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    guns of glory []  2020-5-21 22:34
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    Just played Guns of Glory on a phone application via mistplay reviews. Played this one with amazing interest as on the mobile you got the impression of controlling your characters on the ground level, helping catch pick pockets etc etc. Like all mobile ads this was misleading. Don't obtain me wrong the android game itself was addictive and you can spend hours playing (If you play via mistplay you can earn a fair few Amazon vouchers), but yeah false advertising? Really? Unfortunately this is a huge pitfall a lot of android games like these fall into. For example you can expect a nice create your kitchen safe android game but instead you obtain something quite various (garden scapes see add for application and play game)

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    clash of clans []  2020-5-11 22:47

    recommend amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing

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    Black Dahlia, Red Rose: The Crime, Corruption, and Cover-Up of America's Greatest Unsolved Murder [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    Any fresh book on the killing of Elizabeth Short is an interesting event, since much of the evidence is unavailable and much that is available has been sifted and resifted. Those who follow the case are likely to be well-informed and, absent an undeniable, lead-pipe-cinch solution, likely to have views that run counter to the fresh ‘solution’. At the same time, the case is iconic; it says so much about Chandler’s town and about the LAPD that the journey toward a ‘conclusion’, if well constructed, will be rewarding in its own at journey is beautifully charted by Piu Eatwell, who has a passion for texture, for material culture and for raw historical fact. With its movie noir and classic crime fiction epigraphs it is designed to be evocative and in that it certainly succeeds.I do not wish to spoil the ‘conclusion’ but I will say the following: the prime suspect has been so identified in the past; this is not a wild guess emerging from some distant left field. The case is circumstantial and it is extensive and persuasive. At the same time, the prime suspect has been eliminated because of an alibi, an alibi which the author attacks aggressively, if not in a manner that absolutely compels belief. Absent a dated, untouched photograph that locates the suspect 382 miles from the crime stage (as alleged) or some related form of exculpatory evidence, the veracity of the alibi—given the shaky witnesses attesting to it—is e circumstantial case, however, is very strong. The author constructs a narrative, complete with a psychological profile prepared by an expert witness (who interrogated the suspect) that makes sense. It is coherent and persuasive. It also squares with the larger narrative of how women drawn to tinseltown could easily search themselves entering the valley of the shadow of death and not the nothing-but-blue-skies-ahead glamorous globe of wealth, fame and lead movie e book is well-written, well-researched and very engaging. I will release this bit of information: (SPOILER) the author disagrees with Steve Hodel’s popular acc of his father’s guilt, an acc which James Ellroy found convincing. I personally search this author’s case more convincing, in part because the pictures of ‘Elizabeth Short’ in George Hodel’s effects simply do not look like Elizabeth Short and the case, while very imaginative (with the victim’s body constructed to evoke work by Man Ray) simply too e book contains a bibliography of basic and secondary materials, an index (unlike Hodel’s book), a list of dramatis personae, 8 pp. of contemporary photographs and a postscript which lists ‘what happened to’ the principals in the story. These are all helpful and informative. The illustrations in Hodel’s book, however, are far more extensive and not to be missed by devotees of the case. Crime stage and autopsy gore are now generally available on the internet, though first viewers should be warned that they are very disturbing.R.I.P., Elizabeth.Highly recommended.

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    Black Dahlia, Red Rose: The Crime, Corruption, and Cover-Up of America's Greatest Unsolved Murder [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    Meticulously researched with newly opened FBI files, interviews and wonderful detective work.....this book about Elizabeth Short was special among all others.I've read others, watched the documentaries and movies, so of course my interest was e was a attractive woman from the east hoping to create it huge in Hollywood, like thousands of others. Her desires, her needs, were no various than anyone else's, particularly at the time. Fame....love.....the need to create something of herself.....all created her human. Not just some dissected corpse named wells findings shifted my views and thoughts, read it and see what YOU think!

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    Black Dahlia, Red Rose: The Crime, Corruption, and Cover-Up of America's Greatest Unsolved Murder [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    Having read almost everything I could obtain my hands on over the years on this subject, I finally found the definitive book on the Dahlia. Ms. Eatwell's conclusions are as plausible as any---as the corrupt LAPD of the 1940's enabled this case to flounder and ultimately go unsolved. The author does a fine job of striking the right balance of amazing old-fashioned gumshoe detective work in a dark, smokey noir setting. It certainly blows machine gun holes in some of the ludicrous attempts to amateur sleuth this case in the past. This page-turner should be considered for an Edgar Award for Fact Crime.

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    Black Dahlia, Red Rose: The Crime, Corruption, and Cover-Up of America's Greatest Unsolved Murder [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    I have read too a lot of books about this case and was initially wary of Ms. Eatwell’s take on the murder. I’m glad I took a possibility on this perfect book. The research is unique: LAPD files unearthed and FBI documents exposed provide clarity on the corrupt bureaucracy of the LAPD during the postwar period. Very well-written and respectful of Elizabeth Short’s memory.

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    Black Dahlia, Red Rose: The Crime, Corruption, and Cover-Up of America's Greatest Unsolved Murder [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    I fully admit to rolling my eyes and groaning “not another one” when I saw this book on the shelf. I’m so satisfied that I gave it a chance! I’ve read everything I’ve been able to search about this case and I personally belueve that this is the most compelling, respectful book on the topic that’s been published to date. Ms. Eatwell clearly did a ton of research and she had to war very hard to obtain info that no one had had access to before.I really don’t understand why some people are criticising her research and theories as severely as they are. Her theory seems beautiful solid to me. She place this together very carefully, and I think it’s worth giving a test even if only for the fact that it’s the most humanizing, compassionate exploration of Elizabeth Short’s life and death.

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    Black Dahlia, Red Rose: The Crime, Corruption, and Cover-Up of America's Greatest Unsolved Murder [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    Author, Piu Eatwell, reveals new, little-known facts and events during the late 1940s era of Old Hollywood and a murder that remains unsolved (and now reveals a lot of answers). The puzzle is pieced together here miraculously. I had visions of that 1997 movie called L.A. CONFIDENTIAL as the story unraveled.I found this book to be an awesome piece of research that brought me in, feeling as though I was investigating the crime myself. I actually felt CHILLS towards the end of Chapter 19 (DETOUR).I could easily see a mini-series stemming from this 'cold case' story.I will definitely pass this along to my avid-reader mates who love to delve into a mystery. There are a lot of eye-openers y Elizabeth Short rest in peace...she should've been a star; and now in a bizarre method she will always be that unforgotten e storyline kept me at my edge-of-my-seat. It is quite the page-turner. Don't miss this one...you won't be too surprised by the corruption back in the late 1940s and 1950s...people could obtain away with MURDER more easily back-in-the-day. I found this to be a must-read for anyone looking for a amazing mystery. It's also the ideal book for a book club (for so a lot of discussions could come out of it). And...if I were a CRIMINAL JUSTICE Professor all of my students would have this as REQUIRED READING. Outstanding!

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    Black Dahlia, Red Rose: The Crime, Corruption, and Cover-Up of America's Greatest Unsolved Murder [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    Amazing book--perhaps the myself is solved-perhaps not, but the evidence is compelling.

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    Black Dahlia, Red Rose: The Crime, Corruption, and Cover-Up of America's Greatest Unsolved Murder [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    I'll admit, I stood in the bookstore with this in my hand thinking, "Oh man, not ANOTHER Dahlia book!" but I'm glad I took the possibility and bought it. If there's nothing else of merit about this book; the writing style is gripping and pulls you into the sad story of Elizabeth Short in a method no other before it has...and I've read a lot of them. It's just a amazing to the theories Eatwell puts forward; I could go either way. She seems to have done her homework and, if she's correct, she's probably solved the case. There are those that would argue her perp has already been discredited but it's hard to say. Piu Eatwell does do a amazing job of exposing some of the murkier aspects of the Black Dahlia case and, for that reason alone, this book is a welcome addition to the the end all I can say is read the book and decide for yourself. Agree or disagree with Eatwell's conclusions; you won't be sorry you took the time.

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    Black Dahlia, Red Rose: The Crime, Corruption, and Cover-Up of America's Greatest Unsolved Murder [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    Los Angeles in 1947 was a hard, gritty town filled with people hoping to create a new begin or to achieve fame and fortune. One of them was Elizabeth Short, a attractive young woman from Massachusetts who dreamed of becoming a film star. Ironically but sadly her desire for fame was achieved, but only because of the manner of her death. Her body was discovered one cold January morning, bisected and mutilated. The investigation into her death became a cause celebre. Christened the Black Dahlia murder by the newspapers, the publicity went on for weeks and periodically resurrected when fresh possible fresh evidence or info surfaced. But the mystery of who killed Elizabeth Short and why was never solved. Piu Eatwell's fresh history of the crime and the investigation makes it clear that the failure to track down and bring Short's murderer to justice was due to widespread corruption within the LA Police Department, which had multiple cozy relationships with organized crime figures.Piu Eatwell's fresh history of the Black Dahlia case brings the corrupt globe of 1947 Los Angeles to life. Elizabeth Short herself, as well as the men with whom she consorted, the police officers and detectives who were in charge of investigating her death, and the newspaper reporters who told the story to the world, are all vividly described. Making use of newly released FBI and local police files, Eatwell provides fresh material pointing to the likely murderer, and then explains the circumstances through which that murderer evaded the law. Perhaps the most interesting parts of the book are those set in the present, in which Eatwell describes her own visits to some of the scenes of the crime and coverup, and eventually even encounters the daughter of the Dahlia, Red Rose is a movie noir tale brought to life, and is even more fascinating than anything Hollywood in the 1940s could have produced, because it's all true.

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    Black Dahlia, Red Rose: The Crime, Corruption, and Cover-Up of America's Greatest Unsolved Murder [Book]  2017-12-22 18:0

    I don't know what to create of this book. As a fan of anything written about The Black Dahlia, I guess I am happy that another researcher has stepped forward to her ideas. On the other hand, I found the book confusing and not terribly persuasive. If Leslie Dillon did in fact commit this murder, I would expect him to have a history of violence toward women, and nothing of the kind is mentioned. The idea that Tag Hansen would mention to Dillon that he wanted Elizabeth Short disposed of, and Dillon took it upon himself to murder this young woman in the most bizarre method imaginable--I am not sure I search this believable.Elsewhere in the book, the author refers to the "unsolved murder of Johnny Stompanato." Did I read that correctly? Johnny Stompanato was murdered by Lana Turner's daughter, Cheryl Crane. I think that's well established, and would be common knowledge to anyone who has researched Hollywood history.I realize that Lana Turner's boyfriend has nothing to do with the Dahlia murder, but I search it troubling that the author seems to be so poorly informed. Maybe I read it wrong.

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    The Black Dahlia [Movie]  2017-10-13 21:47

    I have been pointing my gun at a lot of people this week. A box office failure and a neo-noir movie that confounded critics and fans alike, The Black Dahlia now appears to be a pic that has had its strengths ignored. As the clamour to kick Brian De Palma continues unabated to this day, and the point blank refusal to accept that Josh Hartnett is a better actor than the likes of Pearl Harbor suggests, it's a movie worthy of a revisit by genre/style fans alike. Plot revolves around the infamous murder of one Elizabeth Short in Hollywood, 1947. An aspiring actress who was found butchered and her murder to this day remains unsolved. De Palma and his writer Josh Friedman adapt from noir legend James Ellroy's novel of the same name, the crux of the story is about two hot-to-trot detectives who obtain involved in the Short case, and beautiful soon there is a can of worms that has been shaken and opened, and there's dizzying worms everywhere - we think? De Palma loves noir, he has dabbled with it for a long time, not all of it works, but often he delivers for like minded cinephiles. With expectation levels high and following in the slipstream of the critical darling that was L.A. Confidential, Black Dahlia never really had a hope of achieving its lofty ambitions, yet it's a tremendously realised picture from a noir stand point. Whilst it showcases the technical wizardry of the director. The charges of it being convoluted are fair, it's a spinning narrative, stories within stories, characterisations obtuse, but so was The Huge Sleep! I know, I know, this is not fit to lace the boots of Hawks' genius movie, but tricksy narratives have always been a fundamental part of a lot of a movie noir, so why the distaste for this one? Especially since the period design, costuming, styling, photography and characterisations are so rich in detail? For instance Hartnett's detective is gumshoe nirvana, while Scarlett Johansson and Hilary Swank fatale the femme with mischievous glee. But of course De Palma then spells it out for the finale, explaining things, a sort of macabre wrap up for those that required it. Either method he was never going to win, it's too complex, it didn't need spelling out, while Mr. De Palma we have to tell you that your characters have been too cold, we don't feel them?! Huh? This is noirville, a put frequented by poor people, idiots and hapless dreamers, of dupes and double crossers. Hell there's even a suggestion of necrophiliac tendencies in this, and that's before we even delve into the machinations of the two femme fatales, a family that's lacking Adams Family Values and coppers of dubious motives. Yeah, it's cold, and yes De Palma is guilty of trying to please all parties by covering all bases, but it's far from being a stinker. Haters of De Palma, Hartnett and complex noir narratives can knock two points off of my own private rating, otherwise it's 7/10.

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    Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America []  2020-1-19 22:8

    Being a student of history as well as a journalist, I found this book to be one of the best and most informative accounts for that not good summer in the history of American. It reveals a compelling story of how American blacks in a lot of southern communities who had returned from Globe Battle I, w were treated both by the American public as well as by the media, and a biased American President Woodrow Wilson. It should be a must read in schools across the nation in for students to keep a more complete understanding of the treatment of black people during that period.

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    Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America []  2020-1-19 22:8

    Wow. This book was powerful. Very well written. It was horribly depressing, but inspiring too. I feel like a lot of white Americans just don't obtain all the things that shape and influence the mindset and experiences of a lot of black Americans today. If you are someone who wonders why Black Lives Matter is a thing, please read this book. I want this book could be part of the public school, American history curriculum.

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    Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America []  2020-1-19 22:8

    A book that uncovers the what most people would think is a mythical event....Be prepared to be horrified because it all happened and is told in amazing detail.

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    Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America []  2020-1-19 22:8

    Shows the hate that was inflicted upon black Americans for no reason other than ignorance

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    Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America []  2020-1-19 22:8

    If you don’t understand blacks anger. Read this book you will.

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    Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America []  2020-1-19 22:8

    As a history major in college I was blown away by this book! I was never, in the 35 years of studying history, provided this info for review. Black Americans are angry, and white American's don't know why they're angry! I highly recommend this eye opening historical account. Even if you're not a history buff, this book will give you more insight than you've ever known about race relations in America.

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    Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America []  2020-1-19 22:8

    Amazing piece of literature/journalism. The author's position is clear, but at the same time impartial fact-wise. I had to read it for a class but will likely be recommending this book to others in the future.

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    Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America []  2020-1-19 22:8

    When the United States entered Globe Battle I nearly a century ago in April 1917, African-Americans, like Euro-Americans, either volunteered or were drafted en masse into the military in to create the globe safe for democracy. This task was especially ironic for African-Americans who had suffered from a host of de jure and de facto restrictions on their liberty (with only a brief and very partial respite during the Reconstruction Era of 1865-1877) since their emancipation from slavery at the end of the Civil War. Though most African-Americans were agricultural laborers without substantive civil rights as America entered the war, most of the young black men who went to battle hoped to prove their equality on the green fields of ven that the "progressive" President, southern-born Woodrow Wilson, had done much to segregate Federal institutions during his two terms and given that he believed D.W. Griffith's racist polemic, the movie BIRTH OF A NATION was "history written with lightning," and given that of the hundreds of thousands of men of color who were drafted only about 50,000 actually served in combat units, it was a sisyphean task. America, though, changed greatly during the war. A wartime labor shortage in the industrialized north led to the relocation of a million or more blacks from the rural old Confederacy to the urbanized Union states. Management's demands were met with increasing demands (and increasing collective organization) by Labor. Strikes broke out. These wartime strikes took on an ugly cast when the Russian proletariat overthrew the Russian aristocracy in late 1917 during the violent Russian Revolution. The American ruling class (though it would have denied its own existence by that name) chose to see any Labor unrest --- indeed any social unrest at all --- as part of the machinations of a perceived worldwide Bolshevik movement that had already caused chaos in Russia, Hungary, and Germany. The "Red Scare" was not synonymous with the "Red Summer" but the former informed the latter. Lastly, there was the devastating Spanish Flu pandemic of 1918-1919 which killed off then percent of the total human population on the planet in just six months.When black soldiers came home at war's end in 1918, they either chafed under the southern restrictions of Jim Crow (none of which had been impacted by the battle at all) or they chafed at the difficulty of finding gainful employment in a north whose postwar industries were suddenly scaling back and suddenly cutting wages in the face of a flood of returning (black and white) veterans seeking peacetime work. They said at the time that, "You can't hold them down on the farm after they've seen Gay Paree," and Americans' exposure to European culture threw the staid United States into an uproar. Fresh clothing styles, fresh roles for women, fresh modes of transportation, fresh media, and fresh melody were all to alter America forever in a very brief period of ven all this social foment, it is of small wonder that race became a flashpoint in America in 1919. Starting just as the winter thawed, a series of race riots, unprecedented in scope, in size, and in violence, swept across the United States, striking locales as diverse as Elaine, Arkansas, Chicago, Illinois, Washington, D.C., San Francisco, California, and Corbin, Kentucky. The Red Summer lasted into November of the year. Virtually every race riot that occurred was instigated by whites first attacking blacks. The number of killings is still unknown. The number of documented lynchings was 83, though the real number was much higher. Individual knifings and shootings were Cameron McWhirter tells us that the Red Summer began in mid-April in a small city called Carswell Grove, Georgia, when a well-off black farmer by the name of Joe Ruffin, who owned his own land, a tractor, his own home, and two cars, was involved in an altercation that left two white policemen and another black man dead. Exactly what happened is still unknown. Ruffin, known as a law-abiding sort, had to be hidden by the authorities lest he be lynched, and at the end of a protracted legal process during which he was condemned to hang, Ruffin was exonerated. However, all of Ruffin's property was destroyed and his family was either killed or fled the area.And so it went all year. Riots huge and little exploded over name-calling incidents, over unproveable rumors, over front-porch gossip, over even the choice of school colors between a black high school and a white high school. The riot in Washington, D.C. took put along Pennsylvania Avenue. President Wilson refused to say anything at all on the subject. The worst of the Red Summer violence erupted in the Mississippi Delta in the fall of 1919 where organized hunting parties of whites tracked blacks through the countryside like animals for weeks. The number of deaths in little Phillips County, Arkansas was estimated to be at least several hundred.White America refused to look at the riots. Officialdom, reinforced by journalists from otherwise responsible newspapers, blamed the unrest on labor agitators (primarily the despised I.W.W.) who had hoodwinked blacks into becoming Bolsheviks. In reality, few blacks were involved in Organized Labor which was strictly segregated. More often than not, white management caused labor unrest by using non-union black labor as scabs and strikebreakers. Still, the idea that "Negroes" were Communists gained currency among white critics. Attempts at passing anti-lynching bills inm Congress and in statehouses were stymied by racists and the stead of organizing among class lines, African-Americans chose to organize among color lines in 1919. The National Association For The Advancement of Colourful People (NAACP), a little organization founded primarily by white "do-gooders" in 1909 became a major locus of black expression during the Red Summer, watching its membership rise from some tens of thousands in the spring to hundreds of thousands by the fall. The NAACP quickly organized to protect the rights of accused blacks in the courts, and it became the basic platform for black self-expression in those bloody months of 1919.Other African-American organizations existed as well, though McWhirter mentions most of them only in passing. He does, however, present a particular animus toward Marcus Garvey and his "Back To Africa" UNIA movement, which (like the white-run "Colonization Societies of the 19th Century) advocated that American blacks establish a sovereign nation in Africa. Given the tortured history of Liberia and Sierra Leone, two such "colonized" nation-states, it's likely that Garvey's socialist-inspired plan would have been doomed to failure anyway, but McWhirter treats it as a total fraud from the outset. Garvey was eventually jailed on tax-evasion charges, but McWhirter doesn't tell us whether Garvey's conviction was n-Americans also turned to self-help during the riots. Choosing notr to cower, a lot of shot back and fought in the roads as white mobs tried to slay them. Sadly, official organs like the police, the military, and the nascent FBI almost always sided with whites during these battles. Still, the sense that blacks were not submitting passively to cruel fate acted as something of a brake on road violence during the latter half of the Red Summer. The Red Summer also saw the birth of jazz and of the Harlem Renaissance. The young men who came of age during the Red Summer were to influence the thinking of Martin Luther King Jr. and other leaders of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 1960s. It is one of the shortcomings of RED SUMMER that McWhirter skimps on tracing this evolution of ough it was born in blood, the kid of the Red Summer was a fresh form of activism and self-expression among African-Americans who would never again passively submit to abuse nor rely entirely on white allies to promote African-American Civil Rights. It is perhaps no coincidence that Jackie Robinson, destined to break the color barrier in Major League Baseball, was born in 1919 and that his family emigrated from rural Georgia to suburban Los Angeles within only a few months. The Robinsons' "hegira" (as the white papers labelled black relocation in that era) was part of the trends born out of the Red Summer.

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    Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America []  2020-1-19 22:8

    This is a really amazing book that everyone should read but the author's writing is like reading a calendar- e.g. "On this date ____ and two weeks later ___ which followed ____ on this date in a nearby town".

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    Red Summer: The Summer of 1919 and the Awakening of Black America []  2020-1-19 22:8

    Author Cameron McWhirter is an active news reporter. He does perfect interview and research. As subtitle says, " … 1919 and the Awakening of Black America," the story is a pre-Civil-Rights Movement. The perfect reference for this genre.

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    Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America []  2020-1-1 18:20

    A various take on modern day mass incarceration, Dr. Forman examines its beginnings with harsh minimum mandatory sentences for tough gun and drug laws in Washington DC, enacted and doubled down on by black police and lawmakers and largely supported by their goes deeper than that, though, and argued, that today's mass incarceration came about by a series of well intentioned laws and policies to combat drug and gun violence in America's urban zone said. Harsh laws we're not backed up by promises to examine and fix root causes, for of a lot of amazing reads to better understand the current state of our criminal justice system and the rod that led us here.

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    Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America []  2020-1-1 18:20

    An perfect perspective into the DC zone criminal justice system. Mr. Forman gives an in depth explanation of how a lot of African Americans obtain caught up into the system and stay stuck. But coming from an ex Public Defenders view point Mr. Forman also gives some meal for thought into some solutions to combat this epidemic.

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    Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America []  2020-1-1 18:20

    This is the best book about how we have came to have so a lot of young black men in jail and prison. The statistics are familiar but shocking - to take one as an example, roughly 30% of young black men that are high school dropouts are *currently* in jail or prison. That's a stunning failure for those men, of course, but it's a failure for the rest of our society as well. A lot of analysts point to white racism or the battle on drugs as the causes of that incarceration, and they're of course not totally wrong. But Forman's contribution is to point out incompleteness of that narrative, as the incarceration boom had complicated ere are two of those extra factors that Forman analyzes with special skill and detail. The first is the get-tough-on-crime stance taken by a lot of black politicians and civic leaders in the 1980s and 1990s, These were times when the crack epidemic wrought particular havoc in the black community in Washington, DC - on which Forman focuses - and which made a demand for get-tough policies by the black middle class that was disproportionately the victim of crack-fueled crime. The second is the trend towards pretextual searches of vehicles in Washington - Eric Holder's ver of Rudy Giuliani's stop-and-frisk - which was designed to reduce gun possession in DC. Those searches were deliberately executed with greater vigor in poor, black neighborhoods, and the effect was that a lot of not good blacks were arrested for minor drug offenses when officers found marijuana in their vehicles while looking for guns. It's a Greek tragedy, and it reminded me favorably of Randy Shilts' brilliant treatment of the AIDS epidemic in And The Band Played rman's background as a former public defender in DC is a amazing strength of the book, but it also makes the narrative somewhat DC-centric. Incarceration increased throughout the country - were the political and justice dynamics the same in Mississippi and Ohio, to take two examples, as they were in DC. That remains an begin question. The book is frustrating, too, in that Forman no simple cure for the problems. More drug treatment programs, more constructive diversion programs for youthful offenders, more nuanced reading of arrest records by current and prospective employers? Those would all be good, to be sure, but I left this book feeling that it would take these things, and at least a handful of similarly benign trends, before we will really obtain a handle on these problems. But it is to Forman's that he no silver bullet for the problems. Life is sadly frustrating at times.

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    Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America []  2020-1-1 18:20

    Very thought provoking book. Presented extensive historical facts as to the roots of strict sentencing for drug similar crimes and the unintended consequences of it on the black community decades later.

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    Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America []  2020-1-1 18:20

    This book stimulated my mind and broke my heart; then inspired me with a sliver of optimism. It carries the reader along through decades of incremental choices that led America to have the worlds biggest incarceration rate, disproportionately locking up not good black men. It has a few ideas for incrementally unwinding the damage. - Ruth Warren

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    Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America []  2020-1-1 18:20

    If you need to understand the causes of this horrific situation - you MUST READ THIS!!!I bought my own copy, and the factual research clarity here is SO GREAT - I will wish torefer back to this again and MUST READ THIS - unless you wish this tragedy to continue - for those of you whodo wish this - I suggest you ALSO MUST read this!! This is the penultimate counterpointto the propaganda which we've been force-fed for 50+ your mind and rise with your head held up - and see the striking difference betweenCLEAR - CONCISE - LOGIC - RATIONAL DEBATE - and humble consideration for all ofthe players in this tragedy. It's really superb documentation like no other.

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    Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America []  2020-1-1 18:20

    Living most of my life in a little town in rural America, I know small of inner town black American lives. I found this book to be very enlightening as I learned that through the past 40 years most people in the inner cities shared the same concerns of drug and gun violence as people in rural locations, and they resorted to related policies to protect their communities and their kids from the scourges of cocaine, heroin, and gangs. The book did not discover why rural locations (that are greater than 90 percent white ) apparently did not enact as punitive laws versus not good whites as inner town blacks did versus not good blacks. But I came away from reading this book that rural white attitudes toward drug and gun violence are similar. Though I have not come across related pleas in rural white America for leniency in criminal sentencing in selected cases, I think this author’s ideas have merit. This book is extraordinarily well researched and very readable. Perfect book!

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    Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America []  2020-1-1 18:20

    I liked reading this book but I had to push myself to [email protected]#$%!. While I definitely learned more about the failures of our penal system, the author chose to use so a lot of little (and seemingly unnecessary) examples that I found myself lost in the details. I would have appreciated more of an overview with several carefully chosen examples to obtain the point across.

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    Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America []  2020-1-1 18:20

    “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America” by James Forman is a brilliantly written, thoroughly annotated, and extremely valuable documentary. The author is unabashed in dealing with the ways in which the African American political establishment, especially in Washington, D.C. contributed to the anti-gun and anti-drug legislation which has led to the total imbalance in the current system of incarcerating young black males for outrageously long sentences for minimal offenses. In addition, of course, the laws originally passed to “fight crime” in urban environments have in fact led to the militarization of the police and the “warrior ethos” which results in the “shoot first”, “stop and frisk” and other manifestation of police brutality which abound in our culture. Although I already knew a lot about the situations and abuses, the well-organized and thoughtful method in which the author presents his info was extremely valuable. This is a book I highly recommend for anyone seriously interested in the current status of the United States Justice System.

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    Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America []  2020-1-1 18:20

    James Forman has done a masterful job documenting the political, social and criminal justice dynamics of the mass arrest and incarceration period, largely fueled by the crack cocaine epidemic. It’s a complex dynamic that he describes accurately and fairly. This book serves as an necessary corrective to some of today’s collective amnesia about how we got to the point where we are today with regard to policing and incarceration, and the disparate impact it has had on lower-class African American communities. Forman appropriately focuses on the strategic choices made—by police, prosecutors, judges, and political leaders—about how best to address the crack cocaine trafficking and attendant violence. A toxic combination of racial and class bias, political opportunism, genuine fear, and lack of imagination fueled the mass-arrest-and-incarceration strategy. It is to be hoped that we have learned lessons about the failures of that strategy, and that they will not be forgotten or ignored when future social issues show themselves. Police, prosecutors, and others must better appreciate that there are strategic choices to be created about how best to address public-safety problems, and that those choices have necessary implications for both effectiveness and fairness. Forman's book can support encourage police and prosecution leaders to be more adamant about deliberating these choices openly and honestly. I hope this book gets the attention it richly deserves.

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    The Color of Justice: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America []  2019-12-18 20:17

    I hated this book with a passion. The authors are super biased and use manipulative language to deceptively push their agenda. It's a college text though, so if your teacher chose it, you're beautiful much stuck. Just take all that crap with a huge grain of salt. If you are a college professor reading this, please choose a better book for your students.

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    The Color of Justice: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America []  2019-12-18 20:17

    Came in amazing condition

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    The Color of Justice: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America []  2019-12-18 20:17

    Amazing info in this work. Worth reading it.

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    The Color of Justice: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America []  2019-12-18 20:17

    I like the book overall, it has some very interesting info included in it, however, I search the book to be a small redundant in parts. Some sections could be much shorter with the exact same point given. There are LOTS of statistics in this book as well, which I would like to see less of. Overall though, it has met my expectations and is not a hard book to read and follow.

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    The Color of Justice: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America []  2019-12-18 20:17

    Book was for a class. Simple to read with alot of pertinent information

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    The Color of Justice: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America []  2019-12-18 20:17

    Excellent, detailed and comprehensive information.

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    The Color of Justice: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America []  2019-12-18 20:17

    GREAT BOOK

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    The Color of Justice: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America []  2019-12-18 20:17

    great

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    The Color of Justice: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America []  2019-12-18 20:17

    Book is beautiful worn out.

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    The Color of Justice: Race, Ethnicity, and Crime in America []  2019-12-18 20:17

    I liked the convenience. The book is for class.

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    Immigration and the Remaking of Black America []  2020-6-29 18:31

    Highly recommended!

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    Immigration and the Remaking of Black America []  2020-6-29 18:31

    Fantastically written and highly informative. Finally sheds the light on the ways in which disparities exist between native blacks and black immigrants, particularly how structural-level problems, not culture and not good attitudes, explain them. Thank you!

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: One of the Most Notorious Murders of the Twentieth Century . . . Solved! []  2020-1-1 18:19

    Warning: Non Fiction but still spoiler alert!!! Having read several books on the subject this was a very plausible case for his father having committed this murder and several others over a decade. He has amazing documentation and evidence to back this up and despite it being his father Mr. Hodel does his best to be a neutral party presenting facts as he found them during his investigation. Using the same skills he developed as a LAPD detective he finds the clues, digs for more info and presents the facts as he found them. He doesn't gloss over anything and doesn't apologize for anything along the way. When, finding fresh info that does not corroborate his previous deductions he doesn't hesitate to say he was wrong and provide the fresh information. The only reason I didn't like it more was he got bogged down at times with looking inside himself about how this created him feel. The rest of the book was such factual info and at no point did he ever really obtain into the why's of why his father committed these horrendous acts other than his cruel and jealous hero so having him be introspective about how all this created him feel without it being that type of book sort of seemed out of put with the fact based evidence he was presenting. I enjoyed the book and this is as amazing if not better than any other solution presented so far.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: One of the Most Notorious Murders of the Twentieth Century . . . Solved! []  2020-1-1 18:19

    I have really mixed feelings about this book. One tries to and is fascinated by the horror the author, a former detective, experienced when he first suspected that his own father was responsible for the murder and mutilation of the Black Dahlia. Te narrative seems to have been written by two people; the first which tells the tale and develops characters and leads the reader down an wonderful path, the other a detective filing a report that has all the entertainment value of watching paint dry. I found myself skipping over huge parts of the text as the facts were examined in min detail and then repeated later in the book. HOWEVER, I found the book a fascinating expose as to the depths of deceptions and debauchery that people can have living inside them. Finally, while I realize that the author's main interest is uncovering his father's ghastly crimes, he mentions several times the existence of a higher conspiracy to cover them up. The info of the conspiracy were never discussed much to my disappointment.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: One of the Most Notorious Murders of the Twentieth Century . . . Solved! []  2020-1-1 18:19

    The author has made a compelling case of circumstantial evidence to help his theory of Elizabeth Short's murderer's identity. Given the time period, the rampant corruption, and the fractured method the investigation was carried out, I think Steve Hodel's right, and how tragic is that for him. With that being said, this book could stand a amazing polish. Too often the author presents a piece of circumstantial evidence or a plausible theory which stands on its own, but then presents it as fact. Some pieces of evidence are fact, but the method they fit together remain theoretical. Hodel's frequent statement of conclusions as fact undermine the point he's y readers have pointed out the photographs Hodel claims were Elizabeth Short aren't, and post publication, the author has discovered the real identity of one. However, whether or not either of the photographs were Short is immaterial in the long run. They were the starting point for his investigation; it's the rest of the info he has uncovered that prove conclusive.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: The True Story []  2020-1-19 23:27

    A meticulously researched and extremely entertaining read by Steve Hodel, who explains the info (including nitty gritty police facts) in layman's terms so that his readers can easily absorb. Tons of vintage photographs (some never-before-seen) aid in telling his story. Not a whodunit but a why, how-and-wheredunit with a fascinating history weaved in. There are several genuinely creepy moments amid tons of real-life characters littered with a fascinating insight of the Los Angeles Police Department of the 1940s and 50s (and beyond). I hope this makes it to the huge screen (or a mini-series) as the right studio has a gem of a story here. Amazing actors and a amazing director who refuse to look at this material through rose-tinted glasses will have a field day! "Black Dahlia Avenger" is a true page-turner from begin to finish. Highly recommended reading - with the lights on!

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: The True Story []  2020-1-19 23:27

    Everyone has heard about the Black Dahlia case at some point in their life. And everyone knows how much of a mystery it has been. Now, that mystery is place to rest and everyone can finally obtain all the answers to this case. I don't think I've ever read a book that was so highly investigated and so much evidence and proof about who tortured and killed that not good woman so long ago. The author isn't only a retired detective, but the son of the man who is responsible for so a lot of deaths, including The Black Dahlia. I cannot imagine how difficult it must have been to explore such a horrible truth about your own father!! I can only hope that those families and mates who were effected by these deaths feel some closure because of all the hard work that Steve has done. I can't support but wonder what his dad's widow thought of this once it was created public, because it is never really covered in the book.I definitely recommend this book to anyone who has ever been intrigued by the Black Dahlia and to anyone who is a fan of real crime novels. This is indeed one of the absolute best I've ever read. I look forward to reading all of the other books that the author has written since this one. I recently saw a book that Steve wrote which connects his father to the Zodiac killings as well!! For someone who apparently killed over 30 people in just as a lot of years, I search it difficult to believe that he would just suddenly quit. So, I guess it is entirely possible that his father is indeed the Zodiac killer... I just have to read the book first. Regardless, Dr. George Hodel was a very evil man and, from what I just read, not exactly a candidate for father-of-the-year. I have a lot of respect for his son for having the courage to do all he did. Lord knows it had to be extremely difficult for him to come to grips with the truth. Perfect book.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: One of the Most Notorious Murders of the Twentieth Century . . . Solved! []  2020-1-1 18:19

    Whether you are a Police Homicide Detective or just a regular person, I can not imagine a worse case to be assigned than to investigate your own Father for an unsolved murder. Especially one that history is not eve Hodel, a retired LAPD detective does just this when his Father dies at the age of 91yrs, and Steve is given the only private thing not destroyed...Dr. George Hodel's image album. There are shocking pictures inside as well as familiar ones, but, none is more soul shattering to Steve than finding two pictures of The Black eve begins remembering his childhood and upbringing which was not orthodox by any terms. Constant drinking and parties occurred in the home he briefly shared on Franklin in Los Angeles. There was even a of Dr. George when his Half-Sister, Tamar accused him of incest.But, the Black Dahlia, why everyone knew about that case. Now it is sixty years later and I finally decided to read about it as Steve would have a perspective that other authors wouldn't. He knew the man, as well as anyone could, that remains is book was written as an investigation. Step by step, Steve takes us back in the days of the post-WWII world. It is also a time prior to penicillin and legalized abortion which led to corruption at times of the Police the ending, you will have been shocked, saddened, and wonder how this could have happened, but, Steve really presents his case...and in my opinion, solved the Black Dahlia and other murders of the time.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: One of the Most Notorious Murders of the Twentieth Century . . . Solved! []  2020-1-1 18:19

    This was a very interesting piece of work. I am an amateur sleuth. My mates have all decided not to watch mysteries with me, because I always solve them before they even have a clue. They all think that I should have been a detective instead of an audio/video engineer. I'll admit that I was a small skeptical about this book. I mean, somebody claims that they have solved a 70 year old murder seemed a small far-fetched. Especially when they claimed that their own father was the killer. But the more I read, the more the small pieces fell into place. I once read another real crime novel that said that a crime stage is like a jigsaw puzzle. But that some of the pieces were gone and other pieces didn't belong at all. But this was laid out in a logical, insightful order. As far as I'm concerned, the Black Dahlia case has been solved.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: One of the Most Notorious Murders of the Twentieth Century . . . Solved! []  2020-1-1 18:19

    Everyone has heard about the Black Dahlia case at some point in their life. And everyone knows how much of a mystery it has been. Now, that mystery is place to rest and everyone can finally obtain all the answers to this case. I don't think I've ever read a book that was so highly investigated and so much evidence and proof about who tortured and killed that not good woman so long ago. The author isn't only a retired detective, but the son of the man who is responsible for so a lot of deaths, including The Black Dahlia. I cannot imagine how difficult it must have been to explore such a horrible truth about your own father!! I can only hope that those families and mates who were effected by these deaths feel some closure because of all the hard work that Steve has done. I can't support but wonder what his dad's widow thought of this once it was created public, because it is never really covered in the book.I definitely recommend this book to anyone who has ever been intrigued by the Black Dahlia and to anyone who is a fan of real crime novels. This is indeed one of the absolute best I've ever read. I look forward to reading all of the other books that the author has written since this one. I recently saw a book that Steve wrote which connects his father to the Zodiac killings as well!! For someone who apparently killed over 30 people in just as a lot of years, I search it difficult to believe that he would just suddenly quit. So, I guess it is entirely possible that his father is indeed the Zodiac killer... I just have to read the book first. Regardless, Dr. George Hodel was a very evil man and, from what I just read, not exactly a candidate for father-of-the-year. I have a lot of respect for his son for having the courage to do all he did. Lord knows it had to be extremely difficult for him to come to grips with the truth. Perfect book.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: One of the Most Notorious Murders of the Twentieth Century . . . Solved! []  2020-1-1 18:19

    Black Dahlia Avenger: A Genius for Murder is a difficult book to rate. In the book, retired LAPD homicide detective, now personal investigator, Steve Hodel launches an investigation into the unsolved murder of the Black Dahlia. After his father passed away, Steve had the opportunity to look into one of his father’s private photography albums and discovered a picture in there of a woman he recognizes as the Black Dahlia. At first, he believes his father probably just met her at some point. Yet, he’s determined to search out more about the connection between his father and Elizabeth ever, the deeper he starts digging into the past, the more he comes to realize his father might be involved in the Dahlia’s murder. And not just in her murder, but in the murder of other young females must be horrible to search out your father is a murderer. Although I’m not one hundred percent convinced of Mr. Hodel’s guilt, I do feel sorry for Steve, and how it must create him feel. It must take courage and a unique kind of integrity to hold digging, though. Regardless, if George Hodel is the murderer of Elizabeth Short or not, he was not a loveable man – as the reader discovers through Steve’s recollections of the past, George Hodel was once place on for raping his own daughter, he was quite tyrannical, had four wives and over a dozen girlfriends, and was very much into ever, if that makes him the murderer of Elizabeth Short remains to be seen. The book is part memoir of Steve’s childhood with his father, his father’s life and the regarding his raping of his own daughter, and I thought I wouldn’t like those parts. However, I did like them. They’re writing with an simple flowing style, more so than the rest of the book, and George Hodel, despite being a rather cruel, self-absorbed man, does create an interesting person to read e evidence linking George Hodel to the Dahlia crime is circumstancial at best. At least, for the first 90% of the book. The handwriting analysis didn’t convince me (handwriting analysis has often been debunked, and I’m quite skeptical about it), nor did the military-watch near the crime stage that matched Hodel’s watch, and to be honest, I found most of the evidence rather flimsy.He also talks a lot about an LAPD cover-up. I skipped that chapter for the most part. For one, I don’t believe in cover-ups. They might happen, but they’re rare, and when someone isn’t convicted or even tried as a suspect, I choose to believe it’s because of lack of evidence rather than a cover-up. I search that it’s a sensationalized reaction given too often just for cases where there’s easy not enough evidence to do anything. The theory that George Hodel committed the crime with another man involved too, a mate of his, doesn’t persuade me either. Assassins are solitary beings, and the Dahlia murderer doesn’t strike me as the kind of murder you’d commit with two people – it seems the work of a solitary predator.Either way, by the end of the book I was nowhere near convinced. Then, however, comes some of the fresh evidence released by the LAPD, and what convinced me of the powerful chance of George Hodel’s guilt there was the phone conversation he had at some point at his home residence (the LAPD wired his house, they too considered him a powerful suspect). You don’t say those things unless you’re guilty. I don’t wish to give away more, in case you wish to read the book, but this convinced me at least of the powerful chance of George Hodel being the murderer of Elizabeth ever, I don’t follow Steve Hodel’s other claims in regards to the other murders. There’s simply not enough evidence to link Hodel to any of those cases. The cases don’t even have the same M.O. (victims differ too much in age, murder way differs a lot). What I can believe, is that Hodel killed Elizabeth Short – the link with sadism is rather evident, the staging of the body relates to surreal art, and Hodel was a fan of both surreal art, and of Marquis de Sade’s writing. Based on the LAPD-gathered evidence, combined with Steve Hodel’s claims, George Hodel seems a powerful suspect.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: The True Story []  2020-1-19 23:27

    Warning: Non Fiction but still spoiler alert!!! Having read several books on the subject this was a very plausible case for his father having committed this murder and several others over a decade. He has amazing documentation and evidence to back this up and despite it being his father Mr. Hodel does his best to be a neutral party presenting facts as he found them during his investigation. Using the same skills he developed as a LAPD detective he finds the clues, digs for more info and presents the facts as he found them. He doesn't gloss over anything and doesn't apologize for anything along the way. When, finding fresh info that does not corroborate his previous deductions he doesn't hesitate to say he was wrong and provide the fresh information. The only reason I didn't like it more was he got bogged down at times with looking inside himself about how this created him feel. The rest of the book was such factual info and at no point did he ever really obtain into the why's of why his father committed these horrendous acts other than his cruel and jealous hero so having him be introspective about how all this created him feel without it being that type of book sort of seemed out of put with the fact based evidence he was presenting. I enjoyed the book and this is as amazing if not better than any other solution presented so far.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: The True Story []  2020-1-19 23:27

    Black Dahlia Avenger: A Genius for Murder is a difficult book to rate. In the book, retired LAPD homicide detective, now personal investigator, Steve Hodel launches an investigation into the unsolved murder of the Black Dahlia. After his father passed away, Steve had the opportunity to look into one of his father’s private photography albums and discovered a picture in there of a woman he recognizes as the Black Dahlia. At first, he believes his father probably just met her at some point. Yet, he’s determined to search out more about the connection between his father and Elizabeth ever, the deeper he starts digging into the past, the more he comes to realize his father might be involved in the Dahlia’s murder. And not just in her murder, but in the murder of other young females must be horrible to search out your father is a murderer. Although I’m not one hundred percent convinced of Mr. Hodel’s guilt, I do feel sorry for Steve, and how it must create him feel. It must take courage and a unique kind of integrity to hold digging, though. Regardless, if George Hodel is the murderer of Elizabeth Short or not, he was not a loveable man – as the reader discovers through Steve’s recollections of the past, George Hodel was once place on for raping his own daughter, he was quite tyrannical, had four wives and over a dozen girlfriends, and was very much into ever, if that makes him the murderer of Elizabeth Short remains to be seen. The book is part memoir of Steve’s childhood with his father, his father’s life and the regarding his raping of his own daughter, and I thought I wouldn’t like those parts. However, I did like them. They’re writing with an simple flowing style, more so than the rest of the book, and George Hodel, despite being a rather cruel, self-absorbed man, does create an interesting person to read e evidence linking George Hodel to the Dahlia crime is circumstancial at best. At least, for the first 90% of the book. The handwriting analysis didn’t convince me (handwriting analysis has often been debunked, and I’m quite skeptical about it), nor did the military-watch near the crime stage that matched Hodel’s watch, and to be honest, I found most of the evidence rather flimsy.He also talks a lot about an LAPD cover-up. I skipped that chapter for the most part. For one, I don’t believe in cover-ups. They might happen, but they’re rare, and when someone isn’t convicted or even tried as a suspect, I choose to believe it’s because of lack of evidence rather than a cover-up. I search that it’s a sensationalized reaction given too often just for cases where there’s easy not enough evidence to do anything. The theory that George Hodel committed the crime with another man involved too, a mate of his, doesn’t persuade me either. Assassins are solitary beings, and the Dahlia murderer doesn’t strike me as the kind of murder you’d commit with two people – it seems the work of a solitary predator.Either way, by the end of the book I was nowhere near convinced. Then, however, comes some of the fresh evidence released by the LAPD, and what convinced me of the powerful chance of George Hodel’s guilt there was the phone conversation he had at some point at his home residence (the LAPD wired his house, they too considered him a powerful suspect). You don’t say those things unless you’re guilty. I don’t wish to give away more, in case you wish to read the book, but this convinced me at least of the powerful chance of George Hodel being the murderer of Elizabeth ever, I don’t follow Steve Hodel’s other claims in regards to the other murders. There’s simply not enough evidence to link Hodel to any of those cases. The cases don’t even have the same M.O. (victims differ too much in age, murder way differs a lot). What I can believe, is that Hodel killed Elizabeth Short – the link with sadism is rather evident, the staging of the body relates to surreal art, and Hodel was a fan of both surreal art, and of Marquis de Sade’s writing. Based on the LAPD-gathered evidence, combined with Steve Hodel’s claims, George Hodel seems a powerful suspect.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: The True Story []  2020-1-19 23:27

    Whether you are a Police Homicide Detective or just a regular person, I can not imagine a worse case to be assigned than to investigate your own Father for an unsolved murder. Especially one that history is not eve Hodel, a retired LAPD detective does just this when his Father dies at the age of 91yrs, and Steve is given the only private thing not destroyed...Dr. George Hodel's image album. There are shocking pictures inside as well as familiar ones, but, none is more soul shattering to Steve than finding two pictures of The Black eve begins remembering his childhood and upbringing which was not orthodox by any terms. Constant drinking and parties occurred in the home he briefly shared on Franklin in Los Angeles. There was even a of Dr. George when his Half-Sister, Tamar accused him of incest.But, the Black Dahlia, why everyone knew about that case. Now it is sixty years later and I finally decided to read about it as Steve would have a perspective that other authors wouldn't. He knew the man, as well as anyone could, that remains is book was written as an investigation. Step by step, Steve takes us back in the days of the post-WWII world. It is also a time prior to penicillin and legalized abortion which led to corruption at times of the Police the ending, you will have been shocked, saddened, and wonder how this could have happened, but, Steve really presents his case...and in my opinion, solved the Black Dahlia and other murders of the time.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: The True Story []  2020-1-19 23:27

    I thought the book was overall quite interesting. I think that there are locations where the author is grasping at straws, like analysing the painting by Modesto and wondering if the sperm-like objects in various colors represents Hodel Sr. & Sexton (which I will admit, I don't see any sperm or reproductive organs in the painting like the author claims). There were times that evidence felt like it was being repeated much more than necessary.Overall, it was a amazing read but the amount of blatant spelling errors and grammatical mistakes were ridiculous. Given the of the book, it should have been edited much better than what it was.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: The True Story []  2020-1-19 23:27

    I have really mixed feelings about this book. One tries to and is fascinated by the horror the author, a former detective, experienced when he first suspected that his own father was responsible for the murder and mutilation of the Black Dahlia. Te narrative seems to have been written by two people; the first which tells the tale and develops characters and leads the reader down an wonderful path, the other a detective filing a report that has all the entertainment value of watching paint dry. I found myself skipping over huge parts of the text as the facts were examined in min detail and then repeated later in the book. HOWEVER, I found the book a fascinating expose as to the depths of deceptions and debauchery that people can have living inside them. Finally, while I realize that the author's main interest is uncovering his father's ghastly crimes, he mentions several times the existence of a higher conspiracy to cover them up. The info of the conspiracy were never discussed much to my disappointment.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: One of the Most Notorious Murders of the Twentieth Century . . . Solved! []  2020-1-1 18:19

    Okay, the first issue with this book is that the author's suspicions are based on finding a photograph that is clearly NOT of Elizabeth Smart. I have done a fair amount of research on this case and it seems to me that the author desperately wants to THINK his father was the assassin and will grasp at any straw to test to "prove" this idea. Unless you have fun reading about sickening graphic violence and moral depravity just for the heck of it, I'd skip this one.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: One of the Most Notorious Murders of the Twentieth Century . . . Solved! []  2020-1-1 18:19

    I thought the book was overall quite interesting. I think that there are locations where the author is grasping at straws, like analysing the painting by Modesto and wondering if the sperm-like objects in various colors represents Hodel Sr. & Sexton (which I will admit, I don't see any sperm or reproductive organs in the painting like the author claims). There were times that evidence felt like it was being repeated much more than necessary.Overall, it was a amazing read but the amount of blatant spelling errors and grammatical mistakes were ridiculous. Given the of the book, it should have been edited much better than what it was.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: One of the Most Notorious Murders of the Twentieth Century . . . Solved! []  2020-1-1 18:19

    A meticulously researched and extremely entertaining read by Steve Hodel, who explains the info (including nitty gritty police facts) in layman's terms so that his readers can easily absorb. Tons of vintage photographs (some never-before-seen) aid in telling his story. Not a whodunit but a why, how-and-wheredunit with a fascinating history weaved in. There are several genuinely creepy moments amid tons of real-life characters littered with a fascinating insight of the Los Angeles Police Department of the 1940s and 50s (and beyond). I hope this makes it to the huge screen (or a mini-series) as the right studio has a gem of a story here. Amazing actors and a amazing director who refuse to look at this material through rose-tinted glasses will have a field day! "Black Dahlia Avenger" is a true page-turner from begin to finish. Highly recommended reading - with the lights on!

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: The True Story []  2020-1-19 23:27

    Okay, the first issue with this book is that the author's suspicions are based on finding a photograph that is clearly NOT of Elizabeth Smart. I have done a fair amount of research on this case and it seems to me that the author desperately wants to THINK his father was the assassin and will grasp at any straw to test to "prove" this idea. Unless you have fun reading about sickening graphic violence and moral depravity just for the heck of it, I'd skip this one.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: The True Story []  2020-1-19 23:27

    This was a very interesting piece of work. I am an amateur sleuth. My mates have all decided not to watch mysteries with me, because I always solve them before they even have a clue. They all think that I should have been a detective instead of an audio/video engineer. I'll admit that I was a small skeptical about this book. I mean, somebody claims that they have solved a 70 year old murder seemed a small far-fetched. Especially when they claimed that their own father was the killer. But the more I read, the more the small pieces fell into place. I once read another real crime novel that said that a crime stage is like a jigsaw puzzle. But that some of the pieces were gone and other pieces didn't belong at all. But this was laid out in a logical, insightful order. As far as I'm concerned, the Black Dahlia case has been solved.

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    Black Dahlia Avenger: The True Story []  2020-1-19 23:27

    The author has made a compelling case of circumstantial evidence to help his theory of Elizabeth Short's murderer's identity. Given the time period, the rampant corruption, and the fractured method the investigation was carried out, I think Steve Hodel's right, and how tragic is that for him. With that being said, this book could stand a amazing polish. Too often the author presents a piece of circumstantial evidence or a plausible theory which stands on its own, but then presents it as fact. Some pieces of evidence are fact, but the method they fit together remain theoretical. Hodel's frequent statement of conclusions as fact undermine the point he's y readers have pointed out the photographs Hodel claims were Elizabeth Short aren't, and post publication, the author has discovered the real identity of one. However, whether or not either of the photographs were Short is immaterial in the long run. They were the starting point for his investigation; it's the rest of the info he has uncovered that prove conclusive.

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    Sexual Sabotage: How One Mad Scientist Unleashed a Plague of Corruption and Contagion on America []  2020-5-6 18:15

    If this book is even 50% accurate we have been the victims of a tragic case of following a corrupt leader. Based upon this book and other info regarding Kinsey I tend to suspect that this book is far more than 50% nsey claimed to be a legitimate researcher, objectively studying behavior. From a number of sources the picture is painted of a researcher that was sexually abusive to himself and others. Kinsey's objectivity is questionable if, indeed, he was addicted and trying to normalize his own behavior through his work.Judith Reisman words are worthwhile and obviously spoken from sincerity. She pulls no punches and says what needs to be said. I'm surprised by how much even my own values have been swayed over the years but reading this book is a major reality check. Everything she said rings real to my experience. When I was a child, my elders, not just within the family, but those I encountered in school or daily life, were sexually very conservative. The Greatest Generation that she speaks about were, at least in my estimation, very down to earth and had high standards. In line with what she said in her book, the disease rates and teen pregnancy rates bear this out. Kinsey tried to paint a various picture and thereby created that Greatest Generation look like hypocrites.I think it comes down to revisionism for the benefit of "normalizing" his own behavior. My generation was more likely to be sexually active as teens than my parent's generation but it was still relatively uncommon and anyone that dared test was unlikely to be worried about STDs; they were effectively non-existent in our age group. If my generation was thusly restrained the WW II generation could only have been even more st people coming of age in our day never learn any degree of self-control and this is an absolute necessity within a long term relationship. A lot of men these days can't even imagine a few month's celibacy when their wife in in the late stages of pregnancy or directly after childbirth. I can't imagine my father or either of my grandfathers demanding a hall pass to cope with such a situation, yet that is not unknown in our adays techniques are published in women's magazines sold at the checkout line of the supermarket. One could easily obtain the impression that satisfaction requires years of study and practice to achieve, but the generations before ours didn't see things this way. I see it all as a mosaic of social pressures that have moved couples away from intimacy and love and in the direction of maximizing sensation instead. No one can live on cake alone, but some of these relationships are trying to survive on the icing, not to mention the cake. The emotional nutrition of intimacy doesn't seem to be on a lot of people's radar ual Sabotage, IMO, hits it on the head. Things have changed drastically in the latest 60 years or so and Kinsey's misleading research has been a huge part of it. There's much more freedom, but I don't think that there's all that much satisfaction. I was taken in by it to some degree, in spite of a powerful moral background. But, even before reading this book I've noticed that some people seem to believe that they must live up to the mantra of the revolution, even though it has not yielded positive results in their lives. You can almost see it when they speak, as they mentally review their thoughts before speaking lest they accidentally go contrary to the social norm as they perceive my opinion, we have been sold a bill of goods regarding and Dr. Reisman's book helps to explain this. There may be more freedom today, but there is also more divorce, more disease and more people without a mate, living from encounter to encounter. Kudos to Dr. Reisman for standing versus the tide and exposing Kinsey for what he truly was.Highly recommended if you search the current social climate distressing for its lack of morality.

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    Sexual Sabotage: How One Mad Scientist Unleashed a Plague of Corruption and Contagion on America []  2020-5-6 18:15

    I really want this book was on the best seller's list...

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    Sexual Sabotage: How One Mad Scientist Unleashed a Plague of Corruption and Contagion on America []  2020-5-6 18:15

    It is a unbelievable and very useful book

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    Sexual Sabotage: How One Mad Scientist Unleashed a Plague of Corruption and Contagion on America []  2020-5-6 18:15

    Took a small longer than I expected, but in amazing condition, as described.

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    Sexual Sabotage: How One Mad Scientist Unleashed a Plague of Corruption and Contagion on America []  2020-5-6 18:15

    Necessary notice about the Kinsey studies that were based on falsified and unethical research. My only complaint is that sometimes the author's writing can turn polemical (even though she is absolutely correct in her assessment of the data!).

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    The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America []  2020-6-10 20:54

    Khalil Gibran Muhammad has written a masterpiece to display how America worked to paint African Americans and their communities as criminal. For those interested in the history of the Fresh Jim Crow, this is a must read. For those who long heard African Americans under preformed their immigrant counterparts in pursuing the American dream, this is a must read. Muhammad has dealt a blow to one of America's most cherished racial myths.

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    The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America []  2020-6-10 20:54

    The Condemnation of Blackness is a painstakingly researched narrative on the formation of social policy in the urban north rooted in a double-standard applied to African-Americans as opposed to immigrants of European descent, which attributed challenges faced by African Americans to their so-called innate traits to the exclusion of other factors such as employment opportunities, educational disparities and housing segregation rooted in racism. Khalil Muhammad presents a compelling discourse on the historical roots of this policy which appeared to rely more on the racial bias of its progenitors than careful analysis of the other factors contributing to then-named "Negro Problem". Dr. Muhammad's assessment beginning from the 1890 census, the inception of the Progressive Era , through the 1940s, is rooted in factual presentation of the ideas and to a certain extent the biases of the influencers of social policy with respect to African Americans. He highlights the extent to which effort was created to integrate foreign-born immigrants into society while simultaneously excluding black Americans, often rationalizing such behavior by attributing the "waste" in investing resources such as education in African Americans. These same framers of public policy decreed that the challenges of urban life for European immigrants could be addressed through social intervention, placing the blame for rampant crime, unemployment and out of wedlock births on the inherent ills of overcrowded metropolises such as Fresh York, Chicago, and Philadelphia as a effect of mass migrations to these population hubs. Interestingly, Professor Muhammad points out the fact that those same conditions existed in huge cities in Europe from which the immigrants originated without those related patterns of migration, though no policy formers took the leap of thought that these immigrants brought these issues with them. Considering the large-scale criminalization of African Americans in northern urban areas, the eventual concentration of white criminal activity in predominantly black areas, the exclusion of black Americans from access to social services and education, it is a testament to strength of hero of these individuals who were able to survive (and in subsequent generations thrive) in such an openly hostile environment. The author carefully and accurately links the roots of the current problems urban locations face today, particularly in regards to crime, with the policies set in put in the 19th century. The Condemnation of Blackness is a must read for anyone who is interested in the roots of the problem of disproportionately high incarceration rates of African Americans and for those who seek understanding of this problem through the lens of critical analysis of data rather than merely using data to implement flawed decision making . In this sense, The Condemnation of Blackness serves as both a sociological study as well as a historical reference.

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    Sexual Sabotage: How One Mad Scientist Unleashed a Plague of Corruption and Contagion on America []  2020-5-6 18:15

    The author presents a amazing of painstaking detail concerning this issue. I found the book very revealing and full of useful facts. The facts and truth must prevail.

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    The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America []  2020-6-10 20:54

    This is an insightful book that lays out how white crime has been seen as a call for social/economic reform while black crime was read as evidence of racial inferiority. These judgments -- and the actions that flowed from them -- have powerfully shaped our nation.

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    The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America []  2020-6-10 20:54

    Muhammad's book goes a long method in explaining groups like Black Lives Matter. Muhammad's "Condemnation" argues that while white criminals are seen as "temporary" and therefore "reversible;" black criminals, and black crime is seen as DNA related, and therefore, not "reversible." The thing police and white civilians can do is " shoot at it."

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    The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America []  2020-6-10 20:54

    Excellent.

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    The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America []  2020-6-10 20:54

    Perfect historical detail focusing mostly on the "progressive" side of social science and social reformers 1880-1920, showing that white reformers saw the crime rates of white immigrants as a reason to provide social programs and education to uplift them, but saw comparable crime rates among blacks as being due to their race and a justification for segregation and discrimination. The history of sociology and social statistics is very useful. There is also amazing coverage of black scholars and reformers, who were more likely to view black crime the method whites viewed white crime, i.e. as a true issue that was best dealt with by social programs, but black reformers never had the resources white reformers had, and white reformers often refused to support needy black people. Also discussion of the ways in which whites used black writing about crime issues as a justification for their (whites') anti-black all sounds eerily contemporary, and helps to locate today's discussions in a long historical context.

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    The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America []  2020-6-10 20:54

    One of the best books I’ve ever read. It was assigned for my doctoral course and I ended up reading it 2 more times since I originally purchased it.

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    The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America []  2020-6-10 20:54

    I'm a huge enthusiast for history books that inform the show by examining the past. This is such a book! I was grabbed right from the introduction, on page 1, when the question is asked, "How was the statistical link between blackness and criminality initially forged?" A lot of ignore or are ill-informed about such a link. You hear today a lot of talk about "black-on-black" crime. Once you understand the history of linking blackness to criminality, and this book will cement that comprehension you will no longer, or SHOULD no longer engage in the ever so famous conversation of "black criminality."You will hear black commentators weighing in on the black criminal problem, and often use the same refrains that whites used in the 1920's and 30's. The author notes, '"the numbers speak for themselves" was one frequent refrain, followed by "I am not a racist."' So, Khalil Muhammad does an perfect job of getting to the root of black crime rhetoric using anecdotal history along with evidence of the evolution of crime reporting and statistics. Often, people think verbiage and concepts come out of a vacuum, that is why this book is important, it debunks that nonsense.If you wish to be informed about how Blacks came to be condemned concerning the problem of criminality, then this is a must read. If you wish to engage and challenge the "intelligent" pundits, do not hesitate in purchasing this thorough volume. It really illuminates the players in the drama of creating the idea of the black criminal.

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    The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America []  2020-6-10 20:54

    Amazing historical read - learned an abundance of facts concerning the deep-seated racism within most Americans - We were intentionally groomed and unfortunately we don't recognize it in ourselves due to the powers of our own unconscious, but here is the history in black and white. This info should be included in our history books and needed reading for all politicians, legal specialists and others in power.

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    The Condemnation of Blackness: Race, Crime, and the Making of Modern Urban America []  2020-6-10 20:54

    I purchased this for my husband.

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    Sexual Sabotage: How One Mad Scientist Unleashed a Plague of Corruption and Contagion on America []  2020-5-6 18:15

    I always suspected that the true and unknown Alfred Kinsey was a real monster! But, never to the extent that this book examined, exposed, and revealed. It’s a true eye opener!Of course, the majority of people who accepted/swallowed (no pun intended) Kinsey and Co’s. so-called research that appeared at the end of the 40s and early 50s of the latest Century (the published books) were never told or knew of the hidden and never revealed aspect of Alfred Kinsey’s and the Kinsey Institute’s true and real aim: the advancement and promotion of pedophilia, zoophilia/bestiality, necrophilia, and every other evil, aberration, and degeneracy known to humankind.And, it should come as no surprise to the discerning few in the globe that, Kinsey’s largest benefactor/patron was none other than the Rockefeller Foundation. That the ruling elite of the globe (of the past/present/future) would love nothing better than to make a cesspool of living @#$% for the stupid masses of people to eat, absorb, and believe in, is proven and self-evident by the rubbish propaganda/agenda that is in existence and promoted in this very , as insightful and meticulous as Dr. Reisman’s research/compilation of this material was, I have to chastise her on her naïve or intentional glorification of her own generation, which I found to be both ironic and hypocritical. As nice or saintly as Dr. Reisman imagines or thinks her generation to be, the evidence proves otherwise. I’m of course referring to the battles of unprecedented scale that were unleashed during her generation and the generations prior (WWI 1914 -1918 and WWII 1939 – 1945). Her generation dropped the atomic bomb on a human population (the Japanese) not once, but twice. How about the Cold War, the Korean war, Vietnam, etc., etc. that killed and displaced millions of innocent souls throughout the world. No, Dr. Reisman your generation was not that different, whether you believe it or not!Now having said that, I wouldn’t say that all of the people that were involved and participated in these atrocities/wars were evil but, more than likely naïve and ignorant just like the people of today. No generation before or since, has been of evil and injustice to his fellow human beings and other living things for that matter. However, the globe of humankind will continue with its downward slide in the foreseeable future, but there will be a better day, whether one believes or not.Overall, this was an excellent, concise, and insightful report of Kinsey and Co’s. false and depraved ideas, beliefs, concepts, and notions. I'm very begin minded and accepting of other’s ideas/beliefs, orientation, etc., as the saying goes; to each his ever, I don’t care if I’m the latest man on Earth who thinks this way, but to my dying days and nothing will ever change my mind or position on the following: to sleep or have relations with children, animals, or cadavers/corpses is pure evil and runs counter to everything the human spirit and soul represents, it is the greatest of abominations this globe has ever known. God support us all! (BTW: the material in this book is not for the faint hearted. It will create a lot of sick to their stomachs, very, very angry, and rightfully so!)Love and Peace,Carlos Romero

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    Sexual Sabotage: How One Mad Scientist Unleashed a Plague of Corruption and Contagion on America []  2020-5-6 18:15

    The underlying notice of this book -- the unquestionable ill result of Kinsey and his gaggle of perverts on America -- is clear and well-substantiated. Unfortunately, organization is a bit odd and there is considerable repetition. Reisman is a vital balancy to the insanity of the Kinsey "revolution" but there are shorter summary books that likely are more helpful for casual or less academic readers.

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    Sexual Sabotage: How One Mad Scientist Unleashed a Plague of Corruption and Contagion on America []  2020-5-6 18:15

    I just kept thinking while I was reading how susceptible humanity has been historically to Kinsey and people like him (Hitler)...I bought this book because at 50 years old and as someone who has worked in the mental health field for the latest 20 years I am appalled at the rise in disease, dysfunction and despair in this society especially among children. This book went a long method in helping me to understand. I am less concerned with a writer's credentials (something which Amazon reviewers seem to be obsessed with) as I am with whether or not the notice rings true. The notice of this book rings real to me. I would have given the book 5 stars but I found it to be repetitive and not particularly well written in some parts.

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    Sexual Sabotage: How One Mad Scientist Unleashed a Plague of Corruption and Contagion on America []  2020-5-6 18:15

    Who knew.

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    The Helpers: An International Tale of Espionage and Corruption []  2020-1-24 20:22

    At 451 pages, this is not a one afternoon beach read. The Helpers: An international tale of Espionage and Corruption by S.E. Nelson is a meaty novel featuring murder, intrigue, corruption, romance, and suspense. Set in Congo, a notorious put of nearly constant unrest and violence, The Helpers are a strong underground group trying to maintain control of the natural resources of the country. An American journalist arrives to document the resistance and finds herself in immeasurable danger when she uncovers multiple levels of corruption including a brutal lson has a writing style that is direct, which is excellent for this kind of story. The suspense and underlying danger of the plot demands that but beyond the assertiveness of the work, there is a tenderness underlying everything. That softness is where the reader finds the room to care about these characters and what happens to them. Some may call this dark topic matter but I found a hopefulness about it.

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    The Helpers: An International Tale of Espionage and Corruption []  2020-1-24 20:22

    If you are going to give me a story of espionage and intrigue in a war-torn nation, give me the amazing stuff. Don't give me stereotypes and archetypes with no soul. The Helpers did deliver and to me, they delivered strong. Perhaps, the one thing that I was not sure about was how quick Jenny Osborne and John Spencer were able to uncover the ever, after realizing that Jenny is a journalist that will stop at nothing, then it all created sense. Now, of course, the Helpers will be after her. But the story does not end there. It has this kind of documentary feel. I believe this is because it takes put in Congo and you can tell that the country's history and show have been well-researched. Place in the thrill and the action and you got yourself a dense story of espionage.

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    Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence, and the Poverty of Nations []  2020-5-6 18:15

    Great.

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    The Helpers: An International Tale of Espionage and Corruption []  2020-1-24 20:22

    Congo has been drowning in conflict for decades, and now it appears is no different. However, when pulling back the veil, what appears on the surface is a very various case behind the scenes. That being those individuals of an underground strong organization, including international businessmen and high ranking priests, who are making it their goal to maintain a keep Congo’s natural resources. But when an American journalist arrives in the Congo, along with her photojournalist, to report on the current rebel situation, they too learn all is not what it S.E. Nelson takes his knowledge of this remote region of Africa, along with the mingling of his very vivid characters, and drops the reader into a storyline that will hold them on the edge of their seats. The descriptions of the landscape are so vivid, you would swear you were there experiencing the happenings yourself. His characters have such depth that they leap off the page and propel the reading along on this journey of both espionage and corruption. You will not wish to miss this newest addition to his line of books—if you do you will kick yourself later.

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    The Helpers: An International Tale of Espionage and Corruption []  2020-1-24 20:22

    “The Helpers” by S.E. Nelson is, indeed, as the full title says, a tale of espionage and corruption throughout multiple countries. If you love spy stories full of intrigue and murder, this is the book for you. The reader is taken all the method to Congo, where rebels are ready to overthrow the government. But “The Helpers” in the background are there to ensure that an elite group of underground higher-ups retain control of the major aspects of the country’s financial and political dealings. However, Jenny Osborne, our reporter heroine, and her partner, John Spencer, search out when they come to interview some rebels that there’s more going on than meets the eye. A local girl, Kai, turns to Jenny for support with some beautiful deep and deadly secrets, and suddenly the plot and story becomes full of action as Jenny has to avoid “The Helpers” and hold herself safe long enough to uncover what’s really going on and support Kai. It’s fast-paced, engaging story that is just true enough to be scary.

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    The Helpers: An International Tale of Espionage and Corruption []  2020-1-24 20:22

    I have some familiarity with Congolese history, and when I found this book, I eagerly dived into it. I was not disappointed. This perfect novel by S.E. Nelson blends history and fiction into this highly readable narrative. It has all of the trademarks of a real thriller: suspense, plenty of action, and a fast pace that never lets up until the final pages.With a cast of both likeable protagonists and sinister villains, Nelson brings to life a plot rooted in colonial politics and history. As a mysterious group known as “The Helpers” threaten peace talks between the Congolese government and rebels, our cast of characters including an American journalist and French intelligence struggle to untangle the threads of the web thrown by the Helpers. It seems like a fruitless endeavor, but they really have no choice. Will our intrepid characters search what they’re looking for? How will the situation resolve?This was a rare book that had me hooked from the beginning. S.E. Nelson’s writing is to-the-point and doesn’t come with a lot of fluff. I appreciated that. There was enough detail to make the globe but not enough to detract. The prose was smooth, jarring at times, but overall it was an immensely satisfying experience.

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    Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence, and the Poverty of Nations []  2020-5-6 18:15

    OK but not great,

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    Seven Graves One Winter: Politics, Murder, and Corruption in the Arctic (Greenland Crime Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:25

    I highly recommend this book if you love mysteries the method I do. Writing excellent. Plot and story excellent. Hero development excellent. Interesting facts about life in Greenland.

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    Seven Graves One Winter: Politics, Murder, and Corruption in the Arctic (Greenland Crime Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:25

    I thoroughly have fun Christoffers writing. I love Maraste, Petra and Fenna. I am working my method through all the books. Thank you for writing such unbelievable stories. I love them all!

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    Seven Graves One Winter: Politics, Murder, and Corruption in the Arctic (Greenland Crime Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:25

    AT AGE 69; THIS AVID READER HAS STRUCK GOLD! THE CHRISTOFFER PETERSEN CRIME DRAMAS/ STORIES OF ARCTIC NOIR ARE SET AGAINST THE BACKDROP OF GORGEOUS FROZEN GREENLANDARE AND ARE THE BEST I HAVE EVER READ. THIS AUTHOR IS NO POSER! HE KNOWS THE SNAPPING HARSH REALITY OF HIS SUBJECT MATTER INTIMATELY. FROM THE HANDLING OF SLEDGE DOG TEAMS AND THE SHIMMER AND HUE OF ARCTIC NIGHT TO THE CLOSE, RESPECTFUL CONTACT OF GREENLANDERS IN FISHING VILLAGES OF 52; IMPOSSIBLY ISOLATED TO US; YET A PEOPLE SECURE IN SELF SUFFICIENT FREEDOM --- THIS AUTHOR HAS SO NAILED IT!!!AND YOU WILL LOVE HIS CHARACTERS … THIS IS WRITING WHICH SUCEEDS IN EVERY WAY WHERE SETTING AND SUBJECT MATTER DERERVES NO COUNTERFIT!MR. PETERSEN: THANK YOU SO VERY MUCH! LOOKING FORWARD TO READING EVERTHING YOU HAVE DONE!

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    Seven Graves One Winter: Politics, Murder, and Corruption in the Arctic (Greenland Crime Book 1) []  2020-1-22 19:25

    THis author also wrote the Greenland Trilogy, Which is also a amazing read.

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    The Helpers: An International Tale of Espionage and Corruption []  2020-1-24 20:22

    The book The Helpers: An International Tale of Espionage and Corruption by S.E. Nelson, spy thrillers a mix of spies and spy craft’, bombs, intrigue, murder in high places; insurrection, and an engaging plot that keeps the reader riveted to its e story takes put in the Democratic Republic of Congo where a huge push by rebels versus the Government is imminent. These are the bedrock of the story, but there is another, much more strong group in the background, known as “The Helpers”. The Helpers is an underground organization whose members are to be found in business, economy, military, and politics all over the world. Their key objective is control, in the case of the Congo full control the country’s natural resources, by every means ing the android game are: Jenny Osborne, American, a bold and somewhat aggressive American journalist, and her photographer colleague, John Spencer -they initially wished to interview government officials and the rebels. They soon obtain entangled when they explore that a huge WMD was imported earlier into Kinshasa from South Africa. The French Intelligence - Pierre-Jean Phillip, and a veteran master spy, Lance Lemmand, think the Helpers are involved and point their investigations in that direction When Kai, a local schoolgirl, held captive and abused by a Helper assassin, gives Jenny info that threatens the Helpers, this, in the Helpers’ view, is a death wish. Soon danger lies at every corner, room and street. All become hunted by killers and goons inside and outside of the e true excitement is in the details. These contain what one would expect of a spy thriller: summed up in the words – close calls; suspense; and excitement… and a bit of romance. In the end as the Helpers seek to gain back their put in the Congo, identifying their next choice for a fresh President of Congo/Kinshasa. One gets the impression that the country, and Jenny and Pierre/Lance may have won the battle, but the battle was not yet ended as a fresh killer sits e story opened the globe of official/unofficial spies; cocktail parties where info is shared; and the collaboration between foreign Governments in a colonial/post-colonial age. One almost hidden jewel of info explains why the UN cannot enforce solutions on crisis situations in its Member countries. The book also highlights the involvement of unseen persons (beside ex-colonizers) in controlling the Government and politics of ex-colonies. The Helpers’ reminds us of what we hear of the ‘Illuminati’, a clandestine group said to be controlling the stability or lack thereof in today’s world.A riveting read, quick paced and full of action….

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    The Helpers: An International Tale of Espionage and Corruption []  2020-1-24 20:22

    The Congo in Africa holds vast amounts of natural resources, but the destabilizing forces that have reigned in the zone create it impossible to extract any of it safely. In this espionage novel, the author imagines us a secret organization called “The Helpers” reminiscent of the fabled Illuminati. With its fingers in every aspect of life, it is hard to escape them as Lance Lemmand soon finds out. A retired French intelligence officer, he suspects the helpers of pushing the current round of political unrest. Jenny, a photojournalist is soon drawn into things when she gets a secret is novel was high wired, quick paced and I had to attention to all the twists and turns the plot takes. The characters had amazing development as did the worldbuilding. I’ve never been to the Congo, but I can now imagine myself there. The villains were not cheesy and all to believable.

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    Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence, and the Poverty of Nations []  2020-5-6 18:15

    This book should obtain an award for the most misleading title of the year. It is a beach ball approach to global corruption and should be read with milk and cookies on the side of the pool. Chapter 2 "SUHARTO" (one of the most corrupt regimes and battle criminals of the 20th century, mind you); is completely negligent on the points of authentic history. The attitude presented can be summed up by a two line quote from page 39. "Corruption in Suharto's Indonesia wasn't some petty shakedown by underpaid policemen or labor inspectors trying to create ends meet. It was huge business." If you are doing serious research, that is the type of insight you can expect from the entire book. If you are looking for real leads in the globe of black shop politics and dirty pools; don't waste your time here. The only thing more misleading than the title are the 'pre-release' editorial reviews loaded with praises that are carefully crafted to a book that fails to rise to any level of competency.

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    Economic Gangsters: Corruption, Violence, and the Poverty of Nations []  2020-5-6 18:15

    This book is a useful addition to other books examining the development question. In addition to takes head on the problems of corruption and violence which can lay waste to the best laid plans. The correlation between the weather and violence is interesting but when seen versus the more harsher climes of the north shouldn't the African be able to adapt and thrive? With corruption isn't it that our elite have small to no experience in wealth creation and therefore see corruption as means to an end beyond just greed?The find continues. But I am more than glad to have happened on this offering.

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