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    The Down Goes Brown History of the NHL: The World's Most Beautiful Sport, the World's Most Ridiculous League review []  2020-1-8 18:56

    One of the most special voices in hockey journalism has written his first full-length original book and it lives up to his lofty goal of making it both educational as well as fun. Secrets of how Rangers would have had Gordie Howe if they hadn't been stocked by a bunch of obnoxious Fresh Yorkers, where the Predators got the pick they used to draft Shea Weber, how the first outdoor android game of the modern NHL was played in a Las Vegas parking lot, why the NHL chose to use a wheel to see who got to pick Gilbert Perrault (and why they flipped a coin to pick who got to spin it), as well as a (more) serious look at the history of violence in hockey and what happens to the league when they invent a method to try for brain hurt on a living person, are explained in just enough detail. That should suggest that you will need a certain baseline familiarity with the NHL - particularly the 80s and 90s - to obtain full entertainment value out of it. That said, it's just a baseline. The joke about Pierre Dagenais can be understood even if you don't remember him. I read the book in a small under four hours during an plane flight, so again, not a massive lift.

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    The Down Goes Brown History of the NHL: The World's Most Beautiful Sport, the World's Most Ridiculous League review []  2020-1-8 18:56

    I’ve been a DGB fan for a while now and this book certainly lives up to his standard. Packed with stories you won’t obtain in a “normal” NHL history and presented in a manner that makes it fun and easily digestible, Sean not only finds a method to break the literary neutral-zone trap, but also abolish the literary offside challenge while he’s at it. OK, maybe he didn’t do all that, but this book is amazing fun and you should buy it too. Oh, I also miss his Biscuits podcast. I just wish that on the record.

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    The Down Goes Brown History of the NHL: The World's Most Beautiful Sport, the World's Most Ridiculous League review []  2020-1-8 18:56

    I've been reading Sean McIndoe's online columns for most of this decade, so when I saw he was releasing a book on hockey history, there was no question that I would buy it, read it, and love it. What McIndoe does here is rather brilliant, not unlike his articles -- he merges his cleverly sardonic writing style with deep and informed research. In other words, he takes what could in other hands be either dry or overly irreverent material and makes it both extremely entertaining and remarkably intelligent. Personally, given my career path, I have very small time to do "pleasure reading," but I created the exception for DGB's history, and I'm glad I did. Now I feel well-equipped to regale mates at dinner parties with stories of water bottle warfare, ineffective earmuffs, and draft selections that never existed. If *that* doesn't sell you on the book, I don't know what will...

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    The Down Goes Brown History of the NHL: The World's Most Beautiful Sport, the World's Most Ridiculous League review []  2020-1-8 18:56

    McIndoe does a very nice job of hitting the high points of NHL history and absurdity in 250 pages. This isn’t an exhaustive study of the league, nor is it meant to be. I consider myself a “business casual” fan of the league (it’s squarely my #4 of the huge four leagues), but I definitely learned a few things and had a couple of amazing laughs and amazing memories remembering my heyday as a fan growing up in the 80s and 90s. Definitely recommended.

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    The Down Goes Brown History of the NHL: The World's Most Beautiful Sport, the World's Most Ridiculous League review []  2020-1-8 18:56

    I was so satisfied to search out that Down Goes Brown had written a book, and so satisfied to have purchased it and read it, It is a simple breeze through the history of the league, with laugh out loud stories all the method through. The book spends a lot of time covering the 90's - the modern era, which is amazing because so a lot of NHL books were written during another era.

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    The Down Goes Brown History of the NHL: The World's Most Beautiful Sport, the World's Most Ridiculous League review []  2020-1-8 18:56

    I am a fan of Sean's amazing blog, Down Goes Brown. He showed his love for the NH L throughout this very amazing book. He reported the highlights and lowlights of the best sport with amazing precision. He captured the best/worst of the comings and goings of the ry amazing read!

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    The Down Goes Brown History of the NHL: The World's Most Beautiful Sport, the World's Most Ridiculous League review []  2020-1-8 18:56

    I learned so much about the quirky history of Canada's favorite sports league that now when they do things it does not surprise me one so Garry Bettman's voice will remain an impression from another hockey writer.

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    The Down Goes Brown History of the NHL: The World's Most Beautiful Sport, the World's Most Ridiculous League review []  2020-1-8 18:56

    My first thought after finishing the book was that the author is head over heels in love with hockey. Fact and funny meet head on in a really interesting, informative and humorous chronological history of professional hockey in North America. Best sports book I've read since Ball Four

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    The Down Goes Brown History of the NHL: The World's Most Beautiful Sport, the World's Most Ridiculous League review []  2020-1-8 18:56

    Very enjoyable read, every time I picked it up I did not wish to place it down. Very informative with that touch of humor that only DGB does. I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book.

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    The Down Goes Brown History of the NHL: The World's Most Beautiful Sport, the World's Most Ridiculous League review []  2020-1-8 18:56

    Funny telling of the amazing idiocy of the NHL. Being ridiculous is half of what created the NHL so fun til it all became corporate idiocy and killed the fun.

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    Most Beautiful Girl in the World review []  2020-1-3 23:52

    This was the best method to obtain this song. The EP is hard to search or too expensive as is the CD single. The vinyl ver is great. The only drawback is there isn't really a super distinguishable chop between the single and the remix (which I hate). However, you will obtain one of Prince's finest songs IMO.

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    Most Beautiful Girl in the World review []  2020-1-3 23:52

    All things Prince. This single is harder to obtain but worth the effort.

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    Most Beautiful Girl in the World review []  2020-1-3 23:52

     On the amazing side, the record arrived very quick as promised. On the poor side, the record was warped terribly and sounds not good because of it. Very disappointing 😤

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    Most Beautiful Girl in the World review []  2020-1-3 23:52

    exactly what i remember from my school days

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    Most Beautiful Girl in the World review []  2020-1-3 23:52

    Not the original ver of the song. Totally misleading. Wasted 20+ dollars.

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    Most Beautiful Girl in the World review []  2020-1-3 23:52

    This was not the song I was expecting. It is a remix, not the original.

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    Most Beautiful Girl in the World review []  2020-1-3 23:52

    I am so glad that I purchased this back a few years ago. Prince, you will be greatly missed!!

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    Most Beautiful Girl in the World review []  2020-1-3 23:52

    Horrific, cheap illegal bootleg! Do not buy!

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    Most Beautiful Girl in the World review []  2020-1-3 23:52

    Record was warped and the sound quality was poor but since I bought it for my husband he wanted to hold it even though it was not good quality.

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    Most Beautiful Girl in the World review []  2020-1-3 23:52

    This cd was used and scratched. I threw it out.

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    See the World Beautiful review []  2020-1-16 6:28

    The concept of this book is quite interesting--inherent fashion in native dress. I have visited a lot of of the locations in this book and search this to be true. I love these photographs, and the quality of the book is excellent. I gave it to a mate for Christmas and ordered another copy to keep.

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    See the World Beautiful review []  2020-1-16 6:28

    I saw this book featured on The Fresh York Times and Oprah Magazine, and I thought it looked incredible. I hold seeing this book everywhere, and now that I own it, I know that it is as attractive as everyone says it is. The photographs are stunning, and Anne Menke does a unbelievable job capturing breathtaking fashion from around the world.I am so satisfied to own such an awe-inspiring collection of photographs. This is sure to create a amazing bonus to fashion and photography aficionados!

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    See the World Beautiful review []  2020-1-16 6:28

    This book is the work of an awesome photographer, both in fashion and lifestyle images! Each photograph created me feel like I was actually on zone with Anne, they come to life. In a mental 3-D fashion, all photos are worthy of framing. I love the book and will [email protected]#$%! for a lifetime!

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    See the World Beautiful review []  2020-1-16 6:28

    I had to send it back because it doesn't fullfill my purpose as a designer, I had hoped on an explosion of colors, unfortunately most of these awesome attractive pictures are in b/w...Awesome photography, but the color is missing.....

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    See the World Beautiful review []  2020-1-16 6:28

    Bought this for my daughter for Christmas as it was on her want list. It is a big, massive book and as she lives in Alaska, I want I had shipped it to her instead of having it here for her. Now I have to ship it and it won't be cheap!

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    See the World Beautiful review []  2020-1-16 6:28

    One of my favorite coffeetable books to have out. The images of people, animals, fashion are stunning and really do present how fashion & culture collide. -ACG

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    The Most Beautiful Walk in the World: A Pedestrian in Paris review [Book]  2017-11-10 18:0

    I enjoyed the ups and downs, the wide boulevards and the smelly alleys. This author appears to know Paris well. I have been there and it brought a lot of memories flooding back.

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    The Most Beautiful Walk in the World: A Pedestrian in Paris review [Book]  2017-11-10 18:0

    John Baxter has made a book which reflects his knowledge and love of rough his descriptions, Paris and the Parisians then and now ,come alive and the reader is transported to the fascinating globe of The Town of Light. I felt that I was walking with Baxter through his quartier. I learned a lot of things about Paris and its inhabitants, popular and not so famous.I enjoyed Baxter's bonus with language and reading a book that was written by an experienced writer rather than some of the very ordinary offerings available as ebooks. He clearly knows how to tell a tale. There were echoes of "A Paris Christmas:Immoveable Feast" which I also enjoyed. I was charmed by the image of Baxter and his daughter and appreciated the is is not a tutorial book but offers more; it gives the feel of Paris. The locations Baxter mentions have a life of their own and that is so much more interesting than a soulless description in a tutorial book.

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    The Most Beautiful Walk in the World: A Pedestrian in Paris review [Book]  2017-11-10 18:0

    I really enjoyed the first three-quarters of this book. Baxter's descriptions of modern-day haunts in Paris mixed well with the glimpses into the city's literary history that he offered. He proved to be an effective story teller with his vivid descriptions of people and locations - some lines are still in my mind 3 weeks after finishing the book. My problem with the book (which prevented the 5th star) is two-fold: First, my favorite part of the book was when Baxter described his days as a tour tutorial and I don't think he explored that part of his story enough (after all, the book is titled after these tours) and second, the latest quarter of the book really dragged on without purpose. Overall, though, I would recommend this book for people who love Paris or wish to learn more about the city's literary past.

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    The Most Beautiful Walk in the World: A Pedestrian in Paris review [Book]  2017-11-10 18:0

    Because of my interest in 20-30‘s Paris with the likes of Man Ray and company I enjoyed the book (the huge lips Man painted was Lee Miller, who was Man‘s Lover and later a amazing artist photographer in her own name). But, Mr. Baxter your hero description of Americans visiting Paris was a disappointment due to the fact that the Americans who fell on Omaha beach allowed you to be a free man in Paris.

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    The Most Beautiful Walk in the World: A Pedestrian in Paris review [Book]  2017-11-10 18:0

    A lovely trip in Paris

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    The Most Beautiful Walk in the World: A Pedestrian in Paris review [Book]  2017-11-10 18:0

    Everyone loves Paris..

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    The Most Beautiful Walk in the World: A Pedestrian in Paris review [Book]  2017-11-10 18:0

    Funny, well written and puts you in Paris. Locations I have seen a lot of times and I cannot wait to go back and see what I missed and look at with various perspectiveGreat read.

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    The Most Beautiful Walk in the World: A Pedestrian in Paris review [Book]  2017-11-10 18:0

    I bought this book before a latest trip to Paris because I wanted more than a book with the usual tourist agenda. Those are always helpful when you travel, but I don't like to be part of the tourist mass carrying a guidebook. While we were not able to do all the recommended walks, we did several, and will take the book with us the next time we visit Paris. The book celebrates the seasons, neighborhoods and history of Paris in a charming, simple to read format. We were enchanted. It's also amazing fun for the armchair traveler, or those who can't wait to go back to this unbelievable city. Highly recommend.

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    The Most Beautiful Walk in the World: A Pedestrian in Paris review [Book]  2017-11-10 18:0

    I found this book a strange mix of what felt like subliminal messages on how to navigate around Paris, with descriptions of both the beautiful and unpretty facets of the City. I admired the Author's knowledge of history across a lot of divergent realms and his style of writing is engaging and captures the reader with vivid descriptive passages. I think I would summarize this book as a no nonsense and no fluff story about the true Paris. Interesting and thought provoking.

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    The Most Beautiful Walk in the World: A Pedestrian in Paris review [Book]  2017-11-10 18:0

    Amazing to read before walking around Paris. Gives you a feel for what is there from the viewpoint of an ex-pat. We loved our time walking around Paris, but if you can't jump on a plane and go, sit back and read this book with a amazing cup of coffee or glass of wine. Bon Voyage.

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    NewBeauty: The World's Most Unique Beauty Magazine review []  2020-1-11 20:42

    Understand that this magazine is a giant ad book for beauty products. It is more difficult to read on the kindle. Text size did not resize quickly or at all.

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    NewBeauty: The World's Most Unique Beauty Magazine review []  2020-1-11 20:42

    This is a amazing magazine, although it has changed somewhat with the fresh editor. I will continue to obtain for the time being but not sure. Liked the old format better.

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    NewBeauty: The World's Most Unique Beauty Magazine review []  2020-1-11 20:42

    Fresh Beauty mostly advertisement needs more research information.

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    NewBeauty: The World's Most Unique Beauty Magazine review []  2020-1-11 20:42

    Info was special and very interesting...

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    NewBeauty: The World's Most Unique Beauty Magazine review []  2020-1-11 20:42

    Hands down best beauty mag about products and treatments

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    NewBeauty: The World's Most Unique Beauty Magazine review []  2020-1-11 20:42

    Amazing info for whole body care.

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    NewBeauty: The World's Most Unique Beauty Magazine review []  2020-1-11 20:42

    I love this magazine. It has REAL info not just fluff.

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    NewBeauty: The World's Most Unique Beauty Magazine review []  2020-1-11 20:42

    What I like about the subscription... it is paperless... no zone required to shop them.

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    NewBeauty: The World's Most Unique Beauty Magazine review []  2020-1-11 20:42

    Stumbled on this magazine at an airport and loved it! They have amazing articles on fresh technology and products in the beauty industry. The only thing I don’t like is there is a massive emphasis on plastic surgery and it can obtain repetitive with the same doctors. All in all, a amazing magazine if your interested in fresh procedures and products.

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    NewBeauty: The World's Most Unique Beauty Magazine review []  2020-1-11 20:42

    Given as a gift! She loved it!

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    Daily clicks - beautiful photos around the world review [App]  2018-10-13 13:9

    Not enough variety, not enough pics, not what I expected, and not my cup of tea. Sorry I can't be more enthused.

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    Daily clicks - beautiful photos around the world review [App]  2018-10-13 13:9

    Nice UI but images are in a not good quality and shape!!! At least they should be 1080p, so disappointed.

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    Daily clicks - beautiful photos around the world review [App]  2018-10-13 13:9

    Love it 💗. Attractive pictures

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    Window on the World: An Operation World Prayer Resource (Operation World Resources) review []  2020-1-21 22:40

    A amazing description of this is "National Geographic meets Operation World." The pictures, maps, and descriptions of the major globe religions are written in clear language on a level that kids can easily understand. The stories from the perspective of families from the regions described support kids to envision the method that kids live around the globe. The clearly laid out prayer requests create it simple for family devotionals. This is an perfect tool to teach your kid about globe missions, and it also helps anyone of any age obtain aa visualization of what is event around the world.

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    Window on the World: An Operation World Prayer Resource (Operation World Resources) review []  2020-1-21 22:40

    I absolutely love this book. My kids and I use it everyday for homeschooling as part of our devotional time. We are able to learn about various countries and people groups around the globe in need of prayer while forming a better globe view and a heart for the unreached people of our world. I only want there were some sort of a coloring book that could accompany this book for younger kids who have an easier time listening while coloring and doodling to reinforce learning. We hold a world nearby incorporate geography while discussing the people groups, but there is a map available at the front of the book highlighting the various locations. I highly recommend this book!

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    Window on the World: An Operation World Prayer Resource (Operation World Resources) review []  2020-1-21 22:40

    Attractive layout and enjoyable to read with enough info to pique my children’s interest but not bore them. The book has very nice pictures and is a amazing method to introduce the struggles Christians are having daily in countries around the world. I love how the book talks about things for us to pray about and praise God for in each country.

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    Window on the World: An Operation World Prayer Resource (Operation World Resources) review []  2020-1-21 22:40

    I wanted my son to read and see what other countries were like. He is already very compassionate and will pray anytime he hears about someone hurting or in need. This book words it beautifully. It tells about the country and specifically what to pray for in that country. It was a true eye opener for me as well.

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    Window on the World: An Operation World Prayer Resource (Operation World Resources) review []  2020-1-21 22:40

    This is the best resource for kids, and the only I know, (from Operation World) for praying for the locations that are unreached. It is very simple, one page information on the countries or ethnic groups. The binding is weak on this book so it requires careful handling.

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    Window on the World: An Operation World Prayer Resource (Operation World Resources) review []  2020-1-21 22:40

    My girls and I have been praying through the countries since receiving this. We love the stories and the facts about geography and history. Supports our homeschooling efforts. My oldest daughter has a burden for everyone who hasn't heard about Christ. This has grown her prayer life so much. I only want more countries were in the children version.

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    Window on the World: An Operation World Prayer Resource (Operation World Resources) review []  2020-1-21 22:40

    This book is part of our homeschool curriculum. We have the older ver and we were excited to see a fresh ver available with more current statistics.

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    Window on the World: An Operation World Prayer Resource (Operation World Resources) review []  2020-1-21 22:40

    This is a amazing homeschool resource. We had the older ver but ordered this for more updated information. The old one has some people groups that the fresh one doesn't and vice versa so we often use both. We love how the book tells us how we can pray for the various groups and teaches us about their history and circumstances!

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    Window on the World: An Operation World Prayer Resource (Operation World Resources) review []  2020-1-21 22:40

    I think this book would capture the attention and imagination of children from 5-95. I bought it as a bonus for a 5 year old, but definitely paged through it before I wrapped it. A amazing bonus to encourage a missional focus.

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    Window on the World: An Operation World Prayer Resource (Operation World Resources) review []  2020-1-21 22:40

    Attractive pictures. Very formative and insightful into the various countries.

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    How Numbers Work: Discover the strange and beautiful world of mathematics review []  2019-12-17 21:6

    Thoroughly enjoyed this book. It gives an overview of the historical and cutting edge developments in math. It doesn't have any equations (though points you to them if you'd like) and in some parts reads like a novel. So cool!

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    Black Dyke Mills Band: More Of The World's Most Beautiful Melodies review []  2020-1-18 0:31

    Fabulous coronet player, first heard him in the Hetty Wentworth series now on my IPAD. Had to have a CD.

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    World History Maps: The World review [App]  2019-11-24 13:10

    I'm satisfied with this useful app, didn't regret that 4 Euro investment in my education! Makes all those nationalist quarrels about state borders so pointless. My suggestions: 1. Create any bookmarked or at least the recent country borders visible as a background for orientation (e.g. like the geographical shadow option). 2. Create slider and buttons insensitive to dragging of the map and pop-ups. Amazing work!

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    World History Maps: The World review [App]  2019-11-24 13:10

    Best application for this out there! Super useful and interesting!

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    World History Maps: The World review [App]  2019-11-24 13:10

    Brilliant application well designescll and

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    World History Maps: The World review [App]  2019-11-24 13:10

    The interface is very rudimentary, beautiful hard on the eyes. The maps are amazing though, with extensive data. Could be a small clearer for zooming (considering its needed to read some little text) but over gets the job done. EDIT: please please please increase the resolution of the country borders. Slightly longer loading is fine but this blurriness is out of hand (zoom until you can read the text in Spain at 1040, you can barely create out the borders)

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    The Beautiful Tree: A personal journey into how the world's poorest people are educating themselves review []  2019-12-18 20:41

    This is probably going to be the longest Amazon review I have ever written. I am compelled to write this detailed review because this book is excellent, and its accuracy as I see it from an Indian perspective, is spot-on.I grew up in India, and was educated entirely in personal schools (for obvious reasons you can learn about by reading this book). Unlike personal schools catering to the not good that this book examines, I went to ones that were for the middle class. (Note that “middle class” in this context means something various from what a typical westerner would think of.) My school fees were on the order of $10-$15 per month. Because of my father’s job-related moves, I changed 9 schools during my K-12 education. Of those 9 schools, 4 were for-profit secular schools and 5 were non-profit religious schools (1 Anglican, 1 Catholic, and 3 Hindu). The education I received in each school was excellent. Nearly every teacher I had was amazing and instilled a desire for learning in me. I still remember them with e recurring theme of this book is the love that not good parents have for their kids that motivates them to pay cash out of their meager pockets to send their kids to entrepreneur-run personal (mostly) for-profit schools, instead of sending them to “free” government schools. This is the same love that my parents felt that motivated them to create large sacrifices for my sibling and me, and this is the same love I feel for my e second recurring theme you will search in this book is that profit on the one hand, and ethics/charitableness/humanity on the other, are not mutually exclusive. Profit is not an ignoble motive, and the desire for profit does not automatically invalidate the humanity of a person providing a service, nor corrode their intentions. There is ample proof of it throughout the book; in fact, a case study school in Makoko in Lagos State (Nigeria) admitted 9% of its students with ZERO tuition (see page 252). In my own private life, my mother used to tutor kids part-time, and I remember her tutoring a not good kid for an entire year for free. My father’s eye surgeon in the town of Bhopal ran a personal for-profit clinic, and he used to care for not good patients for free, without any government mandate or reimbursement, and without any discrimination based on religion or me people have knee-jerk negative reactions when they hear words like “private” and “profit” and “corporation”. This book should resoundingly disabuse such people of their notions (assuming their minds are not sealed shut a priori). As Frederic Bastiat wrote in Economic Harmonies, “the profit of the one is the profit of the an immigrant in America, I was surprised when I first found out that education here is heavily dominated by government schools. And now as a father of American children, I am shocked by the level of educational spending when compared to what parents and taxpayers obtain in return for it. The inflexibility, increasing centralization, and “one-size-fits-all” approach of government schools, combined with a lack of parental choice (partly due to crowding out of the personal sector) is really sum, this book offers substantive proof on the efficacy of personal schools for the not good in the so-called “third world”. I really hope that transnational development agencies have paid attention to Prof. Tooley’s work.A related approach of personal schooling and school choice, in my opinion, will also benefit the United States. I hate to conclude on a pessimistic note, but I doubt that it will ever happen given the overall blurring of the lines between society and government, the entrenched interests of the educational establishment, and political comfort zones that Americans would rather war to stay in than cross. America will likely tinker around the edges, instead of unshackling voluntary, private, educational alternatives.

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    The Beautiful Tree: A personal journey into how the world's poorest people are educating themselves review []  2019-12-18 20:41

    This is an awesome story that needs a much wider audience. If you find on the Tom Wood sit and the Econ Talk website you can search episodes that they did with James Tooley where you can listen to him talk about his experiences. This is what led me to buy the book, and I was not disappointed. Tooley's work to search out how people living in what we in the US would call extreme poverty (walk to school over half-rotting planks that cross begin sewers, anyone) are opening and running their own personal schools to educate each other is oley is part anthropologist, part scientist, part economist, part political scientist as he explores a virtually uknown world--a globe that officials living in the countries he is visiting repeatedly tell him does not exist. But the globe of personal schools for the not good does exist, and Tooley goes to amazing lengths to discover it and bring it alive for us.

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    The Beautiful Tree: A personal journey into how the world's poorest people are educating themselves review []  2019-12-18 20:41

    There is no such thing as a excellent argument. You can’t convince someone of a truth if they refuse to think, nor can they keep onto an idea if they don’t know how to think. If such a a excellent argument did exist, this book gets very close. It demonstrates concretely the consequences of state run schools, settling the argument for government having a role in education once and for all. My one complaint is that Tooley never abstracts his empirical data into principles. Consequently, the moral problems are never resolved- he can never say that it is government intervention that is a fundamental violation of rights and is, therefore, immoral, but one can do that for himself with the material provided. Sadly, too few are listening and even fewer are thinking in principle today.A must read for Americans who really wish to live the best life possible.

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    The Beautiful Tree: A personal journey into how the world's poorest people are educating themselves review []  2019-12-18 20:41

    James Tooley's "The Attractive Tree" is a book concerned with questioning the widely held assumption that free public education is the only, or most efficient, method to educate the poor. The book is a first-person recount of four years spent examining not good locations of African countries like Kenya, Ghana, Nigeria, and India, and recording the surprising number, and diversity, of personal schools that serve the poor. In a lot of areas, Tooley found that, despite the opinion of the locations politicians, the huge majority of students were educated privately, even with the availability of "free" public oley not only explores that this phenomenon exists (and that it is not an anomaly, but a presence in every not good village he explored), but why it is happening. Tooley talked to school "proprietors," parents who elect to send their kids to personal schools, and kids who have attended both public and personal schools. Tooley found that low quality of public education was the biggest reason for parents sending kids to personal schools. Much like the United States, Tooley explains that corruption and bureaucratic jockeying is plaguing the public school infrastructure in Africa (from regulators taking bribes to teachers' unions shielding teachers from accountability). Towards the end of the book, Tooley unveils the results of his 150 school (and several thousand student) study whereby he gave students in public and personal school tests and compared their results. Even those who can already guess the results will be surprised!One of the most infuriating parts of The Attractive Tree is the attitude and resistance Tooley found in the politicians and academics he encountered along the way. Politicians uniformly told him that his research was a waste of time ("Private schools here only serve the rich," which Tooley would quickly document was not the case.) Academics offered much resistance to "Tooley's research citing the "good reasons" why it was risky to share research on the efficiency of personal schools for the poor, regardless of what the data says. (Tooley rebuts these "five amazing reasons" in a closing chapter.) Much of the time, the politicians' and academics' knee-jerk reaction to personal schools for the not good amounted to the belief that they knew better how to educate the kids than the parents of the students, who one politician called "ignoramuses".)This is a highly interesting book with a notice which needs to be heard. As Tooley points out, the existence, and quantity, of these personal schools goes a long method in showing that personal schools can and do educate the not good for a much more reasonable cost than public schools. And the fact that parents willingly choose to send their kids to for-profit schools even though a "free" option exists gives lie to the myth that personal schools educating the not good are too expensive or low-quality. A very interesting and eye-opening read.

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    The Beautiful Tree: A personal journey into how the world's poorest people are educating themselves review []  2019-12-18 20:41

    The author was commissioned to document the effectiveness of monies sent to educate severely impoverished communities in numerous (mainly Asian/African) countries. He was surprised to explore such communities commonly had unrecognized makeshift schools which were far more effective than the well-funded institutions he had intended to study. -- Tooley explains how the makeshift schools profited from bonds of accountability between parents and teachers. -- Also, teacher shortages led makeshift schools to use their more advanced students as (highly supervised) teachers for the less advanced. There is evidence this system may have been observed by visitors who copied it into British education in the 18th & 19th centuries.

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    The Beautiful Tree: A personal journey into how the world's poorest people are educating themselves review []  2019-12-18 20:41

    If you ever have advocated for the elimination of government schools as I do, a common and almost cliche comeback is, "But how will the not good obtain an education..." Well, James Tooley has done the research in China, India, and Africa. His findings present that personal schools servicing the world's very not good (a dollar-a-day poor) do exist. It also turns out these same personal schools out-perform the government schools in scholastic tests. Sounds like a success story right? The not good are educating themselves bottom up! But the government bureaucrats wish to regulate the personal schools out of existence. It's a attractive book written by a attractive human being. Gives you hope for humanity and contempt for the parasitical government class.

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    The Beautiful Tree: A personal journey into how the world's poorest people are educating themselves review []  2019-12-18 20:41

    This book documents, in the strictest sense of that word, how free-market education is thriving in some of the poorest of third globe countries. The comparison of state-run schools and their unmotivated staffs with schools staffed by teachers who depend on the quality of their efforts should resonate with a lot of parents with school-aged kids in the U. S., as well as with legislators who regulate our educational institutions. Not good people in different cultures are shown to sacrifice financially by paying fees to profit-making personal schools in lieu of sending their kids to nominally free public schools. This is not a dry, academic book, but is very well written. It holds the reader's interest with anecdotes of how the data in the book was acquired in some of the poorest slums of several countries.

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    The Beautiful Tree: A personal journey into how the world's poorest people are educating themselves review []  2019-12-18 20:41

    I very much have fun writing which challenges "conventional wisdom" with first hand research. This book accomplishes that task superbly. Our educational establishment assumes that learning is mostly a function of highly credentialed teachers working in schools which are built to the best standards with little classes. The common wisdom is supported by the academic educational elite, in concert with politicians and teachers' union officials, with small regard for either the practical wisdom and concerns of parents or for measurable proof of their contentions. Tooley has traveled some of the poorest regions of the globe and found a vibrant educational "industry" operating in hovels, at a (very small) profit, sustained by parents of no means with results far outdistancing the supposedly "free" schools provided by governments and international aid agencies. The principal difference between personal schools for the not good and government schools for all is in the degree of direct accountability to the parens implicit in personal schools. This book makes a passionate and moving case for some type of voucher system to supplant the inefficient and ineffective government educational programs in developed, as well as undeveloped, countries.

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    The Beautiful Tree: A personal journey into how the world's poorest people are educating themselves review []  2019-12-18 20:41

    I have been a professional educator for 40 years, in the United States. The past 12, I've worked to develop homeschooling in the U.S., as I see it as the only viable educational option. When parents and communities take their children in hand and away from government-sponsored education, children just do better. They do better academically (proven by try scores across the board), and they do better in life, not having the threats and methodology of "schools" to contend with. (Won't obtain into that laundry list here.)I had no idea that small, privately held schools, run in the poorest communities by the not good and for the poor, were so astonishingly prevalent and successful as Mr. Tooley describes and thoroughly documents, in this remarkable book. Here is a man "on the ground", who discovered a heavy movement that is truly addressing the needs of the neediest, sponsored and run by those very people, in Africa and India! There are not just a few of these schools - there are many, a lot of of them! The governments of the different nations involved tend to deny these schools even exits, and they all insist that personal education is "for the rich." But this is a flat-out lie, and Tooley proves it with unbelievable documentation, and hands-on experience. The title comes from a quote by Gandhi in which he described India's privately held schools as they were before the British came to city and chopped them down. But the Brits are long gone, the privately-held schools (often really extended homeschooling groups by my definition of it) are back, and they are flourishing! And their results tend to be far superior than government-run schools. (No surprise there!)This is a truly uplifting book about education. If you are seriously looking to understand education today, if you are looking for hope for our kids beyond the utterly ruinous garbage that public schools provide, this book has some shocking and unbelievable news for you. This isn't pie-in-the-sky, it is about what is and has already happened! If you truly care about children and not just organizations (such as schools and governments), this books is for you.

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    The Beautiful Tree: A personal journey into how the world's poorest people are educating themselves review []  2019-12-18 20:41

    This book kept me interested throughout because the author discovered how the not good in not good and non- first globe nations were doing for themselves, empowering e Attractive Tree reflects how colonial powers then the Western development experts who followed damaged if not destroyed the attractive tree of indigenous education with unsustainable bureaucratic centralized systems that do not provide the universal education they promised when uprooting the attractive tree.I gave it 5 stars because it makes me wish to support and it helped me see education in a various light and remember it is more than just the classroom.

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    The Gentleman's Pocket Knife: History and Construction of the World's Most Beautiful Models review []  2020-1-4 21:15

    I suspect this book will end up costing me hundreds of dollars over the next few years trying to get some of the knives described and beautifully pictured. I can't loan it to fellow collectors because of the drool stains all over it.

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    The Gentleman's Pocket Knife: History and Construction of the World's Most Beautiful Models review []  2020-1-4 21:15

    Tremendous research and unbelievable mix of historical info with interesting and delightful commentaries. Perfect overwiews and follow-ups with beautifully integrated pictures. One omission makes the book less than absolutely perfect: no inclusion of Eastern Europe’s traditions such as the Hungarian knife culture or others.

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    Well: Healing Our Beautiful, Broken World from a Hospital in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 16:18

    Interesting reading. Thebarge is a amazing story-teller, if somewhat maudlin and dramatic. However, I do take problem w the literary license she seems to have taken with the facts in order to create them fit into her chosen point. Some of the most obvious:1. The rooms at the HOH guesthouse in no method resemble jail cells. I am not one of the characters in this book, but I have stayed in these rooms. For months. They are simply furnished, with huge DOUBLE windows front and back to allow the breeze blow through. Beautiful curtains in African prints tie back, or close if you need daytime sleep. The slate floor is unbelievable - a cool put for your feet in the blazing heat. The bathroom is bigger than the one I have at home in Chicago, and the shower is created with the same slate - an make batter if you have this done in the US. The room is cool and cozy - despite the lack of artwork, etc. What was this about being disappointed about no tub for bubble baths - did she realize this was the third world? Or had she thought she could step back into the comforts of her affluent life after a shift at the hospital?2. The water shortage. The hospital and grounds were without RUNNING water for 2-3 days. There was plenty of bottled water to be had. People deferred showers for that time but there was no reason for thirst. So the “Never before had I wondered where my next sip of drinking water was going to come from. Never before had I so tightly rationed the amount of water I drank, wondering how dehydrated I could obtain without passing out or going into renal failure....It meant sharing with the Togolese people in this hardship, drinking the cup of suffering down to the dregs“ rings false and mawkish but is a amazing set-up for her essay on compassion and the “I. Am. Done...I wanted to be tough as nails, but I was not physically or emotionally capable of enduring this experience.” Real - if you search a 12 hr shift in a US ER too much to tolerate, you are not ready for third globe medicine, and you cannot do this on your own what other happenings have been dramatized/falsified? Yes, the work here is difficult. It IS hard for us as US physicians who rarely see death, when we obtain here and often feel powerless to create all of our patients well. But we have more that physical health to offer our patients. Thebarge had only sympathy , angst, and ebarge keeps referring to John 3:16, “for God so loved the world”...but she didn’t ever quote the latest half of that verse “that He gave his only begotten Son, that whoever believes Him will have everlasting life”Christians are not like Sisyphus, in love with his rock. The burden has been lifted and taken away! Gone! We have instead fallen in love with our Saviour, the one who has lifted that burden and carried it Himself. He paid the debt we owe, and has given us hope for the future. Thebarge speaks about some ephemeral Divine Love, which honestly is of small consolation. A future hope - now that’s something! We wish to share this. We know that whatever care we give, whatever disease we cure, it only benefits our patients until the next problem. But if we can introduce someone to the Amazing Physician - He promises soul healing for all eternity! That is what fuels us. With a judgmental attitude and closed mind from day 1, Thebarge has missed the whole point...

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    Well: Healing Our Beautiful, Broken World from a Hospital in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 16:18

    I was first introduced to Sarah Thebarge when I read her memoir, The Invisible Girls (2013). That story was so powerful, beautifully written, and heart-wrenching. When I heard she had written a fresh book called WELL, I knew immediately I would have to read it. I devoured the book in a few days and was incredibly taken with it. Sarah's writing is deep, heartfelt, passionate, real, transparent, and overall, so articulate and the pages of WELL, Sarah takes us on her journey to Togo and shares the stories of the people she cares for in a hospital in rural West Africa. The stories of suffering and loss, healing, hope, and fresh life are astounding. I found myself caught up in the stories…moved to tears at the suffering and loss, and fully experiencing Sarah's tenderness with those frail patients who were leaving this earthly life; she was literally the hands and feet of Jesus to these fragile ones. I also found myself laughing out loud during lighter moments of humor and joy, such as playing soccer with the sweet “FIFA Boys” in the nearby is book has too a lot of incredibly thought-provoking experiences, stories, and reflections, to mention here. However, at least one takeaway I had from this book is that it challenged my own thoughts and attitudes on suffering, compassion, and serving the midst of a serious bout of malaria, Sarah examines the nature of compassion. Sarah writes, “One night I woke up in the early hours, sweaty and thirsty, unable to fall back asleep. As I lay there in the dark, I started thinking about the word compassion, which comes from the Latin words co, which means “with,” and passion, from the word pati, which means “to suffer.” So the word compassion literally means “to suffer with.” I had always thought of compassionate people as people with tender hearts. But after my Togo experience, I realized that in order to practice compassion, your heart needs to be tender but the rest of you— including your emotions and your commitment and your will— needs to be tough as nails. Compassion, in its most extreme forms, is not cute; it is costly. It isn’t always sweet; sometimes it is downright scary. Compassion makes you suffer and sweat and smell. It requires you to pour yourself out, sometimes, until there’s nothing left. Togo gave me a fresh appreciation for Jesus. Instead of having sympathy for the human condition, Emmanuel, God With Us, came down to suffer with and for us. He took the cup of hardship, loss, grief, pain, and death, and he drank it to the dregs. Maybe, I thought as I lay in the dark that night in Togo, maybe Jesus was calling me to that same level of compassion, calling me to love the globe at a amazing private cost that I never would’ve chosen if it was up to me. To take the cup of suffering and drink it all, down to the dregs. I didn’t know yet what radical compassion would look like for me when I got back to the United States, but in Togo, when the sun came up the next morning, for me, having compassion meant picking up my nearly empty water bottle, walking over to the clinic, and seeing patients in a malodorous, muggy exam room while I was hot and thirsty and tired. It meant sharing with the Togolese people in this hardship, drinking the cup of suffering down to the dregs. Down to the very latest drop.”These are strong words. I am challenged and encouraged and “spurred on toward love and amazing deeds” after reading these words. This is such a amazing reminder that compassion, love, and service—especially to the least of these—is not a sweet sentiment, but instead is costly and often painful. Ultimately though, this is what Jesus demonstrated and modeled for us and it is the best method to live. Sarah shows us an awesome example of this level of compassion in WELL. This book will challenge you and encourage you and will change you (if you allow it!). I cannot recommend it highly enough!

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    Well: Healing Our Beautiful, Broken World from a Hospital in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 16:18

    I don't know if I can truly do justice in reviewing such a moving and true acc of the journey that Sarah took me on as I read Well. Throughout the a lot of short chapters, I grasped and held on to her words. Love looks around. I will never forget that. I am grateful to fighters such as Sarah who are willing to hold loving and pressing forward so that others like myself can search ways to walk in her footsteps. Thank you, Sarah. Your words blessed and touched me!

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    Well: Healing Our Beautiful, Broken World from a Hospital in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 16:18

    Sarah is a legitimate servant who practices the genuine art of love. She is real, authentic and genuinely cares for the poor, disadvantaged and marginalized. As a Nurse Practitioner, this book will give you deeper insights, not only into medicine and its special role is healing, but in the power of touch.

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    Well: Healing Our Beautiful, Broken World from a Hospital in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 16:18

    Very well written memoir of the author’s time working in Togo as a PA in a hospital in a desperately needy area. Her reflections on a lot of subjects are deep, meaningful, and challenging. And engaging read that will move you to action.

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    Well: Healing Our Beautiful, Broken World from a Hospital in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 16:18

    I do not have words to express how awesome this book was. By far the best book I have read in a long time. Sarah's honesty and writing style are just beautiful. Absolutely 10/10 would recommend this book to anyone who is considering missions or wants to support the developing nations.

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    Well: Healing Our Beautiful, Broken World from a Hospital in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 16:18

    Wow, what a read!

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    Well: Healing Our Beautiful, Broken World from a Hospital in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 16:18

    This is a forthright acc of a young woman's three month stint at a huge (for the region) hospital in Togo, "the least satisfied of all the world's nations." Sarah Thebarge came as a physician's assistant and was intimately involved in the medical treatment of hundreds upon hundreds of often desperately ill patients in her short time in country. Her reactions to the constant death of patients because of so a lot of factors--lack of equipment or medicines, delays in patients turning to the hospital after exhausting different kinds of "healing" in their own villages--are begin and honest, and often heart-breaking.Well provides insight into a globe that most of us in the western globe never see, where even dedicated volunteer workers obtain malaria, have to deal with lack of water (especially serious in a hospital where sanitation is critical), and deal with a never seen in the west level of mortality among patients. Thebarge is not afraid to share her emotional ups and downs as she confronts these challenges, and this is a powerful point for the book.What does remain uncovered and unchallenged are some of the things that problem her most and that were most troubling for this reader. She seems to be coming into the work as a "loner," not part of any organization that would have provided both more preparation for the three months as well as supportive co-workers, mentors, etc. She notes being turned down by other agencies but doesn't provide insight into why others saw her cancer history as prohibitive (her vaguely stated reason) when this rotation ignored it. Was it their desperation for any trained staff? Whatever the reason, this was no favor done for Thebarge.While she is complimentary to most of those she worked with, the author really doesn't present us how she was ever able to really relate to co-workers or the people of Togo. Yes, she bought some soccer balls for some of the children (and recounts being castigated for this violation of "regulations") but did she ever reach out to the families of those children, seek any further interaction? Did she ever test to obtain some of her co-workers to come with her in this kind of outreach? Was she ever able to support alleviate what she saw as gaps in the method that other non-Togo staff similar to their Togo peers?Three months is a very short time to really obtain a feel for what long-term compassionate ministry to those in another culture is like. The book is well worth reading, but it serves as a cautionary tale on why poorly prepared, lone wolf actions like this may not be of long term benefit. It also left a cynical feeling that perhaps the true purpose of the trip was not so much to help the people of Togo as to search a subject for a second book. It would be unbelievable to see a follow-up, either in another book or at least a solid magazine article, on how since returning to the States she has been able to further the work at the Hospital of Hope.

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    Well: Healing Our Beautiful, Broken World from a Hospital in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 16:18

    As a short term missionary who has been to Togo seven times and Togo ABWE Hospitals four times, it was amazing to read about Sarah's insight as a Doctor serving there. She is obviously a very talented writer and PA and provided wonderful perspective to the challenges and passion that the medical staff encounter day to day. I applaud Sarah's call for Christians to present the love of our Lord. From her book: "With our physical presence we reminded the Togolese people that they were not forgotten or lost or abandoned. They were not invisible to their loving, compassionate Parent." The amazing disappointment of the book was Sarah's lack of perspective and appreciation for the Missionaries working in Togo or their mission. Her own description of them: "Though no one in Togo ever said it out loud, the actions of the white missionaries suggested a sense that they were not only various from, but superior to, their Togolese colleagues and patients. Missionaries were not only Christians, but fundamentalist Baptists, who claimed to have an exclusive handle on God’s Truth."In my mission trips to Africa, I have worked with these same Missionaries who labor hand-in-hand with local Togolese Pastors and People as equal partners. They are real servants who have a deep love for the Togolese people. I have shared meals and visited Togolese both in Missionary homes and in their own. I have gone to little group bible studies locally in Mango and in remote Togo villages lead by the Togolese Hospital Chaplains and supported by the Missionaries. I have worked with Missionaries to provide clean drinking water to villages that will prevent disease and the a lot of sicknesses that the hospital has to deal with day to day. These efforts are a ongoing active ministry from the Hospital of Hope displayed by the real life changing Gospel of our Lord. It's simply awesome that Sarah didn't recognize or acknowledge this in her time rah obviously did have theological differences with the Missionaries and claimed she was angered whenever they asked her to participate in devotionals or pray. Throughout the book, her worldview and theology was slowly revealed. I couldn't comment further without a private discussion with her, combined with a thoughtful biblical perspective. We would probably disagree on some points but agree on much more than not. We love the same Lord! It doesn't appear from her narrative that she gave the Missionaries the same grace.

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    Well: Healing Our Beautiful, Broken World from a Hospital in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 16:18

    In Well, Sarah Thebarge immerses us in her three-month experience of working as a Physicians’ Assistant in a missionary hospital in Togo, West Africa. From her first days of climate and culture shock to her trip back home, she shares not only what she sees, hears, and smells, but also what she feels on a lot of levels—physically, emotionally, and y chapters are short. Some are unbelievable storytelling. Others read like essays that speak to huge themes of love and the meaning and purpose of life in the shadow of unspeakable suffering and the inequality of the developed vs the developing world. Scattered throughout her chronological acc of her Togo experience are flashback stories about her medical training, her war with breast cancer, and her experiences in ebarge is an perfect writer and a delight to read. She remembers happenings in awesome detail—though I’m sure some credit goes to her journals, which she repeatedly refers to keeping. However, a lot of of the stories are hard to read because of their content. The book is massive with heartbreaking tales of death disease, and primitive conditions. Over and over Thebarge refers to Togo as the saddest put on earth. She is deeply affected by the inability of the medical staff to support more people and prevent what appear to be the meaningless deaths of newborns, children, mothers and fathers required as parents.I would like to recommend this book without reservation, but can’t quite do that. For Thebarge’s theology does not, as I’ve picked it up from Well, agree completely with the Bible. She seems to take a Universalist approach toward the mostly Muslim patients that come to the hospital, implying that in death all will search themselves transported in love to the same loving e is sharply critical of what she calls the “fundamentalist” Baptists who help and run the hospital, offended that the chaplains speak to the dying of hell and how to avoid it.I found her explanation of the Incarnation (p. 294) interesting as ybe I missed it, but in Well I never came across the crux of the Gospel—that Jesus came to earth to present the Father’s love and be with us, yes, but to also die in our stead, to pay the death penalty our sins deserve. His atoning sacrifice is the reason we can look forward to spending eternity with Him and God the Father. Though this is a free gift, it’s a bonus we keep when we, with our volition, accept it.I have nothing but praise for Thebarge’s loving empathetic heart and tireless work. I have so much to learn from her. The theological critique notwithstanding, this book is a worthwhile read because of the part of the globe it shares and the method it challenges the reader to grapple with problems that Thebarge has faced and worked out in her way.I received this book as a bonus from the publisher for the purpose of writing a review.

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    Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World review []  2020-1-8 18:43

    I recommended this for our book club to read, and I expected it to be interesting, but I have to say that I found the book thin and boring. At one point, I was lost--why am I reading whole chapters about a guy named Antheil? What happened to Hedy? Eventually, the threads tie together, but the actual point of the story, that Hedy Lamarr invented a way of controlling torpedoes, is lost amidst a lot of barely-relevant sidetracks. I think the issue is that this is really only a magazine-article length story, puffed up to fill a book. Another issue with the writing is that the author doesn't start paragraphs with subject sentences, so you're reading a lot of info without any clear idea of the point.I found Hedy rather enigmatic, in his telling. She dropped out of high school in order to become an actress, she married three times within the pages of the book (though it is mentioned that she actually married 6 times!), she had no training whatsoever in electronics or engineering. So how is it possible that she created a major breakthrough in electronics? based on what she remembered overhearing while married to an arms manufacturer? I need to understand more about her mind to grasp that, and I do not keep it in this e claimed that glamour was meaningless to her, that her husband just wanted her to stand around and look beautiful--but then it also says that as she aged, she refused to be seen in public, because her beauty was gone. So apparently her beauty *did* mean a lot to her! In the end, I didn't have a really clear idea of what sort of person she was, and I also didn't have a very clear idea of what it is that she invented, or how it was or was not used in WW2.I am surprised that this author won a Pulitzer prize for some other writing--to me, this book seemed poorly written and not exactly captivating.

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    Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World review []  2020-1-8 18:43

    This is a amazing book, but definitely not a biography of Hedy Lamarr, with or without is actually a fascinating slice through the history of the first half of the 20th century, putting the invention of frequency-hopping radio transmission into the unlikely contexts of Hollywood and the European avant garde melody scene. It works out, almost certainly because of the availability of sources, to have more about the life of George Antheil, a provocative composer whose melody was used to inspire a riot for the benefit of a film, and who was Lamarr's collaborator in developing the invention. There's a lot of info about him, because he wrote lots of letters, a lot of of them marr was a much more reserved person: her day job was to be a film actress and "the most attractive woman in the world"; in the evenings she like to settle down in a corner of her drawing room and work at her inventions. The balance of attention is certainly not because Rhodes undervalues her intelligence; it just seems that she wasn't that much into reading and writing, so she left less trace. What we obtain of her life, however, illuminates the move from Central European High Culture to Hollywood, which was imposed on so a lot of people because of their Jewish ancestry, and pursued by some others for the sake of money.Rhodes' writing is nice and crisp, clear, and professional. It doesn't have the annoying mannerisms of a lot of professional authors, but he does create sure that none of his research goes to waste. There's a useful digression on what patent law means by "reduce to practice."I'm left feeling that I know enough about the origins of spread spectrum broadcasting, for the time being, but inspired to search out more about Lamarr and Antheil.

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    Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World review []  2020-1-8 18:43

    Readers will learn a lot from this account. They'll learn about life in Paris, Vienna and London between the wars, about the artistic and family struggles of experimental composer George Antheil (Lamarr's co-inventor), and about Hollywood living in the 1930s. Readers will not learn too much about developing a device to create guided torpedoes, although I do think Rhodes tells us all there is to e actual torpedo story doesn't start until around page 100 (this is a 220 page book), and from that point doesn't continue as a focus for too long. Although Lamarr and Antheil's concept, and the practical app that could be inferred from the schematics of the patent, would search use in military applications and then consumer applications in future decades, the two's torpedo idea was eventually rejected by the Navy and so was not a part of WW II. Lamarr's burning desire was to contribute to the battle effort, which she did do in a lot of other ways. That the idea was able to surviveseveral layers of bureaucratic weeding out and was awarded a patent is e Fresh York Times place it best. "It's to Mr. Rhodes's credit that he gently makes this implausible story plausible." To create it plausible needed Rhodes to cast a wide net indeed. And the title is interesting. The reader is left to judge just how much of a folly Lamarr's pursuit was or was not. However, apparently the idea was not a folly to Antheil, who was something of a polymath. This story from his point of view might be more to the point.

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    Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World review []  2020-1-8 18:43

    In his book Hedy’s Folly Richard Rhodes does an perfect job of showing what a multitalented person Hedy Lamarr was. Of course, a lot of people know about her unbelievable movie career, but Rhodes digs deeper to reveal Hedy's little-known, but important, career as an inventor. However, this book is not solely about Hedy Lamarr, the story of her inventing companion George Antheil, an avant-garde composer, makes up a huge portion of the book as well. Their collaboration on the frequency hopping radio-controlled torpedo led to the invention of spread-spectrum technology which arguably is one of the most necessary inventions of the 20th century.Hedy’s folly is not as much a book about Hedy's life as it is about the birth of her and George Antheil’s invention. Rhodes explains the happenings in Hedy's and George’s life that were crucial to them being able to invent spread spectrum. He also goes into detail about a lot of necessary people that were involved with George Antheil and consequently Hedy’s lives. For example, we hear a lot about George's patron, Mary Louise Curtis Bok, and George's a lot of other acquaintances (George was very social), but not a lot of Hedy Lamarr's acquaintances (despite being Hollywood actress, Hedy, was a personal person). At times, I personally found this tedious, because I bought the book with the intention of learning more about Hedy Lamarr as an inventor, not just as a Hollywood actress. Accordingly, I found the long back-stories of George Antheil's acquaintances to be a trifle vertheless, the book is very well written and very interesting since it delves into George and Hedy’s private lives, careers, and their contributions to the Allied battle efforts in Globe Battle II (outside of inventing). This book is a amazing read for anyone who is even remotely intrigued by the origins of our modern wireless technology and its colourful inventors. Hedy's Folly is truly in an inspiring story of how one small Austrian girl's father perchance for inventing spurred her to become one of America's leading actresses as well as one of the greatest inventors of her time.

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    Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World review []  2020-1-8 18:43

    Very well researched. Ties together a lot of disparate elements of both international and private history of the two central figures. The book does obtain very technical at times which might place off some readers but it all tied together into a fascinating story about Hedy Lamar and her co-inventor George Antheil.

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    Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World review []  2020-1-8 18:43

    I read this book because I am fascinated by the fact that this beautful actress also had the intelligence to first invent, and patent, one of the most advanced communication techniques of the 20th century. Being a communication system engineer, I am astounded that this lady, with no prior technical training, was able to conceive, and patent, a fundamental spread spectrum technique called Frquency Hopping! In fact, she originally named it. This is a amazing book about how it came about. A must read.

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    Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World review []  2020-1-8 18:43

    Would you have thought that player piano rolls had anything to do with missile guidance technology? Me neither. I found 'way more than I was looking for in this e book is well-researched and well-written. The engineering is described in a very suitable method for a general reader who has read some famous science, the contributions of Lamar and her co-inventor are sorted out in a credible way, and I found it to be very interesting.

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    Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World review []  2020-1-8 18:43

    Very entertaining especially because it is real . Makes you think outside your box -- a sexy film star and a musician creating, inventing a technical , patented, solution to a WW II naval warfare problem. Even though their system was never used in the war, the primary principles they proposed of rapidly changing code keys is the basis for a lot of of our modern electronic and security systems. They never got the credit they deserve for their individual battle effort. Film stars can be intelligent too!

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    Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World review []  2020-1-8 18:43

    The book is ok, and writing is good, but it's not really about Hedy's inventing for the most part. Majority of the book is simply biography of the two principals, then a relatively brief section on their basic invention and patent. This is likely because no more detail is available, but I was somewhat disappointed in the the overall content.

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    Hedy's Folly: The Life and Breakthrough Inventions of Hedy Lamarr, the Most Beautiful Woman in the World review []  2020-1-8 18:43

    On page 176, Rhodes fills in a detail that helps create sense of the "frequency hopping" their patent, the inventors called for two clockwork motors. One clockwork motor was on board the torpedo. The other clockwork motor was on board the ship that launched the torpedo. Both motors were to be started simultaneously. These two clock motors, running in excellent synchronization, were used to precisely time and create the frequency shifts. In this way, both transmitter and receiver were always tuned to the same frequency -- and the frequency "jumps" were created simultaneously.I agree with criticisms voiced by other reviewers. The cover is tasteless and the art director who produced it undercut and cheapened the story. Another valid criticism is that Hedy Lamarr's hero and personality never comes through.On the other hand, I gather from reviews of other, fuller biographies of Hedy Lamarr that she was an elusive, complicated character, and that her true biography is obscured by publicity releases and, perhaps, by her own tendency to create her story more fabulous.I thought this was a terrific short book. I enjoyed it all the method through and was astonished by it again and again.Rhodes mentions aside that Hedy Lamarr was a mate of another eccentric LA inventor, Howard Hughes. Two of a kind in some ways.

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    World review []  2020-1-22 3:27

    Amazing magazine for current happenings from a biblical perspective

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    World review []  2020-1-22 3:27

    Have only received one since we ordered...

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    World review []  2020-1-22 3:27

    Comes every month !

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