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    The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism []  2020-1-6 18:45

    [Update 14-May-2019 – added to the review]Preference: Tim starts off with a strawman of an atheist, “To be a secular person – to believe, for example, that there is no God…” Yes, an atheist may believe there is no god. However, the majority of atheists lack a belief in a god. Or a better method to say it is they cannot accept the claims created by humans that a god exists; in most cases due to lack of demonstrable and verifiable evidence. Here are the definitions of faith: Complete trust or confidence in someone or something OR powerful belief in a god or the doctrines of a religion based on spiritual apprehension rather than proof. I have neither of these, so I do not have faith. He has now clearly set up a strawman so he can argue versus and conquer that strawman. In this case he wants his readers (mostly Christians) to believe that non-believer has some kind of faith, when in fact most do ro: Here is a quote from Tim: “But even us believers should learn to look for reasons behind their faith, skeptics must learn to look for the type of faith hidden in their reasoning. All doubts, however skeptical and cynical they may seem, are really a set of alternate beliefs. You cannot doubt Belief A except from a position of faith in Belief B. For example, if you doubt Christianity because “There can’t be just one real religion,” you must recognize that this statement is itself is an act of faith.” First, I do not doubt Christianity for the reason he gave. I doubt Christianity because Christians have failed to provide sufficient evidence for me to rt 1: The Leap of Doubt:1. There can’t be just one real religion: I would never create this claim. Each religion is needed to provide sufficient evidence for belief. So far, I have found none that can meet their burden of proof.2. How could a amazing god let suffering: A amazing human would attempt to elevate unnecessary suffering of other humans. If there were a god, it should be held to the same standards. In reality, suffering happens for a lot of reasons and we humans must simply deal with it.3. Christianity is a straightjacket: This section does not apply to me. It talks about absolute truth being the opponent of freedom. This chapter is really about absolute morality. All morality is subjective at some level. We humans have shared morals because we understand what it feels like to be human. So we know what gives us pleasure and pain. We can understand that other humans feel the same way. So we understand the potential benefits of giving pleasure and the potential consequences of causing pain. That is the baseline of human morality; human wellbeing (an to a lesser extent animal wellbeing). Ultimately Tim can not demonstrate absolute morality exists.4. The church is responsible for so much injustice: People cause injustice; the church is just a group of people. This is not relevant to demonstrating the claims created by Christians or the bible are factually accurate.5. How can a loving god send people to hell: First, this one makes a lot of assumptions such as, a god exists, a soul exists, there is such a put as heaven, and there is such a put as hell. All of these claims must be demonstrated to be real and there is no use in speaking any further about theoretical eternal suffering or bliss until we have proof of the existence of the above mentioned.6. Science has disproved Christianity: Science does not have an agenda to disprove religion. However, there have been demonstrable and verifiable scientific findings which conflict with info presented in the bible. Tim does into how scientists have a bias versus the supernatural. Here is the issue; we have absolutely no method of investigating anything genuinely supernatural, therefore we humans have no means of differentiating between a claimed supernatural happening and something that does not exist at all. Theist who claim supernatural occurrences have happened must demonstrate that actually supernatural occurrences happened. So far no one has been able to demonstrate a genuine miracle; we currently only have unverified claims.7. You can’t take the bible Literally: Here Tim attempts to prove the factually accuracy of the bible by appealing to history. I agree that there are actual places, landmarks and people mentioned in the bible. However, history alone cannot prove miracle claims actually happened. For example: we have info written by historians about Alexander the great. We also have extra cooperating evidence such as a lot of coins with his image, sculptures of him by several artists, monuments and cities named after him, and accounts written by others (both allies and enemies). We can accept he was a true person with a high degree of confidence based on this evidence. However, we should NOT accept the claims that he was born of a virgin and his father was a god. This extraordinary claim requires a much higher standard of evidence to prove it is true.8. The Clues of God: Here comes the standard apologetics: 1. The first cause or cosmological argument. Why there is something rather than nothing. If you are claiming a god did it you must demonstrate that god exists. 2. The fine-tuning argument. Again, if you are claiming an entity did the fine-tuning you must demonstrate that entity exists in some demonstrable way. 3. The laws of nature argument. Yet again, if you are positing a god you must demonstrate it exists. 4. The argument from beauty. Beauty is subjective and is an emotional reaction. What one person finds attractive another may not. If you are stating a god made beauty you must demonstrate that god exists. 5. The existence of cognitive faculties. Our current understanding would be evolution. However, if a god did it, please demonstrate that god exists. 6. Tim goes on to claim that we all have an “unfulfillable longing” or “innate desire” within us which cannot be happy here in the true globe and states it is a clue for god. This is simply an unjustified, and extremely vague, claim. Tim, please demonstrate what this longing is and how it connects to a god… and then prove that god exists.9. The knowledge of god: Tim is claiming our morals come from god. Yet again please demonstrate your god actually exists.10. The issue of sin: Humans do things that others consider to be immoral (not in the best interest of human wellbeing). Yes this is real and we potentially face true globe consequences for these actions. In order to demonstrate sin exists you must demonstrate there is a god who made divine laws which we broke.11. Religion and the gospel: Here Tim uses the claims created in the bible to attempt to prove the claims created in the bible are true. This is circular reasoning. Tim claims that Christianity is not a religion because Jesus claimed to actually be the method of salvation himself. This does not follow. Tim must demonstrate the Jesus described in the bible was a true person as well as a supernatural being. Can he do that? He certainly does not do this in his book.12. The (true) story of the cross: This chapter is about why Jesus had to die for god to forgive man’s sin. Tim has not yet demonstrated that Jesus was a supernatural being, a god exists and sin exists.13. The reality of the resurrection: Here is a quote from Tim “…if you disbelieved the resurrection you then had the difficulty of explaining how the Christian church got stated at all.” Nope. It started just like any other religion. Someone convened them a god (or gods) existed, they believed, then they got organized. This one is ridiculous because there have been thousands of religions. They all started in a related way.14. The Dance of God. Here Tim tries again to create Christianity should unique because they have a triune god. So what! There have been religions with an actual single god (Judaism for example) and religions with a lot of gods (Greek). Just because you claim you have a single god that some how is really 3 gods does not create the claim true. You must demonstrate this claim is true.Epilogue: Not much more to say here. Mostly just preaching to is book includes no actual evidence for the existence of a god or for any of the supernatural elements contained in the stories found in the christian bible. I search it a bit sad that all of the christian apologetic arguments simply fail. I found nothing fresh in this book that I haven't read in other christian apologetic books. Although these types of books are not written for skeptics, atheists or people who adhere to other religious beliefs because these people would most likely not search any of the info convincing. These books are written as christian propaganda for christian believers to bolster their "faith."Please forgive any typos.

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    The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism []  2020-1-6 18:45

    Book Review: The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of SkepticismAuthor: Timothy KellerFormat: SoftbackTopic: Christian DefenseScope: A ulative Case for the Christian FaithPurpose: To give answers to numerous objections to the Christian faith and provide reasons for belief in Jesus as SaviorStructure: The book is separated into two major sections. In section 1, Keller answers the most common objections he has heard versus Christianity in particular and religion in general. In section 2, Keller proceeds to present why Christianity is the best respond and explanation for the method we experience the world.What it does well: *Keller is a master popularist. He takes amazing arguments and distills them into much more compelling and digestible forms.*He loves to use authors and figures that are compelling to those who don't agree with Christianity as his sources. For example, he quotes Thomas Nagel, Albert Camus, and Bono among others.*Even though he meets the skeptical reader with some sources, he is not remiss to use some classic Christian sources as well. C.S. Lewis and Flannery O'Connor create numerous appearances.*Keller is nuanced and knows how to affirm the germ of an objection while also pointing out the flaws in a gentle and compelling way.What it lacks: *This is by no means a comprehensive case. As mentioned earlier, Keller is making arguments appealing to a famous audience. As such, there are times when a particularly nagging objection may not be answered for some readers. However, if the reader will use the endnotes well to search more reading they will be able to wrestle more me fast highlights: "A person's faith can collapse almost overnight if she has failed over the years to listen patiently to her own doubts, which should only be discarded after long reflection."- xvii"Christianity provides a firm basis for respecting people of other faiths. Jesus assumes nonbelievers in the culture around them will gladly recognize much Christian behavior as 'good'... The Biblical doctrine of the universal photo of God, therefore, leads Christians to expect nonbelievers will be better than any of their mistaken beliefs could create them."-19"God takes our misery and suffering so seriously that he was willing to take it on himself."-31"The Biblical view of things is resurrection--not a future that is just a consolation for the life we never had but a restoration of the life you always wanted."-32"...freedom is not so much the absence of restrictions as finding the right ones, the liberating restrictions."-47"Sin is seeking to become oneself, to obtain an identity, apart from him." (God)-168"When we turn amazing things into ultimate things, we are, as it were, spiritually addicted. If we take our meaning in life from our family, our work, as cause, or some achievement other than God, they enslave us."-172 (sic)"Forgiveness must be granted before it can be felt, but it does come eventually."-196"Ultimate reality is a community of persons who know and love one another."-226Recommendation?: I highly recommend this book. Keller does one of the best jobs of making complex material not only accessible, but also still compelling. This is a book I will reccommend to any seeker.

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    The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism []  2020-1-6 18:45

    I have been disappointed by so a lot of Christian books I read- especially those that test to "prove" God. Being well acquainted with logic and rhetoric, the blatant logical fallacies often times presented as "proofs" is an embarrassment to Christian intellect. Then I read this book.Tim doesn't test to "prove" Christianity or that God exists- no one can do this. But he makes excellent, well articulated and reasoned arguments for why it is reasonable to believe in God. If you are looking for theology, this is not your book (this book is much more philosophical if anything). But if you are looking for a book that argues the rationale for belief in God from a reasonable perspective, this is your book! Very highly recommended!

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    The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism []  2020-1-6 18:45

    Perfect book in defense of Biblical Christianity. Tim Keller presents the Christian faith in a attractive method that is honest and intelligent. This is a philosophical defense and deals with some of the larger questions in life from the Christian perspective. Not a thorough defense of every question versus Christianity, but an perfect book to begin on for those who take their faith and its defense seriously. One extra note is that the method in which Keller deals with objections to Christianity is very refreshing. He approaches skeptics in a humble and non condescending way.

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    The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism []  2020-1-6 18:45

    I recently finished reading this book, and found it a very amazing defense of the Christian faith. In this book, Timothy Keller answers objections to Christianity, and in doing so demonstrates the reasonableness of the Christian faith. While no book will ever provide completely watertight argument for Christianity, Timothy Keller does a remarkable job of writing a book that has the potential to move those who are begin to considering the arguments and evidence for Christianity closer to belief in Jesus Christ. What's more, Timothy Keller has "field tested" many, if not most, of these arguments through interactions and conversations with one of the most savvy, skeptical groups of people in the world: Fresh me have commented on how small Timothy Keller addressed evolution, and the fact that he comes out in favor of what a lot of would call Theistic Evolution. While I disagree with Timothy Keller's position on evolution, I would not consider his position a try of whether he is a Christian or not, since he still affirms that God made our globe and the rest of the Universe.I greatly enjoyed Timothy Keller's answers, and feel this is a book I may wish to read again sometime in the future. It really gave me a lot of meal for thought, especially in terms of how people's daily choices and behaviors either draw them closer to God and Heaven, or push them farther away from God, and toward Hell. I've been challenged to look at my own Christian life - even after following Christ for 40 years.I strongly recommend this book to anyone who is begin to considering the claims of Christianity, and to hearing out how common objections to Christianity can be resolved in a manner that 21rst century people can understand.

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    The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism []  2020-1-6 18:45

    A lot of this book (2008 with 2018 preface) matches (and repeats) apologetics offered by Bassilios (2018), Sean McDowell (AWANA, 2017), Stroebel (2000), Zacharias (2000), and venerable Lewis. Keller quotes much of my favorite paragraphs from Lewis. This book has sample true questions by true post-9/11 Fresh York Town people which reflect the most common roadblocks to faith raised to Pastor Keller the latest 20 years. The book differs from the others in that it seeks to identify why urbane highly-educated people are so often attracted to these old chestnuts that Lewis addressed back in 1940's. As all apologists have discovered, most enduring complaints versus God are not equally applied to the typical non-faith narrative. Indeed, in his fresh Preface, he notes that both the Christian community and the Humanist community have grown leaps and bounds in the latest 10 years, but both feel under siege by the other. The Humanists since the 1930's thought Christianity was on its latest legs. However, the track record of removing God from societies has not yielded the utopian non-oppressive rational globe they had hoped. Instead, as Keller notes, it has generated significantly worse atrocities and injustices, and deeper more profound greed and violence. Keller is not glib nor does he dismiss the honest complaints. He identifies both the deeply appealing truths within the sound-bite complaints (e.g. Who in their right mind thinks militarily-backed oppression is good??) and also the logical/natural consequences ignored by the complaint's underlying premises.

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    The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism []  2020-1-6 18:45

    Why hello modern day C.S. Lewis. I mean, for true Timothy Keller. For real. This is by far one of the best Christian apologetic books I've read in a while. It's an simple read, yet so a lot of amazing points to think about and ponder. Whether a skeptic or believer, you should read this book! I believe a decision about faith is too necessary a matter to not think about 's the list of chapters so you have a better idea of what he covers. The first part he address is common arguments versus Christianity and the second is reasons for belief in Christianity. Timothy Keller, the founding pastor of Redeemer Presbyterian Church in Fresh York City, addresses the frequent doubts that skeptics and non-believers bring to religion. Using literature, philosophy, anthropology, pop culture, and intellectual reasoning, Keller explains how the belief in a Christian God is, in fact, a sound and rational one. To real believers he offers a solid platform on which to stand versus the backlash toward religion spawned by the Age of Skepticism. And to skeptics, atheists, and agnostics he provides a challenging argument for pursuing the reason for rt 1: The Leap of Doubt There Can't Be Just One Real Religion How Could a Amazing God Let Suffering? Christianity is a Straitjacket The Church is Responsible for So Much Injustice How Can a Loving God Send People to Hell? Science Has Disproved Christianity You Can't Take the Bible LiterallyPart 2: The Reasons for Faith The Clues of God The Knowledge of God The Issue of Sin Religion and the Gospel The (True) Story of the Cross The Reality of the Resurrection The Dance of GodThere's lots of quotes to share, so let's dive right in!"Everyone has faith in something....What is religion then? It is a set of beliefs that explain what life is all about, who we are, and the most necessary things that human beings should spend their time doing.""At the very heart of [Christians'] view of reality was a man who died for his enemies, praying for their forgiveness." "Love is the most liberating freedom-loss of all. Human beings are most free and alive in relationships of love [whether for a mate or romantic love]."Regrading injustice: "When people have done injustice in the name of Christ they are not being real to the spirit of the one who himself died as a victim of injustice and who called for the forgiveness of his enemies. When people give their lives to liberate others as Jesus did, they are realizing the real Christianity that Martin Luther King, Jr., Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and other Christian voices have called for.""If there is no God, then there is no method to say any one action is "moral" and another "immoral" but only "I like this." If that is the case, who gets the right to place their subjective, arbitrary moral feelings into law?" On the resurrection: "The resurrection also puts a burden of proof on it's nonbelievers. It is not enough to simply believe Jesus did not rise from the dead. You must then come up with a historically feasible alternative explanation for the birth of the church. You have to provide some other plausible acc for how things began...If the resurrection of Jesus happened, however, that means there's infinite hope and reason to pour ourselves out for the needs of the world."So now that I just did a quote slam, what do you think? Have you read any of Keller's writings? Any of the quotes resonate? I would love to hear your thoughts!

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    The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism []  2020-1-6 18:45

    It has been said before, but Tim Keller is C.S. Lewis for the modern age. In the past several years, my social circle has expanded to contain a lot of mates from backgrounds very various than mine. I search myself with numerous relationships with individuals who identify as agnostic or atheist, all well educated and well read, working for social justice in the education circle. I have found myself lacking language to adequately express the "Reason" behind my belief in God and thus for my faith, and I was eager to read this book the moment I read the title. Related in power and weight to Mere Christianity by Lewis, Keller eloquently walks through a lot of of the most common questions and concerns that are asked by non believers and believers alike, and clearly presents the soundness of the logic behind the truth in a rational, reasoned, unconfrontational way. It further grounded my own heart in the strength of the arguments for the truths I believe, and I am deeply grateful for the increased confidence I feel in dialoguing with mates with other perspectives.

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    The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism []  2020-1-6 18:45

    I found the author to stumble mightily when I got to chapter 6, page 95, "Doesn't Evolution disprove the Bible?" Unfortunately the author compromises, i.e. he assumes man to be correct over God. He confuses scientists with science, and physical science with historical science. He clearly believes evolution to be correct, and thus begins a convoluted section trying to rationalize the rather obvious nature of Genesis 1-2 into something it just isn't. Which unfortunately means I couldn't trust anything the author says before or after. If he is willing to compromise in one place, everything else now potentially contains compromises, and I can't trust him as a amazing source of christian apologetics. And that means sadly I can't even give the book away, and it must be consigned to the garbage bin.

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    The Reason for God: Belief in an Age of Skepticism []  2020-1-6 18:45

    As always Tim Keller’s quiet method of speaking, or in this case, his “quiet” writing carries one through chapter after chapter. But even as his “voice” carries your mind his step-by-step approach and a careful reasoning place together a compelling book that educated me, a lifelong Christian with a seminary degree, but will, because of Keller’s quiet method hold anyone reading through the entire book. Well worth your re, no human is perfect, but, as an Amazon rating is totally subjective, and I thoroughly enjoyed the book, Keller’s writing and his approach to the subject, I’ll enthusiastically give The Reason For God five stars!

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    god pranks []  2021-1-17 19:27

    test2

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    The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief []  2020-1-19 22:35

    Francis Collins has the bonus of taking complicated scientific subjects and explaining them in simple, ordinary language. I especially like his descriptions of why irreducible complexity arguments are faulty by showing how combining existing cellular components can build radically fresh and complex features such as molecular motors. It is nice to know that one does not have to choose between religion and science, or between faith and reason.

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    Without God: Science, Belief, Morality, and the Meaning of Life []  2019-12-20 18:37

    I really wanted to like this book but it place me to sleep. I can't relate to the writers style. It just didn't hold my attention. Reads like a technical manual.

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    The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief []  2020-1-19 22:34

    Francis S. Collins is an American physician-geneticist who discovered the genes associated with a number of diseases, and led the Human Genome Project; he is currently director of the National Institutes of Health.He wrote in the Introduction to this 2006 book, “for me the experience of sequencing the human genome, and uncovering this most remarkable of all texts, was both a stunning scientific achievement and an occasion of worship. A lot of will be puzzled by these sentiments, assuming that a rigorous scientist could not also be a serious believer in a transcendent God. This book aims to dispel that notion, by arguing that belief in God can be an entirely rational choice, and that the principles of faith are, in fact, complementary with the principles of science.” (Pg. 3)He continues, “here is the central question of this book: In this modern era of cosmology, evolution, and the human genome, is there still the chance of a richly satisfying harmony between the scientific and spiritual worldviews? I respond with a resounding YES! In my view, there is no conflict in being a rigorous scientist and a person who believes in God who takes a private interest in each one of us… I will argue that these perspectives not only can coexist within one person, but can do so in a fashion that enriches and enlightens the human experience.” (Pg. 5-6)He asserts, “The Huge Bang cries out for a divine explanation. It forces the conclusion that nature had a defined beginning. I cannot see how nature could have made itself. Only a supernatural force that is outside of zone and time could have done that.” (Pg. 67)He suggests, “Much has been written about the potential theological significance of the discovery of life on other planets… Would the existence of life on other planets create a creator God involved in the process less likely? In my view, such conclusions do not really seem warranted. If God exists, and seeks to have fellowship with sentient beings like ourselves… it is not clear why it would be beyond His abilities to interact with related monsters on … a few million other planets. It would, of course, be of amazing interest to explore whether such monsters … also possess the Moral Law, given its own importance in our own perception of the nature of God.” (Pg. 70-71)He points out, “Now that the origin of the universe and our own solar system has become increasingly well understood, a number of fascinating apparent coincidences about the natural globe have been discovered that have puzzled scientists, philosophers, and theologians alike. Consider the following three observations: 1. In the early moments of the universe following the Huge Bang, matter and antimatter were made in almost equivalent amounts… But the symmetry between matter and antimatter was not quite precise; for about every billion pair of quarks and antiquarks, there was an additional quark… if there had been complete symmetry between matter and antimatter, the universe would quickly have devolved into pure radiation, and people, planets, stars, and galaxies would never have come into existence. 2. The method in which the universe expanded after the Huge Bang depended critically on how much total mass and energy the universe had… if the rate of expansion had been grater by even one part in a million, stars and planets could not have been able to form… 3. … If the powerful nuclear force … had been even slightly weaker, then only hydrogen could have formed in the universe… Altogether, there are fifteen physical constants whose values current theory is unable to predict… The possibility that all of these constants would take on the values important to effect in a stable universe capable of sustaining complex life forms is almost infinitesimal. And yet these are exactly the parameters that we observe. In sum, our universe is wildly improbable.” (Pg. 71-74)He states, “No serious biologist today doubts the theory of evolution to explain the marvelous complexity and diversity of life. In fact, the relatedness of all species through the mechanism of evolution is such a profound foundation for the understanding of all biology that it is difficult to imagine now one would study life without it.” (Pg. 99) Later, he adds, “for those like myself working in genetics, it is almost impossible to imagine correlating the vast amounts of data coming forth from the studies of genomes without the foundations of Darwin’s theory.” (Pg. 141)He observes, “it is fair to say that no human knows what the meaning of Genesis 1 and 2 was precisely intended to be. We should continue to discover that! But the idea that scientific revelations would represent an opponent in that pursuit is ill conceived. If God made the universe, and the laws that govern it, and if He endowed human beings with intellectual abilities to discern its workings, would He wish us to disregard those abilities? Would He be diminished or threatened by what we are discovering about His creation?” (Pg. 153)Later, he adds, “by any reasonable standard, Young Earth Creationism has reached a point of intellectual bankruptcy, both in its science and in its theology. Its persistence is thus one of the amazing puzzles and amazing tragedies of our time… Young Earth Creationism does even more hurt to faith, by demanding that belief in God requires assent to fundamentally flawed claims about the natural world.” (Pg. 177) He also observes, “Intelligent Design fails in a fundamental method to qualify as a scientific theory… A viable scientific theory predicts other findings and suggests approaches for further experimental verification. ID falls profoundly short in this regard.” (Pg. 187)He suggests, “If God is outside of nature, then He is outside of zone and time… God could in the moment of creation of the universe also know every detail of the future. That could include… all of the chemistry, physics, geology, and biology that led to the formation of life on earth, and the evolution of humans… In that context, evolution could appear to us to be driven by chance, but from God’s perspective the outcome would be entirely specified. Thus, God would be completely and intimately involved in the creation of all species, while… this would appear a random and undirected process.” (Pg. 205) He concludes, “I search theistic evolution… to be by far the most scientifically consistent and spiritually satisfying of the alternatives.” (Pg. 210)He concludes, “Seekers, there are answers to these questions. There is joy and peace to be found in the harmony of God’s creation… It is time to call a truce in the escalating battle between science and spirit. The battle was never really necessary… Science is not threatened by God; it is enhanced… So allow us together seek to reclaim the solid ground of an intellectually and spiritually satisfying synthesis of ALL amazing truths… Our hopes, joys, and the future of our globe depend on it.” (Pg. 233-234)This is a heartfelt, compelling book, that will be “must reading” for anyone interested in the relation between science and spirituality.

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    The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief []  2020-1-19 22:34

    I enjoyed this read. Dr Collins presents his Christian "testimony" of faith which might be thought my some as in conflict with his status of top biological scientist. I highly respect this man and his reasoned faith. I would suggest though his view still falls under what one might call Christian empiricism (not formal theistic rationalism but the thinking that one must have "testable" evidence upon which to build less rational theistic assumptions) or as one famous Christian writer titled, Evidence that Demands a Verdict (J. McDowell, 1986). His verdict is God is empirically evident in a couple ways. This is an advanced God of the Gaps defense of Christian faith. As a scientist committed to efficacy of biological evolution he long ago had to give up on such empiricisms of complexity as evidence of a direct design... and more and more to give up... and now we are at the the next line of empirical gaps in the natural world. Because the Universe appears finely tuned and because people have a moral code that may not help a certain theory of natural selection, there must be a God much like or exactly like that described by Christian tradition that brings meaning to the author's life. This is an old dialectal discussion... Kierkegaard claims faith of this type cannot be empirically rational... one must take a leap into the dark to search meaning/reason.. the only empirical evidence required is to see how your faith in God affects your life... whilst show day young earth creationists see scientific evidence so obvious that only spiritually blinded persons would not accept their theological theories as essentially facts. I would like Dr Collins to modernize his book and address the a lot of responses to his empirical evidence.... what is the recent gap to gulf?

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    The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief []  2020-1-19 22:35

    A Book full of wisdom and knowledge, a amazing summary of key points of view from science and religion. The material is organized and is concise to the point, presents a balance approach to key questions of life and God, The reader is told to draw their own conclusions, Francis S. Collins presents his journey and opinions and leave the doors begin for others to accept or reject the premise set fore within. Reading and understanding the principles within will create you a better person. I read this book a lot of years ago as a hard copy, gave my copy to an atheist who called on God when he thought he was have a heart attack. I have read this book again, after the passing of my wife of 37 years, this book has brought me a fresh level of comfort in science and religion, they both can stand together in a modern world, read it!

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    The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief []  2020-1-19 22:35

    This is an perfect book that shows scientific evidence for beliefs that are typically not in harmony with those who keep a literal interpretation of scripture. Where science and the Bible seem to disagree, the issue is our interpretation of scripture. Proven science can not be refuted. A person can be a believer in God, and and a believer in science as well. There does not have to be a conflict.Dr. collins makes a powerful case for evolution over the past 4.5 billion years of earth's existence. Being a geneticist, he draws his conclusions from the trail of DNA that is us. He does not subscribe to the "young earth" theory espoused by those who keep to a literal interpretation of the Bible. At the same time he is a powerful Christian believer, with a solid faith in is book makes a powerful argument for those who search conflict with their traditional Christian upbringing, and modern science, to reconcile both and still maintain a powerful faith in God.

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    Without God: Science, Belief, Morality, and the Meaning of Life []  2019-12-20 18:37

    Perfect and challenging read!Zachary does a amazing job of unboxing deep philosophical problems surrounding Atheism, Agnosticism, Humanism, Theism, was refreshing to see this done from a logical perspective rather than an emotional diatribe.#kitten

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    Without God: Science, Belief, Morality, and the Meaning of Life []  2019-12-20 18:37

    This is a book of philosophy. I felt as though I learned a amazing deal about both atheistic and theistic philosophy, and whilst the author was honest about his perspective, I felt as though he was particularly honest about presenting the strengths and weaknesses of each system of thought, rather than relying on the help of "preaching to his own audience". This is a book that caused me to think a amazing deal, and I appreciate the care and consideration given to the presentation of such necessary subjects. I very much look forward to reading any of Mr. Broom's other work.

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    Without God: Science, Belief, Morality, and the Meaning of Life []  2019-12-20 18:37

    I discovered this book right when I was really struggling with my faith. I had a traumatizing experience and any doubts I had seemed to be amplified. Broom does a amazing job at facing these doubts, some that he has themselves, and provides logical reasoning that helps the mind create sense of all the huge questions. He is thorough and cites lots of atheist and theist scholars and does side by side comparisons.I was a small skeptical about the book, because it focuses on the philosophical arguments the most, where I have always been more historical. But this had an simple to follow flow to it. it is not an endless circle. he will say "here are 3, 4, or whatever sides to an argument, and here is why I feel this one makes more sense"another thing I like about it is that his thoughts and reasoning are geared more towards people going through an internal struggle. this helped me restore my faith internally. so a lot of other apologetic books out there speak about how to argue with an athiest and how to answer to non believers. I am not looking to argue with anyone, I am looking to settle some doubts I have and this book has done it better than any others in latest memory.I never heard of this author before, but he seems honest and genuine. he doesn't regurgitate reasons to believe, but looks at it from all angles, including athiest views. he also shares private experiences at times when required to support create a connection. he is very relatable and I will follow him for more if he ever makes another book

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    Without God: Science, Belief, Morality, and the Meaning of Life []  2019-12-20 18:37

    In the beginning of this book it was a small difficult to understand, but I got my dictionary and I learned so much that I never thought about before!! I am very thankful for this book!

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    The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief []  2020-1-19 22:35

    This was a fascinating and informative book....it will give you a LOT to think about! The author is well-respected in his field of expertise...the human genome project...so I was especially interested to read what he had to say about the existence of God, creation, and his private spiritual experience. I highly recommend this book to any reader with an begin mind...and have purchased several copies to share with friends.

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    Without God: Science, Belief, Morality, and the Meaning of Life []  2019-12-20 18:37

    Zach Broom did a superb job of opening up the true globe of the skeptic. By guiding the reader through this field of thinking he is able to show the pros and cons clearly. As you progress he gently brings to light the real answers to the difficulty that every skeptic faces. What is the real meaning of life?

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    Without God: Science, Belief, Morality, and the Meaning of Life []  2019-12-20 18:37

    A amazing read! Perfect excersize of thought, logic, and belief. I highly recommend this book!

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    The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief []  2020-1-19 22:35

    I give this book 4 stars simply because 3 stars is considered critical and though I would not classify myself as critical of the book, I was disappointed. Like method too a lot of a books, the title sets the reader up for disappointment. “Evidence for Belief” set rather high expectation that were quickly damaged by page 30 where Collins says, “the evidence of God’s existence would have to come from other directions, and the ultimate decision would be based on faith, not proof.”It may be helpful to know my background. I’ve been a Christian since I was 4 years old yet in the latest several months have dealt with a lot of doubts and my faith was shaken. I was not mad at God and did not feel that He had treated me unfairly. I just somehow stopped assuming He existed and have been begging Him to present Himself to me. Someone suggested Collins’ books and this was the first I chose to read. The book seemed to give more credibility to by doubts than my owing up a Christian I was raised on literal Bible interpretation (including Genesis 1 & 2) and that evolution was an unproven theory. I agree with the author that the mutual exclusivity of Christianity and evolution is a paradigm furthered by both Christians and Evolutionists. This book is the first smart argument I’ve heard that this does not have to be the case. That being said, Collins comes off a lot more confident in evolution than the existence of God. When he argues that the term theory in evolutionary theory does not mean “unproven” as much as it means “frame of thinking,” such as ‘music theory,’ part of me was really upset. I felt the collapsing of a lot of previously blindly held beliefs. I had to digest this for a while as the acceptance of evolutionary research seemed to edge God out of the picture in my mind as I realized how much I had allow both secular and Christian cultures drive a wedge between the two ideas.I do not have a scientific background and therefore no means to argue with Collins but I was confused by his idolization of Darwin. Though I understand Darwin was brilliant and innovative, I struggle to believe how someone in that time could have every theory upheld by all the modern technology and revelation that has come since his time. Collins never seems to present any weakness in Darwin’s much as the book poked at my commonly held assumptions, I believe it would probably do the same to anyone who came in not believing in God but as open-minded as I was to the idea of the opposite being true. Collins is able to depict the detail and complexity of life and, while being very begin on his confidence in evolution, is insistent that such does not negate the chance of God. He repeatedly suggests evolution as the means God chose to liefs in creation, smart design, and even life beginning at conception will be challenged in this book. Despite not holding this traditional Christian beliefs, Collins very factually and without massive reliance on private experiences argues that the moral conscience and human longing for God may just be the very evidence of a God who had, has and will have a part with human life.

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    Without God: Science, Belief, Morality, and the Meaning of Life []  2019-12-20 18:37

    If you're interested in a thought-provoking look into debunking some of the most common arguments versus the existence of God, do yourself a favor and give this book a roughout the book, the author carefully cites and explains several historical and modern atheist viewpoints, then dissects them to prove that they too, just like religion, are seeded in faith. You may search yourself initially agreeing with some of these positions (as they seem fairly logical at their core), but as Zachary breaks them down, you'll soon realize that they suffer from some of the very same criticisms their authors use versus religion and God. By the end of the book, you'll realize that a lot of of these arguments boil down to the same debate on both sides: both require faith, so which seems more likely?The book is a fast read, and the author does a amazing job presenting both sides of the argument while referencing credible sources on each side. As you read through it, it'll challenge you to rethink your worldview regardless of where you stood before you picked it up.

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    Without God: Science, Belief, Morality, and the Meaning of Life []  2019-12-20 18:37

    Full disclosure: Like Broom, I consider myself a thoughtful theist, firmly grounded in an evangelical Christian globe view. So it's not surprising that I might give this book a positive review. Having said that, this is is the first book I've reviewed on Amazon, and wanted to add my little voice to his by method of a recommendation to read this book. To the Christian or theist struggling to understand the perspective of an atheist, Bloom explains well and with fairness some foundational assumptions which underlie atheism. He outlines a lot of of their key critiques of theistic thought. To the atheist, he does the same in reverse. And most significantly, he does so without rancor, ugly name-calling, or belittling beliefs or perspectives various from his own. He shows honest respect for those who might disagree, even as he clearly embraces some arguments as is is not an in-depth treatise on these topics. It's a clear and concise survey of a rich body of theological, apologetic, philosophical, and atheistic thought. Each of his chapters are multi-volume books in their own right, with a rich tradition of theistic and secular authors wrestling with the subjects he discusses. It's clear that he has read and digested much of this literary library, and not just from authors who keep beliefs that match his own. He quotes and references authors extensively but not in a highfalutin and inaccessible way. His discussion is logical and clear.Even though this book is primarily a bringing together of ideas, I think that Broom's voice adds something meaningful and fresh to the conversation. If you've read or been exposed to a amazing bit of that library like I have, you may search this book to be a unbelievable synthesis of thought. I found it helpful to me in this way. If you haven't read much atheists and theologians, or are trying to sort out your own understanding, I would recommend this book as one of the very best aids I've encountered. Very nicely done.

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    Without God: Science, Belief, Morality, and the Meaning of Life []  2019-12-20 18:37

    This book will challenge you and strengthen your faith! Unbelievable read!

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    The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief []  2020-1-19 22:34

    I guess it was hard to choose the title of the book. On the other hand, it might have been deliberately just to create Christians buy the book. I hate to give a negative comment about a book, because a lot of time went into it. But here I have to be honestly e writer is openly a believer in evolution. At amazing part of the book is about his powerful believe in evolution, and the ugly part is that he "drags" God into the theory. "God controlled the evolution". The writer is convinced that humans and apes/baboons share the same ancestors. It is clear that he is an admirer of Charles Darwin.He also believes in the "Big Bang" and convenieantly drags God again into that and says that God was behind the Huge Bang.While reading the book I could not wait to see if he talks about the Genesis flood. Well eventually he did. He refers to people who believes in the Genesis flood as "Young earth creationists". He mentions that there is with that a believe among some Christians that Genesis 1 started at 4004 BC. That was very interesting for me to read for this reason: I have a KJV of the Bible (it actually a set of 3, because it's too huge to place it all in one book) which was printed in the UK in 1839. After Revelation, it has a "time line" of the whole Bible, containing several pages, starting at Genesis 1 all the method thru to Revelation. It gives approximate times which year was which part written. According to that information, Genesis 1 refers to the year 4004 BC. Collins gives clearly the impression that he thinks that is crazy to believe. Somewhere he refers to other "believers" who believes that the creation was as "recent" as 10000 BC and he also think they are crazy. (I have never heard of the 10000 year idea) On page 177, quote: "Thus, by any reasonable standard, Yong Earth Creationism has reached a point of intellectual bankruptcy, both in it's science and it's theology"In my life I noticed several times that so called "educated / learned people" misuse that to test to convince people they consider uneducated / unlearned / less educated, to believe what they believe, while using their education to impress.I found 10% of the book interesting. I wasted my cash buying this book, but I learned again what I mention in above paragraph, and it reminded me again that Biblical wisdom is the most valuable asset.

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    The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief []  2020-1-19 22:34

    Perfect book, it opens the debate and leads us to the solution of the dilemma. The Language of God is one of those books that leads to reflection without entering into contradiction with the higher spiritual feelings. I liked a lot reading this book and I can say unequivocally that readers will feel the harmony in every chapter, in every paragraph. Well written and simple to read, full of examples which help the arguments of the author. Illustrated on some pages and with a magnificent glossary that helps readers to search what they need quickly. I learned a lot on their pages and my arguments are strengthened by the realization that religion and science are the two sides of the same coin. The religious and scientific thinkings are changing, adjusting to these fresh times and through doents like this book, that is happening. Readers can learn a lot about history, science history, biology, genetics, astronomy, and other topics. Enjoyment in reading.Excelente libro, abre el debate y nos conduce a la solución del dilema. El Lenguaje de Dios es uno de esos libros que nos conduce a la reflexión sin entrar en contradicción con los sentimientos espirituales mas elevados. Me ha gustado muchísimo la lectura de este libro y puedo decir sin temor a equivocarme que los lectores sentirán la armonía en cada capitulo, en cada párrafo. Bien redactado y de fácil lectura, lleno de ejemplos, los cuales sustentan los argumentos de su autor. Ilustrado en algunas paginas y con un magnifico glosario que ayuda al lector a localizar lo que le interesa rápidamente. He aprendido mucho en sus paginas y mis argumentos se fortalecen al darme cuenta que la religión y la ciencia son las dos caras de una misma moneda. El pensamiento religioso y científico esta cambiando y se esta ajustando en estos nuevos tiempos y por medio de doentos como estos que esta realidad esta sucediendo. Provecho en su lectura.

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    The Language of God: A Scientist Presents Evidence for Belief []  2020-1-19 22:35

    How can someone create a philosophical argument and never once mentioned Bertrand Russell or Daniel Dennett? Or create a biological argument and never cite the arguments from Dawkins' books? Or an argument about the universe without Brian Cox? To [email protected]#$%! off, mentions Josephus failing to say that even the Catholic Church recognizes it as forgery.

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    Caught in the Pulpit: Leaving Belief Behind []  2020-1-22 22:38

    One might think that this perfect book is mainly about clergymen's loss of belief in God, but it is to an even greater extent about the more general phenomenon of loss of belief in the perfection and historical accuracy of the Bible, engendered, in a lot of cases, by the scholarly/scientific approach to Bible study offered at most seminaries (and, incidentally, at most colleges). I say "more general" because awareness of the Bible's shortcomings is an intended consequence of these courses, whereas loss of belief in God is not. Significant skepticism about God and the Bible may lead some clergymen to leave their posts, and those who remain are often in very uncomfortable situations where they must conceal their beliefs in order to hold their jobs.

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    Caught in the Pulpit: Leaving Belief Behind []  2020-1-22 22:38

    An alternate sub-title for this book could be: "Leaving Supernatural Beliefs Behind." Caught in the Pulpit should be widely read for the problems it raises about the roles of the clergy and the future of churches in an increasingly secular, pluralistic society. Its major value is in stimulating the kinds of conversations that need to be ongoing among believers, non-believers, atheists, humanists, Christians, adherents of the world's religions, and all those who care about creating a humane globe for all peoples. The authors describe a lot of kinds of faith and unfaith, focusing on both 1) clergy who struggle to maintain their integrity in institutions that are changing and who are supported by their members even when their understandings differ; and 2) churches that are evolving in a cultural context that no longer provides a "sacred canopy" to help their globe views. (Full disclosure: I was "Rick," one of the original five "subjects" in the study in 2010; I was an "outlier" who never felt "caught"). Neither clergy nor religious communities have a clear blueprint for how to adapt. The authors prescribe powerful doses of honesty, but they do not provide a lot of positive or practical suggestions for moving beyond the ancient "atheist vs theist" debates, or how churches as social institutions might be helped to change. But they do give an inside glimpse into some of the issues that must be confronted if religious communities and their leaders are to evolve into cultural movements capable of continuing to contribute to creative human transformation and ecological flourishing. Dennett and LaScola persuasively describe the discomfort of clergy who can no longer affirm "acceptable" orthodoxy. They also consider the potential evolutionary extinction of churches. They wonder whether removing supernatural elements from beliefs about God, the Bible, Jesus, creeds, and doctrines might support churches evolve into more relevant social movements in our increasingly secular scientific culture. While the purpose of the study was to raise questions, I want they could have done more to identify already existing non-supernatural ways to interpret and re-construct religions that honor the humane values that non-believers and believers alike can affirm. Some theologians, biblical scholars, church bodies, and progressive clergy are contributing to these efforts of reimagining, drawing on the core historical principle of a lot of churches: "reformed and always reforming." Yet the authors are correct in their assessment that while a lot of liberal and evangelical churches have created significant contributions to ethical discourse, social justice, human rights, and equality for , women, and racial/ethnic communities, most of them have not updated their statements of faith to reflect our modern scientific globe view (which, it must be admitted, has itself not been free from violence, war, repression and bloody conflict). Finally, the book leaves begin the question of whether the churches will evolve or die. That may be partly up to courageous clergy like those in this study, to the religious communities which formed them, and to whether there can be cooperation between them and the emerging communities of humanists and freethinkers that are evolving alongside them. -Mark Rutledge

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    Caught in the Pulpit: Leaving Belief Behind []  2020-1-22 22:38

    Very interesting read. This books gives amazing incite into what is event behind the scenes in the religious community. I was fascinated by the revelation of thought that occurred in students entering seminary as opposed to what they had been taught in the church from the pulpit. I was amazed that when these students went back to their churches and reported on what they had been taught about the origins of the bible and what the bible actually says, no one wanted to know the truth. They had to play the religious android game and tell the congregation what they wanted to hear as opposed to what seminary actually taught. Apparently, some denominations did not wish to send there prospective pastors to the seminary as it would "taint" their s by Bart Erhmann and Richard Dawkins play a huge role in opening up dialogue with within the pastoral community. Latest revelation in science has also contributed to the rethinking of previously held sacred beliefs and has caused a lot of seminary students to question their superstitious beliefs as opposed to scientific fact.I encourage everyone to read this book as it is eye opening as to the struggles going on within the pastoral community. Jerry DeWitts book, "Hope after Faith" is also another example of people within the church realizing the truth and seeking it out.

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    Caught in the Pulpit: Leaving Belief Behind []  2020-1-22 22:38

    I was also going to write "Surprising," but I am not surprised. As a former preacher myself (who has since abandoned supernatural beliefs), I know exactly what is going through the minds of the clergy who are struggling with faith and reason. What I most admire about this book is the careful, scientific approach to the topic. Dan Dennett's philosophical and moral insights combined with Linda LaScola's professional methodology create this not just another "anti-faith" tome, but an extremely useful objective examination of the phenomenon of the a lot of ministers, priests, imams and rabbis who wish to leave the pulpit but are "caught" in the horrible dilemma of choosing integrity over practicality and morality. (Disclosure: I know and admire Dan and Linda personally.) Whether a reader agrees with the philosophical and theological conclusions of these doubting clergy, no reader can deny that this is a fascinating study of a true problem: what happens to your career and life when your faith IS your career, and you give up your faith? I also loved reading Dan and Linda's private stories at the end. It is nice to see Linda, who maintains a professional objectivity while interviewing and researching, actually tell us something about herself and her motivations. I know I am biased, but that does not mean this is not a GREAT book!

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    Caught in the Pulpit: Leaving Belief Behind []  2020-1-22 22:38

    Christian ministers and pastors, by increasing numbers, are using their brains for reason and logical thinking are realizing that the Christian Religion is a monumental fraud. They are recognizing that the claims and assertions of the Christian Religion are entirely false and they have become non-believers. Unfortunately, a Cristian religious education does not provide the tools for earning a living for themselves and their families except by preaching a lie; consequently, the unbelieving ministers/pastors are caught in a trap of their own making. A unique project known as the Clergy Project has been de3veloped to help nonbelieving ministers/pastors to escape from the profession of preaching a lie to earning a living by another trade/profession.

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    god of pranks []  2021-1-17 19:25

    try

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    Caught in the Pulpit: Leaving Belief Behind []  2020-1-22 22:38

    What is it like to be a person of once powerful faith who is no longer a believer? We can all think of examples of such individuals and some of them have interesting stories to share relating to their rejection of belief. But what about members of the clergy who no longer believe in God or the supernatural? They are a special case and they are the topic of this book, Caught in the is book got my attention because of its topic matter and the unusual situation it investigates. For most people, if they lose interest in something, they simply announce their fresh position openly or they simply refrain from engaging in the activity. The same is real with faith- once powerful believers sometimes proudly announce their decision to reject belief while others choose to just ignore it and not speak about it, letting the notice be known in a more indirect way. But when you’re a preacher, priest, or rabbi, the situation can be quite delicate, indeed, as you have an entire congregation of believers depending on your guidance. Caught in the Pulpit examines this issue, with candid talk from actual people who once believed strongly in the supernatural but have since lost their faith completely and now search themselves in an extremely difficult and often precarious ught in the Pulpit provides examples of faith gone awry from people across the Jewish and Christian religious spectrum and a lot of of those who contribute to the book offer strong insights into the reasons they came to reject belief in a higher power. For some, it was a matter of education- they weighed the often weak evidence presented by their faith versus the known history and decided what they were led to believe no longer seemed feasible. For others, it came down to the irritation of constantly having to search excuses to explain away the countless injustices in the world. Other reasons are given as well and these candid discussions are easily the book’s strongest point. A lot of who read these individual stories will relate to specific former clergy’s own accounts of their fall from grace, and some readers will feel comfort in knowing they are not ught in the Pulpit focuses its attention on Judeo- Christian religious leaders, likely because they create up the bulk of clergy in the United States. It would be interesting if the book expanded its scope and included people from eastern and other religions who decided to leave faith behind. This would create the book better- rounded and would silence the criticisms of a lot of who will likely accuse the book and its authors of bias. It could even create for a amazing follow- up to the series, even though it would require more extensive and time- consuming research, since the United States has scant numbers of people who belong to non- Christian and Jewish religious groups.Losing faith is a common occurrence in the modern world. It is even more common today as the internet has expanded begin communication and as science continues to explore fresh things that cast increasing doubt on religious belief as a whole. Caught in the Pulpit is an interesting idea and makes for some memorable reading as it follows members of the clergy as they struggle with their feelings and test to come to terms with a belief system they no longer follow. It’s a very amazing book overall and I recommend it to those with an interest in modern religion and philosophical topics.

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    Caught in the Pulpit: Leaving Belief Behind []  2020-1-22 22:38

    The authors of this book interviewed 100 self-identified pastors, priests and rabbis who no longer believed in their former religion. Most of them kept their apostasy secret and continued to work, and be paid, in their ministerial profession, although some have now found other e authors have done a amazing job of using the interviewees' own words to realistically describe their inner struggles, as they rejected their faith and then as they continued to "do the Lord's work" for a god that they knew full well did not exist. What ethical compromises (or blatant lapses) did they encounter and how did they resolve (or rationalize) them? How did they feel when their flocks loved them personally and trusted them with some of life's most necessary questions?This book is very creepy because the topics are very creepy. Most of them admit that they used their religion to create a amazing living long after they knew that their former faith was just one lie after another. They earned their incomes by claiming to stand for absolute truth, while lying through their teeth every time they stepped into the pulpit, officiated a wedding, preached a funeral or gave "spiritual" tip to unknowing people who loved them st disturbing of all, however, was the interviewees' repeated claims that they were only the "tip of the iceberg", because they believed that most of their ministerial colleagues were just as unbelieving as they were, the colleagues just lacked the ethical backbone to admit it and search honest work.If these current and former pastors are correct, then the majority of Protestant, Catholic, Mormon and Jewish religious leaders in the globe today are complete hypocrites whose entire careers are built around deliberately conning everyone who loves and trusts them. Although there is no method to verify this claim, it is corroborated by other studies, such as those which are doented in "Bad Religion: How we became a nation of Heretics" by Ross Douthat, and "The Bible In The Balance" by Harold so, secret apostasy does a fine job of explaining the behavior of a lot of religious leaders.Once you obtain past the creep factor, though, this is a fascinating book. It is well-written, well-doented, extremely believable, and includes profound hero studies of 100 individuals who found themselves in the greatest ethical dilemma of their lives.

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    Caught in the Pulpit: Leaving Belief Behind []  2020-1-22 22:38

    This book is basically about the struggles the clergy goes through when they lose their faith. The issue is some can leave without any issues to a various career, but most have no other options and must hold their jobs for their family and livelihood. So they end up in a hypocritical position of giving sermons they no longer believe in. Some say they feel trapped and others appear to me to be in denial by saying they are trying to change their religion from the inside. That appears to be rather difficult if they are afraid to tell their congregation or fellow clergy what they really e only other fresh thing for me in this book is that a lot of lose their faith in seminary because biblical scholars tell them how the bible has been written (and forged).

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    Caught in the Pulpit: Leaving Belief Behind []  2020-1-22 22:38

    In “Caught in the Pulpit: Leaving Belief Behind", researchers Daniel C. Dennet and Linda LaScola show the stories of current and former clergy who have lost their faith. They interviewed 35 people over three years asking them about the experience of questioning their religious beliefs and their choice to either leave their religious community or stay regardless of their change of e book describes the differences between the more "literal" and traditional groups who believe in the infallibility of the Bible and the more "liberal" movements that stand closer to logic and intellect and believe the Bible is a source of inspiration that includes necessary lessons for all. Lastly, there is the group of "nonbelievers" that is guided by reason only and disregard religious was very interesting to focus on the struggle of the people who are entrusted with guiding the community of the faithful and whom all of a sudden search themselves they no longer believe what they have to preach. It is understandably very hard and disconcerting for the clergy not only to lose their faith but their method of life, their source of income, prestige and a lot of time their families and friends. It is also very hard for those who decide not to reveal their true feelings and continue with the lie. However, the majority that decides to leave, search themselves liberated and with few is book will support other priests who are in the same position and it is eye-opening to the rest of us.

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    Caught in the Pulpit: Leaving Belief Behind []  2020-1-22 22:38

    Amazing interviews with a select set of topics that all instantiate the thesis but admittedly there is no method to count how a lot of are excluded. The movement of individuals away from youthful idealism of one sort or another towards a pragmaticism in middle age but then back towards an idealism in the end of life seems to be a more complete pattern to me. This seems not only limited to those who choose the pulpit as their profession, but other fields as well. Politics for example. Teaching! How a lot of youthful teachers wish to change the globe and then meet students who variously create life difficult for the idealist? But what to do? Give up your profession? I wonder if these sorts of questions affect someone like Bill Hull? Or perhaps Rabbi Jonathan Sacks? Or Pope Francis? It would seem not. So the question then is why not? Think of me as a lapsed heretic...or was it a lapsed skeptic?

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    Signposts to God: How Modern Physics and Astronomy Point the Way to Belief []  2019-12-8 18:54

    Intellectually accomplished and well written apologetic on the presence of a creative intelligence in the universe. If you have an interest in physics you will search this a challenging and interesting read. The only consideration preventing a five-star rating is the the author does not, in my opinion, tie the different elements of his case together as well as he could have throughout the book; that is, the individual chapters are extremely well written, but the bridges between and among them could be presented more clearly.

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    Signposts to God: How Modern Physics and Astronomy Point the Way to Belief []  2019-12-8 18:54

    The initial chapters in the book give a summary description of the history and nature of physics and cosmology. The book then becomes a sometimes complicated argument for the inadequacy of “physicalism“ to give answers to the “why“ questions of life. In some ways the book serves as an introduction to primary theology for the “recovering physicalist.” The book argues that ultimate truth can only be discovered by exploring a various category or paradigm of thought from that of philosophical naturalism (physicalism). Science involves a system of thought that is needed to understand the physical world. Observation and, if possible, experimentation will support to understand the universe and may even provide signposts to God, but by definition will only be able to take us so far. We will need to shift paradigms from the physical category to the metaphysical one in order to pursue the answers to the ultimate “why” questions. The author’s “signposts” point to the metaphysical category of thought. These don’t “prove God”, but present that scientific knowledge from physics and astronomy is “God-friendly.” Thus he concludes that physicalism cannot explain everything, especially (as chapter 11 discusses) consciousness and morality.

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    Signposts to God: How Modern Physics and Astronomy Point the Way to Belief []  2019-12-8 18:54

    Well written book that describes the a lot of signposts, otherwise understood to b indications, on the street that point to God. Are the arguments Bussey posits enough to convince an Unbeliever? No; however they are amazing arguments that demand to be taken seriously and can support to reinforce the belief of people who would like reassurance that God has been dispatched.

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    Signposts to God: How Modern Physics and Astronomy Point the Way to Belief []  2019-12-8 18:54

    Very good

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    Signposts to God: How Modern Physics and Astronomy Point the Way to Belief []  2019-12-8 18:54

    I already have a powerful believe in out Lord God and a amazing understanding of physics but I wanted to see what the author Peter Bussey had to say. He does an perfect job explaining physics in a completely layman's terms. He uses simple straightforward language to explain what can typically be a very complex subject. I think he does prove that if you stop and pay attention to the roses, yes even flowers you'll see God's handiwork in everything. He did in fact, leave plenty of signposts for us to follow. Peter, if you read this A+ sir I truly enjoyed reading your book.

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    Signposts to God: How Modern Physics and Astronomy Point the Way to Belief []  2019-12-8 18:54

    Amazing book.

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    Signposts to God: How Modern Physics and Astronomy Point the Way to Belief []  2019-12-8 18:54

    The reason I give three stars is because the book is well written. However, it is hard to believe that a scientist presents so a lot of arguments for God based on purely philosophical considerations (like the Kalam argument for example) while apparently not being aware that these arguments are based on false premises and have been refuted in a lot of ways. Science is a slave to blind faith throughout this book.

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    Signposts to God: How Modern Physics and Astronomy Point the Way to Belief []  2019-12-8 18:54

    Kicking in my interests in philosophy and theology again even though I am not a physicist. Thank you for the rejuvenation of philosophy. Apparently, some scientific thought is on the right path.

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    Signposts to God: How Modern Physics and Astronomy Point the Way to Belief []  2019-12-8 18:54

    No signposts there - Book filled w/philosophy, mathematics, other uninteresting items - Don't buy if you wish signposts to God - 'Nuff said

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    Signposts to God: How Modern Physics and Astronomy Point the Way to Belief []  2019-12-8 18:54

    Peter Bussey is a particle physicist with a Ph.D. from Cambridge. In Signposts to God, Bussey argues that modern physics is either compatible with Christian theism or points to a is review will go through each chapter, commenting on select points. It will not be a comprehensive review, but it will hopefully provide readers with a taste of what the book is like, and what I consider to be its strengths and weaknesses. I should add the disclaimer that I am not a apter 1 is the introduction. Here, Bussey criticizes physicalism. Physicalism appears to be related to materialism, a view that excludes the spiritual by saying that matter is all that there is. According to Bussey, humans have a sense that life contains more than the material, or apter 2, “The Globe of Physics: A Fast Tour,” talks about primary aspects of physics: force, gravitation, electricity and magnetism, light, heat, and atoms. This chapter also has a section on the “God particle,” or the Higgs particle. The prose is not particularly complex, but a lot of info does come at readers at once, which may challenge people (like me) who have difficulty absorbing scientific apter 3, “Revolutions in Physics,” covers relativity, the huge bang, light as particles, and quantum physics. This chapter briefly mentions theological issues that C.S. Lewis and Albert Einstein had with the randomness of quantum physics, but, overall, this chapter is rather thin in theological reflection, in comparison with the other chapters of the book. Bussey does say that quantum physics may pose a challenge to physicalism, or at least rigid forms of physicalism that portray humans as “just physical machines” (page 37). Bussey also refers to views that there is actually an order underneath the randomness. Bussey does not necessarily endorse such views, but, throughout the book, he does appear to be more comfortable with order than with randomness. For Bussey, order (i.e., laws) point to Chapter 4, “Laws of Nature and of Physics,” Bussey argues that there are physical laws, and he believes that these point to a lawgiver, God. Bussey presents different arguments versus those who deny the existence of physical laws; his most convincing argument is that scientists have created predictions on the basis of laws, and the predictions have come to pass. This chapter was lucid in its discussion of nominalism (i.e., there are only particulars) and universalism; it was informative, albeit not as lucid, in summarizing Aristotelian and medieval views on form, and the contrast between those views and modern Chapter 5, “Dangerous Infinities,” Bussey talks about the theological implications of the view that the universe is either infinite in space, or finite. Some, such as Newton, held that the universe was infinite and that this reflected God’s infinity. There was a fear among some theologians, however, that regarding the universe as infinite could create it too much like God, and they wanted to preserve God’s distinctness. This chapter did not knock me out of my seat, but it was interesting to read what prominent thinkers have believed about the infinity of the universe and the theological implications Chapter 6, “Modern Astronomy: Where Has God Gone?”, Bussey addresses the theological implications of the vastness of the universe. When the globe was believed to be the center of the universe, God was deemed to be near, paying close attention to what occurred on earth. Can we believe this now that we know that the earth is not the center but is rather a little speck in a vast universe? Bussey responds as one would expect, saying that God’s eye is on the sparrow, so God is paying attention to us, little as we are. In terms of science, he talks about how the vast universe is important for life to exist on this planet. What was especially interesting in this chapter, though, was when Bussey argued that, even in medieval times, there was some sense that the universe was large: not as huge as we today understand it to be, but still apter 7, “The Human-Friendly Universe,” is about the origin of the universe and earth. Bussey is essentially presenting the argument from design: that things had to turn out a certain method for life to exist, and that this points to a designer. On page 100, Bussey created an intriguing statement: “Somehow, some extremely huge numerical quantities, given by the fields individually, are apparently canceling each other out almost exactly, but there is no known reason why they should.” I was somewhat lost in terms of the science that Bussey was discussing, but I could tell that Bussey was referring to something here that he considered to be enigmatic. In his narration of the development of the universe, things were taking put naturally: one happening followed the other, and we could see why one happening followed the other (even though things could have occurred otherwise, and, fortunately for us, they did not). Here, by contrast, something occurs that turns out well for life, but it is unclear why exactly it occurred. Bussey may be begin to seeing that as pointing to God.Overall, reading this chapter had a rather various result than what Bussey may have intended. As Bussey described the natural development of the universe, that seemed to me to contrast with the picture that we obtain in Genesis 1, in which God simply spoke, and things came to be (fiat). Perhaps God could have used natural processes, but I can understand how some can arrive at the conclusion that a natural explanation makes God Chapter 8, “Implications of a Universe ‘Fine-Tuned’ for Us,” Bussey responds to detractors of the argument from design. He addresses such subjects as the concept of multiverse and the alleged “Theory of Everything.” In one case, Bussey lucidly, and I would say accurately, laid out an argument versus design, but his response to it was rather weak. The argument is: “Advanced life is indeed a complex phenomenon, but it is of no true significance. It is merely one physical chance among many. The cosmic tea leaves just chanced to fall this way.” In other words, just because advanced life is necessary to us, that does not mean that there had to be a God who intended for it to exist; things just turned out as they did, and we got lucky. Bussey’s response was that consciousness is significant. Not only is he basing his argument on a subjective judgment, but his argument does not respond this objection versus his credit, Bussey in this chapter offers criticisms of the Smart Design movement. Bussey notes that biologists have found natural, scientific explanations to the puzzles that have been attributed to design. For unclear reasons, Bussey does not believe that the same situation applies to apter 9, “God As First Cause: An Argument That Seems to Hold,” is about the cosmological argument: the idea that someone caused the universe to exist. Bussey argues versus the idea that the universe has existed forever, and, overall, his arguments were effective. In refuting the idea that the universe has been in a continuous, unending cycle of expanding and contracting, for example, Bussey states that, were this true, there would be a lot more background radiation in the universe, enough to preclude stars from developing. In my opinion, this chapter was the best in the book, in terms of clarity and meeting objections head on.What stands out to me in Chapter 10, “Explanations and Evidence,” is Bussey’s paragraph on page 159 about why belief in God is reasonable: order, human intelligence may point to a higher intelligence, etc. I did not care that much for his statement on page 158: “But rather than saying, ‘God cannot exist because I would have done it better!’ it may be wise to acknowledge our limited understanding.” Our understanding is limited, and, as Bussey most likely knows, that is something that different sides in the debate over the existence of God can cite: atheists can say that there is a natural explanation for the things that theists attribute to God, even if that explanation is unknown, so we should not jump to the “God did it” explanation just because our understanding is limited. My issue with Bussey’s statement on page 158 is that I think that an appeal to “flawed design” should be considered relevant in debates about the existence of God. A lot of apologists like to appeal to design and order to justify their belief in God, so what is wrong with skeptics asking about apparent flaws in the design structure, or disorder?Chapter 11, “Mental Reality,” is about the soul and human consciousness. Bussey contends versus the idea that the human mind is merely the product of the physical brain, as he maintains that humans have a soul, and that God (not nature) is responsible for the human mind. This chapter provided the interesting detail the Descartes may not have been as dualistic in his conception of the soul and the body as a lot of might think. There were also judicious aspects to Bussey’s discussion, as when Bussey stated that we cannot create flawless judgments about the thinking-ability of animals, since we are not them. Bussey’s arguments versus materialism (or epiphenomenalism) were rather elliptical, however. Plus, there is a lingering question in my mind: What exactly does the human brain do, according to people who believe that humans have a soul? Does the brain do anything or serve any purpose, if the soul is what gives us our thinking ability? If humans have a soul, is their brain superfluous?In Chapter 12, “Mystery and Ignorance,” Bussey talks about having a sense of wonder at the universe. He criticizes the romantic notion that greater knowledge and understanding detracts from wonder. Bussey is probably implying that the sense of wonder that even non-believing scientists experience is a signpost to apter 13, “Beyond Physicalism,” criticizes the idea that science can know or understand everything. Bussey also spends time critiquing Carl Sagan’s view that religion encouraged superstition, until science showed the truth, and that we should stick with what is “rational” rather than pursuing is book was over my head, in areas, but it was also informative. There were times when Bussey seemed to be jumping to conclusions, but there were also times when his discussions were judicious.I apologize for any misunderstandings on my part in reading and reviewing this book.I received a complimentary copy of this book from the publisher. My review is honest!

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    In God We Trust []  2020-1-17 2:37

    If you rock at all you will like this album. Unlike other releases from Stryper, every track is headbangingly glorious. In fact I invented the adjective "headbangingly" solely in order to describe this album. A few Stryper classics, like The War Hymn of the Republic and Honestly can be found on other albums, but for the luke-warm Stryper fan this album is the one. The vocals and guitar of the Sweet brothers harmonize like nothing you have ever heard, and the frenzied drumming of Oz Fox could not be improved upon. It is a metal classic that is only beggining to obtain its due as people hear how difficult it is to search a thourougly amazing metal album. Buy it! Treasure it! Give yourself whiplash listening to it!

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    In God We Trust []  2020-1-17 2:37

    My favourite song on this one is Always There For You. It's been a long time that I latest heard this bands music. I'm more familiar with To hell with the devil, I'm glad Stryper didn't stop making music. That would have been a sin. Like real believers, Stryper support to create God the loving creator he his. I'm enjoying this CD very much.

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    God in the Dock []  2020-1-16 9:55

    I search that the more I read the writings of C. S. Lewis, the more I search myself admiring his skill as a writer and thinker. I do not know of another writer who is so amazing at getting straight to the heart of whatever topic he is considering and working out every logical implication of a position held by himself or someone else. Thus, I found this collection of essays by Lewis titled God in the Dock to be a unique ese forty-eight essays written over a period of some twenty years and published in a dozens of publications provide perfect examples of Lewis’s clear thinking and uncompromising defense of his Christian beliefs. Although there is some diversity of topic in these writings, the editor, Walter Hooper, has sorted them out into three parts and included a fourth part containing a few letters Lewis wrote. As he explains, the first two parts deal mostly with theology while the third has essays dealing more with Christian ethics or behavior. These essays are not so easily differentiated and Lewis is always as much concerned with Christian living as much as Christian beliefs. Ethics and theology blend together more than are separated in these essays.Lewis does tackle a dozens of topics in these essays, but always he returns to the same themes. He defends the concept of miracles versus the idea that science disproves the miraculous by pointing out that science only studies the regularities found in nature. Given that the miraculous is not part of the regularities, science can tell us nothing about it. Lewis also argues versus reducing everything to mechanistic naturalism. He insists that to study a thing is not the same as to experience it and one must not assume that either process tells us everything about the thing. A person in love experiences the emotion of love. A doctor studying his brain might perhaps learn something of the chemicals that produce the feelings of being in love, but cannot know what it is to be in love unless he actually experiences it.C. S. Lewis defends dogma in religion versus those who would do away with it in favor of a loose theism by pointing out that a religion with no beliefs is hardly worth the trouble. He writes of the difficulties of spreading the Christian notice to a contemporary audience and of the necessity of speaking the common people’s language in order to teach them. The essay God in the Dock notes that unlike the pagans in first century Rome, most people today do not believe themselves to be sinners in need of repentance and instead of fearing the judgment of God, is more inclined to place God in the dock and judge of the themes throughout C. S. Lewis’s writings is his contention that it is what is real that matters, not what is modern or progressive or practical. In Bulverism, he attacks the twentieth century fashion of refuting an argument not by proving it is wrong, but by attacking the motives of the debater. (Check your privilege?) He insists that a point is either right or wrong, regardless of the motives of the person stating it, and it can only be shown to be right or wrong using ere is a lot more to this collection and I have only scratched a very shallow line on the surface of the profound riches to be found in reading these essays. I think that any follower of C. S. Lewis will search that reading God in the Dock to be a rewarding experience.

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    God in the Dock []  2020-1-16 9:55

    Amazing book. Seller was amazing and the book was better than described. But the content is really good. Of course, I'm a fan of C.S. Lewis. I love his logic. He usually takes me somewhere and gives me amazing perspective on the cross and life itself. In so doing, he has a method of minimizing any current stressors. They come back for sure. But the respite he gives by adding perspective is a amazing thing. This collection of essays will be read numerous times by me. One in particular ("Man Or Rabbit") has already been read numerous times.

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    God in US []  2020-1-16 22:56

    thanks, amazing service, a joy to obtain this

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    God in US []  2020-1-16 22:56

    Don Morn's melody goes beyond my expectations.

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    God in America []  2020-10-19 19:58

    This program is a amazing overview of how integral religion is to American history. And the forces are still in play. It helped me to understand where (and when) Evangelicals are coming from. I had no idea of the very deep roots of the prayer in school problem for example. I like history but I found a lot here that I had not known or had not thought about. It left me marveling at the courage and insight of our founders.I have used this series in two groups of adult learners and all participants thought this was very helpful in understanding where we have come from and what is going on now.

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    God in America []  2020-10-19 19:58

    Interesting DVD series but only amazing nothing great

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    God in America []  2020-10-19 19:58

    Very interesting DVD for anyone interested in Religion in America.

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    God in America []  2020-10-19 19:58

    I like religion and its result on believers. In this video we look at the different stages religion takes in the development of American society. It is quite poignant. It is worth a look.

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    In God We Doubt []  2020-1-6 18:42

    it caused me to alter my view on atheism and religious views.

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    God in US []  2020-1-16 22:56

    GREAT CD. BOUGHT MANY FOR MY FRIENDS ALSO

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    God in US []  2020-1-16 22:56

    Out of print and hard to find. Was thrilled to search a copy on Amazon. Outstanding blend of traditional and contemporary melody by one of the best musicians in decades.

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    In God We Trust []  2020-1-17 2:37

    Come on, admit it.... you remember the old days when MTV actually played music, watching the Stryper videos playing and rocking out to the music.I got the urge to hear some of their classic hits again, so I picked up the first four CDs via Amazon. I fully expected to listen to them now and think, "Huh, I remember them being so much better than this...."I was wrong. Their original songs still rock as hard today as any other band out there in their sound genre. They didn't go for half the gimicky sound that some of the bands had, they just stuck to a standard rock & roll formula that worked, and it sounds just as amazing today as it did back then.Well worth the meager price paid for the CDs. ;-)

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    God in the Dock []  2020-1-16 9:55

    This is a collection of essays by Lewis, all on religious subjects or similar to it. Unlike his more unified apologetics, this book contains discussions about hymns, whether the purpose of punishment (for crimes) is desert or remedial, all sorts of things. Some of the essays are less interesting than others, but all are packed with his wisdom and compact style. I particularly like his take on the language evangelism should use: he makes the point that if a minister cannot explain anything in the Bible in easy language that he probably doesn't understand it well enough himself. He goes on to call for seminarians to be tested on their ability to place complex biblical themes or theological subtleties into "vulgar" language, much as we would expect them to learn to speak Bantu before ministering to the Bantu people..Towards the end is a collection of letters, mostly to magazines and journals commenting on this or that paper. Some are funny in his dry way, others present that he was engaged in lots of various one can go wrong reading anything he wrote. But this volume should not be your first exposure to him.

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    God in the Dock []  2020-1-16 9:55

    After years of struggling with the modern church's lack of appetite for the intellectual, I finally found an author who wasn't afraid to ask the hard questions that plague Christians and non-Christians alike:> Should we pray, and [why] does it work?> Why would God wish to bother with a tiny, insignificant planet in the universe?> Has science negated God?> Why should anyone go to church?...and a lot of more challenging subjects in this complilation of essays written over CS Lewis's lifetime. The awesome thing about this book is he doesn't just ask the hard questions--he has well thought out, mind-blowing answers as well, backed up by theologians, scientists, the Socratic method, and of course, the Bible. The essays may have been written in the 1940s and 50s, but they have lost none of their relevance or power in today's world. As a Christian, this book has taken me to a whole fresh depth of understanding about what I believe. As a thinking person, it challenged me to look at my motivations for everything I do. For example: Why do I test to be a amazing person? Why is "good" better than "bad"? I would recommend this book to any Christian with a thirst for deeper understanding of Christian theology. I would also recommend this book to anyone who is interested in what being a Christian REALLY means at the foundation, not what modern culture has tried to create it mean. Some people may have problem reading this book --it is definitely not light reading. Lewis was an English professor at Cambridge, and it shows in his dense writing and complex topic matter. He frequently quotes Latin and from sources and authors only a literature scholar would know of. However, the editor does a amazing job in translating and citing references where appropriate. It is not enough to say that I have been profoundly moved and changed by this book. Definitely, definitely read it.

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    God in the Dock []  2020-1-16 9:55

    C.S. Lewis is known for being one of the best apologists (and amateur theologians) of our day. Primarily, Lewis is a writer; he knows how to use words to draw the reader in, and then humbly offers his insights on whatever subject is at hand. It is this humility that I think makes him so accessible - he talks about what he knows and doesn't presume to be an authority over anyone.About GOD IN THE DOCK specifically, this is a collection of his letters, columns, and speeches. Most are short (4-10 pages) reflections on something he has encountered recently, from animal-rights protestations to dogma within the church to attempts to debunk myth to Christmas. Really, though, each one of these essays is about modernism. Modernism is the arch-enemy to Lewis - in its materialism, rationalism, statism and "groupism", it denies the validity of opposing systems of thought. Miracles are definitively ruled because they can't be reproduced in a lab (which Lewis argues is precisely why they are "miraculous" in the first place." Christian beliefs are discarded because they are related to other "primitve" myths; Lewis argues that if God is true and we are created in His image, it makes sense that we would have common motifs in how we think about e essays in GOD IN THE DOCK are mostly designed to present the fallacies in people's thinking. They begin with an observation, continue to describe the orthodox Christian point of view, point out something which the reader already knows to be true, and then shows that it makes more sense in the context of orthodox thought rather than modernist thought. What I found most interesting was that the same issues that Lewis wrestled with in his day are the same ones that Americans face today! I'm not sure if this proves that history repeats itself or if America is just 50 years behind England. Either way, Lewis' predictions for the future if his society continued to follow the modernist path were vindicated (if anything, he underestimated the degree to which society would degenerate).In summary, C.S. Lewis was a humble and insightful man whose essays cover a wide gamut of topics. Each essay is short, about a 15 min read, which is a comfortable method to wind down the day. I think that he very correctly evaluated the danger that modernism poses to humanity. Finally, his essay subjects are very relevant to Americans whose country is now hashing outt he same problems that Lewis' nation did fifty years ago.

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    God in America []  2020-10-19 19:58

    Very informative without denigrating the believer or our heritage as a nation

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    God in US []  2020-1-16 22:56

    Has locations that skip—disappointed

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    God in US []  2020-1-16 22:56

    A remarkable musical presentation of God's majesty.

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    In God We Trust []  2020-1-17 2:37

    Stryper was/is a metal band for Christians with highly moral and Biblical views in the lyrics. Although not "preachy", it is still beautiful obvious their meaning. "Always There For You" is easily recognizable. One of the few Christian bands to create it into top 40 mainstream rock/metal due to highly versatile guitars(anything from speed metal to pop metal) to versatile vocals(hard rock to attractive ballads like "I Believe in You"). Although not included on this album, listen to "Honestly" and hear one of the best hard rock ballads/love songs EVER.

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    In God We Trust []  2020-1-17 2:37

    Still Hands Down. My favorite Stryper album. That could be because it was the first time I had heard of them when this album was released. Very underrated album. Writing's on the wall. In my opinion there Best Song Ever.

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    God in the Dock []  2020-1-16 9:55

    WARNING: UNREADABLE FORMATTING. The cheap $4 edition is not worth it. The more expensive ver is worth every penny and twice that.

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    God in the Dock []  2020-1-16 9:55

    Prof Lewis lived in a time when the intelligentsia were daring to assert the idea that God perhaps did not exist. Now, religion is taught in our universities along the lines of " How and Why Did Mankind Feel the Need to Invent God?"The question is still the same. If indeed we are a bundle of random cells, why does any of our rambling matter? What is the basis of declaring anything amazing or bad? Do what you want, and amazing luck to one will ever victory this argument, but Prof. Lewis gave a marvelous test at showing belief in God to be a rational choice, though of course asserting that the matter is, in the end, one of heart belief.If you love God, and love C.S.Lewis, you will have fun this book. He does obtain carried away with his extremely erudite logical calisthenics replete with the Greek and Latin quotes to go with them, but after all, he did not deny it, but rather saw his hyperintellectualism as a liability in being a easy witness for Christ.But his erudition reveals what a truly classically educated person has access to in examining a matter. Would we all had access to that kind of n't begin reading Lewis here. For prose, read Surprised by Joy or Mere Christianity. For fun, read Screwtape. Above all, read his Narnia tales, and his Zone r a private memoir of amazing pathos by someone who could not resist watching himself even at his greatest extremity, read A Grief Observed.But if you are a college student, read God in the Dock as an antidote. The same if you have kids or grandchildren in college. It's a brilliant and entertaining work.His is a amazing body of work that revealed a brilliant, quirky, passionate and perpetually truthseeking man.

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    In God We Doubt []  2020-1-6 18:42

    This is a amazing book.....and I say that having spent the latest year reading all of them (well, almost). From the militant athiests to the fundamentalist hard core I have taken the time to really discover the varying views and opinions on the nature of christinatity and belief. It has been a labor of love.full disclosure: I entered this excercise a militant athiest myself......and coming out the other end I am still an athiest - but no longer mphrys is largely responsible for my transformation (I am leaving out the info - this is not about me). He is a amazing writer and can tell a amazing story - and the story he has to tell here is compelling and ultimately persuasive - although that is not his intent of my other findings from my own research is that you believe what you believe and few are going to allow facts or logic obtain in the way. Michael shermer's fresh book on "the beieving brain" explains in amazing detail the phenomenon that happens when we think what we are doing is following logic to arrive at our beliefs/conclusions. We are not. We are looking for evidence to help what we have already decided to mphrys gets this and tells a tale here about his own journey and, more importantly, about those he encountered in the course of and after doing his broadcasts with religious leaders from the three monotheistic's.If you are at all interested in the topic - you must obtain this book and read it - and think about what this author has to say and what it really means. Amazing stuff!

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    God in America []  2020-10-19 19:58

    Perfect historical acc of how the different Christian religions began in America, how they differed, and how that has affected those same religions over time. Here is a teaser.....The idea of, "Separation between Church and State", originates from religious leaders not the Founding Fathers who place it into words.

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    God in America []  2020-10-19 19:58

    One of the best doentaries on religion and America I've seen. It is not a comprehensive exposé of all religions started or practiced in America (which would be impossible and overwhelming), but instead a story of how religion has shaped life and politics in America from the Puritans all the method up to Billy Graham, George W. Bush, and Barack Obama. I think PBS struck the excellent balance in providing a factual introduction to a lot of mainstream groups as well as telling a cohesive story throughout this extensive time is unfortunate that some major religions were not included (i.e., Mormonism) but understandable as PBS has place out a full-length doentary specifically on this topic. You can watch both "God in America" and "The Mormons" for free on the PBS website.

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    God in the Dock []  2020-1-16 9:55

    C. S. Lewis is considered to be the greatest Christian apologist (defender of the Christianity) of the twentieth century. He is that and so much more. He is inspiring, amusing, no-nonsense, humble and exact. I recommend this book to anyone who is searching for a fuller experience of God. This special Christian writer can give you a fresh perspective, can squelch your doubts, or can deepen your faith. Give him a test and stick with him -- you will reap a benefit.Of all the essay books published, this is the most rewarding. The range of topic matter is impressive and edifying -- from the Miracles essay on the supernatural to Meditation in A Toolshed about looking at and along things to obtain a complete picture. There are two sections of questions and answers -- one from factory workers at Electric and Musical Industries, Ltd. and one at Magdalene College, Cambridge with an interviewer from the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association. The first is a wide range of topic matter and the second about Christian writing. There is also a sample of leters with topic matter from battle to capital punishment. I feel sure that both believers and non-believers can benefit from this book.

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    God in US []  2020-1-16 22:56

    joy in finding this = thanks

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    God in US []  2020-1-16 22:56

    This CD has proven extremely helpful to my life. The words share God's love for you and me song after song and spoken testimony. The melody comes from the time when church choir musicals were popular. Okay with me since I sang in church choirs. A lot of of the songs are recognizable as we sing them still as "praise" songs. Amazing buy!

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    In God We Trust []  2020-1-17 2:37

    Stryper catches a lot of crap for the band they were. They weren't doing anything various than the other bands coming out around that time.With the exception being that the guys in Stryper actually knew their instruments and abilities and utilized that knowledge to the fullest! My favorite bands are Motorhead, Saxon, black Sabbath,manowar etc and Stryper is right up there with them. I have their beliefs and stand up for them. That's what I call integrity. I.G.W.T. is a amazing album. After to hell with the devil I didn't think it was possible to make another album on that bar but they did it with this one. I loved it when it came out and over 25 years later im still jammin' to it

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    In God We Trust []  2020-1-17 2:37

    DUH NUH NUH NUH NUH NUH NUH NUH DUH NUH DUNNUH NUH DUH NUHI've enjoyed these tunes since I was beautiful small, so there's a lot of nostalgia in it, to say the least. It's a amazing band to raise children on, assuming they're the "I wish everything I do to be cool" (not like "Bieber/teen drama/hangout for no reason" cool, but like "extreeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeme!!" and whatever else.. kinda like Anakin in episode 1, you know?).

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    In God We Doubt []  2020-1-6 18:42

    "In God We Doubt", a born again atheist mate told me, is "a wishy-washy fence-sitting book". I got about half-way through when he asked for my opinion, which was "yes, it IS a wishy-washy fence-sitting book".It's a fast and simple read, and now that I've finished it, I'm wondering if John Humphrys (or "the guy off of Mastermind" to me) got splinters up his bum from sitting on that fence. If it was a book about a fictional hero who struggled to come to terms with his God-doubting, you'd expect him to reach some sort of conclusion in the end - he'll create his mind up, somehow, that there either is a god, or there isn't. This never happens. It ends, just as it begins and has been all the method through, with a "well, there might be, or there might not be - who knows?" And where's the fun in that?I'm not really sure why this book was written, to be honest, because it's not going to create atheists search religion, nor is it going to create a religious person become an atheist. It just sits there, being mostly harmless, saying both sides sort of have a point but both go about it wrong. If the point is to keep the hand of agnostics and say it's okay to be on the fence, sure, job r someone like myself, who is somewhere nicely in the middle, "In God We Doubt" is completely redundant, simply because there's no point to it. It's preaching to the crowd already, and I don't need a book to tell me what I already know. It's an okay book. Might provoke a few thoughts in those who are unsure of what to believe, or it might not. Either way, you're probably not going to be bowled over.3 out of 5 potential deities.

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    God in America []  2020-10-19 19:58

    This is an accurate and honest acc of America's religious history. Thank you for creating such an perfect doentary!

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    God in America []  2020-10-19 19:58

    A amazing review of the history of the US and aspects of religion as we developed, religion and the constitution review is good.Over all I bought it for our teen grandchildren who have no concept of US history. I also buy DVDs about Presidents, wars, etc. for them to supplement their public education.

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    God in US []  2020-1-16 22:56

    This is one of my classic favorites and is very anointed. I love it.

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    God in US []  2020-1-16 22:56

    I was very satisfied with the cd "god for us". the sound was perfect. it sounded just as amazing as if it were new. the case had no defects. I was very pleased. I was also satisfied with the promptness of your service. It arrived exactly on the day you said it would. Thank you.

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    In God We Trust []  2020-1-17 2:37

    if you like 80 metal i love stryper .i love always there for ep the fire burning it u to rper came out in the late .there they dress like bees with long hair .'in the latest under them year they got older and the melody change..i guess maybee five year..they melody was piop metal. and song of the melody was eazy to siging too .too hell with the devil and solderunder commmade in god we trust yellow and black attack was there first one..they got fresh album out right no more hell to pay..for tempory micheal sweet left and went one his own.with his first micheal swett.i like cond was true .i was more unpluged style i have not follow that muchthe latest time i seem them in concert was cornerstonefestival in 2002 in bushinell ill. and 2012 was the festival fairwell the call it quit .for cstone festiival

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    In God We Trust []  2020-1-17 2:37

    I had this album on record when it was first released. The sound quality was very amazing and loud. They have translated the sound to cd very well. As far as the melody goes, this album really didn't give me what I thought it would when I first heard it. Now you must realize this was the follow up to 'To Hell With The Devil". Not a simple album to follow. I just feel like they did not take enough time with the song writing on this album. Now the positives, I really like the songs In God We Trust, Writing On The Wall, The Reign and a couple others. I can listen to this album all the method through and that says something. It's not To Hell With The Devil but there is a lot of energy on this cd. It is a must in any Stryper fans collection.

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    In God We Trust []  2020-1-17 2:37

    Fans of rock and massive metal will not be disapointed with the driving beat and massive guitar solos. Awesome clairity of notes compared to some songs where you are not sure where the guitarist is e best part is the uplifting notice you obtain without being sappy or uncool. Non-Christian rockers may not be use to the name of Jesus being used in a song (interesting how Satan may be mentioned and no one has a issue with that) These are written with God in mind and still kicks out wonderful wrifs and sounds created popular during the "glam" age of is is definatly a "hair" band of the 80's with strong presents that you can compare to "Poison, Cinderella, and the like". Lead singer hits high notes a lot of will not try. If you like this - you must obtain the "Soldiers under Command" album which does all this and showcases more dirty guitar with creature layering I would compare to "Metallica"

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    God in the Dock []  2020-1-16 9:55

    The 2014 HarperOne/Harper Collins edition with the teal and red cover is the one you want. The $4 kindle ver (that was the price at the time of this review) with the picture of Lewis and a bridge on the cover is practically unusable as a Kindle book. Create sure you obtain the right ver and you'll have a grand time with Lewis :)

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    God in the Dock []  2020-1-16 9:55

    This is a series of rebuttals by CS Lewis to essays by his local atheist society. These two groups got together regularly for civil debate on religion. One Group would state a position as part of a thesis and the opposite group would answer the following week. The essays are short, but the theology is deep and solid.Example: Jesus miracles are just the same thing that God does every day, but done in a compressed time period, in a size our little human brain can comprehend. Jesus turned water into wine. God invented grapes. Every day that it rains, the water feeds the grapes, humans (also God's creation) create the grapes into wine. God has been changing water into wine since humans first learned to ferment kes you yearn for the time that people with diametrically opposed religious beliefs could talk civilly.Excellent book!!

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    In God We Doubt []  2020-1-6 18:42

    This is not a Dawkins or Hitchens kind of book that believers can fairly attack as one written by a "Militant Atheist", though the people who use that description have not explained whether they meant it to be used to disapprove of militant atheists as they would religious extremists or whether they are saying it's all right to be a religious extremist but not a militant atheist. Humphrys just asks questions. Smart questions that believers and non-believers alike would and should be asking. He takes the neutral ground of an agnostic; he can't prove that there is no god, but he wants religious people to explain and prove what the god it is that they are worshipping. His chapter on interviews with a rabbi,a an Anglican Archbi, and a Muslim academic is worth reading carefully. The reader must judge for himself whether the answers given by these three learned men clarify the religious stand. I suspect that most neutral people will be left skeptical about a private God that micromanages human lives. If there isn't a micromanager god, then is there any use in prayer? If there is then shouldn't he take responsibility for all the ills of the world? These questions are worth pondering over.

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    God in America []  2020-10-19 19:58

    interesting view that I'm afraid a lot of will not agree with.

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    God in the Qur'an: God in Three Classic Scriptures []  2020-1-19 22:28

    Miles, a Pulitzer Prize and a MacArthur "genius" award champion has written a compressed sequel to his books on God as a literary hero in the Old Testament and then the Fresh Testament. Since a sequel, a conclusion and a final corrective to the OT and NT was just how Mohammed pictured the Quran, the way works. I tried twice to warn humanity, the Quran's God tells Mohammed. They wouldn't listen to Moses, they wouldn't listen to Jesus. This is my latest attempt and their latest chance. Miles's prose is brisk and clear. Almost any page has some insight. Excellent.

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    God in the Qur'an: God in Three Classic Scriptures []  2020-1-19 22:28

    Love it.

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    God in the Qur'an: God in Three Classic Scriptures []  2020-1-19 22:28

    I would give this book 3.5 stars, but will bump up to four rather than down to 3 for the author’s noble objectives. As Miles writes, “We must all learn…to read one another’s scriptures with the same understanding and accommodating eye that we turn upon our own.” (21-22)Miles gives an explanation of his approach in the introduction, wherein he states that he will approach the Quran as a literary text with “suspension of disbelief.” He then explains his choice of Tarif Khalidi’s Quran translation, which is sound, as it is much more accessible to contemporary readers than, for example, Arberry or Pickthall. He also uses selections from Asad’s translation. Miles explains his choice with reference to other translations, in particular The Study Quran, which he cites on a few occasions.While the book is ostensibly about God in the Quran, there are often as a lot of or more references to the Bible and multiple references to Christian tradition, such as Augustine, Milton, Blake, etc, accompanied by asides about the Sistine Chapel and other aspects of Euro-American civilization. This is understandable, given the author’s background and intended audience, but betrays a lack of research on his part. Whereas in Gary Wills’ What the Quran Meant and Why it Matters, we search extensive references to scholarship regarding the Quran and Islam by Muslims and non-Muslim scholars of Islam, Miles has a tendency to retreat to the familiar. This may be an effective tool for addressing his non-Muslim audience, but may also prevent him from delving deeper into interpretations of the text under consideration, the Quran. This approach does lead him to miss significant aspects of the text. For example, when discussing the question of why God did not forgive humanity immediately after the fall, Mills turns to a discussion centering on Milton’s Paradise Lost with reference to the Old and Fresh Testaments (35-40), rather than other Quranic verses which discuss the manner in which God relented unto Adam and Eve immediately after the is approach plagues the book throughout, giving us more of an appreciation for how Miles sees the Quran in relation to Christian theology and Western civilization than for what the Quran actually says and how God is presented in the Quran. If one wishes to gain a deeper understanding of what the Quran itself actually says, there are better books available.

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    God in the Qur'an: God in Three Classic Scriptures []  2020-1-19 22:28

    I surely agree with reviewer "Michael." Reading this one =without= the considerable context supplied by the earlier PP champion would seem to be far less educational or rewarding than reading it =with= that backdrop.But there's a lot more to this, IMO, and MO is this: What the books =say= is begin to considerable interpretation, and has been since the first renderings were rolled out about 3,000 years ago. Further, those interpretations -- decidedly including all those of the early Christian texts in the three Roman Empires of 500 to 2,000 years ago -- are what the shouting has been all about. (The politics of scriptural interpretation are at least as intriguing as the immense effects thereof.)For a researcher on the sociopsychological effects of religious belief, Miles has indeed provided useful speculations in all three of his books. But to put those speculations =in= useful context, I've turned to such as Martin Buber, Kurt Riezler, Erving Goffman, Karl Jaspers, Eric Hoffer, Walter Martin, Karen Armstrong (pretty much in the chronological order of their work), and lately, Barnaby Rogerson and Peter e latest listed's =The Silk Roads= is the most illuminating I've yet run into on the topic, especially with regard to the rapidly changing interpretation of the Quran in the seventh and either centuries that moved Islam from one published policy with regard to other religions to quite the opposite... with enormous impact to the moment you're reading this.

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