goes off on tangents such as The Critic or his speaking and other writing engagements. It reads more like an autobiography at times with lame jokes and ultimately fails to deliver on much of the promise that the book's title implies. If he had stuck with the book's premise, I would have liked it much more.

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    Springfield Confidential: Jokes, Secrets, and Outright Lies from a Lifetime Writing for The Simpsons []  2020-2-6 19:38

    I randomly heard Mike Reiss discuss this book on a local radio morning present and between the thoughts of getting a deep inside look at what exactly goes into The Simpsons and Reiss' hilarious interview on the radio, I bought this book the second I got home from work that did NOT disappoint.I very much liken it to the book and subsequent film "A Futile & Stupid Gesture" which took an inside look at former Harvard Lampoon writer (much like Mike Reiss himself) and National Lampoon writer Doug Kenney. We obtain a amazing look at how our favorite TV present started, the issues the present endured, the success of the legendary show, and awesome factoids and laughs along the is book is a real inside look of the Simpsons and exactly what goes into making it the 30 year old power house that is still going strong. For example: ONE episode takes 9 months to create. There was animosity early on between present creator Matt Groening and Sam Simon which led to the latter leaving the show. We also search out how a lot of of the characters were named, why they're yellow, and how the staff handles criticisms of the is book was a two sitting read for me as Springfield Confidential is simply one of those books where you say "OK, one more chapter" at 9:30pm and you're finally putting the book down for the night at 1am and 9 chapters later.

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    Springfield Confidential: Jokes, Secrets, and Outright Lies from a Lifetime Writing for The Simpsons []  2020-2-6 19:38

    I am a Simpson’s fan, so this was an entertaining read. It explains a lot about how the present gets made. I would even recommend it to anyone interested about the industry. But it’s also about Mike Reiss’ life and career too. His work on feature films, kids books, TV and internet shows. Quite comical but not nearly as funny as he thought it was. Just like a Simpson’s episode there are some true groaners here. Sometimes he’ll go off on a comic tangent when you are more interested in the main ill an easy, fun and enjoyable read.

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    Springfield Confidential: Jokes, Secrets, and Outright Lies from a Lifetime Writing for The Simpsons []  2020-2-6 19:38

    If you wish an in depth look at the making of, production and behind the scenes secrets of America’s number one animated family you’ve come to the wrong place, this ain’t the Belcher’s (you know, from Bob’s Buurgers? Those Belcher’s.) So Mike Reiss’s Springfield Confidential will have to keep you over till someone spills the beans on Fox’s other funnier than funny prime time family misfits. I know what you’re saying to yourself, hey Amazon critic, what about Family Guy. I said funny, remember?Springfield Confidential is probably the best book ever written about the Simpsons, which isn’t saying much but it is saying something. Mike Reiss, a self confessed Jew and Harvard guy, not necessarily in that order, spends the 300 or so pages of this hilarious and fascinating book dishing the dirt and oh yeah telling fascinating stories about everything Simpson’s related. And the best part is he worked and still works for the present for at the time of its writing 28 of it’s 30 years. Mike’s all time favorite guest star? Smokin Joe Frazier... he had problem with his line. Mo’s voice? Hank Azaria’s really poor impression of Al Pacino. Quack doctor Nick Riviera? Another poor impression of Desi Arnez (Rickey Ricardo).But, yeah, this is just the hint of the yellow iceberg, Springfield Confidential, plenty of laughs and info about things you never even thought to ask, like- Hey Mike, did you write jokes for the Pope? The respond is yes, or Why are the Simpson’s yellow? Read the book and search out, enough with all these questions!

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    Springfield Confidential: Jokes, Secrets, and Outright Lies from a Lifetime Writing for The Simpsons []  2020-2-6 19:38

    It stands to reason a book authored by a long-time multiple-award-winning writer for “The Simpsons” would be funny and unpredictable like the TV show. “Springfield Confidential” by Mike Reiss with Matthew Klickstein delivers all you want. And then some.He answers questions from viewers — like “Where is Springfield?”There is insider items like the present was almost canceled before it got on. And that power plant mogul Burns’ assistant Smithers was African-American but changed after they saw the present in color and decided having a prominent black hero kiss up to his cruel, white boss was ere is celebrity gossip: “I’ve heard that Bruce Willis is so monstrous that one of his directors, a cancer survivor, said, ‘I’d go through another round of chemo rather than work with Bruce again.'”Insider stuff: Some think “The Simpsons” never won an Emmy. “That’s because our awards aren’t handed out at the boring televised ceremony. Our awards are handed out at the super-boring un-televised ceremony, the Creative Arts Awards.”On his colleague Nancy Cartwright playing male characters Bart, Nelson and Ralph: “Not since Lassie had a TV actor played a classic hero of the opposite sex.”There’s even items about Tom Cruise which I won’t mention because Cruise e book is sprinkled with interludes like this “True Fact”: There is a Macon, Ga., resident named Homer Simpson who works in a nuclear power plant. Says Reiss, “Poor guy. Having to live in Macon, Georgia.”In the chapter titled “Gay for Pay” Reiss admits his favorite project was not “The Simpsons” or “The Critic” but a web series called “Queer Duck” (He can’t even fly straight.) It was enormously popular, Britain’s Channel 4 viewers named it one of the 100 greatest cartoons of all time. Notes Reiss, “Now, mind you. England is the world’s only exclusively country. Britain’s an island — it’s like a huge cruise that doesn’t go anywhere.”He writes about the art of comedy — “k” words are funnier. But there are exceptions. “My cousin Kenny was killed by the Ku Klux Klan,” for instance. And he recommends some amazing comedy flicks you may have missed. And some books about being iss finally answers the burning question of why “The Simpsons is so successful. “… the valuable input of network executives. We don’t have any.”The book is written with the same comic timing and cleverness that Reiss brings to everything he does. My regret is that it is not twice as long.

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    Springfield Confidential: Jokes, Secrets, and Outright Lies from a Lifetime Writing for The Simpsons []  2020-2-6 19:38

    Krusty's autobiography was better. This book is more about Mike Reiss than the Simpsons. Like the TV present itself, the earlier chapters were the better ones. Did we need a list of foreign countries that Reiss hated visiting? Are people really interested in pictures of him at the North Pole or South Pole? It's nice that he made a bunch of other items like Queer Duck, but that wasn't why I bought the book.

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    Springfield Confidential: Jokes, Secrets, and Outright Lies from a Lifetime Writing for The Simpsons []  2020-2-6 19:38

    Brilliant! Hilarious! Wonderful! Full of insight and shade and even a joke about full-blown AIDS (it’s hidden... test to search it!) my only complaint is this book isn’t long enough. I tore through it in a week. More, Mr. Reiss! More I say! In the slightly revised words of movie critic Jay Sherman: “Buy this book! Buy this book! BUY THIS BOOK!” I’ll be quiet now.

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    Springfield Confidential: Jokes, Secrets, and Outright Lies from a Lifetime Writing for The Simpsons []  2020-2-6 19:38

    I love reading. I love laughing. It's rare when I obtain the possibility to do both at the same time. And I don't mean an under-my-breath-snicker sort of laugh, I mean a true, thank-goodness-I-wasn't-drinking-something kind of laugh. Luckily for me, I had that experience several times while reading SPRINGFIELD CONFIDENTIAL, this amazing book by Mike Reiss with Mathew Klickstein.I haven't watched The Simpsons religiously in decades, and haven't even really watched it casually in a very long time, but I was amazed at how a lot of episodes and characters I remembered. What I loved most about the book were the bits I didn't remember because, well, I couldn't have remembered them because I never experienced them. I'm referring specifically to Reiss's anecdotes from working on The Simpsons and his other creative works, like The Critic. The book zips from anecdote to anecdote so quickly that its almost possible to miss how they all connect to each other - but they actually do more than just connect, they feed off of and into each may be a bit cliché, but reading the book was like listening to an exciting conversation from an old friend. Reiss and Klickstein clearly have a knack for making their readers feel comfortable, even when the occasional joke earns a cringe and a head shake (it is comedy, after all, right?)I truly enjoyed this book, and as someone who wouldn't consider himself a lifelong Simpsons fan by any stretch, it was quite impressive that I was drawn in so quickly and my attention held from first page to the last. If you're a huge fan of the Simpsons, I imagine you'll love this, and if you're a more casual viewer like me, but a lover of well-told behind-the-scenes stories about present business, this is right up your alley too.

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    Springfield Confidential: Jokes, Secrets, and Outright Lies from a Lifetime Writing for The Simpsons []  2020-2-6 19:38

    Besides detailing some juicy tidbits and trivia -- and Mike is not going to shy away from more controversial items like the early Simon/Groening rift, Smithers going from black to white, Apu's controversy, declining quality, Tom Cruise's sexuality, etc. ..Besides all that, it's actually laugh out loud funny. I read it in a day (my one gripe is I [email protected]#$%! were longer). The only times I place it down, besides the usual bodily functions, was when I actually has to pause for a literal ere are some digressions. After all, it's about Mike Reiss and somewhat autobiographical. Though he spent most of his life writing/running The Simpsons, there are some sections on his less famous side projects: The Critic, Queer Duck, his family and friends. But overall, it is in bulk about The Simpsons and a must have for any fan.

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    On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense []  2020-5-6 18:11

    The final third of the book which examines the scientific subjective view and the artistic subjective view seems to go off course, but is still beautifully written and constructed.

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    On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense []  2020-5-6 18:11

    Anyone interested in epistemology or the philosophy of language. It's not overly long. Worth the time to read and consider.

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    On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense []  2020-5-6 18:11

    Nietzsche is great, this review concerns the material publication itself.I bought this to teach for my Intro. Philosophy Class, as the sole essay doesn't seem to be available outside larger collections of Nietzsche's work (though there are a lot of translations online). But I'm embarrassed I didn't review the copy before putting the book in. As other reviewers have pointed out, this is a really shoddy publication. Spelling errors aren't the worst of it. It's set in size 14 font and double spaced, with half inch margins on roughly 4 inch by 8 inch pages. This makes for an poor reading experience. Margins are too little for notes. "Justified" paragraphs with no attempt to hyphenate longer words create for awkwardly spaced lines. The whole thing feels off. You'd have better luck copy-pasting a translation into word and formatting your own document. For $9.99 this is a rip off. Don't more than 3 bucks for this-- it's worth no more and probably far less.

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    On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense []  2020-5-6 18:11

    The book is in itself a amazing treatise on the pursuit of truth and the importance of knowledge to life as human beings. But it is also a rare unfinished project by Nietzsche in which it is possible to search the seeds of his more widespread ideas as developed in latter is a short, uncomplicated, poetical exposition of very interesting philosophical ideas. It makes a amazing introduction to Nietzsche's thought.

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    On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense []  2020-5-6 18:11

    Didn't wish it to end! What a amazing read. Nietzsche writes with pure confidence that every man must have admiration for.

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    On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense []  2020-5-6 18:11

    No point remarking on the essay itself. But this Kindle edition has lots of errors of spelling, random letters, words run together, and can only be read in its entirety by switching from one display format to another to uncover otherwise hidden pieces of text. Under no circumstances should anyone this.

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    On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense []  2020-5-6 18:11

    A little continuous speech with difficult to translate concepts on lies about this existence in a materialistic approach. But all revolved over the same repertoire. Same concept in various colors over and over again is repeated. Have some coffee and Tylenol ready!

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    On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense []  2020-5-6 18:11

    Short and clear

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    On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense []  2020-5-6 18:11

    In this publication, there are numerous spelling errors, spacing errors, and formatting errors. It appears that the publisher did not once proofread the essay or apply any editorial evaluations towards the printed work. That being said, if you are willing to work through these errors, the essay can still be read and analyzed. Thumbs down to the publisher for your laziness.

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    On Truth and Lies in a Nonmoral Sense []  2020-5-6 18:11

    Do you need me to tell you that Nietzsche is brilliant? His expressive talent, at least as translated here, is exciting and beautiful. Challenge your sense of reality, if you dare. I found this treatise to be a wonderful, accessible, and rewarding entry-point to a amazing philosopher's work.

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    AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order [Book]  2019-11-19 18:0

    I am listening to the Audible ver and the info that I learned so far from this book is really an eye-opener to me. I think I am rather well informed about the IT globe and the AI developments. However, how things are developing in the true world, and especially in China, is really fresh to me. I've heard all the huge names (Wechat, Alibaba, Tencent,...) but Kai-Fu Lee shows us why China has a large advantage over the USA and the rest of the Occident.I am not a native English speaker. I can hardly judge stylistic matters. As far as I'm concerned, this is a well-written book with very high density of information. It's not Hemingway or Steinbeck, but we are talking about AI here (I am saying this because of a comment created about the book from a pickier reader). I highly recommend reading that book or listening to its audio version, which is well done.

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    AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order [Book]  2019-11-19 18:0

    Google "books about artificial intelligence," and you'll search a slew of them. Amazon lists 286. Computer scientists, journalists, science fiction authors, and other observers have written on the topic, sometimes insightfully, sometimes not. I've read nearly two dozen of these books. But AI Superpowers, the recent one to land on my Kindle, is by far the best. Author Kai-Fu Lee isn't just one of the most authoritative voices in the field. He's also unusually insightful. And he writes well (although a collaborator may support acc for that).A carefully balanced appraisal of AIDr. Lee's thesis is straightforward. China is quick approaching parity with the United States "in the defining technology of the twenty-first century," he contends. This rivalry is the focus of AI Superpowers. But the book ranges far beyond this narrow question into a carefully balanced appraisal of the field's potential for good—and for harm. He is skeptical about the prospects for machine super-intelligence that doomsayers like Elon Musk and Stephen Hawking have decried. Lee doesn't envision machines killing off the human race.Taking the broad view, he asserts that "The AI globe will combine winner-take-all economics with an unprecedented concentration of wealth in the hands of a few companies in China and the United States. This, I believe, is the true underlying threat posed by artificial intelligence: tremendous social disorder and political collapse stemming from widespread unemployment and gaping inequality." For example, "within ten to twenty years, I estimate we will be technically capable of automating 40 to 50 percent of jobs in the United States.""Like the harnessing of electricity"Much of contemporary commentary on AI dwells on the approach of Artificial General Intelligence (AGI). At that point, supposedly, machines will become so much smarter than humans that they may regard us as small more than pests. So goes the critics' lament, at any rate. Dr. Lee believes AGI lies far in the future and may even prove to be impossible. But that's not to say that AI's impact will ultimately be anything but grave. "The dawn of AI in China," he writes, "will be like the harnessing of electricity: a game-changer that supercharges industries across the board." And, of course, that impact will be felt in the United States and everywhere else around the globe as well: "the technology's skill biases will generate a bifurcated job shop that squeezes out the middle class."The best book about artificial intelligenceHowever, Dr. Lee is optimistic that the most severe consequences of AI's wide deployment can be avoided. Certainly, millions of workers (most of them white-collar employees) will be displaced by automation. But there are a myriad of tasks that can only be performed by humans unless AGI should miraculously create an appearance. Take medicine, for example. Machines are rapidly gaining the ability to diagnose illness and prescribe medications better than any physician. Not long from now, it may be possible for doctors to forego memorizing all the min info about illness and pharmacology and concentrate instead on relating to patients as human beings. This will begin the chance that much larger numbers of doctors can be place to work, since the intellectual demands will no longer be so great.Far more compassionate caregivers"As a result, society will be able to cost-effectively help far more compassionate caregivers than there are doctors, and we would keep far more and better care." And there are innumerable other human services occupations that currently employ far too few people. (Think social work and education.) Also, "we will see entirely fresh service jobs that we can hardly imagine today. Explain to someone in the 1950s what a 'life coach' was and they'd probably think you were goofy." Clearly, a shift toward human services and fresh forms of work isn't a panacea. But it may go a long method toward mitigating the impact Dr. Lee foresees from AI. Nonetheless, public policy will need to shift as well, not just to provide the important incentives to move people into these fresh fields but to lessen the impact of growing economic inequality.An alternative to a Universal Primary IncomeOthers have proposed either a Guaranteed Minimum Income or a Universal Primary Income (UBI) as the solution. Dr. Lee doesn't agree. "I propose we discover the creation not of a UBI but of what I call a social investment stipend. The stipend would be a decent government salary given to those who invest their time and energy in those activities that promote a kind, compassionate, and creative society. These would contain three broad categories: care work, community service, and education." Lee might have mentioned the arts as ese fields would form the pillars of a fresh social contract, one that valued and rewarded socially beneficial activities in the same method we currently reward economically productive activities." And society would the enormous cost of such a program out of the gargantuan profits Dr. Lee foresees accruing to the few AI giants that will dominate the globe in the years to come.About the authorDr. Kai-Fu Lee is a Bejing-based Taiwanese venture capitalist, technology executive, and artificial intelligence expert. Before founding his venture capital fund, he was the president of Google China, and earlier had founded Microsoft Research China (now Microsoft Research Asia), which "trained the amazing majority of AI leaders in China, including CTOs or AI heads at Baidu, Tencent, Alibaba, Lenovo, Huawei and Haier." (If you follow the news about technology in China, you're probably familiar with all these companies.) He is one of the most widely read microbloggers in China, with more than 50 million followers, and has written seven bestselling books there.

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    The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America []  2020-1-9 19:0

    Fascinating read. Professor O’Mara makes clear how Silicon Valley came to be in this lucid and compelling story. One must admire her erudition, reach of historic imagination, and comprehensive analysis. The Code is a benchmark work for our time.

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    AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order [Book]  2019-11-19 18:0

    An perfect overview of Chinese activity in artificial intelligence from ground zero perspective. Lee shows how two strands (China and AI) are being irreversibly woven together into an unbreakable high-power cable that will transform, control, and possibly strangle humanity’s economic e inciting incident for both Lee’s book and another comparable latest effort (Artificial Intuition: The Improbable Deep Learning Revolution, by Carlos Perez) is the latest win in Go of an AI-based system over the best human winner of that ancient game. This had about the weight of an empty beer can in the USA and other Western news cycles, but shook the Asian intelligentsia at their core (because they care so much more about Go). Both Lee and Perez create a huge out of the Go win as a Sputnik moment, awakening entire East Asian populations, and their central planners, to the urgency of becoming the dominant AI superpower. Meanwhile, apart from some corporate research,the USA snoozes blithely on. We may wake like Rip Van Winkle in 20 years (or 20 months) to search ourselves hopelessly lagging China. AI Superpowers skillfully exploits and intensifies the fear factor. A cynic would say the hidden agenda here is to trigger another 1980’s-style AI panic, when it seemed that Japan would defeat the globe with their Prolog (logic programming) initiative. But I am not cynical. I appreciate this book on its own terms.Anyway, after both books (Lee and Perez) lead off with humanity’s miserable Go android game beatdown, they then diverge sharply in quality, and Lee quickly pulls method ahead of Perez. Where Perez gets lost in an impenetrable thicket of his own miserably confusing writing style and rambling topical garden paths (or garden mazes), Lee drives straight for the goal line: a clear and compelling picture of the current state of play, and a crisp delineation of where things will end e depiction of China’@#$%!&echnology business culture is the stronger element, relative to the presentation of AI as technology. Although Lee knows the tech methods and architectures inside and out, this is a famous treatment and you won’t encounter a single equation or circuit layout anywhere. Basically, you’ll obtain the key notice that ‘narrow’ AI (task-specific systems that learn and perform well on human expert functions) has created a giant leap in a brief latest period. These systems are lumped under the term ‘deep learning’, an extension of a fairly easy neural modeling concept dating back to the 1950’s that has just now broken of the package and left the field behind. That breakout has been enabled by more data, more computing power, and some architectural upgrades to the original concept. Lee then zooms in on how quick and how furious the deep learning tsunami will Superpowers is strongest in its contrasting portraits of the Chinese high tech stage vs. the USA’s Silicon Valley. Lee numerous real-world cases illustrating parallels and divergences, sprinkled with entertaining private tales from the trenches on both sides.He traces the ascendance of China’s tech giants such as WeChat, AliBaba, and a lot of others that aren’t household names in the West, digging deep into exactly how each one succeeded – pound for pound, blow by blow, user by user – a view from the trenches. Basically he portrays Chinese entrepreneurial high tech as sharing much in common withorganized crime, possibly minus the sicarios. (See the book Narconomics: How to Run a Drug Cartel by Tom Wainwright if you wish the true dirt.)All that leads into Lee’s clear-sighted take on the employment implications of the fresh AI. Lee is no Elon Musk, in that he doesn’t see AI posing any immediate existential threat to the human species. Nor does he spend much ink on the roseate Kurzweil ‘singularity’ items (which is essentially religious fantasy in my view). Real to form, Leemoves soberly and smoothly, like the no-nonsense businessman he is, to consider something closer to home: the possible loss or diminution of up to 40% or more of current jobs with a decade or less. A lot of of these threats are well known, particularly the driverless cars thing, automated medical radiology, and a lot of others. Analyses of thistype go back at least as far as Jeremy Rifkin’s classic The End of Work (1996) and a lot of more latest treatments. But Lee’s examination is particularly lucid and right up to the min in its full attention to the fresh AI (deep learning).The book then takes a private twist as Lee info his war with an abrupt cancer diagnosis and how the recovery ordeal opened his eyes to elements of the emotional and social landscape he’d skated lightly past in his meteoric ascent to the top of the transPacific high tech dogpiles, both Silicon Valley and Zhongguancun. Newly sensitized to the human side of life, he prescribes human-to-human (or heart-to-heart) operations as something we can turn to, a need that will persist, even when all the truck driver spots dry up. This is a really laudable aspect of the book. How a lot of tough tech exec’s and macho VC posers would have the spine to reveal this much of themselves and lay down their pugnacious facades, to go this deep? Truly admirable and the final section, Dr. Lee his prescription, which is a social do-gooder program of make-work in locations that computers still have problem with, such as cheering lonely elders and such. Lee believes government mandated social-service jobs programs have advantages over the resurgent Universal Primary Income proposals (basically air-dropping on people from helicopters).The strengths of this book are the amazing high-tech anecdotes and ringside latest history accounts, the straight-forward descriptions of some key technical advances, and future directions, as well as the uniquely heart-centric infusion of that emo human touch in considering palliatives for the upcoming unemployment wave.Minor downsides contain a certain Chinese cultural chauvinism. Lee is very convincing in proudly calling out all the strengths of China relative to the West (basically, the USA) in the AI’s Brave Fresh World. But he sometimes gets a small carried away. For example, he makes more than one admiring reference to a latest Chinese sci-fi hit, Folding Beijing by Hao Jingfang, which depicts a future globe of extreme class and functional at’s an appealing effort but hardly as special as Lee seems to believe, given that this primary scenario was chillingly and unforgettably depicted in one of the very first science fiction novels ever published (The Time Machine by H. G. Wells - a future globe of the surface dwelling Elio vs. the Morlocks, ape-like troglodytes who live in darkness underground and surface only at night). That’s just one example of several where Lee’s understandable cultural pride gets the better of his basically dispassionate instincts.He also paints too powerful a contrast between Silicon Valley culture and the organized crime ethos of Zhonguancun (China’s Silicon Valley). For example, Lee writes that the Valley (USA high tech culture) despises copycats. Is this real of Larry Ellison, secretly copying the original IBM research paper on relational databases that became the signature tech of Oracle? Is it real of Steve Jobs, ripping off for his Macintosh every element demonstrated to him on the Star office system when he toured the Palo Alto Xerox research lab one day? And we all know the saga of DOS and Windows. How original was Facebook? I could go on. And on. Things are more related than different.Where he really has a bonus is in making concepts that would be method too scary or boring to a lay reader perfectly understandable and accessible. Here, Lee really shines. For just one of a lot of examples, consider is his seamlessly smooth rendition of a blazing hot way in current AI research, Generative Adversarial Networks (GANs). This would scare the pants off most lay readers if they encountered it in a technical book, but look how easily the medicine goes down when administered by Dr. Lee:“Toutiao then used that labeled data to train an algorithm that could identify fake news in the wild. Toutiao even trained a separate algorithm to write fake news stories. It then pitted those two algorithms versus each other, competing to fool one another and making each other better in the process.”Rendering this strong frontline concept perfectly lucid in a couple dozen words – that’s a bonus (but again, note the touch of Chinese chauvinism, implying that Toutiao, a Chinese company, somehow thought up this approach for their own small application, while in fact the GAN configuration is entirely the innovation of a Western AIresearcher).But enough carping. It’s a very amazing book and well worth reading. Now the huge question opens before us: after reading this, am I worried? Am I convinced to be at least as worried (yet cautiously hopeful) as Lee himself? No, I’m not worried at all, and here’s rst, some background. Despite the fact that these high-tech icons and visionaries pretend to revere intelligence and genius and talent and brains and innovation and creativity and all that, secretly every one of them must know that the greatest economic resource is not intelligence at all. The greatest economic resource, by far, is stupidity. They all know this, and now you know it too. I can prove nsider where the economy would be if even a few sectors such as the following were entirely removed: drink industry; snack foods industry; global arms industry; all religions; makeup and cosmetic industry, including weight loss and cosmetic surgery; high end luxury brands of all kinds; most video games; most films and famous entertainment; most of the ‘financial services’ industry – need I go on? Every one of the above sectors is based almost entirely on human stupidity. Or, at a minimum, none of them could function without a solid root in human stupidity. And that’s only the consider the ramifications of just eliminating one item on that list, say, the drink and snack foods industry. That alone would probably eliminate up to 50% of current health care services needed by the population. So the effects would ripple out everywhere. I could go on but you obtain the idea. The one essential economic resource isnot intelligence at all. It is stupidity. The human economy would grind to a dead halt without it. Whether human stupidity is exploited haphazardly by existing manual methods, or (in the near future) exploited and stimulated more efficiently via AI methods is at’s why I don’t see any amazing long term threat in AI. Or if there is any threat in AI, it isn’t the economic items called out by Lee, it’s more likely to be the existential items called out by Musk and others in his camp. But we’ve place that aside for this discussion, so within the terms of Lee’s book, we can expect clear sailing. Yes, AI will continue to advance, but in the words of one popular science fiction writer: ‘the road finds its own use for things’. Humans will adapt AI to their own unceasing pursuit of profit and pleasure through organized and unorganized crime and it all will be business as usual in the long e only huge result will be that the AI mavens of today, the ‘smart ones’, will probably end up displacing themselves. We can do without intelligence (see above). The crucial resource is stupidity. The co-founder of Communism, Vladimir Ilyich Lenin, once famously predicted that “when the time comes to hang the capitalists, they will rush to usthe rope”. Similarly, the Chinese rush to pull ahead in AI by throwing and brains at it is likely merely accelerating the creation of their own successor species. That engineered fresh life form will likely place all the intelligent guys out of business yet retain some need for stupid feedstock, just as in the Matrix films the AI’s ran the globe but kept sleeping (stupid) humans as batteries.But still - shouldn’t I be a bit more tremulous about the advent of our AI overlords? After all, it has been stated by one who should know that: With superintelligent computers that understand the universe on levels that humans cannot even conceive of, these machines become not just tools for lightening the burdens of humanity; theyapproach the omniscience and omnipotence of a , AI’s will become ‘gods’. But even so, they will never be able to beat down the human race. Because we have our amazing ace in the hole, the one cognitive zone we humans uniquely occupy, where by definition, no AI can follow. Before you hide under your bed, dig these words of wisdom:“Against stupidity, the very gods themselves contend in vain.”- Friedrich Schiller

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    AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order [Book]  2019-11-19 18:0

    Dr Lee Kai-Fu brings special insights into the discussion. As a researcher in the field, he understands the technology. As a Taiwanese-American who has spent time on both sides of the Pacific, he has special insights into the start-up, technology and policy ecosystems in both countries. And as a latest cancer survivor and having experienced the clarifying vision that comes with a brush with mortality, Dr Lee has written a tremendous book that incorporates a lifetime of learning. An perfect reference book to look at in the next few years as countries huge and little grapple with the movement of AI technologies in ever more fields of work. His call for social impact investment needs to be heeded as we consider what truly value in society.

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    The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America []  2020-1-9 19:0

    The headline says it all - no news here, folks. Sorry to say that, but I am passing this one on to the local library sale.

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    The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America []  2020-1-9 19:0

    Very comprehensive history of the Silicon Valley, with stories and first-hand narratives that I have not read anywhere else. I especially appreciated the focus on women’s roles in the creation and commercialization of technology innovations.Overall, the book is an perfect primer, and gave me the ability to keep an smart discussion on the subject with tech-industry folks.

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    AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order [Book]  2019-11-19 18:0

    I had high expectation for this book given it is written by a practitioner in AI and a leader in VC in China. It lacks scholarship and the view is very one-sided. It painted China's future as a copycat proudly and shamelessly. Being a practitioner myself and a Chinese, I am deeply disappointed with and ashamed of the book and the author.

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    AI Superpowers: China, Silicon Valley, and the New World Order [Book]  2019-11-19 18:0

    In his book, Kai-fu Lee makes the startling contention that within the latest three years, China has caught up to Silicon Valley in artificial intelligence. China accomplished this by leapfrogging the US in mobile computing, enabling China to take a various path to AI nirvana.Dr. Lee is one of the pioneer creators and thinkers of artificial intelligence. After he obtained his doctorate degree in AI from Carnegie Mellon, he joined Apple in Cupertino to develop the voice recognition system and then left for China to build research centers of excellence for Microsoft and Google. Now he is the premier venture capitalist investing in AI startups in adays, artificial intelligence has become part of everyday conversation, even if not everyone understands what AI is all about. Wall Road considers AI to be the recent prime investment in technology following the Internet and the intelligent phone. Lee believes development of AI is even more profound than that, equating the future impact of AI on the human civilization to be as fundamentally revolutionary as the invention of the steam engine that ignited the first industrial revolution and electricity for the became a true emerging technology when researchers moved machine learning to the next level called “deep learning.” Properly designed algorithm, called neural network, can learn to fine tune its algorithm by repetitive and error calculations, at lightening speed, until the best solution is derived based on the data set fed to the algorithm. The bigger the data set that’s fed to the algorithm, the better is the resulting optimization and e importance of huge data, explains Lee, has allowed China to close the gap with Silicon Valley in AI because China generates much more useful and higher quality data than in the US. Lee credits Steve Job and the introduction of the intelligent phone as the happening that pushed China into AI s in the West may not have noticed that as China’s economy grew at dizzying rates in the 40 years since reform began, the country leapfrogs certain crucial development along the way. Telecommunication is one such example. When China began its economic reform, its telecommunication network was woefully inadequate. The country was so under invested in copper wire lines overland that it was easier for the consumer to adopt the mobile phone rather than waiting for the allocation of a landline.When Apple introduced the iPhone in 2007, China already had the biggest number of mobile phones users in the world, and the users were primed to make batter to a smartphone, albeit not always an iPhone but a lower priced, domestically created alternate. At the time most Chinese did not own a computer at home and the tablet gave the Chinese user Internet access bypassing the need to a inese entrepreneurs quickly learn to develop apps specifically for the smartphone. For example, being decades behind the West, the use of card never really took off in China. Now with WeChat, considered a “superapp” by Lee, the tablet can be linked to the owner’s bank acc and the phone becomes a digital billfold able to create and keep e American AI monitors the user preferences such as what www service the user visits. In China, Tencent, the owner of WeChat, can gather data not only on what the user looked at, but what he/she bought, from whom, where and when. The data collected is much higher quality and multi-faceted. In addition, China has at least 3 times more users generating data for feeding into AI optimization than in the e author argues that while China remains behind the US on the creative side of writing AI algorithm, China has been closing the gap and in some aspects surpassing Silicon Valley for certain uses of AI. This has occurred within the most latest three years because China has been gushing high quality data derived from the e vast quantity of quality date is helping China refine their AI, which helps to improve the product offering, which increases customer acceptance, which generates even more data to optimize the AI program. Lee calls this the virtuous cycle of AI whereby the availability of date would let an inferior AI algorithm to surpass the performance of a superior AI that do not have access to as much example would suffice to illustrate the difference between China and the US. A program in China called Intelligent Finance has used AI and access to the user’s tablet to determine the creditworthiness of the individual and grant the user a private loan. No collateral, no report, no private references, and no banking info are needed. And the single digit loan default rate is the envy of commercial arently AI correlation of hundreds of data points residing in the tablet (Lee calls them weak features) can more accurately evaluate the reliability of the borrower, even if no human banker can fathom why. The iteration of AI over millions of smartphones have established predictive rules and the accuracy will only improve with use—and default becomes even more uncommon.While ground breaking AI research will continue in the US, China is graduating upwards of a million AI engineers every year. They are motivated and will work long hours to search fresh products and services based on AI solutions. And the access to large amount of data will more than offset their not being as amazing in designing the ina’s leadership recognizes the importance of AI and has allocated financial help to encourage and further AI research. The US? Not so much federal help and America will continue to depend on personal sector efforts. Personal sector AI will remain proprietary and be kept behind closed e author does not express much anxiety over the possible rivalry between the US and China. He is much more concerned with eventual advances in AI that could lead to wide spread displacement of human by machines. Owners of the strong AI could become members of a little elite class that have fun all the wealth and status while an “useless” class of masses can no longer generate enough economic value to help is is where Lee becomes very private drawing from his own dramatic experience as a cancer survivor. He suggests that no matter how advanced AI becomes, it can never replace human interaction that love and compassion. He proposes that we start to prepare for the day by placing higher priority and monetary value for socially beneficial activities. In other words a drastic and primary reordering of our value system based on humanity.His book is a thoughtful treatise on the possible benefits and destructive damages AI poses to the world. Anyone wanting to understand the downside of unbridled AI advances on the humankind will search relevant questions and answers in this book.

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    The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America []  2020-1-9 19:0

    THE CODE relies on archives, interviews, oral histories, and a range of sources to construct a fascinating history of Silicon Valley, a little zone in California that reshaped not just the United States, but the world. O'Mara's prose makes a story about technology, policy, engineering, and innovation readable and personal. Silicon Valley emerges as a complex construction of individual innovators AND policy -- an argument that should satisfy readers seeking to understand historical change with complexity as well as clarity. Moreover, the people in this history come alive through her telling, in particular with the "Arrivals" section that capture the transformation of the zone over time, creating a sense of dynamism along with a sense of place. Highly recommended to understand the origins of our modern technological landscape and the complex questions we now face regarding regulation, privacy, and the promises of innovation.

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    The Code: Silicon Valley and the Remaking of America []  2020-1-9 19:0

    A beautifully written, fast paced, exciting view of 20th Century Silicon Valley.

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