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    need pin to play rsweeps []  2020-5-22 6:38

    Lost my pin for RSweeps

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    bringg dispatch How to setup [For Panera Drivers]  2020-5-28 1:23
    [email protected]

    I the application ands it asks for my email and pads and I can’t see hint registration to use the application what’s their point no help page or nothing! Help me out

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    Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef's Journey to Discover America's New Melting-Pot Cuisine [Book]  2018-7-5 18:0

    Amazing read

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    Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef's Journey to Discover America's New Melting-Pot Cuisine [Book]  2018-7-5 18:0

    A thoroughly enjoyable read that was honest, entertaining, and had amazing voice. I loved the exploration of the subject of immigrant meal and how it evolves with each generation. One of the freshest meal books I’ve read in a while.

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    Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef's Journey to Discover America's New Melting-Pot Cuisine [Book]  2018-7-5 18:0

    Amazing read! Amazing stories along with a lot of recipes I’m looking forward to trying out. Can’t wait!

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    Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef's Journey to Discover America's New Melting-Pot Cuisine [Book]  2018-7-5 18:0

    While I bought this thinking it was more like his previous book smoke and pickles, I was not disappointed.

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    Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef's Journey to Discover America's New Melting-Pot Cuisine [Book]  2018-7-5 18:0

    Author is insufferably pretentious. Could not stand this book for more than a few minutes. He wouldn't even contain pictures because you the reader should "trust your instincts". This book is just an excuse for the author to blab on and on about himself, rather than share any useful recipes. 0/5

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    Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef's Journey to Discover America's New Melting-Pot Cuisine [Book]  2018-7-5 18:0

    On one hand, Buttermilk Graffiti gives us the dramatic sweep of American Regional meal in the 21st Century. As in 1939's United States Regional Cookbook, and Molly O'Neill's 2010 One Huge Table, this meal reflects put and people who've come from near and far. Edward Lee is as much an anthropologist and philosopher as he is gifted chef. His odyssey never nods, even as he questions his voyeurism and the chance that he is appropriating someone else's the other hand, the recipes will require serious kitchen time to understand what he's done with the inspirations he found. I've not yet had time to do that. As an expatriated Southerner, my first recipe try will be the Lacy Cornbread, the latest recipe in this tour-de-force.

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    Buttermilk Graffiti: A Chef's Journey to Discover America's New Melting-Pot Cuisine [Book]  2018-7-5 18:0

    Cool book! I'd love to just travel around exploring different things! I enjoyed Edward Lee's book and especially the recipes! The recipe for haesenpfeffer will be passed on to my daughter who makes a mean rabbit!Thank you to publisher for providing me a copy of the book in exchange for a fair review.

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    Becoming MomStrong Bible Study: A Six-Week Journey to Discover Your God-Given Calling []  2020-5-9 18:36

    I had the opportunity to hear Heidi speak at a conference latest year.. This woman is real.. This book is wonderful, and every mom, young or old should read it. The prayer points support me to pray things I wouldn't have necessarily thought of on my own.. God has gifted this woman to support a lot of others. God bless you Heidi. Hold sharing your awesome gift!

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    Becoming MomStrong Bible Study: A Six-Week Journey to Discover Your God-Given Calling []  2020-5-9 18:36

    Amazing study but so detailed. As a busy mom, I couldn’t even search the time to sit long enough to complete one lesson. The book is amazing but this is so in depth that, as a working mom, it did not support me feel Mom Strong! That being said, I still say obtain the book and test this out with it. Maybe you can search the time better than me!

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    Becoming MomStrong Bible Study: A Six-Week Journey to Discover Your God-Given Calling []  2020-5-9 18:36

    This companion to the awesome book by Heidi St. John, "Becoming MomStrong" is thick!!! I don't just mean page numbers - this bible study is the meat and potatoes of applying God's easy truths to the every day lives of women. This book is all about growing deeper roots in scripture and growing closer to the God who loves us. It's liberating without corrupting truth and it's a gentle challenge to the uniquely designed female heart.I've enjoyed other studies by Beth Moore - this study, in comparison, is more specifically applied to woman who have influence in the life of a child.I've read a lot of parenting books that American Christian culture has produced and honestly - none are more life giving. None are as rooted in Scripture. I've never read a Christian book that puts such a amazing emphasis on developing your own special walk with God rather than trying to apply someone else's formula to your special home and family. No more cookie cutter parenting - explore what truths God wants to speak to your life and your family...because no other book can do that - only God can and Heidi's book and Bible study gently holds the hand of the reader and leads them to the Life giving well.Heidi also isn't turning the mole hills into mountains here - she has experienced truly deep hurts and has experienced God's grace and healing. This book is a testimony to what God has wrought in her life that it might bring others who damage to a put of healing and victory.

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    Becoming MomStrong Bible Study: A Six-Week Journey to Discover Your God-Given Calling []  2020-5-9 18:36

    This bible study is a amazing partner with the book Becoming Mom Strong. Each week has applicable pieces, journaling prompts and examples of women from the Bible and how their story can speak to us today. Highly recommend this study as well as the book Becoming Mom Strong.

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    Becoming MomStrong Bible Study: A Six-Week Journey to Discover Your God-Given Calling []  2020-5-9 18:36

    I recently had the privilege to read through this book as part of the begin team. It was such a blessing in my life as a mom of a three year old. With so much I could say about this book and it's sweet author, Heidi, I will leave it at this. There are a lot of devotional books out there and a lot of self-help books, if you will; however, this book is the first of its kind that I have read which is really a call to moms to point them back to the Word of God. It is not meant to be a devotional book. It is mean to be a war cry to mom's that we need to be spending our devotions in the Bible! Heidi is honest, brutally honest at times, about her journey as a mom of 7 and it speaks to every mama's heart!

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    Becoming MomStrong Bible Study: A Six-Week Journey to Discover Your God-Given Calling []  2020-5-9 18:36

    Never before have I had a Bible study tutorial as "meaty" as this one! The questions, journaling prompts and applications are wonderful. Using this with a little group of women right now and it has encouraged fruitful thinking and discussion. If you have read Becoming MomStrong, you MUST obtain the Bible study!

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    Becoming MomStrong Bible Study: A Six-Week Journey to Discover Your God-Given Calling []  2020-5-9 18:36

    I LOVED the book and I decided to obtain the Bible study. I like the studies but I feel like they’re too long for moms...I don’t have a lot of time to sit down and do a bible study, and even though I test to do a bible study every day, with this one particular bible study it’s almost impossible to finish a whole study in one session. So I have to break it in two and it makes me feel like I didn’t finish what I planned. The studies are deep and thoughtful and helpful for moms who are trying to follow God and entrust their lives and loved ones’ lives as they raise their children.

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    Becoming MomStrong Bible Study: A Six-Week Journey to Discover Your God-Given Calling []  2020-5-9 18:36

    I am currently working through this Bible study with the Becoming MomStrong book. It has been such a blessing to my life and brought me closer to God at a time when I was feeling far away. Heidi St John is such an encouraging woman and is inspiring me to become the mom God designed me to be and disciple my kids to support them become who God created them to be.

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    Becoming MomStrong Bible Study: A Six-Week Journey to Discover Your God-Given Calling []  2020-5-9 18:36

    This is an AMAZING study!! I HIGHLY recommend it to really obtain the most from the MomStrong Book by H.S.J. I love how she shares scripture throughout the book to bring encouragement to moms!! I have read over 20 mom-books and I have been a christian for 30 years and this was the BEST mom books I have read!!

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    Becoming MomStrong Bible Study: A Six-Week Journey to Discover Your God-Given Calling []  2020-5-9 18:36

    I just finished week 2 and I am LOVING this! I just recently started diving into my faith after having my 3rd child and getting my sanity back together. I have felt so a lot of emotions over the latest 5 years and this book is talking right to me! It brings up current problems and concerns for us moms and raising our children. I highly recommend!!

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    Alphabeatz. Graffiti Alphabets from A to Z []  2020-2-12 20:57

    My boyfriend has been wanting this book for awhile so I bought it for him for Christmas and he loves it! He took it to his mates house and it was a huge hit there as well. Very happy and would recommend to anyone who is into graffiti.

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    Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders with America's Mexican Migrants []  2020-1-23 19:10

    This is an exceptional book that puts a face on the current hot subject of illegal aliens in America. Having purchased property in Mexico I am reading a lot of books and finding the culture much more diverse and charming than Americans realize. My recent book was Finding Enrique, the story of kids left in Central America who are raised without their mothers as they are in the USA earning a living for the family. These children endure a heartbreaking journey trying to join their mothers. Imagine arriving in Texas and asking which method to San Francisco!Having learned so much, I purchased this book to review how the illegal alien environment was in the late 1980s as that is when this book was written. Frankly, it sounds very related to today as so a lot of of the workers are migrant farm workers and travel back and forth each season. Frankly, I just assumed that once across the aliens stayed here but in this book that is not the case as they continually travel back to their village. In addition, there is an entire "word of mouth" network of recommending fresh workers from certain villages to American farms of previous is author starts on orange groves in AZ. The living conditions are deplorable and it's interesting how he lives and works among the Mexicans but they treat him with such respect. From AZ, they head to FL for a various season. This is one of the comical parts of the book as over 6 people load in to a $300 vehicle and head across America in a blizzard with repeated vehicle trouble. After a lot of mishaps they do create it to Florida where conditions are related to slightly e Author then spends a amazing of time in villages of workers he has met in central Mexico. This gives him amazing insight in to how their culture is being pulled apart by the migration to America, specifically how it breaks down the core family in this heavily Catholic country. This visit contains an illegal passage into America specifically through the AZ desert which is quite dangerous. Also, when revisiting AZ, there is a side trip to Los Angeles for work that due to not good transportation they decide to fly. This sounds like a amazing idea until you see that these men have never been in an airport before which creates amazing comedy and sympathetic stories. Finally, there is an extended stay in Los Angeles where it shows living conditions for those who have lived in America for a while in a huge city.I must say this author took amazing risk, physically on crossing and legally as he could have been accused of harboring illegal aliens that carries high penalties. I compliment him on this special research that generates a compelling read. I found this book extremely educational and entertaining. And, it may change your view of the plight of these aliens. I'm not sure what the solution is but I have amazing respect for the hardworking tenacity of a lot of of these people.A very necessary book concerning current events.

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    Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders with America's Mexican Migrants []  2020-1-23 19:10

    I work in corrections and with illegtal entry all day long, I thought it may be interesting to see how they got across, but this book is pre Sept 11 so the methods are somewhat harder now, not impossible obviously !! It was a fast one night read. But will look for a more current book.

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    Northland: A 4,000-Mile Journey Along America's Forgotten Border []  2020-2-2 1:16

    Porter Fox has written on an intriguing topic - the border between the U.S. and Canada and how this boundary cuts through different geographies and ginning in Maine and taking a series of trips over several years, he follows the U.S.-Canadian border and learns the history of the people and locations that are located along it.I found Parts I (The Dawnland) and II (The Sweet-Water Seas) the most compelling sections. The time he spent growing up in Maine deeply informs the first section of the book, and you can tell he is most intimately knowledgeable about that part of the border. You almost think he would have been content to produce the whole book just on that section, but that approach would have found fewer readers and created it harder to search a he moves west, his knowledge of the geology and history decreases, and he becomes more of a tourist, visiting the camp of protesters fighting the ETP pipeline. I can imagine that as a journalist, he found the protest movement exciting and writes extensively about the movement but never really explains how this protest fits in with the book's theme of "America's Forgotten Border". He tells a amazing story about how native Americans have been treated by the U.S. government, but that almost calls out for a separate book, and in doing so, he neglects the basic focus of U.S.-Canadian relations in the the time he takes a trip to the West Coast, he is reporting what he sees, but has lost the deeper context he was able to provide at the eastern end of his journey. He ends the book by finding himself lost as he tries to drive to the Seattle airport, and that is a fitting metaphor for his West Coast adventure.If you the book for his vision of the eastern half of the U.S.-Canadian border, you won't be disappointed. I found myself swept up by his canoe trips and greatly enjoyed his time on a Amazing Lakes freighter; but I suggest that a related story of the U.S.-Canadian border beyond the Mississippi River remains to be written.

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    Northland: A 4,000-Mile Journey Along America's Forgotten Border []  2020-2-2 1:16

    This is one book I truly didn't wish to end! Porter Fox's expedition along the 4,000-mile-long northern border of the U.S. is so much more than a travelogue, it's a modern-day pioneer's journal that chronicles exploration of the land, the history and the cultures that have existed for centuries if not millennia along the "northland." With his backpack, canoe, maps and an assortment of books, Fox sets out for the Hi-Line for an unforgettable engaging journey that thrills as much as it entertains!Having grown up in the east-coast "borderland," Fox begins his journey in Lubec, Maine, and via canoe, on foot, freighter and automobile, he traverses the northern border from sea to shining sea. Along the way, he retraces hundreds of years of courageous and treacherous adventures of our earliest pioneers who defined and shaped our land from Champlain's expeditions in the northeast to the "sweet-water seas," to the "voyageurs" who plied the Boundary Waters of Minnesota, to the sacred lands of the "seven fires" and continuing along the 49th parallel to Peach Arch Border Crossing, Washington -- 4,000 miles of captivating accounts of his experiences while immersing the reader with his vivid poetic prose of the changing landscapes along the way. Throughout the book, I felt like I was there alongside this intrepid explorer.Overall, this book is THE consummate reference tutorial to the "Northland," both past and present, deeply researched and also includes an invaluable index that I referenced throughout my reading. For all those armchair explorers, modern-day pioneers, I highly recommend this engaging memoir that hearkens back to the days of the world's greatest explorers!

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    Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders with America's Mexican Migrants []  2020-1-23 19:10

    This was a book club selection. I live in Arizona so I'm familiar with the arguments pro and con regarding illegal immigration. I have sympathy for the situation a lot of face in their home country place I also recognize the undesirable elements are also using this path to our country. It seems to be no true respond for the problem

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    Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders with America's Mexican Migrants []  2020-1-23 19:10

    This book a first-hand testimony of the lifes of Mexican undocumented aliens, on both sides of the border. The author has spent a year working alongside, living with and ultimately befriending them,while picking fruit in Arizona and Florida. Ted Conover even spends the off-season in his fresh friends' village in Mexico and crosses the border with them is an awesome testimony, in turn hilarious, riveting and sometimes sad, of what goes on in this underground world, of which we actually know very small aside from some bits of info sometimes featured in the news about the Immigration border e author goes where very few "gabachos" ever have been and depicts other small known characters, such as coyotes, the judiciales, border patrol agents, occasional smugglers keen on making additional income as well as US employers. He also sheds light on the wonderful conditions inherent to illegal border crossing.Once a (documented) alien myself, now a naturalized US citizen, I couldn't support but search this testimony very is acc doesn't aim at debating over the legal and political problem of illegal aliens. Rather, it puts faces on those hard-working, decent, silent, anonymous and almost invisible people who work incredibly hard to place produce on our supermarket shelves, clean our houses, maintain our gardens and wash our cars...A must-read!

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    Northland: A 4,000-Mile Journey Along America's Forgotten Border []  2020-2-2 1:16

    Well researched and a very fun exciting read! So much I did not know!

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    Northland: A 4,000-Mile Journey Along America's Forgotten Border []  2020-2-2 1:16

    While at times descriptive & at times a history class.& I found it a small preachy at times.I found irony that environmentalists protest versus damaging the t leave trash behind.& this along with other books I've read about history & current state of ls of people & the land.I was expecting more tales of the journey it's is in the description.I can't support but feel part of the story is missing.& seems rushed through at points.I guess it would of been a much thicker book having done ever all that said it was a amazing read.even if I thought it required more info of the journey.

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    Northland: A 4,000-Mile Journey Along America's Forgotten Border []  2020-2-2 1:16

    Delightful book about a series of trips along the US/Canadian border. Private encounters and a lot of historical and contemporary research. Nice.

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    Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders with America's Mexican Migrants []  2020-1-23 19:10

    I was born in El Paso, Texas only one mile from Juarez, Mexico. I grew up in Las Cruces, Fresh Mexico. As I kid I would ask my Mother to create sandwiches for the illegal Migrants working in the fields next to our home in Brazito. Ted Conover tells it as I remember it being before I joined the Troops and moved away from home. I am becoming a huge fan of Mr. Conover after reading this book and his other book "New Jack". Mr. Conover tells things the method they are and lives what he writes about. I think everyone should read this book and learn that Migrants from Mexico are just hard working people trying to earn a living and create for their families. From Mexico through the United States I know you will have fun this book. Corruption Behind Bars: Stories of Crime and Corruption In Our American Prison System.

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    Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders with America's Mexican Migrants []  2020-1-23 19:10

    This is an necessary book, particularly in today's charged political climate. It is very simple to in absolutes when one with abstract ideas, but what Conover does well, is to humanize those ideas. While a lot of speak of illegal imigration, Conover speaks of specific imigrants. He shares their perspectives,not condemning them, not glorifying them, but merely letting them tell their itionally Conover is remarkable for the amount of energy he place into getting to know his subject. Half of the worth of the book is the story of the migrants, the other half certainly is Conover's own story.

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    Northland: A 4,000-Mile Journey Along America's Forgotten Border []  2020-2-2 1:16

    Part a history of our northern border, part a travel adventure, this book was totally fascinating. Especially with all the spotlights on the southern border, this book is a refreshing take on our US border. If you love the Amazing Lakes, you should read this. If you feel for the Native situation, you should read this. If you wish to learn about our country, you should read this.

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    Northland: A 4,000-Mile Journey Along America's Forgotten Border []  2020-2-2 1:16

    In Northland: A 4,000 Mile Journey Along America's Forgotten Border, the author, Porter Fox, describes his travels along America's northern border shared with Canada. Over this three-year expedition across the northland, Fox encounters a lot of historical happenings of the past and show and sheds light on the underprivileged and forgotten people of the amazing plains, Native Americans. The book leaps between short historical explanations of how a put or body of water was named what it is, as well as Fox's own experience trekking the Northland. This book receives a powerful recommendation from myself and created me ponder the forgotten belt of wild America delineated by iron monuments, rock piles, and clear-cuts.

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    Northland: A 4,000-Mile Journey Along America's Forgotten Border []  2020-2-2 1:16

    Porter Fox is an honest tutorial as he takes the reader on an exploration of America's Northland. His thoughtful observations and interactions with the special folks who live in the region combine with his rich prose to create for a delightful and deep journey through the region.

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    Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders with America's Mexican Migrants []  2020-1-23 19:10

    Ted Conover is an perfect writer...I have read several of his books and they are so real to the subject. Ted digs deep and involves himself within wht he is researching. I absolutly am enthralled with his writing and topic matter. It keep my interest so much that sometimes i stay awake at night reading beyond my time to sleep. I've learned so much from him because of his private investigatios by putting himself in the topic and working from the inside of his subject. I highly recommend reading this book along with his others. He is a amazing representer of how things really are.

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    Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders with America's Mexican Migrants []  2020-1-23 19:10

    I purchased this book for my book club, and although I was a bit perplexed by the choice (living in Fresh England where the immigration issue is not so obvious), I was actually pleasantly e subject is one that should be on everyone's mind with respect to the immigration issue in our ever, this fresh, private perspective does give us a "birds eye view" of the life of the Mexican immigrant culture, and how difficult and complex it is. I especially found the book interesting having grown up in California, and observing first hand, what a complicated economic and social issue immigration really is for the immigrants and natives though a bit slow in parts, it did give a refreshing insight to the culture that may not have been captured by a mere casual observer. On the other hand, I found the chapter set in the airport quite fascinating and entertaining!I would definitely recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in the Hispanic immigrant culture.

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    Northland: A 4,000-Mile Journey Along America's Forgotten Border []  2020-2-2 1:16

    The book started out as advertised with the author tracing the line forming the boundary with the US and Canada. While he stays in the East, he stays faithful to his mission. He gets distracted once he clears the Amazing e stories about how the border came to be and the history behind discovering the geography generally defined as the border region are well done. There are amazing brief and informative tellings of the discoveries of Champlain and early French explorers. A journey he takes on a working boat through the Saint Lawrence and Amazing Lakes gives an interesting acc of work and life afloat along that portion of the ever, as the author ventures further West, he touches less of the border and journey's beautiful far away from what can be described as the border region. He spends a lot of time on the protests that accompanied the Dakota Access Pipeline which felt out of bounds from a book about the line separating the US and Canada. If memory serves me, the protest website is a lot closer to South Dakota than the border. After the pipeline chapter, he beautiful much makes a quick bee-line to the coast and the end of the book skipping over huge geographic e history is interesting as are is too-infrequent trips along the actual border. I found this a hit or miss work - parts interesting, parts sped through or digressions.

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    Northland: A 4,000-Mile Journey Along America's Forgotten Border []  2020-2-2 1:16

    This book was a rich history of the region that is the North border. It once again created powerful my thankfulness to have a neighbor as amazing as Canada. Thanks for the amazing read.

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    Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders with America's Mexican Migrants []  2020-1-23 19:10

    Rather than sitting in an office reading books or conducting economic studies, this author puts his boots on and goes to where the immigrants live, work and travel. Yes, the author travels with groups of illegal immigrants on their method to jobs in the United States.He spends a considerable amount of time in a Mexican village getting to know the culture and the motivation behind their lives. He spends time working in a camp of migrant agricultural workers in both Arizona and Florida. The research is hands on. He documents the struggles, the culture, the admirable qualities of the people as well as the not so admirable qualities of the people and their culture. This book is written by someone who walked a lot of miles in these people's moccasins.But it's outdated. This book, although only a few years old, is for historical purposes only. After 9/11 crossing the border has changed significantly. Given the difficulties the people described in this book had over a decade ago, one can only imagine that their lives have been created even more difficult by latest government policies and public opinion.

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    Coyotes: A Journey Across Borders with America's Mexican Migrants []  2020-1-23 19:10

    Really, really interesting, A very well-written description of a sustained association with Mexicans crossing the border and picking our fruits and vegetables. Everyone in this country should know about this! The author met some admirable and remarkable people (not U.S or Mexican cops) and the book is very absorbing read, I recommend it.

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    Saha: A Chef's Journey Through Lebanon and Syria [Middle Eastern Cookbook, 150 Recipes] []  2020-2-1 7:0

    A mate of mine was recently in Lebanon and upon her return she recommended this attractive book. As someone from Lebanese descent I bought it and have started making the recipes! They are unbelievable and top of that I have a attractive picture book that I hold on my coffee table! It's fun for me to create Lebanese recipes that are alittle finer that what I am used to making. I can't wait to prepare them all!

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    Saha: A Chef's Journey Through Lebanon and Syria [Middle Eastern Cookbook, 150 Recipes] []  2020-2-1 7:1

    I absolutely LOVE Lebanese/Syrian food! I want the book had more recipes, but I was truly impressed by Anthony Bourdain's forward!

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    Saha: A Chef's Journey Through Lebanon and Syria [Middle Eastern Cookbook, 150 Recipes] []  2020-2-1 7:0

    Buy this book for your reference library if you are at all interested in a book with attractive pictures, unbelievable stories but most importantly yummy recipes. There is something for everyone here. Your tastebuds will come rsonal favourites are the Goats salad, Tangy Lamb chops and chickpeas (so simple and tasty) and the spicy lamb. I am not a true sweet eater but have even created a few from this book as well. Enjoy!

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    Saha: A Chef's Journey Through Lebanon and Syria [Middle Eastern Cookbook, 150 Recipes] []  2020-2-1 7:1

    amazing book.

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    Saha: A Chef's Journey Through Lebanon and Syria [Middle Eastern Cookbook, 150 Recipes] []  2020-2-1 7:1

    As an amateur photgrapher, I love the pictures accompanying this well crafted cookbook. Greg's treatment of the traditional recipes and variations on these recipes is well balanced. The recipes are simple to follow and they create for unbelievable additions to anyone's culinary taste. Have fun and Saha to all.

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    Saha: A Chef's Journey Through Lebanon and Syria [Middle Eastern Cookbook, 150 Recipes] []  2020-2-1 7:0

    I love this book! My husband was just in Lebanon and brought me back dozens of spices! According to him these recipes and the true deal! I'm cooking up a storm! The recipes are really simple to follow and very few of them are time consuming. I've looked at the bookstore for other books on Lebanon meal and there are only three that I could find. Two by this author and one by someone else who doesn't even use any Lebanon spices. If you wish a true feel for the country this book.

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    Saha: A Chef's Journey Through Lebanon and Syria [Middle Eastern Cookbook, 150 Recipes] []  2020-2-1 7:1

    She was verbally wishing I have fun her meals.. an awesome book - Awesome cultural notes, wonderfully delicious recipes just beg to be cooked

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    Saha: A Chef's Journey Through Lebanon and Syria [Middle Eastern Cookbook, 150 Recipes] []  2020-2-1 7:1

    I've ordered the book for a Christmas present. I received it in no time and in perfect condition. The book met my expectations after reading the reviews on Amazon. It's a attractive book to hold or to give as a unique show for people who like to travel and like food.

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    Saha: A Chef's Journey Through Lebanon and Syria [Middle Eastern Cookbook, 150 Recipes] []  2020-2-1 7:0

    I haven't cooked my method through this cookbook, but some of the recipes have been true winners! For instance, the Manoushi bread recipe is amazing! We've created it quite a few times. It puffs up so well and tastes great. I've used it as a pita for chickpea sandwiches and to dip it in hummus. I've created this recipe with all-purpose flour and with half whole wheat half all-purpose flour. That was great, too. We also enjoyed the pull-apart cheese bread dinner rolls and we're looking forward to making the manoushi bread pizzas.I haven't really read much of the cookbook except the recipes, so I don't know about that part of the book, but I've enjoyed all the recipes we've created so far.

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    Saha: A Chef's Journey Through Lebanon and Syria [Middle Eastern Cookbook, 150 Recipes] []  2020-2-1 7:1

    Love the recipes. Wife doing dinner with it tonight amazing food.Have always liked this type of meal and it has a dozens of dishes

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    Discover! America's Great River Road: Volume III: St. Louis, Missouri, to Memphis, Tennessee []  2020-1-23 1:17

    This volume is still worth reading today, nearly 20 years after first publication. The info is to the point and there is plenty of it to enjoy. In a day and age when everyone heads for the internet to search everything under the sun, it is amazing to see a tutorial book as thorough as this one still available.

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    Discover! America's Great River Road: Volume III: St. Louis, Missouri, to Memphis, Tennessee []  2020-1-23 1:17

    Was dissappointed. Long and wordy and not a lot of information on actual travel info Felt Street Trip USA was better and worth the money

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    Discover! America's Great River Road: Volume III: St. Louis, Missouri, to Memphis, Tennessee []  2020-1-23 1:17

    While planning for yet another summer of rides on the motorcycle,my wife and I had this book sent as part of our research.We were very disappointed, it has 5 stars. So what is the problem?For one thing it is not well written nor does it seem up to date.We travel a lot, all over the USA and the is like asking about a amazing cafe, first you need to know the people who felt it was great. Do they know amazing food?We know well done books and this is not one. I move it to the waste fill.

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    Discover! America's Great River Road: Volume III: St. Louis, Missouri, to Memphis, Tennessee []  2020-1-23 1:17

    Amazing series.

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    Drive-Thru Dreams: A Journey Through the Heart of America's Fast-Food Kingdom []  2020-2-1 7:9

    Drive-Thru Dreams is a terrific book. It's an informative and entertaining look at the empire of Quick Meal which, despite its international reach, remains a uniquely American is book is created to be enjoyed while savoring a crisp french fry or munching on quarter-pound burger. Highly recommended.

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    Drive-Thru Dreams: A Journey Through the Heart of America's Fast-Food Kingdom []  2020-2-1 7:9

    1)Danielle Steele2)C.S. Lewis3)John Grisham3)Adam ChandlerThis is a amazing book and Mr. Chandler’s witty and thoughtful writing style lend to a superb and delightful pace. Quick meal unites Americans in a unique way, with fond childhood memories of Huge Macs, Whoppers and french fries - and Adam captures that (and the history behind it) brilliantly in Drive Thru Dreams. Grab a milkshake (or Frosty), place on a baseball game, and read this book.

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    Drive-Thru Dreams: A Journey Through the Heart of America's Fast-Food Kingdom []  2020-2-1 7:9

    Really hits hard from the standpoint of nostalgia. And some very interesting historical tidbits that I never knew.

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    Drive-Thru Dreams: A Journey Through the Heart of America's Fast-Food Kingdom []  2020-2-1 7:9

    I've never been particularly attracted to fast-food, either as the focus of books and documentaries, or as a dietary staple (readers inclined in any of the above directions will be richly rewarded.) But this book managed to artfully defy my dispositions, presenting a broad and balanced view of the fast-food landscape, and more crucially its relevance in our national fabric- for eaters of all culinary stripes. And I may never have bought in to the topic matter in the hands of another author. Chandler's writing sizzles with wit, verve, new insights, and familiar observations freshly turned. He shifts with stylistic ease between modes historical, anthropological, personal, and poetic- with his waggish humor running through it all. Damn fine book. Highly recommended.

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    Drive-Thru Dreams: A Journey Through the Heart of America's Fast-Food Kingdom []  2020-2-1 7:9

    A scholarly but affectionate look at America's -- and by extension the world's -- favourite treat. (But I feel the book could have been longer.)

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    Drive-Thru Dreams: A Journey Through the Heart of America's Fast-Food Kingdom []  2020-2-1 7:9

    The author does a commendable job of showing how the inception, expansion and evolution of quick meal restaurants was both shaped by, and shaped, America's culture over the latest hundred years. More emphasis is devoted to those brands that have endured vs those that failed, so those interested in general business will particularly have fun learning about the dozens of tactics and strategies that the winners have utilized to achieve their success. The book, while a fun and entertaining read, is not shallow; readers will search quite a bit to, shall we say, "chew on."

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    Drive-Thru Dreams: A Journey Through the Heart of America's Fast-Food Kingdom []  2020-2-1 7:9

    Ugh. Much weaker cousin to the far superior Quick Meal Nation. I had high hopes for this book. They were dashed, unfortunately.

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    Drive-Thru Dreams: A Journey Through the Heart of America's Fast-Food Kingdom []  2020-2-1 7:9

    I devoured this book (pun intended) in two days. It's smart, fun, and funny, and the writing is beautiful. Excellent for history buffs and quick meal loyalists, of course, but there are also a lot of thoughtful, unexpected insights that will interest anyone who cares about modern-day meal systems and politics.

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    Drive-Thru Dreams: A Journey Through the Heart of America's Fast-Food Kingdom []  2020-2-1 7:9

    I loved this book. I read a lot of U.S. history books and while they’re informational, few are entertaining. This book did a amazing job telling short stories about how the top quick meal restaurants got their begin and how they woven into the fabric of American culture.

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    Drive-Thru Dreams: A Journey Through the Heart of America's Fast-Food Kingdom []  2020-2-1 7:9

    I bought this book because I was interested in reading about the history/origins of America's quick meal industry. What I did not appreciate was a rewriting of history according to the author's political and idealistic agenda. It's a shame. The title of the book seemed promising. but the book itself was more along the lines of propaganda.

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    How to Draw Graffiti [App]  2019-6-6 13:44

    need more options

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy V. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-23 1:23

    There are any number of studies of the Supreme Court's 1896 decision in Plessy v. Ferguson which held that "separate but equal" was constitutional in railroad transportation, a doctrine that was applied consistently in a lot of locations (including public education) until the 1954 Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education. This very long book (505 pages of text; 58 pages of notes) approaches the subject from an special perspective, somewhat broader than a traditional legal history e author begins his study in 1833, with Massachusetts railroads segregating passengers by race, and traces this practice up until 1896. Moreover, he focuses upon three key players in the Plessy drama--Justices John Marshall Harlan and Henry Billings Brown, and Albion W. Tourgee (who lost the case) through extensive biographical studies. In short, the author here is devoted to establishing the context of the case and the individual histories of these three actors going all the method back to 1833. He demonstrates that to really understand this case, you have to do a lot more than merely read the Court's e author's discussions of the two Justices, especially Harlan, are outstanding. While there is not much to Brown, who wrote the 8-1 decision upholding the practice, Harlan is a fascinating character. While fighting on the Union side in the Civil Battle in Kentucky, he never opposed slavery and hoped Lincoln would just restore the status quo ante and not interfere in his state. He was certainly no "flaming liberal" and how he came to write his dissent in well covered in the book. Tourgee was a driven enemy of the practice, especially after having lived in North Carolina for 17 years after the war. He really achieved fame not for his work in this case, but as a best novelist. While his arguments to the Court were sound, he was method ahead of his time. Any analysis of the Court by Tourgee and his allies would have to have demonstrated clearly that their chances were zero with the Court's membership. It seems the Justices simply didn't see what injury was inflicted by "Jim Crow cars." I think this is why Chief Justice Warren in his opinion striking the practice in public education placed reliance upon sociological evidence (such as the "black doll" studies by Kenneth Clark) to demonstrate the severe emotional injuries inflicted upon segregated school of the most interesting things I learned was that the Plessy case was a fully staged try casewith with both sides (including the railroad) working together to show the problem to the Court. The book is not blessed with extensive legal analysis--but that is not why you read this study. What the author gets to better than anything else I have read, is "the story behind the story" regarding the case. If you really, really wish to understand what Plessy is all about, this is the book to read. What happened in 1896 is not so much the story as is why it happened. That is what this fine book is all about.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy V. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-23 1:23

    So my dad is an avid reader. 12-15 books / year. He is retired history professor.He said it was a amazing book. I'm not sure if he means it, because it was a gift.. but I can tell you he never finishes a book if he doesn't like it, and I know he finished this one.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy V. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-23 1:23

    Perfect historical review. Loaded with facts, personality and viewpoint dispositions of the people of the times. Very revealing about the collapse of Reconstruction and the ensuing transformation, the evolution from slavery to outright exclusion, which extends to current times. Reveals the cancer of human behavior which resists any cure.

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    Your Heart, My Hands: An Immigrant's Remarkable Journey to Become One of America's Preeminent Cardiac Surgeons []  2020-1-26 23:28

    In keeping with Dr. Singhs Childhood passion, "kites fly against, not with the wind". Some struggle and resistance are necessary in our development and who we become. Dr. Singhs life as outlined in "Your Heart, My Hands" is a testament to the human spirits ability to overcome what may appear to be insurmountable obstacles. Dr. Singhs legacy is not only in the 15,000 hearts he directly touched, and tens of thousands of family members- it is also in the countless people he encouraged to pursue their dreams. I had the amazing fortune of rotating on Dr. Singhs service as a surgical resident. He was instrumental in my pursuing my dream to become a cardiac surgeon. This book is a must read, I think, for a lot of genre of readers.

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    Your Heart, My Hands: An Immigrant's Remarkable Journey to Become One of America's Preeminent Cardiac Surgeons []  2020-1-26 23:28

    Having been part of Dr. Singh's team,I have always held him with the upmost respect. I too remember the late night calls,and how he'd sleep in his office when he was concerned about a owing how he struggled to become the renowned surgeon he became, has created me respect him even more. This was a wonderfully written book that shared a private side of a unbelievable surgeon and ank you for your years of nette

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-17 21:29

    There are any number of studies of the Supreme Court's 1896 decision in Plessy v. Ferguson which held that "separate but equal" was constitutional in railroad transportation, a doctrine that was applied consistently in a lot of locations (including public education) until the 1954 Court decision in Brown v. Board of Education. This very long book (505 pages of text; 58 pages of notes) approaches the subject from an special perspective, somewhat broader than a traditional legal history e author begins his study in 1833, with Massachusetts railroads segregating passengers by race, and traces this practice up until 1896. Moreover, he focuses upon three key players in the Plessy drama--Justices John Marshall Harlan and Henry Billings Brown, and Albion W. Tourgee (who lost the case) through extensive biographical studies. In short, the author here is devoted to establishing the context of the case and the individual histories of these three actors going all the method back to 1833. He demonstrates that to really understand this case, you have to do a lot more than merely read the Court's e author's discussions of the two Justices, especially Harlan, are outstanding. While there is not much to Brown, who wrote the 8-1 decision upholding the practice, Harlan is a fascinating character. While fighting on the Union side in the Civil Battle in Kentucky, he never opposed slavery and hoped Lincoln would just restore the status quo ante and not interfere in his state. He was certainly no "flaming liberal" and how he came to write his dissent in well covered in the book. Tourgee was a driven enemy of the practice, especially after having lived in North Carolina for 17 years after the war. He really achieved fame not for his work in this case, but as a best novelist. While his arguments to the Court were sound, he was method ahead of his time. Any analysis of the Court by Tourgee and his allies would have to have demonstrated clearly that their chances were zero with the Court's membership. It seems the Justices simply didn't see what injury was inflicted by "Jim Crow cars." I think this is why Chief Justice Warren in his opinion striking the practice in public education placed reliance upon sociological evidence (such as the "black doll" studies by Kenneth Clark) to demonstrate the severe emotional injuries inflicted upon segregated school of the most interesting things I learned was that the Plessy case was a fully staged try casewith with both sides (including the railroad) working together to show the problem to the Court. The book is not blessed with extensive legal analysis--but that is not why you read this study. What the author gets to better than anything else I have read, is "the story behind the story" regarding the case. If you really, really wish to understand what Plessy is all about, this is the book to read. What happened in 1896 is not so much the story as is why it happened. That is what this fine book is all about.

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    Useful review?

    Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-17 21:29

    It obvious that Luxenberg does exhaustive research, but what is so unique is that he is able to weave the results of it into a narrative that makes what could have been a dry historical work into a story that is hard to place down. His vivid descriptions create the reader understand not just what happened, but why it happened and how each happening affected the three principles involved and the country. If you are looking for a dry retelling of history peppered with footnotes, this may not be the book for you. But if you wish to read compelling history told in a manner that is informative, interesting, and enjoyable, don't miss this book. Luxenberg has a bonus for turning historical facts in to a compelling story. My only complaint with Steve is that he has only written two books, I am waiting for his next effort.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-17 21:29

    Washington Post journalist Steve Luxenberg has written an necessary book as to how the “separate but equal” doctrine was codified by the Supreme Court in 1896 that for all practical purposes legalized the Jim Crow laws of the South thereby betraying the promise of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution. He tells this story through the biographies of the dissenting Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan, the majority opinion writer Henry Billings Brown, the lead plaintiff attorney Albion Tourgee and the history of the mixed-race community that grew up in pre-Civil Battle Fresh Orleans, of which Homer Plessy was a e two heroes of the book are Harlan and Tourgee. Harlan was the slaveholding son of Kentucky’s Whig aristocracy who while supporting slavery opposed the dissolution of the Union and fought on the Union side during the Civil War. Tourgee was an Ohio lawyer who fought for the Union and later became a judge in the Reconstruction South. Massachusetts born Brown, on the other hand, bought his method out of Civil Battle service and became a judge in Michigan. Of unique interest is the milieu of the mixed race Fresh Orleans community who fought with Andrew Jackson in popular war of Fresh Orleans and how it evolved over the 19th essy v. Ferguson was a set-up case orchestrated by Tourgee to overturn Louisiana’s separate vehicle rule which kept black people out of the white’s only vehicles at the sole discretion of the conductor. How was a conductor to tell whether a light-skinned Negro was black or white? Nevertheless that was part of his job. Also of interest is the fact that the railroads did not like the separate vehicle rule either. It cost them money. As a effect both the Louisville & Nashville RR earlier and later the Eastern Louisiana RR fully cooperated with Tourgee in causing Plessy’s removal from the whites’ only vehicle to set-up the case. Clearly the railroads, at least in the 1890s, were not the handmaidens of segregation.What is remembered today is Justice Harlan’s popular quote that came out of his ringing dissent: “Our Constitution is color-blind.” Would that be real today? Luxenberg has written an necessary history. To me it was method too detailed and method too long, but at a lot of points he reveals himself to be a very fine writer.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-17 21:29

    I can't remember the latest time I could not wait to obtain back to reading a book! And this one was a history book! I had been lamenting my lack of knowledge about the evil of Jim Crow and happened upon this book from its NYT review. I would have been happy with a straightforward history But the author designed his book like a novel, tracing the main characters from long before the civil battle until they meet at the Plessy v. Ferguson travesty. I am delighted with the exhaustive research and careful, colorful, even loving writing. The footnotes are not to be missed.

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    Useful review?

    Separate: The Story of Plessy V. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-23 1:23

    In writing Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation, it would be hard to accuse author Steve Luxenberg of not trying to be thorough. He manages to cover a period of fifty years in about five hundred pages. This period runs roughly from Civil Battle Reconstruction to the moments when Plessy v. Ferguson was decided, which allows the reader to obtain a meaningful understanding of the times and conditions both sides of the Plessy v. Ferguson case were is story is told from a wide dozens of vantage points over five hundred pages: Louis Martinet-a newspaper editor in Fresh Orleans who helped organize the mixed-race community of Fresh Orleans versus separation, Plessy’s lawyer: Albion Tourgee, and two Supreme Court Justices who heard the case: Henry Billings Brown of Fresh England and John Harlan of Kentucky. While I disagree passionately with the reasoning of some of these men, Luxenberg goes deep enough into the times and biographies of these men that I was able to reach a point of e fact that the story is told from a wide dozens of viewpoints can make some issues however. While the story is told in an interesting and engaging way, the movement back and forth from various characters and sides of the segregation debate can take readers out of the narrative right as their getting into a particular person or section. But that’s more of a private reading thing.I think Separate is a useful read for anyone looking to understand how separate but equal came to be.

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    Your Heart, My Hands: An Immigrant's Remarkable Journey to Become One of America's Preeminent Cardiac Surgeons []  2020-1-26 23:28

    Arun Singh’s legendary surgical skills are well known to the southern Fresh England cardiology community, as well as to broad swaths of the public. His remarkable skills, as well as the reliably outstanding outcomes that he routinely achieved, will never be duplicated. Now, those who mainly knew the professional side of Dr. Singh can be entertained by these unbelievable tales of his colourful youth and his professional as well as private development. While learning first hand how Arun Singh became not just the surgeon but also the man that he is, all Americans can be inspired by this story of hard work and the American Dream. It is a compelling example of the necessary role that immigrants have often played in helping to create our country great. Also kudos to John Hanc for helping to capture Arun's real voice. Well done – a must read!

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    Your Heart, My Hands: An Immigrant's Remarkable Journey to Become One of America's Preeminent Cardiac Surgeons []  2020-1-26 23:28

    Although he is one of the best known physicians in the state of Rhode Island, I would bet that most people would never guess that he was a recalcitrant kid and an indifferent student growing up in India. In this forthright memoir, Dr. Singh tells how his curiosity and disobedience led to severe arm and hand injuries and how his mother's home grown therapy programs helped him heal and regain strength. He also talks about his undiagnosed dyslexia which created learning difficult. Yet once he finally got motivated to succeed, he graduated from medical school and was accepted into a residency program in the U.S. His troubles did not stop there, however, and the book follows his perseverance to learn and work hard to become a leading heart surgeon. His concern for his patients comes through in the stories he tells about them. He touches briefly on the racism he encountered and the business side of medicine. This well-written memoir is a fascinating tale of one man's journey from a difficult background to becoming a highly respected surgeon.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-17 21:29

    This unbelievable book tells a story almost no one knows. I've spent my life reading books about American history but knew next to nothing about the popular Supreme Court case of Plessy vs. Ferguson, the case that created segregation lawful until Brown vs. Board of Education swept it aside in 1954.I worked for years with the author, Steve Luxenberg, but I am not writing this book to do him a favor--my intention is to do you a favor. If you like a well-written story that's central to the story of our country, you will love this book as much as I nberg tells the story through the biographies of several of the principles: Louis Martinet, a newspaper editor from Fresh Orleans; Albion Tourgee, a popular novelist who pursued the misguided legal tactic that doggedly tried to obtain this case to the Supreme Court; Justice Henry Brown, whose preposterous majority opinion was the law of the land for almost 60 years; and the first Justice John Marshall Harlan, whom one comes away admiring to no end. He had the wisdom to write "In my opinion, the judgment this day rendered will, in time, prove to be quite as pernicious as the decision created by this tribunal in the Dred Scott case." The author is fair in describing all Harlan's faults, but to any reader of this book, he is a hero.And so is the author. Steve Luxenberg is a gifted writer and he has a story to tell you. Do yourself a favor and read it.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-17 21:29

    In writing Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation, it would be hard to accuse author Steve Luxenberg of not trying to be thorough. He manages to cover a period of fifty years in about five hundred pages. This period runs roughly from Civil Battle Reconstruction to the moments when Plessy v. Ferguson was decided, which allows the reader to obtain a meaningful understanding of the times and conditions both sides of the Plessy v. Ferguson case were is story is told from a wide dozens of vantage points over five hundred pages: Louis Martinet-a newspaper editor in Fresh Orleans who helped organize the mixed-race community of Fresh Orleans versus separation, Plessy’s lawyer: Albion Tourgee, and two Supreme Court Justices who heard the case: Henry Billings Brown of Fresh England and John Harlan of Kentucky. While I disagree passionately with the reasoning of some of these men, Luxenberg goes deep enough into the times and biographies of these men that I was able to reach a point of e fact that the story is told from a wide dozens of viewpoints can make some issues however. While the story is told in an interesting and engaging way, the movement back and forth from various characters and sides of the segregation debate can take readers out of the narrative right as their getting into a particular person or section. But that’s more of a private reading thing.I think Separate is a useful read for anyone looking to understand how separate but equal came to be.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy V. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-23 1:23

    The author sets the scene for one of the most necessary cases ever to appear before the US Supreme Court: Plessy vs. Ferguson decided on January 11, 1897. "Act one" is a comprehensive review of slavery and the separation of the races in the early 19th century. Here Steve Luxenberg introduces the main characters who play a role in this watershed court case. They contain John Harlan, a Kentuckian whose family bought, sold and owned slaves. He was an attorneyinvolved in local politics and took up the call to war for the Union during the Civil War. Though Harlan did not anticipate or help the emancipation of slaves, he was more intent on the preservation of the Union. Henry Brown, born in Massachusetts and a graduate of Yale, to have a substitute serve in his put during the Civil War. He worked as an attorney in personal practice and wrote a tome on admiralty law. Albion Tourgee served in the Union Troops until he was wounded. He was a judge, author, orator and newspaper columnist who championed the rights for blacks before, during and after the Civil War."Act two" occurs during the Civil Battle and Reconstruction. Both Harlan and Tourgee saw the bravery of negro soldiers fighting fot the Union. For Harlan the shedding of their lifes' blood by colourful soldiers entitled them to the full rights and privledges of all citizens. Tourgee chose to live in North Carolina after the Civil War. He railed and wrote versus the widespread prejudice, poverty, violence and murder of blacks during Reconstruction. He advocated for Federal funds to help schools for blacks. He strongly believed that education would support the emancipation of colourful did both Harlan and Brown come to sit on the Supreme Court? "Act three" is fascinating because their nominations and approval by the Senate were so very various from the very public and politicized selection of today's Supreme Court e "final act" is, in the opinion of this reviewer, the most interesting. Civil Rights advocates decided to promote equal rights by challanging the Jim Crow train vehicles in Louisiana that blacks were needed to ride in. These vehicles were used for smokers as well, so they were smelly, dirty and less comfortable than the vehicles for whites. Jim Crow vehicles had been abolished in northeastern states since before the Civil War. It was up to the train conductor to determine the race of a passenger and enforce where he or she could sit. Louisiana was the excellent locale to challenge the racial laws because so a lot of freed blacks had intermarried with whites in that state starting in the 18th century. Every shade of human skin was evident in Louisiana especially in Fresh Orleans. Homer Plessy, a 29 year old, volunteered to be the try case in an intrastate trip he hoped to take in June 1892. Because the light-skinned Plessy refused to leave his seat in the whites only car, he was arrested. The case was tried locally with John H. Ferguson as the state judge. It took four and a half years for the case to create its method to the US Supreme Court. Robert Brown wrote the majority decision. He interpreted both the XIII and XIV Amendments to the US Constitution very narrowly. It was he who entoned the acceptablilty of "separate but equal" accomodations. John Harlan worte the sole minority opinion in which he called the majority ruling "...an assault on the Constitution ...Our Constitution is color blind and neither knows not tolerates classes among citizens." Some sixty years later in 1954, the Supreme Court unanimously embraced the depth and breadth of the XIV Amendment when it ruled in the school integration case of Brown vs. Board of Education. Separate could never be equal; it was just separate. Since the author did such an perfect job in the Plessy vs. Ferguson case, this reviewer ardently hopes that he selects the Brown vs. Board of Education for his next writing project.

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    Useful review?

    Separate: The Story of Plessy V. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-23 1:23

    Washington Post journalist Steve Luxenberg has written an necessary book as to how the “separate but equal” doctrine was codified by the Supreme Court in 1896 that for all practical purposes legalized the Jim Crow laws of the South thereby betraying the promise of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments to the Constitution. He tells this story through the biographies of the dissenting Supreme Court Justice John Marshall Harlan, the majority opinion writer Henry Billings Brown, the lead plaintiff attorney Albion Tourgee and the history of the mixed-race community that grew up in pre-Civil Battle Fresh Orleans, of which Homer Plessy was a e two heroes of the book are Harlan and Tourgee. Harlan was the slaveholding son of Kentucky’s Whig aristocracy who while supporting slavery opposed the dissolution of the Union and fought on the Union side during the Civil War. Tourgee was an Ohio lawyer who fought for the Union and later became a judge in the Reconstruction South. Massachusetts born Brown, on the other hand, bought his method out of Civil Battle service and became a judge in Michigan. Of unique interest is the milieu of the mixed race Fresh Orleans community who fought with Andrew Jackson in popular war of Fresh Orleans and how it evolved over the 19th essy v. Ferguson was a set-up case orchestrated by Tourgee to overturn Louisiana’s separate vehicle rule which kept black people out of the white’s only vehicles at the sole discretion of the conductor. How was a conductor to tell whether a light-skinned Negro was black or white? Nevertheless that was part of his job. Also of interest is the fact that the railroads did not like the separate vehicle rule either. It cost them money. As a effect both the Louisville & Nashville RR earlier and later the Eastern Louisiana RR fully cooperated with Tourgee in causing Plessy’s removal from the whites’ only vehicle to set-up the case. Clearly the railroads, at least in the 1890s, were not the handmaidens of segregation.What is remembered today is Justice Harlan’s popular quote that came out of his ringing dissent: “Our Constitution is color-blind.” Would that be real today? Luxenberg has written an necessary history. To me it was method too detailed and method too long, but at a lot of points he reveals himself to be a very fine writer.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Separate: The Story of Plessy V. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-23 1:23

    I can't remember the latest time I could not wait to obtain back to reading a book! And this one was a history book! I had been lamenting my lack of knowledge about the evil of Jim Crow and happened upon this book from its NYT review. I would have been happy with a straightforward history But the author designed his book like a novel, tracing the main characters from long before the civil battle until they meet at the Plessy v. Ferguson travesty. I am delighted with the exhaustive research and careful, colorful, even loving writing. The footnotes are not to be missed.

    0  


  • 0

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    Your Heart, My Hands: An Immigrant's Remarkable Journey to Become One of America's Preeminent Cardiac Surgeons []  2020-1-26 23:28

    While growing up in Rhode Island it was virtually impossible to escape the the larger than life tales of a talented cardiac surgeon, whose hands healed so a lot of broken hearts. Throughout the years, Dr. Singh had repaired a lot of of my own relatives’ damaged hearts. His name would come up with heartfelt gratitude during family gatherings. Yet, I knew very small about this man whose precious hands added years of life to a lot of of my own flesh and blood. After reading “Your Heart, My Hands,” I now feel like he is an old mate who I could call up and invite over for dinner. His story is a compelling look into the heart of an ordinary man who overcame adversity and accomplished extraordinary things. The book is a unbelievable read.

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    Your Heart, My Hands: An Immigrant's Remarkable Journey to Become One of America's Preeminent Cardiac Surgeons []  2020-1-26 23:28

    I have had the distinct honor of working with Dr. Singh. As a nurse, I witnessed the a lot of hours he dedicated to his patients. He was humble, compassionate yet “all business” in his focus. In reading his book, I was amazed by the story behind the man. It is a story of family, faith and commitment to succeed. It is a timely story for those who question the importance of welcoming an immigrant’s value adding status. A must read for those in medicine who need a lift in spirit and for anyone else who wishes to “cheer a fighter”on!Bravo, Dr. Arun Singh. Joyce

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    Your Heart, My Hands: An Immigrant's Remarkable Journey to Become One of America's Preeminent Cardiac Surgeons []  2020-1-26 23:28

    A memorable, necessary biography of a world-class medical hero: Dr. Arun Singh tells a fascinating epic of our time. His memoir, "Your Heart, My Hands," is woven with frankness, pain and humor out of five story lines: the miraculous scientific development of cardiology; the struggles and triumphs of a young Indian doctor who. after overcoming two broken arms and dyslexia. came to America with five dollars to become one of the America’s preeminent cardiac surgeons; dramatic vignettes of the lives of some of his 15,000 begin heart surgical patients; a candid insight into Indian and American hospital politics; and a blunt forecast of the coming critical crisis in healthcare. As Dr. Singh has held human hearts safely and firmly in his hand, he holds the reader on his lifetime adventure.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-17 21:29

    Separate by Steve LuxenbergThis is a unbelievable book to bookend with Dred Scott: The Inside Story by David Hardy. both books involve legal decisions affecting race relations in America. Both books leave the reader in amazement about how such learned men of the Supreme Court could be so stupid and Steve Luxenberg approaches the Plessy v. Fergusson legal decision through the biographies of different individuals, particularly Supreme Court Justices John Marshall Harlan and Henry Brown and Albion Tourge, the lawyer and civil rights advocate who argued before the Supreme Court on behalf of Homer Plessy. Luxenberg starts with the early lives of these individuals in the 1850s and follows their lives through the Civil Battle and into the Guilded is approach is absolutely fascinating and educational. The reader gets a spectrum of views on American culture during its time of transformation. John Marshall Harlan was the kid of an influential, slave-holding Kentucky family who grew up to war as an officer for the Union and eventually became the only Supreme Court justice to keep that the "Constitution knows no race." Albion Tourgee was a Yankee who joined the Union troops as a personal soldier in to the slaves, moved to the South as a carpet bagger, became an attorney and a successful author and eventually master-minded the losing case for Homer Plessy. Henry Brown was another Yankee lawyer who moved to Michigan and eventually created his method to the Supreme Court to become the author of the infamous Plessy v. Fergusson decision which absurdly rejected the argument that making former slaves segregate from their former masters was inconceivable as a badge or indicia of nberg also brings a number of other characters. There is the entire les gens de couleur libres - the men of color - the entire community of blacks and mulattos in Fresh Orleans, who had never been slave, had fought with Andy Jackson in defense of America and had been cruelly denied their promised equal rights. This community felt deeply the sting of Jim Crow legislation and conspired with the railroads to bring a try case. For the try case, they provided Homer Plessy, who could pass as white, to be arrested for refusing to leave the white coach. It may come as a surprise for some to search that the railroads opposed the Jim Crow laws because of the expense of running the additional vehicles for a few ederick Douglas is also an necessary part of this book. I was impressed by this person, who I had never really knew, that I picked up the fresh Frederick Douglas nberg writes very well. He seems very sympathetic to his subjects, even Justice Brown, who, at times comes across as shallow social climber. At times, Luxenberg can tug on the heart strings as his topics leave their lives, which leaves none unscarred by tragedy.I was surprised to search that Plessy was not considered an necessary case until the legacy of Jim Crow was dismantled in the 1950s. Perhaps the most necessary legacy of Plessy v. Fergusson was simply the dissent of John Marshall Harlan, which place a marker down on the promise that America should not be a racial state.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-17 21:29

    Perfect historical review. Loaded with facts, personality and viewpoint dispositions of the people of the times. Very revealing about the collapse of Reconstruction and the ensuing transformation, the evolution from slavery to outright exclusion, which extends to current times. Reveals the cancer of human behavior which resists any cure.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy V. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-23 1:23

    Separate by Steve LuxenbergThis is a unbelievable book to bookend with Dred Scott: The Inside Story by David Hardy. both books involve legal decisions affecting race relations in America. Both books leave the reader in amazement about how such learned men of the Supreme Court could be so stupid and Steve Luxenberg approaches the Plessy v. Fergusson legal decision through the biographies of different individuals, particularly Supreme Court Justices John Marshall Harlan and Henry Brown and Albion Tourge, the lawyer and civil rights advocate who argued before the Supreme Court on behalf of Homer Plessy. Luxenberg starts with the early lives of these individuals in the 1850s and follows their lives through the Civil Battle and into the Guilded is approach is absolutely fascinating and educational. The reader gets a spectrum of views on American culture during its time of transformation. John Marshall Harlan was the kid of an influential, slave-holding Kentucky family who grew up to war as an officer for the Union and eventually became the only Supreme Court justice to keep that the "Constitution knows no race." Albion Tourgee was a Yankee who joined the Union troops as a personal soldier in to the slaves, moved to the South as a carpet bagger, became an attorney and a successful author and eventually master-minded the losing case for Homer Plessy. Henry Brown was another Yankee lawyer who moved to Michigan and eventually created his method to the Supreme Court to become the author of the infamous Plessy v. Fergusson decision which absurdly rejected the argument that making former slaves segregate from their former masters was inconceivable as a badge or indicia of nberg also brings a number of other characters. There is the entire les gens de couleur libres - the men of color - the entire community of blacks and mulattos in Fresh Orleans, who had never been slave, had fought with Andy Jackson in defense of America and had been cruelly denied their promised equal rights. This community felt deeply the sting of Jim Crow legislation and conspired with the railroads to bring a try case. For the try case, they provided Homer Plessy, who could pass as white, to be arrested for refusing to leave the white coach. It may come as a surprise for some to search that the railroads opposed the Jim Crow laws because of the expense of running the additional vehicles for a few ederick Douglas is also an necessary part of this book. I was impressed by this person, who I had never really knew, that I picked up the fresh Frederick Douglas nberg writes very well. He seems very sympathetic to his subjects, even Justice Brown, who, at times comes across as shallow social climber. At times, Luxenberg can tug on the heart strings as his topics leave their lives, which leaves none unscarred by tragedy.I was surprised to search that Plessy was not considered an necessary case until the legacy of Jim Crow was dismantled in the 1950s. Perhaps the most necessary legacy of Plessy v. Fergusson was simply the dissent of John Marshall Harlan, which place a marker down on the promise that America should not be a racial state.

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    Your Heart, My Hands: An Immigrant's Remarkable Journey to Become One of America's Preeminent Cardiac Surgeons []  2020-1-26 23:28

    Dr. Singh's life is an inspiration. His compelling story is one of overcoming countless hurdles through intellect and sheer determination. It is a story of humanness laid bare. In a lot of ways, it is a love story for his immediate and extended family and his thousands of patients. The memoir was a joy to read and an example of private triumph in his journey from rural India to American rah

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    Your Heart, My Hands: An Immigrant's Remarkable Journey to Become One of America's Preeminent Cardiac Surgeons []  2020-1-26 23:28

    It’s all been said already in these amazing reviews! What a amazing book! I’m a retired MD in Rhode Island and I’ve known Arun for a lot of years having started my career the same year Arun did and having shared cases with him. He is always the same with his patients and his colleagues: calm, caring, professional and respectful. In his book he opens himself up to share the struggles he has had with teenage follies, injury and dyslexia as well as prejudice as an Indian physician immigrant to the US and a bright and ambitious young man of color and the lack of expected professional help similar to that prejudice at critical times in his private and professional life.His work ethic is amazing! The average cardiac surgeon in the US performs about 130 cardiac surgeries a year, Arun has averaged 365! One might wonder why he does more surgeries than any number of prominent vascular surgeons in a lot of huge cities. The respond is the absolute confidence RI cardiologists have in his skill and commitment and his ability to match or exceed the skills of cardiac surgeons in Boston or Fresh Haven.OK he is great! However, I would differ on one count with Arun and that is the problem of when a surgeon should retire. In the UK it’s 65. Sure, as in football or even hockey lately there are outstanding sports players still amazing long after the average age time should catch up. However, Dr DeBakey mentioned in a previous review still went into cardiac surgeries to help in his 90’s because no one had the nerve to tell him he really shouldn’t be in there! So I kind of have to agree with the Chief of Surgery who told Arun when he turned 70: its time to have fun life now. And as a matter of fact that’s just what I see Arun doing!James P Crowley MD, Professor Emeritus of Medicine, Brown University.

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    Your Heart, My Hands: An Immigrant's Remarkable Journey to Become One of America's Preeminent Cardiac Surgeons []  2020-1-26 23:28

    Dr. Arun Singh is a celebrity in Rhode Island for the the a lot of lives he's saved as a cardiac surgeon. In Your Heart, My Hands, Dr. Singh shares the happenings and people who shaped the man he is, including the secrets he required to hide to succeed in his chosen field. It is at once a strong immigrant story, an inspirational story that counters the rhetoric we hear so often nowadays. And this story will inspire readers to think about their own contributions and how to live a life that makes a difference for others.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy V. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-23 1:23

    This unbelievable book tells a story almost no one knows. I've spent my life reading books about American history but knew next to nothing about the popular Supreme Court case of Plessy vs. Ferguson, the case that created segregation lawful until Brown vs. Board of Education swept it aside in 1954.I worked for years with the author, Steve Luxenberg, but I am not writing this book to do him a favor--my intention is to do you a favor. If you like a well-written story that's central to the story of our country, you will love this book as much as I nberg tells the story through the biographies of several of the principles: Louis Martinet, a newspaper editor from Fresh Orleans; Albion Tourgee, a popular novelist who pursued the misguided legal tactic that doggedly tried to obtain this case to the Supreme Court; Justice Henry Brown, whose preposterous majority opinion was the law of the land for almost 60 years; and the first Justice John Marshall Harlan, whom one comes away admiring to no end. He had the wisdom to write "In my opinion, the judgment this day rendered will, in time, prove to be quite as pernicious as the decision created by this tribunal in the Dred Scott case." The author is fair in describing all Harlan's faults, but to any reader of this book, he is a hero.And so is the author. Steve Luxenberg is a gifted writer and he has a story to tell you. Do yourself a favor and read it.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy V. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-23 1:23

    It obvious that Luxenberg does exhaustive research, but what is so unique is that he is able to weave the results of it into a narrative that makes what could have been a dry historical work into a story that is hard to place down. His vivid descriptions create the reader understand not just what happened, but why it happened and how each happening affected the three principles involved and the country. If you are looking for a dry retelling of history peppered with footnotes, this may not be the book for you. But if you wish to read compelling history told in a manner that is informative, interesting, and enjoyable, don't miss this book. Luxenberg has a bonus for turning historical facts in to a compelling story. My only complaint with Steve is that he has only written two books, I am waiting for his next effort.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-17 21:29

    The author sets the scene for one of the most necessary cases ever to appear before the US Supreme Court: Plessy vs. Ferguson decided on January 11, 1897. "Act one" is a comprehensive review of slavery and the separation of the races in the early 19th century. Here Steve Luxenberg introduces the main characters who play a role in this watershed court case. They contain John Harlan, a Kentuckian whose family bought, sold and owned slaves. He was an attorneyinvolved in local politics and took up the call to war for the Union during the Civil War. Though Harlan did not anticipate or help the emancipation of slaves, he was more intent on the preservation of the Union. Henry Brown, born in Massachusetts and a graduate of Yale, to have a substitute serve in his put during the Civil War. He worked as an attorney in personal practice and wrote a tome on admiralty law. Albion Tourgee served in the Union Troops until he was wounded. He was a judge, author, orator and newspaper columnist who championed the rights for blacks before, during and after the Civil War."Act two" occurs during the Civil Battle and Reconstruction. Both Harlan and Tourgee saw the bravery of negro soldiers fighting fot the Union. For Harlan the shedding of their lifes' blood by colourful soldiers entitled them to the full rights and privledges of all citizens. Tourgee chose to live in North Carolina after the Civil War. He railed and wrote versus the widespread prejudice, poverty, violence and murder of blacks during Reconstruction. He advocated for Federal funds to help schools for blacks. He strongly believed that education would support the emancipation of colourful did both Harlan and Brown come to sit on the Supreme Court? "Act three" is fascinating because their nominations and approval by the Senate were so very various from the very public and politicized selection of today's Supreme Court e "final act" is, in the opinion of this reviewer, the most interesting. Civil Rights advocates decided to promote equal rights by challanging the Jim Crow train vehicles in Louisiana that blacks were needed to ride in. These vehicles were used for smokers as well, so they were smelly, dirty and less comfortable than the vehicles for whites. Jim Crow vehicles had been abolished in northeastern states since before the Civil War. It was up to the train conductor to determine the race of a passenger and enforce where he or she could sit. Louisiana was the excellent locale to challenge the racial laws because so a lot of freed blacks had intermarried with whites in that state starting in the 18th century. Every shade of human skin was evident in Louisiana especially in Fresh Orleans. Homer Plessy, a 29 year old, volunteered to be the try case in an intrastate trip he hoped to take in June 1892. Because the light-skinned Plessy refused to leave his seat in the whites only car, he was arrested. The case was tried locally with John H. Ferguson as the state judge. It took four and a half years for the case to create its method to the US Supreme Court. Robert Brown wrote the majority decision. He interpreted both the XIII and XIV Amendments to the US Constitution very narrowly. It was he who entoned the acceptablilty of "separate but equal" accomodations. John Harlan worte the sole minority opinion in which he called the majority ruling "...an assault on the Constitution ...Our Constitution is color blind and neither knows not tolerates classes among citizens." Some sixty years later in 1954, the Supreme Court unanimously embraced the depth and breadth of the XIV Amendment when it ruled in the school integration case of Brown vs. Board of Education. Separate could never be equal; it was just separate. Since the author did such an perfect job in the Plessy vs. Ferguson case, this reviewer ardently hopes that he selects the Brown vs. Board of Education for his next writing project.

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    Separate: The Story of Plessy v. Ferguson, and America's Journey from Slavery to Segregation []  2020-1-17 21:29

    So my dad is an avid reader. 12-15 books / year. He is retired history professor.He said it was a amazing book. I'm not sure if he means it, because it was a gift.. but I can tell you he never finishes a book if he doesn't like it, and I know he finished this one.

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    The Happiest Dentist in the World: The Story of One Man’s Journey Beyond the Stress, Burnout and Misery of Traditional Dentistry to Discover a Completely New Way to Practice []  2020-1-28 23:34

    Excellent primer for Dental BurnOUT!

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    Discover! America's Great River Road: The Upper Mississippi River Valley, St. Paul, Minnesota, to Dubuque, Iowa: 1 []  2020-1-23 1:13

    This books adds amazing travel hints and interest to my drive along the Mississippi. The author does a nice job of describing the locations and adds to the adventure of street travel.

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    Discover! America's Great River Road: The Upper Mississippi River Valley, St. Paul, Minnesota, to Dubuque, Iowa: 1 []  2020-1-23 1:13

    amazing book, used it to plan photographic trips along the Mississippi, full of amazing information

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    Discover! America's Great River Road: The Upper Mississippi River Valley, St. Paul, Minnesota, to Dubuque, Iowa: 1 []  2020-1-23 1:13

    If you plan to travel the picturesque Amazing River Street through western Wisconsin, this book should be an essential part of your travel planning. It provides info on nearly every city or town along the way. Each chapter is broken into the towns included in that chapter. The book describes attractions, parks, historic sites, recreatioinal locations and more. It is easily understood and gives the traveller some insight to the zone next on their journey. It also provides detailed histories of certain cities or regions that gives further info that lend perspective to one's e book is organized geographically north to south. Volume One covers St. Paul, Minnesota to Dubuque, Iowa or about 250 miles of the Amazing River Road. The river street follows the Mississippi River that contains Lake Pepin, Wabasha and Winona on the Minnesota side and Pepin, La Crosse, Prairie du Chein on the Wisconsin side. This route is very scenic and will take several hours to see all there is to do.If the book has one drawback it is the lack of color maps and photos, but this does not detract from the book's overall effectiveness. It is easily read and you can prepare for the next city as you leave the put you are currently at. But don't just go city to city as there are a lot of other stopos along the package the car, package a lunch (or lunch along the way), and bring this book. Your journey awaits.

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    Journey to Munich: A Maisie Dobbs Novel [Book]  2018-1-9 18:0

    Fans of British mystery who have not yet discovered Jacqueline Winspear’s Maisie Dobbs novels are in for a treat. "Journey to Munich" is the second of the series that I have read, after "A Risky Place", which is well into the series, and I anticipate working back to the beginning and catching up. One of the things I liked about the two Maisie Dobbs novels I have read is that Ms Winspear does an perfect job of weaving a bit of backstory into the current book -- enough so that a fresh reader does not search themselves all at sea in the current book, but not so much as to be is fresh book finds Maisie being recruited by the British Secret Service to go to pre-war Nazi Germany to aid in the return of an English businessman who has been imprisoned by the Hitler regime for 2 years. The Nazis will only let the man to be released to a family member, so Maisie is to impersonate the man's daughter, who is too ill to travel (BTW -- the Amazon synopsis of the book is wrong in this respect, stating that the man's daughter had been killed in an accident. Amazon also got a few other things wrong in their synopsis…). As if this assignment were not delicate and risky enough, Maisie agrees to attempt to locate and result the return to England of the daughter of Canadian newspaper magnate John Otterburn (a clever renaming of the real-life Lord Beaverbrook, a Canadian newspaper tycoon who was named the UK's Minister of Aircraft Production by Winston Churchill in 1940.) The complication in this second task comes courtesy of the fact that Maisie has long held the young woman in question to be at least partially responsible for her husband's death at the controls of an experimental isie's tense confrontations with the cold-blooded Nazi regime, in the heart of their put of power -- Munich -- tense moments that serve the story well. She also moves on in her private life, coming to grips, finally, with the loss of her husband and unborn kid several years before, readying the hero for a fresh era. I think that we can look forward to some fresh and interesting adventures from Maisie Dobbs as Europe, England, and indeed the entire globe are plunged into total battle for the second time in a quarter-century.

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