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    Both of Us: My Life with Farrah review [Book]  2018-1-28 18:0

    Amazing book. I couldn't place it down. But I have always love Farrah.

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    Both of Us: My Life with Farrah review [Book]  2018-1-28 18:0

    Such a poignant and well written book. I feel as though I'm sitting across from the author while he speaks.

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    Both of Us: My Life with Farrah review [Book]  2018-1-28 18:0

    Amazing

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    Both of Us: My Life with Farrah review [Book]  2018-1-28 18:0

    Perfect reading of much fresh information..this family has had enough suffering. I pray that their son Redmond will search peace an happiness

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    Both of Us: My Life with Farrah review [Book]  2018-1-28 18:0

    My mother loved this. Thanks so much.

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    Both of Us: My Life with Farrah review [Book]  2018-1-28 18:0

    I loved the love story of Ryan and Farrah.....they were a attractive couple together...the story was kind of like the move "The Method We Were"...loved each other but still could not live together...

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    Both of Us: My Life with Farrah review [Book]  2018-1-28 18:0

    Loved the book, very romantic and interested facts.

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    Both of Us: My Life with Farrah review [Book]  2018-1-28 18:0

    I enjoyed this book very much. it was a very heartfelt story of a attractive love. I will definitely recommend this.

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    Both of Us: My Life with Farrah review [Book]  2018-1-28 18:0

    Sad and heart breaking story about some of the streets we all travel through life. These were two people trapped in love and more.

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    Both of Us: My Life with Farrah review [Book]  2018-1-28 18:0

    This is truly a love story but with a lot of mistakes created in Ryan and Farrah's love affair. I have always thought they were a striking couple and was glad Ryan wrote this book. I takes two to tango so all of the issues in this relationship were not all Ryan's fault. Especially with his kids. I think Tatum was "in love" with her dad, Ryan. She wanted him all to herself and did not like him being with Farrah. She did some beautiful mean things to him as punishment such as not inviting him to be in her wedding to John McEnroe - Ryan was not asked to walk her down the aisle. I think that was one of the cruelest things ever to do to a parent. Her need for constant attention was extreme. I think she is bipolar because of her erratic behavior throughout her whole life - especially her drug addiction. I do think it would have created a difference if Ryan and Farrah had married and lived in one house and not had separate residences. There was a lack of maturity on Ryan and Farrah's part in the raising of Redmond. However, I do obtain it that Farrah was the love of Ryan's life. At the end of the book when telling about Farrah's war to live and the horrible cancer treatments and ultimately her death...even though I saw the documentary that was created and know the story, I still became teary-eyed and very, very sad reading about it in Ryan's words. It touched my heart deeply. I am a Texas girl who was raised in a little city 25 miles from Corpus Christi where Farrah was raised and also we are the same age. I am a cancer survivor so I know about cancer treatments. I want Farrah could have been saved.

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    Destiny Fails Us: A New Life review [App]  2018-2-16 13:0

    Absolutely thrilled that I can now play on my phone! I have so much fun playing through this visual novel. It's my absolute favorite!

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    I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life review [Book]  2017-12-4 18:0

    With the growing Zika and Dengue threats, understanding how microbes and their hosts interact is vital. Not everyone can create it through this long and detailed account, but it is worth the effort. We will all face questions that are addressed in this book - - from whether to pay additional for heavily advertised probiotics to whether or not to help the release of wolbachia-infected mosquitoes in our own backyards to stop the spread of deadly diseases.Without requiring specialist knowledge or vocabulary, the author introduces the complex concepts behind the latest revolution in understanding of microbes' role in health, evolution, ecology, and culture.A few years ago, before I retired from a medical practice in non-tropical Minneapolis, I had a patient whose unusual rash was probably caused by an African parasitic worm that hosts a bacterium which allows the worm to live inside its human host. By chance, I had just seen an article on treating his condition by giving antibiotics to eliminate the bacterium, thus allowing the patient's immune system to slay the worms. In an increasingly globalized world, the more people acquire the background to be able to absorb info like that and recall it when it becomes relevant, the rtunately, the reader is rewarded with tidbits of levity along the method - - the name of a product aimed at restoring healthy digestive system microbes, for instance: "rePOOPulate."There's no cheerleading for every trendy "natural" "probiotic" cure under the sun. Nature is revealed as indifferent to our private goals - - and capable of producing undesired results when we test to tamper with it. What we search here instead is a very balanced look at what has been learned and tried, what has worked and what has failed, and where we may be going.

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    I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life review [Book]  2017-12-4 18:0

    It’s time we became mates with microbes. And not just with them but with their very idea, because it’s likely going to be crucial to our lives on this planet and beyond. For a long time most humans have regarded bacteria as a nuisance. This is because we become aware of them only when something goes wrong, only when they cause diseases like tuberculosis and diarrhea. But as Ed Yong reveals in this sweeping, exciting tour of biology, ecology and medicine which is pregnant with possibility, the vast majority of microbes support us in ways which we cannot possibly fathom, which permeate not just our existence but that of every single other life form on our planet. The knowledge that this microbial universe is uncovering holds tantalizing clues to treating diseases, changing how we eat and live and potentially effecting a philosophical upheaval in our view of our relationship with each other and with the rest of life.Yong’s book shines in three ways. Firstly it’s not just a book about the much heralded ‘microbiome’ – the densely populated and ubiquitous universe of bacteria which lives on and within us and which rivals our cells in terms of numbers – but it’s about the much larger universe of microbes in all its guises. Yong dispels a lot of misconceptions, such as the blanket statements that bacteria are amazing or poor for us, or that antibiotics are always amazing or poor for us. His narrative sweeps over vast landscape, from the role of bacteria in the origins of life to their key functions in helping animals bond on the savannah, to fresh therapies that could emerge from understanding their roles in diseases like allergies and IBD. One fascinating topic which I think Yong could have touched on is the potential role of microbes in seeding extraterrestrial e universal theme threading through the book is symbiosis: how bacteria and all other life forms function together, mostly peacefully but sometimes in a hostile manner. The first complex cell likely evolved when a primitive life form swallowed an ancient bacterium, and since this seminal happening life on earth has never been the same. They are involved in literally every imaginable life process: gut bacteria break down meal in mammals’ stomachs, nitrogen fixing bacteria construct the primary building blocks of life, others play critical roles in the water, carbon and oxygen cycle. Some enable insects, aphids and a dozens of other animals to wage chemical warfare, yet others hold coral reefs new and stable. There’s even a species that can cause a sex change in wasps. Perhaps the most necessary ones are those which break down environmental chemicals as well as meal into myriad interesting and far-ranging molecules affecting everything, from mate-finding to distinguishing mates from foes to nurturing babies’ immune systems through their ability to break down sugars in mother’s milk. This critical role that bacterial symbiosis plays in human disease, health and even behavior is probably the most fascinating aspect of human-bacteria co-existence, and one which is only now being gradually teased out. Yong’s central notice is that the reason bacteria are so fully integrated into living beings is simple: we evolved in a sweltering, ubiquitous pool of them that was show and evolving billions of years before we arrived on the scene. Our relationship with them is thus complex and multifaceted, and as Yong demonstrates, has been forged through billions of years of messy and haphazard evolution. For one thing, this therefore makes any kind of easy generalization about them almost certainly false. And it makes us realize how humanity would rapidly become extinct in a globe suddenly devoid of condly, Yong is adept at painting vivid portraits of the men and women who are unraveling the secrets of the microbial universe. Old pioneers like Pasteur, Leeuwenhoek and Koch come alive in crisp portraits (for longer ones, I would recommend Paul DeKruif's captivating classic, "Microbe Hunters"). At the same time, fresh pioneers herald fresh visions. Yong crisscrosses the globe, from the San Diego Zoo to the coral reefs of Australia to the savannah, talking to adventurous researchers about wasps, aphids, hyenas, squid, pangolins, spiders, human infants and all the microbes that are intimately sharing their genes with these life forms. He is also a sure tutorial to the recent technology including gene sequencing that has revolutionized our understanding of these fascinating monsters (although I would have appreciated a longer discussion on the so-called CRISPR genetic technology that has recently taken the globe by storm). Yong’s narrative makes it clear that innovative ideas come from the best researchers combining their acumen with the best technology. At the same time his sometimes-wondrous narrative is tempered with caution, and he makes it clear that the real implications of the findings emerging from the microbiome will take years and perhaps decades to unravel. The amazing news is that we're just getting irdly, Yong delves deeply into the fascinating functions of bacteria in health and disease, and this involves diseases which go method beyond the familiar pandemics that have bedeviled humanity throughout its history. Antibiotics, antibiotic resistance and the marvelous process of horizontal gene transfer that allows bacteria to rapidly share genes and evolve all obtain a nod. Yong also leads us through the reasonable but still debated 'hygiene hypothesis' which lays blame for an increased prevalence of allergies and autoimmune disorders at the feet of overly and deliberately clean environments and suburban living. He discusses the novel practice of fecal transplants that promises to cure serious intestinal inflammation and ailments like IBD and Crohn’s disease, but is also wary about its unpredictable and unknown consequences. He also talks about the fascinating role that bacteria in newborn infants’ bodies play when they digest crucial sugars in mother’s milk and affect multiple functions of the developing baby’s body and brain. Unlike proteins and nucleic acids, sugars have been the not good cousins of biochemistry for a long time, and their key role in microbial symbiosis only highlights their importance for life. Finally and most tantalizingly, the book describes potential impacts that the body’s microbiome and its outside guests might have on animal and human behavior itself, leading to potential breakthrough treatments in psychiatry. The true implications of these roles will have to be unraveled through the patient, thoroughgoing process that is the mainstay of science, but there is small doubt that the arrows seem to be pointing in very promising directions.“There is grandeur in this view of life”, Darwin said in his magnum opus “The Origin of Species”. And just how much grandeur there exactly is becomes apparent with the realization that Darwin was dimly aware at best of microbes and their seminal role in the origin and propagation of life. Darwin saw life as an 'entangled bank' full of wondrous species: I can only imagine that he would have been enthralled and stupefied by the vision of this entangled bank presented in Ed Yong's book.

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    I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life review [Book]  2017-12-4 18:0

    What a ride. I was aware of my microbiome, but knowing Earth life is as interconnected and mutually dependent as I fantasized as a child, staring up through the leaves of whatever tree I was perched in at the time? That is glorious. Science gives that early feeling solid footing and wings to fly - we're starting to manipulate microbiomes, hoping to save reefs, hamper disease-carrying insects, and create buildings healthier, to name just three. Fantastic.If you wish to become more aware of Earth life's smallest members, this book is your ticket in. It's a gentle, thorough ride with visits to various scientists and projects and always, Ed Yong's humor. About 30% of the text is notes and so on, so don't be daunted by the length, either.

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    I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life review [Book]  2017-12-4 18:0

    This book was a glorious, educational romp through microbial wonderland. From mystical development triggers to sinister instinct repressors, the globe of microbes is not, apparently, a land of amazing (gut microbes) and evil (MRSA) but instead, microbes are a whole set of ethics unto themselves, there to trigger things irrespective of what is good, or preferred. This automaton quality is precisely what makes microbes so magical and scary. Ed Young is a clear writer who knows how to show complex material in a compelling way, creating plot, suspension and hero out of illness, development and reproduction. This book thoroughly entertained our family during drives up and back from Tahoe (16 hours more or less total) and we all highly recommend!

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    I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life review [Book]  2017-12-4 18:0

    The microbes within us are in deed multitudes, and until recently were largely unknown. The microbes that were known, or at least studied, were labeled as harmful, and in need of destruction. What is now beginning to be known is that there are more microbes in our bodies than non microbial cells. There is a tremendous dozens of them, and most of them are either helpful or at least not dangerous. Various parts of our bodies include various microbial colonies, and each person has their own collection. Our micro biome is special for each of us. A lot of ailments that plague us are caused by a poor mix of microbes. Curing these issues depends on re-balancing the biome. The author writes very clearly, with a minimum of scientific jargon.

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    I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life review [Book]  2017-12-4 18:0

    Transplanting the poo of one person into another, opening the windows in hospitals, concocting building materials filled with microbes... what will science come up with next? This book is filled with stories about bringing the invisible globe of microbes that existed before us into the wars with human and agricultural disease. It reads like a storybook and not a textbook which I appreciated greatly. Hold an begin mind and would you please begin the windows..

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    I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life review [Book]  2017-12-4 18:0

    Who, or what, is really in control? A fascinating read about the microbes in and around all of us. Bacteria have been on earth for billions of years, it only makes sense that we, and all creatures, have evolved with them. I highly recommend this book to all of the germophobes out there. The vast majority of microbes are not harmful and if fact are important for a healthy body.

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    I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life review [Book]  2017-12-4 18:0

    You're going to look at your physical globe with a considerable amount of depth after you read this book. Who knew your microbiome would be thought of as another organ in the human body? There are more cells in your microbiome than cells in your physical self.Learn how the bacteria can be bred to war diseases. How every organism in the globe functions or is eradicated by these rapidly changing ey have been on this earth for millions of years and the time is coming, through ardent research, when we will be able to prevent or cure our most pernicious diseases.

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    I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life review [Book]  2017-12-4 18:0

    Yong has written a fascinating tale of the microscopic animals and viruses that reside in us and in fact are the majority of organisms comprising ourselves. You'll quickly become an Ed Yong fan, I guarantee it!

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    I Contain Multitudes: The Microbes Within Us and a Grander View of Life review [Book]  2017-12-4 18:0

    Ed Yong's first book is a unbelievable foray into the unseen globe of bacteria: how they colonise us, cohabitate with us, and even control us. Though they go largely unseen, they are critical for almost all life on earth.A confession: I've been a fan of Ed Yong's writing for a while. A few years back, when I was considering science journalism myself, I found his work over at Not Exactly Rocket Science. It was (and is) an informative and inspirational blog that tackles complicated science well and with amazing humour. So when I saw that he had released a book, I bought it straight away. For full price. If you know me, that's almost a recommendation in itself.But while it might seem like I was always destined to have enjoyed this book, I was still pleasantly surprised with how amazing a read it was. Yong shares the scientist's love of an elegant experiment, and the journalist's love of a amazing narrative hook; these two loves pleasingly intersect in enjoyable narratives that are compelling while being lucid and well-researched. This is the sort of science writing that doesn't shy away from complexity, but is written well enough that the average lay person could understand - it tackles the difficult task of addressing multiple audiences in the same volume well. A scientifically-minded reader will be sated by the level of detail without being bored by remedial inly, I enjoyed this book because Yong paints bacteria with a complete palette, describing friends, competitors and sometimes foes. This makes it a compelling read, as most often famous science literature refers to bacteria in a binary sense: 'good' bacteria or 'bad' bacteria, an adversarial fairy tale which undercuts the full spectrum occupied by the thousands of bacterial species that create our body their home. The subtlety and nuance in this book is refreshing, and I want more writers took the time to do the topic justice.Highly recommended.

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    Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals review [Book]  2018-3-11 18:2

    There were a lot of aspects described of factory farming that I could have lived without knowing. Much of this book was graphic and disturbing. It takes a tough person not to allow emotions obtain in the method of focusing on making conditions at factory farms better for animals. Temple Grandin is one such person and I admire her being able to research and think things through to provide better lives for chickens, cattle and other monsters we consume. I do admire her work and appreciate that she has created improvements for these creatures.

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    Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals review [Book]  2018-3-11 18:2

    I loved Dr. Grandin's earlier book, Animals in Translation, and found some overlap in this book. I did have fun reading her views and findings on our most ubiquitous domesticated animals, especially pigs and cows. The facts certainly reinforced my commitment not to eat meat from the factory farm system. The facts on so-called more humane raising of cage-free egg-laying chickens makes me question whether to help eating eggs at all, and treatment of dairy cows, even in organic sources, challenges my drinking of organic milk products. Though Dr. Grandin has been a more researcher and designer of more humane practices in factory meat farming, it's clear to me that farming on an industrial scale is not compatible with the humane treatment of animals. Combined with powerful evidence that a plant based diet is more healthy in countless ways, a book like this provides a powerful argument for me not to eat meat, and to be very cautious about the source of even organic and more humanely raised egg and dairy products. Given the ever increasing growth of human populations, improved humane animal farming is very unlikely on the immense scale needed.

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    Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals review [Book]  2018-3-11 18:2

    This was a bonus for a mate so I can only comment on its appearance and preface. Temple Grandin has proved to be a real professional in all her endeavors. The one chapter I took time to read was very clear and informative. Then I had to wrap it up and send it on its method to my friend.

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    Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals review [Book]  2018-3-11 18:2

    The thing that stuck with me through the reading of this book and after was that the worse thing you can do to an animal is create it afraid. I bought the book because of the section on dogs. I felt like what she had to say about companion dog welfare matched well with what my instincts have told me with my own dogs but her explanation of the "blue ribbon emotions" -- particularly restraint explained so much to me.I went on to read about animal welfare at huge farms and although some of the things she described were horrible to read about, it was a true eye opener. Animals who are raised for slaughter can still have a safe and fear free life and Temple Grandin knows exactly how to do it. If only all corporate and independent farms would listen to her.I also loved her very matter of fact narration.Warning: she does describe animal cruelty and it can be upsetting.

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    Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals review [Book]  2018-3-11 18:2

    I thought this book was about Dogs, but that is only a little part. I have a super sensitive golden retriever. And something that Temple Grandin said in this book created me stop and look at my dog differently and accept that she sees things differently. Temple said that like autistic children, dogs can have a hyper sensitivity towards various objects. I don't know why, but this easy statement created me stop and accept my dog. There are things that startle her (a plastic bag, an unbrella opening near her) that scare her. I don't protect her, we simply deal with the object and move on. But I no longer worry about the objects any longer. This book was very interesting and I am very interested in reading her other books. Ms. Grandin has an insight about animals that no a lot of have.

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    Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals review [Book]  2018-3-11 18:2

    Extremely well written. Dr Temple Grandin has brought an analytical clarity to the subject.Animal behavior specialist struggle with criticism regarding anthromorphism. I suspect that it is just normal animal behavior that has involved into the animal known as human that is being described rather than an anthromphism.When humans decide to raise animals for their benefits, then it became necessary to provide their primary needs from birth to death and is amazing business.Dr. Temple Grandin provides a unbelievable tutorial regarding animal behavior and issue solving.Her insights regarding the suppression of patents and the issues with managing the behavior of people when they interface with a complex system was on tle have to navigate handling systems designed by Dr Grandin, but they are the simpler part of the problem. The more difficult variable is positively influencing the human behavior that interfaces her handling systems.Animals Create Us Human is also a amazing business guide.

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    Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals review [Book]  2018-3-11 18:2

    The info about *dogs* isn't the most current or cutting edge, but the rest of it is incredible. It is real, quantifiable info about how to meaningfully improve animal lives and reduce animal suffering, written by a person who has done more to improve animal welfare than any other living person.

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    Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals review [Book]  2018-3-11 18:2

    I learned so much from Professor Grandin. She is so amazing at backing up her observations with biological and historical facts. She focuses quite a bit on dogs. As a dog rescue volunteer, the info has helped me understand my own dogs as well the different purebreds and mixed breeds we save from animal shelters. I have quoted info from this books to a lot of other dog owners and recommend it highly to anyone who shares this planet with animals.

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    Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals review [Book]  2018-3-11 18:2

    Dr. Grandin is able to share unassumingly, simply, and from a special and very impressively informed e opening chapter ('What Animals Need') primarily discusses subjects I felt beautiful acquainted with, but Dr. Grandin's attitudes and approach toward animals, along with her impressive-while-simply-stated knowledge is reflected immediately in this chapter and I felt I gleaned much from llowing this first chapter are eight more chapters - each about 30 to 40 pages in length - and each dealing with a specific topic. They include:"A Dog's Life"; "Cats"; "Horses"; "Cows"; "Pigs"; "Chickens and Other Poultry"; "Wildlife"; "Zoo Animals" and finally an afterward entitled, "Why Do I Still Work for the Industry."In the chapter about dogs I found fresh information, gained from latest wolf-studies, which was particularly of interest. These more latest studies offer a whole fresh slant on our currently accepted notions of "The Alpha Male" and the dynamics of the package thus offering a perhaps even deeper understanding of our own dogs.I enjoyed Grandin's scientific perspective which reevaluates and corrects popularized conceptions as fresh info is obtained through scientific study. As her info is very well documented, further reading and study on specific locations of interest becomes quite simple.I personally have shied away from, or quickly glanced over a few sections I've come across in this book which discuss in brief, simple, frank terms, incidents of cruelty toward animals - particularly in zoos and in the meat industry. I've done so simply because such things haunt me. On the other hand, if we are going to be allowed to create responsible choices concerning what we actively help (e.g. - do we pay a zoo or a particular meat vendor to be cruel?) then it is certainly a vital service Grandin provides in revealing these situations and directing us toward how to avoid supporting such anyone who has pets; goes to zoos; eats or buys meat or dairy products; has or deals with kids - actually, for all of us who share this planet with other animals & with wildlife - I can recommend this book and the invaluable insights it ly, I just have to add - I love the attractive cover. Yeah, it's paperback - but I love it.

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    Animals Make Us Human: Creating the Best Life for Animals review [Book]  2018-3-11 18:2

    I read this book in conjunction with Dr. Grandin’s other book entitled Animals in Translation. This book will occasionally reference that one although either one can stand alone. Dr. Grandin is an accomplished animal behaviorist who also characterizes herself and the manner in which she views the globe as autistic. I was quite interested in her premise of understanding the autistic brain via animal behavioral research: “ There’s no method to know exactly how close an autistic person’s sensory perceptions are to an animal’s….But I think a lot of or even most autistic people experience the globe a lot the method animals experience the world: as a swirling mass of little details. We’re seeing, hearing, and feeling all the things no one else can.” Animals Create Us Human establishes the basics of the lens through which animals experience the world. It provides an insight that obligates us, as humans, to do nothing less than be amazing stewards, and even advocates, of the care of different animals we are familiar with in our homes, on farms, or in the wild. There are Chapters entitled: A Dog’s Life, Cats, Horses, Cows, Pigs, Chickens……. Obviously the chapters on cats and dogs and horses will resonate within our own homes. The chapters on pigs, and cows and chickens address the meal industry starting on the farms. And even if amazing stewardship is not a basic driver to adopt her recommendations in that venue; it’s hard to overlook the fact that doing so also increases profit.Dr. Grandin challenges us to think beyond labeling and dismissing an animal’s behavior as being attributable to just being an animal. But to think more in terms of how their brains are wired so as to understand there is logic behind the behavior. For example, to paraphrase Dr. Grandin, cats seem set in their ways and downright obsessed with specific food, water source and what they consider their roaming boundaries. Dr. Grandin discusses the frontal lobes of the brain. A cat’s frontal lobes are 10 times smaller than a human’s and half the size of a dog’s. The frontal lobes are necessary to planning, staying on track and changing easily and smoothly. Cats, and obsessive people, have problem with the change part getting stuck on one behavior and are unable to shift to a various one.I have a amazing deal of respect for Dr. Grandin’s a lot of years of hands on practical research . I do look forward to reading some other books by this author to support me better understand animal behavior.

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    Life review [Book]  2017-11-28 18:0

    I thought this book was great. I loved every word of it. The only thing that bothered me was Mr Richards's lack of insight into how his drug a use impacted those around him especially, Mick Jagger. I can't imagine what it was like for Jagger to watch his mate turn into a junkie. Typical of an addict who gets better, Mr Richards expected those around jhim to fall in line when he finally decided to quit. "Here iI am, I'm better and I expect to be treated with respect!" I love Keith, but he needs to have empathy for his old friend. I don't doubt thati Mick is a handful, but he was probably s scared s***less that Keith was going to die.I have always loved the Rolling Stones and I could not place this book down. As for Keith, a small understanding those who place up with his antics would not go astray.

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    Life review [Book]  2017-11-28 18:0

    Biographies/Autobiographies are one of my favorites to read. I LOVED this book! It was so well written that it took me by surprise. Now don't obtain me wrong, I always knew Keef was an wonderful talent. This book, however, took me on an amazingly candid journey with a deeply smart human being. It was a fun read...full of tales of wild partying all over the world, writing songs, and also about mates and family. It's simple for us regular folks to forget that popular people are HUMAN! This book just touched me in that method and I could almost hear him narrating along. Melody has always been necessary to me and I've even seen the Rolling Stones when they toured in '94. Reading the book has me listening to more Stones songs than ever before. I'm satisfied that I finally had the time to indulge and read! Two thumbs up!

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    Life review [Book]  2017-11-28 18:0

    Liking this book, deep into it right now, just as I had hoped from others' ever, as has happened before, the copy I got appears to be new, but arrived with dirty fingerprints on the edges and insides. Could not have been given as a gift.

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    Life review [Book]  2017-11-28 18:0

    What a amazing read! I have been a Stones fan for decades, but never really knew a whole lot about the band's early history or private lives. I was familiar with Richards' reputation as a hard partying poor boy, but this book elevated him into one of my life heroes. I have read a dozens of rock n roll autobiographies and this is by far the best. Richards could have produced a fluff piece that only showed him in the best light...that is not the path he took. He didn't cast himself in the role of character in every situation. Instead he allowed the reader the opportunity to join him on his journey from awkward school boy to aging rock star, complete with poor decisions and poor yond the info of his life, Richards also provides endless info about the music. I am not a musician by any stretch if the imagination; however, even I was able to grasp the subtle info of the Stones' sound that are highlighted throughout the book. I always appreciated the melody spilling from my speakers, but now I have a better understanding of what makes the Stones sound unique. I also have an enhanced knowledge of the dedication that went into producing the songs that have meant so much to me through the years. I will never listen to a Stones album in the same way.I was also impressed by the method Richards detailed the musicians that have influenced him throughout his life. Some I was familiar with, some were fresh to me. I can say I have a much better understanding of the role the Stones played in popularizing the blues and selling it back to America. It really is a shame that the pioneers of the blues never got the recognition they so clearly deserved... due to prejudice and racism. Richards also created a point of recognizing the legions of studio musicians and touring members that have kept the melody flowing for over fifty years. It is always amazing to see credit given where it is e story of the Stones wouldn't be complete without addressing the tensions between players that have arisen throughout the band's history. The interpersonal problems with Brian Jones, Mick Taylor and Richards/Jagger are all covered, but don't appear to be sensationalized. Richards' determination to live his life on his own terms while striving for elusive perfection locations him in the fine company of Hunter S Thompson, Hemingway, and Roger Waters. All heroes in my humble opinion.

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    Life review [Book]  2017-11-28 18:0

    I was very surprised to search that I liked this so much -- Keith is a fabulous, hilarious storyteller, and an insightful observer as well as participant in a lot of of the heavy cultural changes that occurred in the latter half of the 20th a Stones fan I also enjoyed his behind-the-scenes accounts of the recordings of so a lot of amazing songs and albums, in addition to the usual tour stories and excesses galore.I will say that Keith remains in denial about certain happenings in his life, and doesn't seem to wish to admit that his drug/alcohol habit was responsible for much of the chaos in his ill, it's his book and he's entitled to view his life and Mick any method he wants.He managed to produce a amazing autobiography, one that sets the bar high for the a lot of copycat accounts that are sure to follow.

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    Life review [Book]  2017-11-28 18:0

    Amazing book. Very detailed. Mick Jagger described it accurately, "very tedious." Still a amazing book from and about a rock d the story about him being wasted on heroin, (not a amazing thing), in a studio, when the police came in searching the put while he hid under a desk.

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    Life review [Book]  2017-11-28 18:0

    This book is hysterically funny in parts, moving, informative, ith's "voice" is delightful. I had no idea what he was really like. The guy is deep and he gets it, life that e stories he tells like the one about driving to morocco for drugs paints such a stage for the reader as to what Keith, those around him, and the globe was like. Just reading about what his freaking vehicle was like was worth that chapter!IAnd the story of the stones being pulled over in Arkansas after being warned never to drive around southern states and how they got out of that mess is vividly described and will create you laugh in amazement about what goes on behind the scenes or at least what the 60's were 's interesting to read about Keith and mick's relationship. And then the Canadian prime minister's wife being a stones' groupie and running around their hotel rooms. e narrative is so rich and not a single page is slow.I love Keith now. I am so glad he opened up and now we obtain to know him and the history of that time period.I loved hearing about his parents, his schooling, how he met the stones and the Beatles and on and ter i read it, I got the audio book. That is a hoot, especially the part keith reads himself!You have to read this book!

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    Life review [Book]  2017-11-28 18:0

    One of the most entertaining and delightful books I've ever read. Something akin to sitting down and hanging out with Keith Richards for a few days. I was disappointed when it was over because it was such an awesome read. Keith has an wonderful memory and a amazing bonus for writing. You will not regret reading this book.

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    Life review [Book]  2017-11-28 18:0

    Since I am not a fan of Keith Richards' notorious drug and alcohol abuse I had no plan to read this book, and when it was suggested to me by a mate I refused to consider it. After hearing amazing reviews of the book, and high praise from my reading mate (who is also a blues guitarist), I decided to give it a shot.I was in for a very pleasant surprise. Mr. Richards has written a very detailed and well constructed biography that begins with his early youth and ends in about 2009. In that time period he gives a candid acc of how he developed his poor boy persona (multiple beatings at school, bullying from peers, poverty, drugs and alcohol), the early years of his own musical education and experimentation, the first meetings and jams with Mick Jagger, and then the development and growth of the current line up known as the "Rolling Stones". Interspersed with his first person acc are a lot of excerpts from other mates and musicians with whom he shared experiences over 60+ years. There are photographs, from a school boy portrait of an unhappy looking Richards of about 10 years old, to a very early black and white of the Rolling Stones wearing silly, matching, early 60's costumes (their manager at the time was trying to fit them into the Beatles mold), to concert photos, intimate family pictures, and finally the haggard appearing Richards that we are familiar with today. I came to the conclusion that I had greatly underestimated this man, his contributions to the melody world, and his defining role in making the Rolling Stones the amazing band that they are. My least favorite aspects of the book is his obvious sexism and disdain for women, and the recounting of his serious on-going alcohol abuse (which he does NOT acknowledge as a problem). To his credit, Richards does repeatedly warn the reader of the dangers of using Heroin. But the detailed musical history of his musical influences, his own work and collaborations and that of other bands and musicians of the time are well worth the read and very informative. I also enjoyed his obvious wit and entertaining writing style. I would recommend this book to anyone who loves music.

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    Life review [Book]  2017-11-28 18:0

    Life, in broad application, is always full of surprises. LIFE, Keith Richards' autobiography, is no less laden with the unexpected: First, that the book is even readable, and it is--eminently so; second, that the type story that has been told numerous times by countless other survivors of hedonistic excess would keep any interest at all, and it did--well past the halfway point when interest only wavered under the burden of sheer repetition. Another surprise: The glimpse into the real musicality of Richards as demonstrated by his extensive knowledge of musical structure, technique, and style, however unorthodox the learning process may have been. And another: That the creation of some of the Stones greatest hits is either glossed over or completely ignored. And yet another that's maybe not such a huge surprise: Richards' determination to set the record straight regarding "rejuvenating" blood exchanges, heroin use, and the relationship with e "civilian" facet of the book is plodding at times, just as is most civilian life, but that only adds to the legitimacy--the truth-telling theme of the memoir.James Fox, as co-writer, has done a stellar job of organizing what had to be an absolute glut of material in a method that respects and maintains Richards' voice. A must-read for Stones fans, LIFE deserves a unique put on the shelf holding the most definitive documentations of rock 'n' roll as a lifestyle.

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    Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life review [Book]  2018-1-31 18:0

    Yiyun Li is a Chinese-American writer who moved from China to the US when she was 24 years old. Although her mother tongue is Chinese, from the very beginning she started to write in English. She has won a lot of awards for her writing. This is her r a decade, Li tried to be a excellent mother, writer and full-time worker. During those 10 years, she used to write between midnight and four in the morning --- and then one day she just could not do it anymore. She became depressed and even tried to commit suicide. As a result, she was hospitalized twice. She wrote DEAR FRIEND, FROM MY LIFE I WRITE TO YOU IN YOUR LIFE for two years, and her intention, at first, was to argue for and versus suicide at the same time. But once one starts reading this magnificent memoir, it soon becomes obvious that this is about much more than that. The reader will not search out the info of Li’s depression or suicide attempt, and she does not even write too much about her hospital stays. There is no recollection of her dark times, because this is a memoir about AR FRIEND does not have a linear plot line. Instead of providing insight into her childhood and youth in China, move to the US, depression, hospital visits and healing, Li takes the reader on an intimate journey. Yes, bits and pieces about her life in China and her hospitalization are scattered throughout the book, but what dominates are her thoughts about writing and references to the literature that she read during her healing process. In a way, this is a homage to Li’s favorite authors in whose works she found solace in her dark times. Thus she refers to such writers as Turgenev, Kierkegaard, Hardy, Gorky, Green, Chekov and Mansfield, and a whole chapter is devoted to William Trevor and their is is neither an simple nor a quick read. It is pregnant with difficult thoughts and reflections on life, death, writing, the relationship between a writer and his/her characters, and the writer and his/her readers. Li also poses a question about identity and language, because she writes solely in English, her second language.With her recollections of the books she read in her teens, Li transported me back to my own adolescent years, a time when electronic devices didn’t dominate our lives and we could surrender to reading. The book rouses a desire to read not only all the authors she mentions here, but also her own AR FRIEND is a beautifully crafted memoir in which Li masterfully combines childhood memories with the life and work of amazing authors and her own intimate thoughts on life, death and writing. Although it is divided into nine chapters, each dealing with a various issue, the book should be read as a whole. Only that method will one obtain the complete ed by Dunja Bonacci Skenderovic

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    Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life review [Book]  2018-1-31 18:0

    This is actually not a total memoir, but rather an overall exploration of literature and criticism: “Dear Friend, from My Life I Write You In Your Life” is the first book of non-fiction by Chinese American writer and award winning novelist Yiyun Li. Throughout the book Li injected brief info from her life, writing career, showing the lingering effects and impact of her mental illness. Li resides in Oakland, California with her husband and riving in the U.S. from China, Li felt like a fresh and liberated person. Leaving her career as a scientist, she would graduate from the prestigious Iowa Writer’s Workshop, doing most of her early writing between midnight and 4:00 AM. Li began by sharing info of her lonely childhood in the family apartment in Beijing. Family responsibilities likely included helping care for her mentally unstable mother; her father was described as “fatalistic” and “stoic”—teaching Li meditation when she was 11. Li’s sister was a med student during the Tiananmen Square Protests/Massacre (1989) and came to the aid of individuals during the hunger strikes in Beijing.Early on, literature played an necessary role in Li’s life, her book is a testament to the therapeutic effects of literary influence, direction, solace and the connection with literary figures having related situations as our own. Li traveled to midland Ireland, to study the prolific novelist John McGahern (1934-2006): he had lived in “quiet desperation” partially isolated from omas Mann was sharply critical of the double suicide of Austrian novelist/playwright Stefan Zweig (1881-1942) with his second wife Lotte Altmann. Li recalled the suicidal urge and the intense need to stop pain. Vague references were created throughout the book of Li’s mental health hospitalizations, which seemed like temporary shadowy background ssian novelist Ivan Turgenev (1818-83) had never married, instead obsessively loved a attractive opera singer and befriended her husband. A lot of of the author’s and poet’s Li profiled were lesser known single, solitary, individuals, and her inspiration from their work was easily recognized: though readers may not personally relate, agree, or identify with her topic matter or views. For example Li wrote...“A writer and reader should never be allowed to meet. They live in various time frames. When a book takes on a life for a reader it is already dead for the writer.” It was a amazing thing that Irish author William Trevor (1928-2016) didn’t share this view: he corresponded with Li, and met her for lunch in Boston in 2007. Li had his first note to her framed, and is one of her most prized though Li’s books have been translated in over 20 languages, Li realized a “private salvation” in “disowning” her native language, and felt that a lot of Chinese (from China and the west) viewed her as a “cultural traitor” for not producing more writing in Chinese. During her mental episodes of un-wellness, Li dreamt of her life in Beijing, becoming an American citizen in 2007. This book took about two years to produce and must be read (and re-read) carefully to absorb the meaning. Li’s thought process was often difficult to follow, her reflections could be bleak and depressing, and it was easier to feel sympathetic towards her. Li teaches creative writing at the University of California. Honestly not recommended for the common reader—this book would be very beneficial for literary mental health study and/or research. ~With appreciation to the Seattle Public Library.

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    Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life review [Book]  2018-1-31 18:0

    Author Yiyun Li suffers from debilitating depression and has created attempts to end her own life. This non-fiction book is like a journal of suffering and also survival. Li explores deeply the different works of literature that sustain her when she needs the most help. As others have mentioned, the writing is powerful and attractive if a bit disjointed occasionally (befitting a journal). The literary references sometimes sent me to Google to learn more about the works Li was writing about, but that’s not a poor thing. Just be prepared to do a bit of the work here alongside Li. All in all, a worthwhile (if not easy) reading experience.

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    Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life review [Book]  2018-1-31 18:0

    This book sounded intriguing; a memoir of a fiction writer, from China, musing about her life after several suicide attempts. Her writing forms her thing I found odd, from the start, the title of this book “Dear Friend, from my Life, I write to you in Your Life” is a phrase taken from another writer. While it might capture what she felt this book does, it was odd to use another author’s (Katherine Mansfield) phrase as her title, however later reading in the book it starts to create is book wanders from the begin all over the place. At times it was hard to follow, other times it was spot on in capturing the separation between people and what forms another’s reality and what is authentic. At times it is clear, the author is struggling with a sense of who she is and gets fixated on a concept or two (melodrama). Her mother clearly had some mental illness and I’m sure impacted the author’s sense of the globe when she was one point, the author writes about another author: “Reading her is like trudging through a frozen snowfield in the dark. Even though her words seemed to have been written out of the want to communicate, together they take on a frustrating opaqueness.” Unfortunately, this book has felt this method to me, at several points including the chapter, that contained this sentence. The author talks of reading different authors when she was young (and questioning if it was appropriate) and their similarities, but it wavers around a lot. However at the end of the chapter, her writing is very clear (discussing her difficulties in dealing with her mother). As I have said earlier, the writing ebbs and onically though this author is often concerned with giving away some of her self, from her Mom, reading her journals, to denying her fiction sometimes could be autobiographical, she has provided this book, which truly is. It is odd to me to go from so hidden, to then so transparent, especially at just a vulnerable time her in life. While my admitting to some self consciousness might seem as a universal complaint that all could understand, a lot of of this author’s concerns are very private to her, so again even more so ly I have had enough. After a chapter where the author debates different other authors (whom I don’t know and some I do) existentially on and on, I lost complete know that mate that gets obsessed about a boy who is not interested and she has to parse every conversation for every nuance. This is what reading this book is like to me. Painful and tiresome and I quit at the 2/3rds mark. I only got that far because I wanted to review the book.If you are into philosophy this book might be for you...It is clearly not for me. Gave it 2 stars as the writing is amazing in spots..but only a few.

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    Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life review [Book]  2018-1-31 18:0

    Amazing Product - Quick Service

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    Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life review [Book]  2018-1-31 18:0

    The title gives intimation and hope of a two method conversational thread developing between friends, but that's not how this book works. It's a memoir in the traditional sense, with the twist of suggesting the author could be speaking to her younger self, when she struggled with suicidal thoughts and spent time in a mental health facility. With the benefit of hindsight, she is detached enough to befriend and view her experiences more dispassionately and appears to be written partly as an ode to writing influences, being littered with literary references to such an extent it had me checking out the original sources of several of them, and downloading a sample of their books. Such is an avid reader's response to the power of words!There's also an ongoing monologue on the art and craft of writing itself. These snippets, plus those from different writers' books, diaries and letters, which spoke to the author during her challenging journey—and reveal where this book's title originates from—were what intrigued and interested me the me books captivate from the start. This one is more of a slow burning imprint on the mind and a gradual warming to the necessarily disjointed narrative. It took me a while to fully appreciate the nuances of Yiyun Li's pared back prose and poetic phraseology. But once I did, I began to truly admire her elegant writing style and the cleverness of its execution. Rather like fine wine, this is a book to savour slowly and devour in little doses to appreciate its superb flavour and finer qualities.

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    Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life review [Book]  2018-1-31 18:0

    Raw, lyrical and somewhat disjointed this is far from your average book. In a lot of instances it reads more like a journal albeit one made by a talented writer blessed with the bonus of poetic expression mixed with angst. This is one of those books in need of just the right time, just the right mental state, just the right mood to read...it's not entertaining, it's not all that informative, it's not even something that will resonate equally with all people. On the other hand, there is a touching openness able to transcend the distractions of every day life and share the inner suffering so often ignored, overlooked and unaccepted.

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    Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life review [Book]  2018-1-31 18:0

    Li is an award winning fiction writer, but this is her first non-fiction work. It’s a memoir, written over two years that saw Li hospitalized for suicide attempts. While it jumps around in time a lot, it’s still obviously been smoothed out a lot because things flow e author writes about her childhood in China during a time when free thought was not encouraged, with a mother who had significant mental problems of her own as a narcissist. She speaks of her decision to change from being a scientist with an assured income and green card, to being a writer. She tells us some about her stay in a mental hospital and about her feelings that took her there. Mostly, she writes about reading and writing, and the books and authors that have been necessary to ’s a sad tale, mostly. But it engaged me and the prose is so well done that it sucked me in for hours.

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    Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life review [Book]  2018-1-31 18:0

    This is mainly a treasury of literary allusions as a partial explanation to how we live, and can change our lives, hopefully for the better. It's the kind of book that is amazing from begin to finish, but can be read on nearly every page at any time. A small difficult, perhaps mainly for those without a powerful background in amazing writers. Amazing for English and Philosophy majors. The author described some desperate situations, and early deaths, mainly from China, and Fresh York City. A lot of amazing authors are noted, as their fictional works become almost a beacon for the author's life. The book is a self-education course for not only the author, but for those exploring the highs and lows in life, as the writers mentioned are interpreted. A bit rough at times, and you can tell the author is of the MacArthur Prize variety.

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    Dear Friend, from My Life I Write to You in Your Life review [Book]  2018-1-31 18:0

    I love this book. At first, I was skeptical, but as the larger picture emerged, I was moved by how intensely the author considers her life and her relation to others, especially through literature. Her self-examination is unsparing, and her insights have a clarity of expression that comes from her struggle to write them in her fresh adopted language, English. I found myself writing out passages, something I rarely do.

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    Life in a Medieval City (Medieval Life) review [Book]  2018-2-22 18:0

    Unbelievable fact-filled book you will wish to read over and over. All of the medieval life subjects written about by the Gies are excellent, by the way. This book, in particular, is fascinating because you obtain a clear picture of what life was like in a city. Not a castle, not a village, etc--an actual functioning city. Before all of the conveniences we have fun and take for will cringe at medieval mistakes and raise an eyebrow or two at medieval innovations. How was waste dealt with? Speaking of waste, what was the political dynamic in a city? How did a town function with fairs, disasters, theaters, funerals, and such going on?All kinds of interesting questions obtain their answers in this book. Perfect research and necessary black and white photographs combine with a skilled writing style to create this a superb IT. No question, it is worth much so, check out:1) Life in a Medieval Castle by the Gies2) Life in a Medieval Village by the Gies3) The Knight in History by Frances Gies4) Everyday Life in the Middle Ages by Paul B. Newman5) The Medieval Fortress by KaufmannEspecially the latest two. They are nearly perfect.

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    Life in a Medieval City (Medieval Life) review [Book]  2018-2-22 18:0

    I did not keep this book for free.I paid for it...and truthfully, I didn't pay enough. I'm going to create this clear for all the skeptics...I reallydislike history books since they are boring. For that matter, I dislike documentaries for the same reason...is book is fantastic. You will search yourself compelled to hold turning the pages. There is just the right amount ofdetail to fill in all the blanks for what life was like back then, but not so much that it became tedious.If you read this book, you will search ways to bring up the content with friends, because you'll wish to talk about it.Easy reading, and very informative.

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    Life in a Medieval City (Medieval Life) review [Book]  2018-2-22 18:0

    I absolutely love this book, and the other book by the Gies, Life in a Medieval Castle. Really informative, yet simple to read. A amazing sense of humor which never gets in the method spices the pages wonderfully. A true, well researched acc of life, created simple for regular people to digest and enjoy. Divided into sections such as Trades, Home Life, and such, there is an awesome amount of detail. Seriously, go obtain this even if you're not interested in medieval history; it's a amazing coffee table/ bathroom/ traveling book. You can pick it up for five minutes, learn something, smile, and go about your day. Or you can sit down and finish the whole thing in one sitting, and still wish to read it again. Just buy it

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    Life in a Medieval City (Medieval Life) review [Book]  2018-2-22 18:0

    We are using this book as part of our history curriculum this year. I'd bought a copy several years ago and just never got a possibility to crack it open. I like the method the chapters are divided. It makes it really simple to portion it out to go along with the various subjects we'll be covering in our study of the Middle Ages. The wording might be a bit above the lower elementary grades but the topic matter could be easily explained because it's well-written and very simple for an older student or adult to understand.

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    Life in a Medieval City (Medieval Life) review [Book]  2018-2-22 18:0

    Up front, I liked the book and enjoyed reading it in two short evenings. However, I was missing a lot of details. What were people doing in winter, summer and inbetween, any differences in lifestyle during the seasons (which is obvious for a farmer, but in the city?)? What were they doing during the numerous holidays ? What did they know about "the world" ? How huge were the families ? I could ask a lot of more questions that are not answered in the book. Also most chapters describe the life of the well-to-do , rich "burghers". Even if I understand that the documentation of the life of "upper class" is well better than that of the poor, still I would be interested in how the paupers lived and survived (they are mentioned often when they are begging at weddings/festivities/markets etc). Also there is not much info on the vast majority of the population: the people that are not rich and not not good but getting by just fine. In my opinion, the book could have been much better than it already is.

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    Life in a Medieval City (Medieval Life) review [Book]  2018-2-22 18:0

    Frances and Joseph Gies are experts in this field of study. They wrote a whole series of books on the middle ages, and I would tell you that if you study the middle ages, you need this book. It does not read like a text book. The whole series was wonderfully written, and if I could give it 10 stars I would. These books are a amazing resource to go to if you need to remind yourself of those small info that if you don't obtain right, they will mess you up.

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    Life in a Medieval City (Medieval Life) review [Book]  2018-2-22 18:0

    Very informative I really like this book. I will be buying his other books as well.

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    Life in a Medieval City (Medieval Life) review [Book]  2018-2-22 18:0

    I was looking for info on exactly this town during the 12th century and this book came very close to meeting that criteria. It helped me to imagine what characters living during this time would be influenced by. I was writing a short story that took put in Troyes back in 1185. This is one of the advantages of using Amazon, I can search books on any zone of interest.

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    Life in a Medieval City (Medieval Life) review [Book]  2018-2-22 18:0

    I am not steeped in studies of history, but am writing a story and need background. This book was simple to read and clear in details. I like that authors' abilities so much that I may read something else they have written. I believe that this book might have wider appeal than to historians alone - that the ordinary reader might have fun it.

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    Life in a Medieval City (Medieval Life) review [Book]  2018-2-22 18:0

    Fun to read! Would recommend if you like the medieval times!

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    Jenny Life - Life Insurance for Moms review [App]  2018-6-22 21:8

    Thanks for the calendar update!

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    Jenny Life - Life Insurance for Moms review [App]  2018-6-22 21:8

    Zach thomas

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    Jenny Life - Life Insurance for Moms review [App]  2018-6-22 21:8

    Very simple to use

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    In This Life review [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    Amazingly Wonderful!This book captured me from the beginning with it's well written story line and words. I was hooked and could not place it down. The love, the romance, the chemistry between Nash and Kat is something amazing. Throw in adorable children and 2 pasts that are forced to present their heads and you've got yourself a book that not only makes your laugh, but also cry. The emotion it brings to you is everything I look for in a amazing book.Kat and Nash are excellent together. The two bring a certain dynamic to the story that you rarely see in other books. She needs him as much as he needs her and in the end, you obtain ........ Yeah, I'm not going to spoil it.. MUST READ!!!

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    In This Life review [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    Wow, just wow! There is so much emotion packed into book. Nash is a broody loner who has never had a amazing relationship with his father. Their relationship only got more strained after the murder of his mother when he was 14 and it only worsened years later. He hasn't been back home in 5 years when tragedy strikes his life once again, leaving him to care for his 4 month old baby brother. He has support from Kathleen, or Kat as her mates call her. She has her own past demons to war and an adorable toddler named Emma. This is book is raw at times and left me sobbing but there is laughter to balance it out. This book leaves you with the age old lesson that we often forget.....life is too short for regrets.

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    In This Life review [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    This is a standalone novel. I loved everything about this book from beginning to end. It was such a beautifully written story, with such complex layers and emotionality. I loved how everything was interconnected and how our relationships can shape us and shape our future relationships. Nash and Kat are at times so emotionally vulnerable that it physically hurts. I love their love and their journeys. This book is superb storytelling at its finest. I simply adore Ms. Brent and have been a fan of her work for years, but this story, this book, is my favorite. It is at times raw, funny and heartwarming. This is a definite must read if you love gritty and emotional reads. Bravo Ms. Brent, Bravo!

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    In This Life review [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    I have lived a long time, seen a lot and felt a lot. These two young people Kat and Nash in their short life have seen and felt more than most people will in their entire lives. This book is a very sad and yet heart warming with its story of various family dynamics. If you love reading stories with children, babies and childhood crushes this is a must read

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    In This Life review [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    This is my first book by this author and I think I’m hooked. I love every word of this book. It’s full of emotions, hurt, forgiveness and love. I love Nash, the method he rises up to the occasion and takes control of his life and takes care of his small brother when life throws some unexpected circumstances his way. And along the method he discovers that his heart isn’t cold but his heart is capable of allowing people in to love them.

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    In This Life review [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    This book was nothing like I was used to from Cora but oh my I so enjoyed it. Y'all Nash knows tragedy and he is getting hit with some more. Kat is a sweetie and she's taking care of baby and it takes her a while for her to warm up to Nash!!! Y'all these two fall for each other at a rough moment but I gotta say they create the most of it. Its a emotional journey but they work through it and grow.

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    In This Life review [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    Kat is a feisty loveable character. Nash is a nifty with a lot to learn about forgiveness moving on and especially about love. Place these two together with two amazing children and you won't wish the story to end.

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    In This Life review [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    Cora Brent is an AMAZING written whose books always leave me happy. I TOTALLY adored Nash and Kat's story. Of course, I loved the kiddos. This book was extremely well written, and, as always, I look forward to more.

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    In This Life review [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    I was turned a fan of Cora Brent with the gentry boys books and so far I have every one of her books you will love this book and any other books she has published amazing read

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    In This Life review [Book]  2018-5-22 18:0

    This story wasn’t as intense as the Gentry boys but it was just as amazing. A story of life’s mistakes turning into life’s beauty. As always I love Cora’s books!!

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    Declutter Your Life: Out With The Old, In With The New (In All Areas Of Your Life) review [Book]  2018-7-15 18:1

    I love this book. It was simple and fast to read and kept my attention throughout the book. That is necessary to me as I can be easily distracted. The hard thing about sticking to reading this book is that it will create you wish to obtain up and go declutter!

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    Declutter Your Life: Out With The Old, In With The New (In All Areas Of Your Life) review [Book]  2018-7-15 18:1

    This book has literally been life-changing. I really enjoyed reading the book and it did support motivate me to clean locations that I had been putting off to downsize and declutter.

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    Declutter Your Life: Out With The Old, In With The New (In All Areas Of Your Life) review [Book]  2018-7-15 18:1

    it is a very amazing book.i love it very e stylus of this book is very simple and interesting.i [email protected]#$%! become very famous and famous. unique thanks to its writer.Everything written in this book makes sense, definitely a amazing read! I recommend this book and would read more books from this author.

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    Declutter Your Life: Out With The Old, In With The New (In All Areas Of Your Life) review [Book]  2018-7-15 18:1

    Amazing general starting presentation on the subject with examples. I believe the you need to wish to simplify before these suggestions will benefit you. A lot of ideas felt common sense and a few seemed overly complex, so the reader will need to pick and choose what feels right in their situation

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    Declutter Your Life: Out With The Old, In With The New (In All Areas Of Your Life) review [Book]  2018-7-15 18:1

    This book will support you learn and understand more about Declutter. You will be able to know how you can clean your life, mind and put in an older method but can support you to have an spacious put that you could ever have.

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    Declutter Your Life: Out With The Old, In With The New (In All Areas Of Your Life) review [Book]  2018-7-15 18:1

    In here a lot of information. I realize this book content. Simple to read and well written about Declutter your life. Read and growth up your life. Helpful tutorial content book for everyone. Thankful for Author.

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    Declutter Your Life: Out With The Old, In With The New (In All Areas Of Your Life) review [Book]  2018-7-15 18:1

    This Declutter Your Life book is a amazing fast read. I found it full of amazing hints to manage the Out With The Old, In With The Fresh in your life, this book is a must read.

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    Declutter Your Life: Out With The Old, In With The New (In All Areas Of Your Life) review [Book]  2018-7-15 18:1

    At latest somebody to keep my hand while I obtain this garbage out! Truly however a huge portion of the book is evident yet it is truly helping me. Much obliged creator.

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    Declutter Your Life: Out With The Old, In With The New (In All Areas Of Your Life) review [Book]  2018-7-15 18:1

    This book is really amazing .i love this book.I believe the you need to wish to simplify before these suggestions will benifit commended

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    Declutter Your Life: Out With The Old, In With The New (In All Areas Of Your Life) review [Book]  2018-7-15 18:1

    An perfect book on declutter your life. This book is extremely well-written and well explained by the author. I really love this book and recommended.

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    Set for Life: Dominate Life, Money, and the American Dream review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:1

    This book's basic audience is people 30 and under who are just starting their professional lives post-college. I would highly recommend it to those folks. I cannot recommend it for anyone who is already deep in their career and looking for ways to create a transition out into a more self-directed e author doesn't acknowledge people in the latter circumstance, so I want the focus was created clear in the book at being said, I'm one who can always search nuggets of truth in any book. I found the sections on time utilization helpful where he talks about the day job taking up so much of your day. My job, including commute time, takes up 12 hours of my day. Finding a job with a shorter commute could obtain me 6+ hours of time back a week that could be spent on earning more ere are other truths that I picked up as well, but not enough to recommend to my peers.

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    Set for Life: Dominate Life, Money, and the American Dream review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:1

    Enjoyed the knowledge in this book thanks, gave me a more understanding on how to accomplish my dreams financially thanks.

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    Set for Life: Dominate Life, Money, and the American Dream review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:1

    This book is awesome! The tip is very practical and takes the complicated globe of finance and boils it down to the handful of things that really matter. It's a amazing balance of how to save and grow your income and then scale your method to financial freedom. I've already bought a copy for my brother and I'm sure it won't be the first one I give away to a mate or family.

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    Set for Life: Dominate Life, Money, and the American Dream review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:1

    I have not yet finished the book but I absolutely love the layout it is written in. the book being split up into 3 parts depending on your financial situation is pure genius. I am currently on part one in my financial life which is why I am taking my time with this book. Thank you for writing this and helping us out Scott Trench!

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    Set for Life: Dominate Life, Money, and the American Dream review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:1

    I gifted this book to a mate after reading it. Its a terrific book and has a amazing framework to follow. Though in some locations (cities) itll be harder to implement, the content is solid. Would recommend to anyone who needs direction and focus in life.

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    Set for Life: Dominate Life, Money, and the American Dream review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:1

    Awesome eye-opening book about how to achieve financial independence. Definitely worth the read for anyone, especially young professionals.

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    Set for Life: Dominate Life, Money, and the American Dream review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:1

    This book does a amazing job of laying out a no non-sense method of growing wealth. Then it explains how this wealth can be used to fund early financial freedom. The concepts are easily understood and it is a amazing book for young people and folks early in there investigation of lifestyle choices to lead to early financial freedom.

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    Set for Life: Dominate Life, Money, and the American Dream review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:1

    I like the no BS approach the writer takes. "Shut up and create it happen"! "Here is how you can do it". It's very practical and the blueprint is spot on. He covers all that's required to obtain going and tools to ry very amazing book/guide.#salute

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    Set for Life: Dominate Life, Money, and the American Dream review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:1

    Concrete tangible ideas that anyone can implement. If you follow bigger pockets podcasts or follow the website at all, then some of the tip was predictable. But overall amazing financial tip (some uncomfortably so) that can lead to early financial freedom as the author suggests.

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    Set for Life: Dominate Life, Money, and the American Dream review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:1

    I have read several finance/real estate books in my life but this has been the most relatable of them all. As a 21 year old graduate student, this book taught me how to use my time effectively now and select specific courses of action that will yield amazing returns. Phenomenal.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    I am one of those people who love animals (especially dogs) more than I do most people so I was really drawn to this book. I thought it would be another warm fuzzy, light read kind of book that I'd speed through but it ended up being more cerebral, in-depth and educational than I expected and I really enjoyed reading it. It had so a lot of facts about the history of pets that I had no idea about before reading this book. I kept reading parts of it out loud to my spouse because I'd search it so interesting.I'm glad I got a possibility to read it and for me it exceeded my expectations. For some others though I can see the potential for it not meeting them because the cover and title (at least to me) does give off the impression of a lighter read than it is.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    "Dogs love their friends... quite unlike people, who are incapable of pure love and always have to mix love and hate." - Sigmund FreudWe love them. We pamper them. We overspend on them, and when they leave us, it is loneliness like we have never known. They provide us real unconditional love. I can personally attest that my experience with animals, most recently with raising and then losing our 18 year old German Shepherd, was the most attractive and rewarding experience and a bond I will never forget as long as I live.Early on in Bradshaw's book, he grapples and refrains for the overuse, or perhaps misuse, of certain labels such as "pet," "companions," "owners," "pet parent," and even "caregiver." The reason is, that words can't seem to describe our "pets" and we can't circumscribe their significance to us with any label. Our relationship with our animals is coded in our DNA and we venture through the history and evolution of our working animals and hunting with them, to domesticated companions in "The Animals Among Us," you will explore fresh insights such as how Pet-based therapy seems to have positive effects on Autistic children, the reverence of cats in ancient Egypt, popular personalities and their pets, how grieving and death effects us and other in various parts of the globe and much is book will support you discover and reflect on our rich history with our animals and the benefits their unconditional love brings to us. There is no question that "pets" create us more human and Bradshaw's fresh book explains why in significant detail.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    This book was everything I had hoped it would be and more. Gosh, I do love animals and always have to have a cat or two living with me. So when it comes to books about pets and people, I'm all over it. I so enjoyed reading this book and it actually created me feel even closer to my furry feline adshaw did a unbelievable job writing this book with amazing flow, words that translated into photos dancing in my head, and so much more. It's a hard to place down book and one I could have just kept on reading if there were more pages to read. It's that p, this is a very unique book that anyone with animals sharing their lives would enjoy.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    John Bradshaw’s THE ANIMALS AMONG US discusses the relationships humankind has with animals of all kinds, with an emphasis on dogs and cats. This work is extensive; the mail text is about 310 pages, with a preface and an explanation of the conventions Bradshaw uses, such as how he prefers to refer to the humans who care for animals (He explains why he prefers and uses “owner.”) and how and why he does use “it” when the animal’s gender is unknown or perhaps not particularly important. In the back matter, the notes cover about thirty-seven pages. The final copy will be indexed, but my advance copy is not; I’m certain that the index will be thorough as adshaw works as a biologist, and this work probably leads to what I see as some faults with this book. Though thorough, Bradshaw seems to lack a warmth that a lot of people reading a book like this one would want. I felt too much as if I was in his laboratory with him rather than talking with him about and among his pets or mine and how humankind domesticated animals to become pets. Though a clinical tone is appropriate for a scholarly work, that tone seems “off” for a work like I believed this one to be. With two advanced degrees myself, I have read a lot of scholarly papers; this work reminded me of a scholarly paper, not something a pet owner would smile and laugh over. Who did he truly intend as his audience, and what was his purpose?With this in mind, I give THE ANIMALS AMONG US a four-star rating. I do wish to read Bradshaw’s other works, but I think this work misses the tag a small when it comes to his readership and his purpose. It may be perfect for a science department library, but to general readers Bradshaw may come across as a small cold about the animals he claims to care so much about.

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    I have long been a sucker for any kind of non-fiction book that looks at the history of the human-animal bond, especially when it comes to dogs. So, naturally, I was quite drawn to this one which is a good, well-researched history of pets. It relies a lot on quantifiable evidence more so than anecdotes and speculation (like this subset of non-fiction sometimes seems to turn to). The formatting of the book with breakouts gives it a more modern flow, though it does break-up the experience if you are reading this cover-to-cover. I think some readers would prefer actual photographs than the detailed drawings, but this didn’t bother me at all. I wouldn’t recommend this as a non-fiction book to read straight-through, as by the ending, it started to feel a bit e historical view of domestication is laid out in an interesting and logical fashion and there are some anecdotes interspersed throughout that liven things up a bit, too. And though the author leans towards the science side, there are still some missing links and steps that are frankly unknowable. But these do not go unacknowledged. And I think that this is handled very well here. I really was quite taken with the idea that there is a genetic link for a “knack” with animals that may run in some families (I know that my grandmother had such a knack for dogs, and it interesting to see which of her six kids share this, and which of her grandchildren also can’t imagine life without a dog). Unlike some books on this topic, it never gets overly preachy or political but it is fascinating and definitely a amazing addition to this subsect of non-fiction!

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    The Animals Among Us: How Pets Make Us Human review [Book]  2017-11-27 18:2

    I chose this book to review because I am a die-hard, animal lover. I've always had cats and dogs live with me (along with a few other assorted species) and really can't imagine life without them. I can't tolerate animal cruelty and even watching nature shows where animals slay each other for meal is impossible for me to endure. I've wondered sometimes why I feel so strongly in this zone and chose this book mainly because it delves deeply into the human/pet relationship. A lot of time and effort has been place into it and it fully deserves 5 stars. Besides the expected info about our love and need for companion animals (mainly dogs and cats but other animals are mentioned), some very interesting info and some speculation is given too - such as the need for people to stroke pets. From page 216 - "Perhaps we search stroking our pets so pleasurable because it taps into some half-remembered primate instinct that we can no longer satisfy entirely by touching each other."The book discusses pet assisted therapy for elderly, cats playing with toys are actually hunting in their heads, people who are violent to each other are also violent to animals, does compassion for animals have a genetic component? and much, MUCH more very interesting and enlightening info is given. I don't necessarily believe it all to be true, and some of it is hypothesized, but the source of the hypothications create amazing sense.If you have ever wondered about your relationship with your pet(s), or why people act the method they do concerning their pets and vice-versa, then this book should definitely respond a lot of questions. Warning - some things are not simple to read. I had a hard time in the very beginning about people eating animals especially dogs and cats. The fact that millions of dogs and cats are consumed annually makes me sick to think about it.

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