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    Catholicism and Orthodox Christianity []  2020-1-19 22:47

    As an Orthodox Christian, I can't speak for the accuracy of the material about the other side, but this includes some egregious errors that even a young Orthodox Christian kid would be able to point out. (It would have been better if both authors weren't followers of the pope of Rome.)One instance: an icon of the Theotokos (Virgin Mary) holding the Lord Jesus Christ is labelled an icon of the Virgin Mary and God the Father! (Two points: apart from some isolated instances where Western influences have trumped Orthodox standards, God the Father, being immaterial, is never depicted; and apart from obvious situations such as an icon of the Annunciation, the Virgin Mary is always depicted with the Son because He is the reason we honour her -- in fact, the most common representation is her holding Him in one arm and the other hand pointing to Him Who is the Way, the Truth, and the Life.)Another instance: the authors claim the division between the Orthodox Catholic Church and non-Chalcedonian Christians (aka 'Oriental Orthodox' or 'Monophysites' [the more common older, but offensive label]) has been healed. Although that would be unbelievable if true, it is not. I cannot imagine where the authors came up with that claim.I would prefer to give it zero stars.

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    Catholicism and Orthodox Christianity []  2020-1-19 22:47

    First, the amazing stuff. It is written so that grade 6-8 children can read this easily and it is certainly a general is book reads more like a Catholic Church pamphlet than a seriously researched document. Non-Catholic groups, regardless if they are Protestants or Orthodox, are depicted as groups who decided to not follow the correct views, but are nevertheless not completely e Crusades are dealt with in a paragraph and "Throughout the succeeding crusades, however, dissension among the leaders took put and deviations from their holy purpose often led to failure." By stating that there was a holy purpose to conquering the Levant is not only extremely subjective, it is historically inaccurate. The Inquisitions are related reviewed in a paragraph and stated as being a means to achieving political unity. Nothing is mentioned of executions, torture, or the really amazing stuff. There are a lot of other examples, but these two should demonstrate a fundamental weakness that is consistent throughout the short, the subjectivity of this work got on my nerves and as a history teacher I would question its value as a source because of it very obvious bias.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, Hardcover: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-6-4 18:38

    I just recently received my OSB and thought I'd go ahead and give a "post-study" rst impressions:The paper cover over the book itself was slightly bent up, however, the binding of the hard-back itself is nice. It's also worth mentioning that for the print, a lower quality paper is used (so if you're like myself and create a habit out of marking up bibles, obtain ready for some bleed-through), but considering the book is only about $40, I think you obtain what you for. With that being said, I would have gladly more for better paper quality and a page ribbon or ter a "trial study" and reading the first five chapters of Genesis and Revelation, the notes are very straight forward, and feature paraphrases and commentary from the Saints, as well as tie-ins to misuse of scripture by heretics.Over all, I'm very satisfied with my OSB.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, Hardcover: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-6-4 18:38

    As an evangelical curious about a lot of conversions from evangelical camp to Orthodoxy, I received such a Bible with gratefulness, as a very helpful tool. I own both the paper edition and Kindle edition. Both are very well produced. The more I use that edition of the Bible, the more I become informed about the doctrine and practice of the Orthodox family of Churches. I search also a lot of insightful commentaries both from the Church Fathers and from contemporary Orthodox scholars. As an open-minded man I admit that due to the reading of "The Orthodox Study Bible" my understanding of spiritual things increases and that a lot of valuable spiritual counsels support me in my process of sanctification.I do not recommend that Bible to fundamentalist Protestants. But I strongly recommend that ver to all people who already learned to honor other traditions in Christianity and wish to learn from other theologians and for the Bible translation itself, the Old Testament includes probably the best modern translation of the Greek Septuagint (LXX), the translation of the Old Testament created in the 3rd century before Christ. A lot of learned people believe that the Septuagint includes more reliable text of the Old Testament than the Masoretic text created by Jewish scribes long after Christianity appeared on the globe scene. The Septuagint is somehow older ver which was not preserved in the Hebrew language but as the translation of then available Hebrew text, which is now almost extinct. The Dead Sea Scrolls are a strong proof for the reliability of the Septuagint. Moreover, Masoretic scribes did not believe in Christ, so they changed meaning of several Messianic prophecies available in the original text. Maybe it was not deliberate effort on their part, but the effect of ignorance. You are always confused when you compare the Fresh Testament quotations from the Old Testament with the Old Testament in Masoretic form, appearing in the prevailing number of today's Bibles. But here you have the Bible translation which does not create you confused, because the Fresh Testament writers used mainly LXX as their Old Testament. So, the Orthodox Study Bible text is the Holy Scriptures almost related to those used by the first Church. You should also know that the Church Fathers recognized much wider canon of the Old Testament Scripture than Protestants and for the Fresh Testament in that edition, it is simply the Fresh King James Bible (NKJV), based on Textus Receptus, the Received Text of Erasmus, Roman Catholic scholar of the 16th Century. It is not identical with the Byzantine Fresh Testament, but in a lot of respects it is very close to that family of the Greek texts. I believe that the NKJV is one of the best English translations. It includes short and helpful notes showing differences between the Received Text and Critical , buy, take, and read and be blessed!

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, eBook: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-7-4 19:39

    This is NOT a 100% translation of the Greek Septuagint. It is, instead, the King James Ver of the Bible with additions from the Greek Septuagint. I thought it was the former, but it is really the latter. My buyer's fever has subsided but if I were to look for the Septuagint in English, I might look next at the Septuagint from Oxford University Press. Given what it is, it is impossible to tell by inspection if I'm reading the KJV or the LXX, except by prior knowledge. I'm not sure when anyone has latest done a complete 100% translation into English, so I suggest a prospective buyer should attention to the description of the ver they wish to purchase.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, eBook: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-7-4 19:39

    I just recently received my OSB and thought I'd go ahead and give a "post-study" rst impressions:The paper cover over the book itself was slightly bent up, however, the binding of the hard-back itself is nice. It's also worth mentioning that for the print, a lower quality paper is used (so if you're like myself and create a habit out of marking up bibles, obtain ready for some bleed-through), but considering the book is only about $40, I think you obtain what you for. With that being said, I would have gladly more for better paper quality and a page ribbon or ter a "trial study" and reading the first five chapters of Genesis and Revelation, the notes are very straight forward, and feature paraphrases and commentary from the Saints, as well as tie-ins to misuse of scripture by heretics.Over all, I'm very satisfied with my OSB.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, eBook: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-7-4 19:39

    As an evangelical curious about a lot of conversions from evangelical camp to Orthodoxy, I received such a Bible with gratefulness, as a very helpful tool. I own both the paper edition and Kindle edition. Both are very well produced. The more I use that edition of the Bible, the more I become informed about the doctrine and practice of the Orthodox family of Churches. I search also a lot of insightful commentaries both from the Church Fathers and from contemporary Orthodox scholars. As an open-minded man I admit that due to the reading of "The Orthodox Study Bible" my understanding of spiritual things increases and that a lot of valuable spiritual counsels support me in my process of sanctification.I do not recommend that Bible to fundamentalist Protestants. But I strongly recommend that ver to all people who already learned to honor other traditions in Christianity and wish to learn from other theologians and for the Bible translation itself, the Old Testament includes probably the best modern translation of the Greek Septuagint (LXX), the translation of the Old Testament created in the 3rd century before Christ. A lot of learned people believe that the Septuagint includes more reliable text of the Old Testament than the Masoretic text created by Jewish scribes long after Christianity appeared on the globe scene. The Septuagint is somehow older ver which was not preserved in the Hebrew language but as the translation of then available Hebrew text, which is now almost extinct. The Dead Sea Scrolls are a strong proof for the reliability of the Septuagint. Moreover, Masoretic scribes did not believe in Christ, so they changed meaning of several Messianic prophecies available in the original text. Maybe it was not deliberate effort on their part, but the effect of ignorance. You are always confused when you compare the Fresh Testament quotations from the Old Testament with the Old Testament in Masoretic form, appearing in the prevailing number of today's Bibles. But here you have the Bible translation which does not create you confused, because the Fresh Testament writers used mainly LXX as their Old Testament. So, the Orthodox Study Bible text is the Holy Scriptures almost related to those used by the first Church. You should also know that the Church Fathers recognized much wider canon of the Old Testament Scripture than Protestants and for the Fresh Testament in that edition, it is simply the Fresh King James Bible (NKJV), based on Textus Receptus, the Received Text of Erasmus, Roman Catholic scholar of the 16th Century. It is not identical with the Byzantine Fresh Testament, but in a lot of respects it is very close to that family of the Greek texts. I believe that the NKJV is one of the best English translations. It includes short and helpful notes showing differences between the Received Text and Critical , buy, take, and read and be blessed!

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, eBook: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-7-4 19:39

    For purposes of full disclosure let me to say, first of all, that I'm a practicing Catholic Christian of the Latin Rite who hopes to grant a special perspective regarding the offerings of this particular Bible. I've been in possession of the leather-bound edition since I received it two months after my original pre-order. It's taken me a couple years, but I've really come to love it. As I mentioned in the title of this review, the Orthodox Study Bible has recently dethroned my trusty, old-RSV, Fresh Oxford Annotated Bible as my study Bible of choice. I had small notion this would happen. I do have an extensive collection of Bibles in different translations that I use for comparative study; but probably like yourself, I also have a preferred Bible to go to by default for prayerful reading. Over the latest two years, I just found myself picking up the OSB more and more and the NOAB less and less. Let me to articulate exactly why:The case for the Septuagint Old Testament:The special and most compelling reason to acquire the OSB: it is the only complete Bible in English to be published with the Greek OT right next to the NT. If you have one of those reference Bibles, I'm sure you've noticed that a lot of of the OT quotes used in the NT mismatch when you actually look them up, sometimes to a amazing degree--this is because Jesus and the disciples apparently quoted from the Septuagint Greek, as opposed to other Hebrew sources, a vast majority of the time. This is so, because Greek was the common language of antiquity in the region and the Septuagint translation (which contains the apocryphal/deuterocanonical "hidden books" of the "second canon") was completed more than a century before Christ's birth. By the time of Jesus' ministry, it was in widespread use by Jews throughout the Diaspora, particularly outside of Palestine and, especially, Jerusalem by those who couldn't speak or read Hebrew. Bear in mind: the Hebrew OT, from which 99% of modern English Bibles are translated, relies on Masoretic Hebrew (Hebrew with fixed vowels) whose manuscripts didn't exist until the high middle ages, approximately the 9th century AD--almost a thousand years after Christ! By then, the methodology behind Jewish biblical scholarship had evolved immensely and the original meaning of certain passages were irrevocably changed. Isaiah 7:14 is the classic casualty of this: Masoretic Hebrew renders "young woman" while Septuagint Greek renders "virgin"--a beautiful significant paradigm shift. Ever wonder why the OT books of the Christian Bible are in their current as opposed to the method the Hebrew Bible orders them? That's right, the Septuagint lists them in of Law, Histories, Writings, and Prophecy; the NT books are similarly ordered by Gospel, Acts, Epistles, and Revelation. In the end, the Masoretic/Septuagint battles will rage on; but the latter is still the most ancient and reliable source of the OT, it's quoted extensively by the ancient Church Fathers, and it was the de facto source of scripture for Jesus and His Disciples. If you don't already have a Septuagint, it's well worth picking one up, and the OSB ver is preferable to the aging Brenton translation and even to the flawed-NRSV-based NETS (if you're a conservative practitioner of your faith, it's really hard to take the NRSV seriously with its literal-but-intentionally-unorthodox renderings of scripture as well as its politically-motivated gender-sterilized language).The case for the NKJV Fresh Testament:Other reviewers have mentioned a distaste for the Fresh King James Ver and, as someone who also affirms most of the critical methods of modern NT scholarship, I can certainly empathize. Though the NKJV relies on the Textus Receptus (a Reformation Era-variant of Byzantine text-type manuscripts, compiled by Erasmus) and maintains such renderings in the body of scripture, its footnotes are the most comprehensive of any translation. In fact, all variations from the Majority Text as well as the Nestle-Aland/UBS editions (the "Critical Text" based on Alexandrian text-type manuscripts) are comprehensively documented. The overriding benefit to the selection of the TR is that the NKJV retains the same eloquent, familiar phraseology and literary grace that caused its predecessor to leave such an indelible tag on English language and literature ever after. And because it adheres to the principle of formal equivalence in translation, the NKJV maintains a vocabulary and style in accordance with high English--this is not a "dumbed-down" translation like a lot of other famous ones out there. The effect is that the Bible reads less like a contemporary novel or a everyday newspaper, and more like dignified prose--which is befitting of sacred e case for the commentary:If you're strictly an academic, you may search this to have a limited appeal; but if you consider yourself a member of the faithful laity, you'll obtain quite a lot out of this. Even if you're a Christian of Reformation descent, you'll appreciate the uniqueness in hero of the OSB notes because it's the only modern commentary available that doesn't depend on the historical-critical way to elaborate on passages. Instead, it's comprehensively Christological, even in the OT where it succeeds in pointing out both significant and obscure messianic prophecies. The effect is an OT commentary that approaches scripture holistically, with the same Christ-centered worldview that is readily show in the NT. If you're an Orthodox Christian, you'll love it more than not, even though the brevity characteristic of its notes contrasts with the immense depth and breadth typical of Church Fathers. In my humble opinion, the commentary's simplicity is its strength for ordinary study or prayerful reading. As someone who occasionally refers to the Haydock edition of the Douay-Rheims Bible to shed light on certain difficult scripture passages, I search the OSB's concise, pointed commentary to be a refreshing change, in contrast to Haydock's excessive wordiness for normal use. Sure, for more in-depth study you'll wish a deeper commentary, but the vast majority of the time, and for the vast majority of people, the OSB's solidly patristic explanations are a sight for sore eyes. If you're an Eastern Catholic, this will fit you like a glove since all scripture references cited during Byzantine Divine Liturgy are clearly referenced and the appendix even contains a lectionary for the entire liturgical year. If you're a Roman Rite Catholic, like me, trust me: there's no better modern, complete Bible out there that's created to bolster your faith like this one. To wit: the single-volume Navarre Bible is hopefully in the works and, as of this writing, the NT of the Ignatius Catholic Study Bible is available for pre-order with the OT probably years away. The potential benefits to such future volumes would be references to papal encyclicals, pertinent teachings from the Catechism, and explanations by intellectual giants like Dr. Scott Hahn, Curtis Mitch, or other faithful scripture scholars. The OSB commentary, along with the introductions to each book, purposely limits its scope to the wisdom of the Holy Fathers and the Ecumenical Councils of the first millennium. While this may sound like a detractor at first, it has one substantial benefit: these are the teachings that predate any Reformation, or subsequently required Counter-Reformation, as well as the Amazing East-West Schism. Essentially, these are the teachings of Christ's Church when that Church was One: singular and rmatting notes:The full biblical text is set in a two-column format and is graced with section headers within the chapters themselves for easier searching. The font is a nicely-readable 11-point for the text and about 8-point for the footnotes and commentary. Overall, the page layout is among the most practical and attractive I've seen in any Bible. One major upshot to the OSB is the page thinness. In to package the wealth of info contained in this veritable library into a single volume, the pages evidently had to become nearly tissue-paper thin. Despite this, text ghosting from the other side is surprisingly minimal--I just worry about dropping this one day and forever creasing a couple hundred pages for its potential lack of resilience. Also, the tome measures about 7x10x2, so it's a bit larger than your average private Bible. The bonded leather is elegant and sturdy but suffers some minor-but-still-irritating curl after use. The pages are gold-edged and the Bible has that humble and reverent look and feel that they surely ought to have for the sacred scripture they contain. Finally, the full-color, high quality, icons interspersed throughout are a blessing and further aid the sense of actually being "in church" as you read.Other observations of note:The OSB does suffer one logistical drawback shared, for example, by the Douay-Rheims (the traditional Catholic Bible translated from the Clementine Vulgate): the verse numberings occasionally deviate from the standard (which has been set by an OT in Hebrew and a NT in Greek). In the case of the Douay, this is a effect of translating from the Latin text. With regard to the OSB, related verse discrepancies occur only in the Greek-based OT. Outside the Septuagint Psalter, I've found such a phenomenon to be a rare occurrence, at least. The stock NKJV NT obviously follows standard someone who, admittedly, is accustomed to Masoretic Hebrew renderings in the OT from my NOAB, adjusting to Septuagint ones is an occasionally surprising endeavor, but always a fruitful one. Since the NKJV OT was the base translation for this particular ver of the Septuagint, a lot of beloved passages you're used to are nearly identical; Psalm 23 is a amazing example that remains virtually unchanged. Others, like Proverbs 3:5 are completely different; showing, instead, a much closer relationship to the deuterocanonical book of Wisdom, chapter 8. Such "Easter eggs" are prevalent throughout the text and create having the Septuagint well worth it, even just for comparative r all that you're getting, the OSB's point is just right for both bonded leather and hard-bound. Also, the publisher has more or less recently come out with a red, genuine leather edition that is significantly pricier, but which sports a attractive and ornate gold cover the end, the Orthodox Study Bible is a God-send (quite literally in a lot of senses). If you're less interested in getting to know the "historical Jesus" as portrayed by scholars in most study Bibles, and more interested in meeting with Our Lord and Savior as understood by saints, "Highly recommended" would be an majorem Dei gloriam!

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, Hardcover: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-6-4 18:38

    I'm sorry, I want I could give this Kindle edition of the Orthodox Study Bible a better review. I own the print version, which has extensive articles and notes that bring out the Orthodox perspective of the Bible in terms of liturgics, sacraments, the Incarnation, Baptism and Chrismation. The notes in the print ver emphasize these doctrines of the Orthodox faith in both the Old and Fresh Testaments. I bought the Kindle Ver because the print ver was too massive to carry through airports from terminal to terminal (I lugged it for what seemed like miles in a "book bag"). I reasoned that the Kindle was lighter, and I could have the whole OSB as an eBook, so I forked out $15.00 and downloaded it, only to search that the notes are absent, and what this ver calls "notes" are just references of one passage to another, much as you will search in any ver of the Bible This greatly diminishes what I have in the print ver -- I might as well have bought a NKJ, Don't obtain this Kindle ver if you are expecting to obtain what you search in the print ver of the Orthodox Study Bible.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, eBook: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-7-4 19:39

    The Orthodox Study Bible is a treasure of ancient Church wisdom. I never knew how necessary it would be for the Old Testament to be Septuigint rather than the Hebrew until I did some studies. Historically, the Septuagint was the basic source of Old Testament for the Jews prior to Christ's First Coming and was used by Christ, and the Early Christians (est. 30 A.D. to 1600 A.D.). It contained all prophecies of the Messiah, and even in Genesis 1 clearly shows the entire Trinity at work in creating the world, for instance when it says "God spoke, and there was Light." This is poetic verse to say that He commanded Christ who is Light (John 1:1-15) to bring forth light to the entire Universe and all living things. This is lost in Hebrew translation because the Hebrew translation of the Old Testament is from around 12th Century, a thousand and two hundred years after Christ died on the cross and rose from the dead. By then Jews had eliminated most of the allusion of the Messiah to support hold their people unified and so the Truth of that the Prophet Isaiah, Prophet Jeremiah, the Pslamist David, and more spoke was watered down. The Septuagint includes the original texts in the excellent detailed language of Greek (translated in this Bible into English). This alone makes it worthwhile for serious follower of Christ and Bible addition, there are a lot of excerpts, notes, and commentaries that change how we understand events. For example, when Jesus reinstates Peter, we remember Jesus asking, "Do you love me Peter?" three times. To us it simply was verbal act to recant Peter's three denials. But in Greek it is so much more. Jesus asks Peter twice, "Do you Agape me?" Agape is full devotion love for God and man, it leads to even dying for God and man. Peter responds to Agape twice with Philo, which is a lesser love, more like brotherly love. The third time Jesus asks, He says, "do you Philo me?" Peter is grieved, something I always puzzled at until I read the Orthodox explanation that Jesus was lowering his expectation and standard of love to where Peter was at. This humiliated Peter for His Lord to do this, but it actually was a kindness from Christ, Him saying, "I will meet you where you are at, and support you one day obtain to Agape." This is all in the Orthodox Study Bible. I highly recommend it because it will deepen your understanding of Scripture and support you see the divine hand of Savior from Old Testament to Fresh Testament.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, Hardcover: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-6-4 18:38

    The Orthodox Study Bible is a treasure of ancient Church wisdom. I never knew how necessary it would be for the Old Testament to be Septuigint rather than the Hebrew until I did some studies. Historically, the Septuagint was the basic source of Old Testament for the Jews prior to Christ's First Coming and was used by Christ, and the Early Christians (est. 30 A.D. to 1600 A.D.). It contained all prophecies of the Messiah, and even in Genesis 1 clearly shows the entire Trinity at work in creating the world, for instance when it says "God spoke, and there was Light." This is poetic verse to say that He commanded Christ who is Light (John 1:1-15) to bring forth light to the entire Universe and all living things. This is lost in Hebrew translation because the Hebrew translation of the Old Testament is from around 12th Century, a thousand and two hundred years after Christ died on the cross and rose from the dead. By then Jews had eliminated most of the allusion of the Messiah to support hold their people unified and so the Truth of that the Prophet Isaiah, Prophet Jeremiah, the Pslamist David, and more spoke was watered down. The Septuagint includes the original texts in the excellent detailed language of Greek (translated in this Bible into English). This alone makes it worthwhile for serious follower of Christ and Bible addition, there are a lot of excerpts, notes, and commentaries that change how we understand events. For example, when Jesus reinstates Peter, we remember Jesus asking, "Do you love me Peter?" three times. To us it simply was verbal act to recant Peter's three denials. But in Greek it is so much more. Jesus asks Peter twice, "Do you Agape me?" Agape is full devotion love for God and man, it leads to even dying for God and man. Peter responds to Agape twice with Philo, which is a lesser love, more like brotherly love. The third time Jesus asks, He says, "do you Philo me?" Peter is grieved, something I always puzzled at until I read the Orthodox explanation that Jesus was lowering his expectation and standard of love to where Peter was at. This humiliated Peter for His Lord to do this, but it actually was a kindness from Christ, Him saying, "I will meet you where you are at, and support you one day obtain to Agape." This is all in the Orthodox Study Bible. I highly recommend it because it will deepen your understanding of Scripture and support you see the divine hand of Savior from Old Testament to Fresh Testament.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, Hardcover: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-6-4 18:38

    This bible is stunning to begin up. I got the hardcover, my advice, don't allow the dustcover fool you, the book underneath is classy and elegant. The commintaries are great, as the approch the whole bible from a Christian point view, with a mind toward worship, something lacking in most other bibles. As a Roman Catholic I want "Catholic publishers" would do more Bibles in this style. It reminds me of the old family bibles pre-vatican II, with prayers, Icons, and guides. This bible presents the Orthodox Faith as attractive & mystical. From the font size to the page layouts, to the mini-sermons that explain hard to understand Christian-Catholic-Orthodox theology & interpretations this bible works.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, eBook: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-7-4 19:39

    I was looking for the Ethiopian Orthodox Bible which contains a lot of apocrypha not included in the US at's NOT what this says Greek Orthodox Bible when you begin the book, however, it's not that either (as another reviewer has already pointed out).So, this forced me to approach this book by looking at each individual book to see exactly what it at's incredibly tedious. But here are my is book includes all of the books in the regular KJV bible (and most other US bibles):Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings, 2 Kings, 1 Chronicles, 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Psalms, Job, Proverbs of Solomon, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Hosea, Amos, Micah, Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, Nanum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Exekiel, and Daniel from the OLD tthew, Mark, Luke, John, Acts, Romans, 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon, Hebrews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, Jude, and Revelation from the NEW also includes the following books which are NOT in the KJV or other US bibles:2 EzraTobitJudith (very disappointing)1 Maccabees2 Maccabees3 MaccabeesWisdom of Solomon (my favorite book of all)Wisdom of SirachBaruchEpistle of JeremiahALL of these apocryphal books are in the old testament and not the fresh testament so if you're expecting wisdom from Jesus Christ you will not search it in here. I was extremely disappointed with the books selected for this bible because they're very slanted toward Jewish Orthodox religion, not Christian and yet this is supposed to be a Christian bible. :(Most disappointing for me was JUDITH. It's completely told as a Jewish text and was completely favorite book was WISDOM OF SOLOMON which is a attractive text, but it's also online, so buying thie entire book just for that is rather silly. My favorite chapter is Wisdom of Solomon 7 which is about wisdom and how Solomon became a amazing man and an exceptional follower of God. If you wish to truly understand how to follow God begin reading there (and read it for at KingJamesBibleOnline).

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    Christianity and Eastern Religions []  2020-1-21 23:7

    Used in discussion groups.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, eBook: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-7-4 19:39

    I'm sorry, I want I could give this Kindle edition of the Orthodox Study Bible a better review. I own the print version, which has extensive articles and notes that bring out the Orthodox perspective of the Bible in terms of liturgics, sacraments, the Incarnation, Baptism and Chrismation. The notes in the print ver emphasize these doctrines of the Orthodox faith in both the Old and Fresh Testaments. I bought the Kindle Ver because the print ver was too massive to carry through airports from terminal to terminal (I lugged it for what seemed like miles in a "book bag"). I reasoned that the Kindle was lighter, and I could have the whole OSB as an eBook, so I forked out $15.00 and downloaded it, only to search that the notes are absent, and what this ver calls "notes" are just references of one passage to another, much as you will search in any ver of the Bible This greatly diminishes what I have in the print ver -- I might as well have bought a NKJ, Don't obtain this Kindle ver if you are expecting to obtain what you search in the print ver of the Orthodox Study Bible.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, eBook: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-7-4 19:39

    This is a statement about the physical book itself, not the text. I am not qualified nor worthy to state any opinions on it's e quality of the book is good, overall. I don't see the binding or anything coming apart soon but the quality of the cover, the materials, and the outer binding do lack, somewhat, in quality. Paper quality is very good. Overall, for the of the book, the build quality is good, could be a small bit ere is a difference in the layout between the physical book and the eBook but it must be said that there is absolutely no difference in content (that I can find). The illustrations are, along with the foot notes are at the end of the eBook. That is unlike the physical text itself which is contained within the pages. There are links to each note from the symbol in the text and a link back to the symbol.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, Hardcover: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-6-4 18:38

    As a pentecostal I was very interested about how the Christian body eventually broke into all these denominations. Going to my church elders wasn't as support as I thought. Ministers seem to go back and forth about denominations (like pentecostals are the only ones going to heaven). After some research I finally came to the Orthodox church. It seemed like the Orthodox church was the closest to the original teachings of the Apostles. I love the commentaries and liturgy of morning and evening prayers (which I have done every since buying this bible). For some reason this bible has a certain "smell" which I can't figure out. That smell has now taken over my bookshelf with all my bibles and study guides. It's a amazing smell that I believe could just be in my head (or is it?) All in all I would encourage anyone interested in seeking a deeper understanding of the early churches of Acts to obtain this bible. I only gave it a 4 stars because it doesnt compare up to my Life App bible in regards to bible helps but I somehow feel "closer" while using the Orthodox bible.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, Hardcover: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-6-4 18:38

    For purposes of full disclosure let me to say, first of all, that I'm a practicing Catholic Christian of the Latin Rite who hopes to grant a special perspective regarding the offerings of this particular Bible. I've been in possession of the leather-bound edition since I received it two months after my original pre-order. It's taken me a couple years, but I've really come to love it. As I mentioned in the title of this review, the Orthodox Study Bible has recently dethroned my trusty, old-RSV, Fresh Oxford Annotated Bible as my study Bible of choice. I had small notion this would happen. I do have an extensive collection of Bibles in different translations that I use for comparative study; but probably like yourself, I also have a preferred Bible to go to by default for prayerful reading. Over the latest two years, I just found myself picking up the OSB more and more and the NOAB less and less. Let me to articulate exactly why:The case for the Septuagint Old Testament:The special and most compelling reason to acquire the OSB: it is the only complete Bible in English to be published with the Greek OT right next to the NT. If you have one of those reference Bibles, I'm sure you've noticed that a lot of of the OT quotes used in the NT mismatch when you actually look them up, sometimes to a amazing degree--this is because Jesus and the disciples apparently quoted from the Septuagint Greek, as opposed to other Hebrew sources, a vast majority of the time. This is so, because Greek was the common language of antiquity in the region and the Septuagint translation (which contains the apocryphal/deuterocanonical "hidden books" of the "second canon") was completed more than a century before Christ's birth. By the time of Jesus' ministry, it was in widespread use by Jews throughout the Diaspora, particularly outside of Palestine and, especially, Jerusalem by those who couldn't speak or read Hebrew. Bear in mind: the Hebrew OT, from which 99% of modern English Bibles are translated, relies on Masoretic Hebrew (Hebrew with fixed vowels) whose manuscripts didn't exist until the high middle ages, approximately the 9th century AD--almost a thousand years after Christ! By then, the methodology behind Jewish biblical scholarship had evolved immensely and the original meaning of certain passages were irrevocably changed. Isaiah 7:14 is the classic casualty of this: Masoretic Hebrew renders "young woman" while Septuagint Greek renders "virgin"--a beautiful significant paradigm shift. Ever wonder why the OT books of the Christian Bible are in their current as opposed to the method the Hebrew Bible orders them? That's right, the Septuagint lists them in of Law, Histories, Writings, and Prophecy; the NT books are similarly ordered by Gospel, Acts, Epistles, and Revelation. In the end, the Masoretic/Septuagint battles will rage on; but the latter is still the most ancient and reliable source of the OT, it's quoted extensively by the ancient Church Fathers, and it was the de facto source of scripture for Jesus and His Disciples. If you don't already have a Septuagint, it's well worth picking one up, and the OSB ver is preferable to the aging Brenton translation and even to the flawed-NRSV-based NETS (if you're a conservative practitioner of your faith, it's really hard to take the NRSV seriously with its literal-but-intentionally-unorthodox renderings of scripture as well as its politically-motivated gender-sterilized language).The case for the NKJV Fresh Testament:Other reviewers have mentioned a distaste for the Fresh King James Ver and, as someone who also affirms most of the critical methods of modern NT scholarship, I can certainly empathize. Though the NKJV relies on the Textus Receptus (a Reformation Era-variant of Byzantine text-type manuscripts, compiled by Erasmus) and maintains such renderings in the body of scripture, its footnotes are the most comprehensive of any translation. In fact, all variations from the Majority Text as well as the Nestle-Aland/UBS editions (the "Critical Text" based on Alexandrian text-type manuscripts) are comprehensively documented. The overriding benefit to the selection of the TR is that the NKJV retains the same eloquent, familiar phraseology and literary grace that caused its predecessor to leave such an indelible tag on English language and literature ever after. And because it adheres to the principle of formal equivalence in translation, the NKJV maintains a vocabulary and style in accordance with high English--this is not a "dumbed-down" translation like a lot of other famous ones out there. The effect is that the Bible reads less like a contemporary novel or a everyday newspaper, and more like dignified prose--which is befitting of sacred e case for the commentary:If you're strictly an academic, you may search this to have a limited appeal; but if you consider yourself a member of the faithful laity, you'll obtain quite a lot out of this. Even if you're a Christian of Reformation descent, you'll appreciate the uniqueness in hero of the OSB notes because it's the only modern commentary available that doesn't depend on the historical-critical way to elaborate on passages. Instead, it's comprehensively Christological, even in the OT where it succeeds in pointing out both significant and obscure messianic prophecies. The effect is an OT commentary that approaches scripture holistically, with the same Christ-centered worldview that is readily show in the NT. If you're an Orthodox Christian, you'll love it more than not, even though the brevity characteristic of its notes contrasts with the immense depth and breadth typical of Church Fathers. In my humble opinion, the commentary's simplicity is its strength for ordinary study or prayerful reading. As someone who occasionally refers to the Haydock edition of the Douay-Rheims Bible to shed light on certain difficult scripture passages, I search the OSB's concise, pointed commentary to be a refreshing change, in contrast to Haydock's excessive wordiness for normal use. Sure, for more in-depth study you'll wish a deeper commentary, but the vast majority of the time, and for the vast majority of people, the OSB's solidly patristic explanations are a sight for sore eyes. If you're an Eastern Catholic, this will fit you like a glove since all scripture references cited during Byzantine Divine Liturgy are clearly referenced and the appendix even contains a lectionary for the entire liturgical year. If you're a Roman Rite Catholic, like me, trust me: there's no better modern, complete Bible out there that's created to bolster your faith like this one. To wit: the single-volume Navarre Bible is hopefully in the works and, as of this writing, the NT of the Ignatius Catholic Study Bible is available for pre-order with the OT probably years away. The potential benefits to such future volumes would be references to papal encyclicals, pertinent teachings from the Catechism, and explanations by intellectual giants like Dr. Scott Hahn, Curtis Mitch, or other faithful scripture scholars. The OSB commentary, along with the introductions to each book, purposely limits its scope to the wisdom of the Holy Fathers and the Ecumenical Councils of the first millennium. While this may sound like a detractor at first, it has one substantial benefit: these are the teachings that predate any Reformation, or subsequently required Counter-Reformation, as well as the Amazing East-West Schism. Essentially, these are the teachings of Christ's Church when that Church was One: singular and rmatting notes:The full biblical text is set in a two-column format and is graced with section headers within the chapters themselves for easier searching. The font is a nicely-readable 11-point for the text and about 8-point for the footnotes and commentary. Overall, the page layout is among the most practical and attractive I've seen in any Bible. One major upshot to the OSB is the page thinness. In to package the wealth of info contained in this veritable library into a single volume, the pages evidently had to become nearly tissue-paper thin. Despite this, text ghosting from the other side is surprisingly minimal--I just worry about dropping this one day and forever creasing a couple hundred pages for its potential lack of resilience. Also, the tome measures about 7x10x2, so it's a bit larger than your average private Bible. The bonded leather is elegant and sturdy but suffers some minor-but-still-irritating curl after use. The pages are gold-edged and the Bible has that humble and reverent look and feel that they surely ought to have for the sacred scripture they contain. Finally, the full-color, high quality, icons interspersed throughout are a blessing and further aid the sense of actually being "in church" as you read.Other observations of note:The OSB does suffer one logistical drawback shared, for example, by the Douay-Rheims (the traditional Catholic Bible translated from the Clementine Vulgate): the verse numberings occasionally deviate from the standard (which has been set by an OT in Hebrew and a NT in Greek). In the case of the Douay, this is a effect of translating from the Latin text. With regard to the OSB, related verse discrepancies occur only in the Greek-based OT. Outside the Septuagint Psalter, I've found such a phenomenon to be a rare occurrence, at least. The stock NKJV NT obviously follows standard someone who, admittedly, is accustomed to Masoretic Hebrew renderings in the OT from my NOAB, adjusting to Septuagint ones is an occasionally surprising endeavor, but always a fruitful one. Since the NKJV OT was the base translation for this particular ver of the Septuagint, a lot of beloved passages you're used to are nearly identical; Psalm 23 is a amazing example that remains virtually unchanged. Others, like Proverbs 3:5 are completely different; showing, instead, a much closer relationship to the deuterocanonical book of Wisdom, chapter 8. Such "Easter eggs" are prevalent throughout the text and create having the Septuagint well worth it, even just for comparative r all that you're getting, the OSB's point is just right for both bonded leather and hard-bound. Also, the publisher has more or less recently come out with a red, genuine leather edition that is significantly pricier, but which sports a attractive and ornate gold cover the end, the Orthodox Study Bible is a God-send (quite literally in a lot of senses). If you're less interested in getting to know the "historical Jesus" as portrayed by scholars in most study Bibles, and more interested in meeting with Our Lord and Savior as understood by saints, "Highly recommended" would be an majorem Dei gloriam!

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, Hardcover: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-6-4 18:38

    This is a statement about the physical book itself, not the text. I am not qualified nor worthy to state any opinions on it's e quality of the book is good, overall. I don't see the binding or anything coming apart soon but the quality of the cover, the materials, and the outer binding do lack, somewhat, in quality. Paper quality is very good. Overall, for the of the book, the build quality is good, could be a small bit ere is a difference in the layout between the physical book and the eBook but it must be said that there is absolutely no difference in content (that I can find). The illustrations are, along with the foot notes are at the end of the eBook. That is unlike the physical text itself which is contained within the pages. There are links to each note from the symbol in the text and a link back to the symbol.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, Hardcover: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-6-4 18:38

    This is NOT a 100% translation of the Greek Septuagint. It is, instead, the King James Ver of the Bible with additions from the Greek Septuagint. I thought it was the former, but it is really the latter. My buyer's fever has subsided but if I were to look for the Septuagint in English, I might look next at the Septuagint from Oxford University Press. Given what it is, it is impossible to tell by inspection if I'm reading the KJV or the LXX, except by prior knowledge. I'm not sure when anyone has latest done a complete 100% translation into English, so I suggest a prospective buyer should attention to the description of the ver they wish to purchase.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, Hardcover: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-6-4 18:38

    I was looking for the Ethiopian Orthodox Bible which contains a lot of apocrypha not included in the US at's NOT what this says Greek Orthodox Bible when you begin the book, however, it's not that either (as another reviewer has already pointed out).So, this forced me to approach this book by looking at each individual book to see exactly what it at's incredibly tedious. But here are my is book includes all of the books in the regular KJV bible (and most other US bibles):Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, Deuteronomy, Joshua, Judges, Ruth, 1 Samuel, 2 Samuel, 1 Kings, 2 Kings, 1 Chronicles, 2 Chronicles, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Psalms, Job, Proverbs of Solomon, Ecclesiastes, Song of Solomon, Hosea, Amos, Micah, Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, Nanum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi, Isaiah, Jeremiah, Lamentations, Exekiel, and Daniel from the OLD tthew, Mark, Luke, John, Acts, Romans, 1 Corinthians, 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, Philippians, Colossians, 1 Thessalonians, 2 Thessalonians, 1 Timothy, 2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon, Hebrews, James, 1 Peter, 2 Peter, 1 John, 2 John, 3 John, Jude, and Revelation from the NEW also includes the following books which are NOT in the KJV or other US bibles:2 EzraTobitJudith (very disappointing)1 Maccabees2 Maccabees3 MaccabeesWisdom of Solomon (my favorite book of all)Wisdom of SirachBaruchEpistle of JeremiahALL of these apocryphal books are in the old testament and not the fresh testament so if you're expecting wisdom from Jesus Christ you will not search it in here. I was extremely disappointed with the books selected for this bible because they're very slanted toward Jewish Orthodox religion, not Christian and yet this is supposed to be a Christian bible. :(Most disappointing for me was JUDITH. It's completely told as a Jewish text and was completely favorite book was WISDOM OF SOLOMON which is a attractive text, but it's also online, so buying thie entire book just for that is rather silly. My favorite chapter is Wisdom of Solomon 7 which is about wisdom and how Solomon became a amazing man and an exceptional follower of God. If you wish to truly understand how to follow God begin reading there (and read it for at KingJamesBibleOnline).

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, eBook: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-7-4 19:39

    As a pentecostal I was very interested about how the Christian body eventually broke into all these denominations. Going to my church elders wasn't as support as I thought. Ministers seem to go back and forth about denominations (like pentecostals are the only ones going to heaven). After some research I finally came to the Orthodox church. It seemed like the Orthodox church was the closest to the original teachings of the Apostles. I love the commentaries and liturgy of morning and evening prayers (which I have done every since buying this bible). For some reason this bible has a certain "smell" which I can't figure out. That smell has now taken over my bookshelf with all my bibles and study guides. It's a amazing smell that I believe could just be in my head (or is it?) All in all I would encourage anyone interested in seeking a deeper understanding of the early churches of Acts to obtain this bible. I only gave it a 4 stars because it doesnt compare up to my Life App bible in regards to bible helps but I somehow feel "closer" while using the Orthodox bible.

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    The Orthodox Study Bible, eBook: Ancient Christianity Speaks to Today's World []  2020-7-4 19:39

    This bible is stunning to begin up. I got the hardcover, my advice, don't allow the dustcover fool you, the book underneath is classy and elegant. The commintaries are great, as the approch the whole bible from a Christian point view, with a mind toward worship, something lacking in most other bibles. As a Roman Catholic I want "Catholic publishers" would do more Bibles in this style. It reminds me of the old family bibles pre-vatican II, with prayers, Icons, and guides. This bible presents the Orthodox Faith as attractive & mystical. From the font size to the page layouts, to the mini-sermons that explain hard to understand Christian-Catholic-Orthodox theology & interpretations this bible works.

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    Parish Priest: Father Michael McGivney and American Catholicism [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    Perfect book on the life of Fr Michael McGivney, founder of the Knights of Columbus. But what makes it truly exceptional is that it tells the "whole story" explaining the times and situation Fr McGivney lived in. It is this context that I appreciated the most. Even if you aren't Catholic this is a amazing history book of "regular life" in the late 1800's.

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    Parish Priest: Father Michael McGivney and American Catholicism [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    I met a Knight of Columbus who chop my winter wood supply. He told me he had some mates who would then come to support him split and stack it. I never knew the story about the Knights of Columbus or what their purpose was. Now I do. This book explains how the Knights of Columbus came to be and of their accomplishments. What a unbelievable story.

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    Parish Priest: Father Michael McGivney and American Catholicism [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    Amazing

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    Parish Priest: Father Michael McGivney and American Catholicism [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    This book should be read by all Knights. It gives amazing insight to our founding. It also provides insight into how the Catholic faith helped people in poverty.

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    Parish Priest: Father Michael McGivney and American Catholicism [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    This was a amazing book to read for a lot of reasons. It gave me a renewal of history of the happenings of early America and the happenings and descriptions of the middle and later 1800's. It gives a amazing description of how the early Catholics were treated when they arrived in the United States. Also it is a amazing history lesson of how the Knights of Columbus was stared and developed over time. I pray that one day soon Father McGivney will be canonized a Saint. Richard

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    Parish Priest: Father Michael McGivney and American Catholicism [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    As a member of KoC I found the history of the founding highly interesting. Also gained a lot of insight in what it was like to be Catholic in America in the late 19th century. The book has a few dull parts; probably due to Fr. McGivney's short life, humility, and lack of self-promotion. The author fills in the slow parts with minutiae that could have been left out and not been missed. That said, I've recommended the book to others and think it is a must read for KoC members or anyone with an interest in the time & put in American history.

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    Parish Priest: Father Michael McGivney and American Catholicism [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    Such a amazing charger for the , Better than expected . I like that they have various lengths in the pack so that i can use them for various pupose. The works amazing when i am on the bed but need to charge my phone whose charger is placed on the far end. This cable is nylon braided and seems very tight andd protective. Cables arrived promptly and work great. The quaily is very good. Super product, Perfect customer service. Certainly would recommend.

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    Parish Priest: Father Michael McGivney and American Catholicism [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    It's a amazing story, I'm a knight also

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    Parish Priest: Father Michael McGivney and American Catholicism [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    This was a compelling story that really brought to life the struggles of growing up during tough economic times and the passion Father McGivney had for protecting families. He was a pioneer and worked tirelessly to obtain both life insurance and income protection for members because he had seen first hand what happens when the bread-earner becomes too sick or damage to work.

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    Parish Priest: Father Michael McGivney and American Catholicism [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    Brinkley and Fenster have written a must read for every Catholic. This biography depicts the struggles of Catholic Americans and immigrants in the 19th century. Fr. McGivney was a man of faith with a mission. He saw the discrimination and bigotry and made a faith-based organization to overcome them and their families. McGivney's short life (38 years) was filled with challenges. Through his vision the Knights of Columbus was formed. It is a legacy that will surely carry him to sainthood. As we face the current attacks on the Catholic Church, we must look to Fr. McGivney for guidance. His faith was strengthened by his trials and tribulations, so must our own faith be fortified by the frequent barrage of negativity we encounter today.

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    The Orthodox Heretic: And Other Impossible Tales []  2020-1-22 22:23

    This book is smaller than I expected. It's "gift size" if you know what that means. About 4 x e book is divided into three main parts: Beyond Belief, GODISNOWHERE, and Transfigurations. Each section contains eleven yond Belief talks about what could happen if we took our faith beyond primary belief and actually lived like Christ.GODISNOWHERE explores the idea of "living in the resurrection" and seeking God among other ansfigurations looks at traditional beliefs and flips them on their respective heads to really mix up what you thought you knew.Obviously, this book is not for everyone. Evangelicals, stay away. If you are open-minded, seeking, liberal, curious or atheist then this book will intrigue you. These stories I tend to read over and over again. I actually discuss these with other people and have some e packaging, layout, presentation is also stellar.I highly recommend this book for anyone who is post-modern or knows someone who is post-modern.

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    The Orthodox Heretic: And Other Impossible Tales []  2020-1-22 22:23

    I knew nothing about the author or the book other than some Christian and post-Christian mates recommended it on Fb and it @#$%!0.99 on the Kindle. Based on that, I figured it wouldn't be too a huge a risk to grab it and read it. I'm glad I e book is a collection of parables, some are twists on the parables Jesus told. If you like Anthony De Mello, you'll probably like this book. The author follows each parable with a commentary. But, he recommends you read each one slowly and even repeatedly to obtain the full lesson. It's a fast read and one that will possibly cause you to reconsider your view of what it means to be faithful- especially if you're coming from a traditional Christian background.

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    The Orthodox Heretic: And Other Impossible Tales []  2020-1-22 22:23

    This book will humble ones pretenses of being holy. Mr. Rollins stories remind me of a boy in my home parish who distributed calling cards asking, "If you were accused of being a Christian, would there be enough evidence to convict you?" In a series of piercing parables, Mr Rollins' response is, "Probably not!"

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    The Orthodox Heretic: And Other Impossible Tales []  2020-1-22 22:23

    Reading this book through slowly in a devotional type style is the best method to do it. If you read it front to back like a normal book without taking time to allow the words soak in to your heart, mind, and soul, then it will likely have small result on you. But if you read each story/parable slowly and truly allow the words soak in, then it can be a strong and transformative experience that is rare to search in contemporary Christian literature.

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    The Orthodox Heretic: And Other Impossible Tales []  2020-1-22 22:23

    Image included is of my very well loved, very well travelled copy of this book. It is the first Peter Rollins book I bought and has been very necessary in my life. Rollins has grabbed my faith (or remenants of it) and shaken it back to life by breathing fresh responsibility and purpose into it with this delightfully engaging and familiar book.

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    The Orthodox Heretic: And Other Impossible Tales []  2020-1-22 22:23

    pete rollins kinda scares me. first, he's clearly so off-the-charts smart. he's got some kind of super-rare combo platter going on of wicked intelligent and uber-cool and completely non-pretentious. he doesn't care what i think of him, or what anyone else thinks, i'd guess. his book how (not) to speak of god blew me away -- so amazing and so disequilibrating at the same time. i felt slightly off-balance for a week after reading it. so this book was a small let-down after that; but it's still "so amazing and so disequilibrating." it's a collection of parables, each with a few pages of unpacking. i liked the parables more than the unpacking; but the unpacking was often helpful and necessary. there wasn't enough of a thread to keep them all together as a book, for my taste (other than "so amazing and so disequilibrating"!). but it's still very much worth the read if you wish to be pushed a bit to think of the jesus method from various perspectives. no question: some of the parables are ones i will be reading in sermons or hoping to use (with permission, of course) in some future book i might write.

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    The Orthodox Heretic: And Other Impossible Tales []  2020-1-22 22:23

    How can anyone read this book and not see themselves in these stories? They awaken us, create us see ourselves from a fresh perspective, and eventually can transform us. A amazing book for those who may feel they've grown "beyond Christianity" and those who wish to see how Christianity lives in the world. One of the most compelling books I've ever read.

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    The Orthodox Heretic: And Other Impossible Tales []  2020-1-22 22:23

    This book is a excellent example of amazing things coming in little packages. It’s a little hardback, black-cover (without the sleeve) that reminds me of my marriage is a book of tales; a book of parables. Some are taken from the Bible. Some are not.Each one is a relatively short read, followed by a commentary. There’s much wisdom here, as well as humor, suspense, and unexpected twists.“In the parable, truth is not expressed via some detached logical discourse…Parables subvert the desire to create faith easy and understandable.”We look at “the real meaning of the phrase Word of God,” as Peter declares “it is impossible to affirm God’s Word apart from becoming that Word, apart from being the put where that Word becomes a living, breathing act.”We view a lot of of the parables of Jesus from slightly various perspectives, which can sometime render very various Rollins believes, as do I, that we should not “treat the Bible as a type of textbook providing us with an ethical blueprint,” and that we must question “whether the Bible can be treated in this method without doing the teachings of Jesus a amazing injustice.”The fresh insights on “turn the other cheek” were both eye-opening and, depressing. We look at the kind of people Jesus was speaking to, and contrast that to the kind of people he was speaking about. When we realize that “through the clothes we buy, the coffee we drink, the investments we make, and the vehicles that we drive,” we are often supporting slave labor and suffering, we can see ourselves not as the ones turning the other cheek, but rather, as the ones doing the slapping.[That's one reason my wife and I now only "fair-trade" coffee. I know it may not be possible (or feasible) to eliminate all avenues of our negative footprints, but if we at least do something, we can create a difference.]There’s a simply unbelievable tale of a kind, well-respected elderly priest, and a jealous, self-absorbed prince who’s hell-bent on exposing the priest as a “coldhearted liar who sells the people lies in to live.” I had my wife, Kathy, read that one. She didn’t see the “twist” coming, either. It’s really ere’s also some new material on “the pearl of amazing price,” “the prodigal son,” “feeding the five-thousand,” and a lot of is anthology is, I think, excellent for short, meditative everyday readings (or, as some prefer the term, “quiet-time.”). It’s really not a book you should even attempt to read in one or two sittings, although it would be simple to do so. At least half of the value of reading this book is the story-by-story private reflection.I didn’t know this was a collection of short stories when I ordered it. If memory serves me, I purchased this book on the recommendation of a Fb friend. I do not recall which one. Whoever you are, “Thank You!” I loved “The Orthodox Heretic,” and will certainly be reading more writings of Peter Rollins.

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    The Orthodox Heretic: And Other Impossible Tales []  2020-1-22 22:23

    By subtly altering biblical and other religious stories, Peter Enns opens fresh perspectives on the original stories. God is not the same as human concepts of God. What happens if we strive to live with love as the central principle of life?

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    The Orthodox Heretic: And Other Impossible Tales []  2020-1-22 22:23

    This is a book of parables, or tales, or very short stories. As Rollins states in his introduction, you can decide how to classify them. In any case, they are all amazing works of fiction that do their job of shifting the reader to see things from a fresh viewpoint, offering to present our own minds what we mostly already know, but from a fresh perspective. Often it is this fresh perspective that is the very thing we need to gain a deeper understanding to those things we think we already understand.I enjoyed all the stories. At first I was a small disappointed that Rollins added a commentary after each one, preferring the idea of grappling with the point of the parable myself. Giving an explanation in a sense takes some of the power out of the parables themselves. However, in hindsight I am glad he did give us a commentary, as his own insights and thoughts give a deeper understanding to his parables.His style of fiction reminded me, in some ways, of the short stories of Ray Bradbury. In particular, his ability to create the final sentence not only take the reader by surprise, but add an entirely fresh depth to the whole om what I know of Rollings he is primarily a non-fiction writer, and this is amazing news, for he has plenty of special and valuable insights into the spiritual life and the human experience. However, I do hope he decides to at some point to pen a full length novel. He has shown through this little book of parables he has the skill to do it.Mick Mooney,author of God's Grammar: A Novel

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    Practical Catholicism [App]  2020-5-24 21:9

    We are proud to have our student, Roberto Rafo, for being part of this unbelievable task he has set out to do. We have thoroughly reviewed the application before it was published and have come to the conclusion as a squad that it should be shared with others around the world. We believe this application will be very successful. God bless you Roberto and we want you the best of luck in drawing others closer to our faith.

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    Practical Catholicism [App]  2020-5-24 21:9

    Very amazing job Roberto. I'm very proud of you. I am enjoying reading the answers to the questions most. Ever since you were a child you wanted to be close with our Father in heaven and now you are closer to him than ever before, and daily you're getting stronger. God bless you for this.

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    Relationship of National Socialism and Christianity []  2020-2-6 23:10

    This is an excerpt of a intra-party memo prepared by Martin Bormann. The memo was uncovered by the OSS as part of its investigation into the Nazi Party as part of the Nuremberg trials. The memo was part of the evidence used versus the has become conventional to link the Nazi party to Christianity for modern political or rhetorical purposes. The late Christopher Hitchens created it part of his typical indictment of Christianity.But Hitchens never mentioned is Kindle book allows limited copying, but the quote I managed to copy has Bormann explaining:"National Socialist and Christian concepts are irreconcilable. Christian churches build on uncertainty of human beings and attempt to preserve the uncertainty of as wide segments of the population as possible, for only in this method can Christian churches hold their power. As opposed to that, National Socialism is based on scientific fundamentals. Christianity has invariable tenets, which were set up almost 2,000 years ago and have crystallized in dogmas incompatible with reality. National Socialism on the other hand must, if it is to fulfill its job in the future, always be organized according to the recent knowledge of scientific research."Bormann, in fact, sounds a lot more like Christopher Hitchens than Jerry Falwell. This is understandable. Nazism emerged out of the occult tradition and fancied itself progressive and scientific. Bormann represented that feature of Nazism. Given his control of the levers of the Nazi Party, that aspect of Nazism might have become the aspect that might have prevailed if Germany had won Globe Battle is is a very short text. You can probably search it online as part of the evidence for the Nuremberg trial. For me, the is worth it just to have it readily at B

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    Mystical Tradition: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam []  2019-12-30 18:53

    Had hoped for something with more of the "global ideas" and practices of the mystics. A bit too a lot of detailed factoids for my taste. I didn't like how small of true substance was said about Hildegard. However, I haven't listened to the entire series yet...maybe the amazing items is yet to come.

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    Mystical Tradition: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam []  2019-12-30 18:53

    The Amazing Courses DVD “Mystical Traditions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam” by Prof. Luke Timothy Johnson is a thirty-six-lecture course devoted to the mystical aspects of the three Abrahamic religious traditions. Lecture 1 focuses on defining mysticism, while lecture 2 is a general overview of the similarities and differences between Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; Lecture 3 talks about the Biblical roots of Western mysticism, while lecture 4 focuses on the similar topic of mysticism in early Judaism; Lecture 5 talks about Merkabah mysticism, while lecture 6 talks about Hasidism (ultra-Orthodox Judaism) in medieval Germany. Lectures 7 and 8 talk about the mystical Jewish school of thought known as Kabbalah. Lecture 9 talks about the life and thought of the Syrian-born Jewish mystical philosopher, Isaac Luria, while lecture 10 talks about the Turkish-born Jewish mystic and rabbi Sabbatai Zevi 1628-1676); Lecture 11 is about the modern incarnation of Hasidic Judaism via the Baal Shem Tov in the late 1700’s, while lecture 12 talks about mysticism in contemporary Judaism. Lecture 13 focuses on mystical elements of the Fresh Testament, while lecture 14 talks about Gnostic Christianity. Lecture 15 talks about the early Christian monks---known as the Desert Fathers---in a lecture entitled “The Spirituality of the Desert,” while lecture 16 talks about the shaping of Christianity in the East; Lecture 17 talks about Eastern Monks and the Hesychastic Tradition, while lecture 18 talks about the Mysticism of the Western Tradition; Lecture 19 focuses on female mystics, while lecture 20 focuses on mendicant mystics; Prof. Johnson devotes lecture 21 to the discussion of English Mystics of the 14th Century, and in lecture 22, he focuses on mystivs of fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Spain; Lecture 23 and 24 talks about Mysticism in Protestantism; Lecture 25 focuses on twentieth-century mystics, while lecture 26 talks about the prophet Muhammad; Lecture 27 talks about “the House of Islam,” while lecture 28 with Shi’ite Islam; Lectures 29-35 talk about different aspects of Sufism (Islamic mysticism); Finally, lecture 36 sums up the course. One thing which I found surprising and cool was that Prof. Johnson used to be a Benedictine monk. So I guess they picked the right person to talk about mystical experiences and how people in the Abrahamic traditions test to develop an intimate relationship with God. Wow! I was also surprised and intrigued by the fact that Prof. Johnson also recounted his own spiritual experiences of having seen both Heaven and Hell. I also thought it was interesting that he was fluent in five languages---English, French, Latin, Greek, and Hebrew. Now, given his theological background, it should not surprise me that he knows Latin, Greek and Hebrew since, after all, those were the languages in which the Bible was originally written. I was also surprised to learn that the Jews did not begin to call themselves Jews, or to begin to call their religion Judaism, until the Greeks and Romans began to take over the Holy Land because---apparently---that was their method of distinguishing themselves from anyone who did not worship the God of Israel. It is related to how Hindus did not begin to be called Hindus until the Muslims came when Muslim conquerors used that term for basically anyone from India who wasn’t an adherent of either Judaism, Christianity or Islam and how the term Hinduism was used in a related method by the British after it was coined in the early 1800’s by the Hindu reformer, Ranmohun Roy (1772-1833). I was also very surprised that Hasidic Jews have an almost quasi-mystical view of the cosmos and its relationship to God. Apparently, according to Prof, Johnson, a lot of Hasidic---and, presumably, Haredi---Jews have a quasi-Platonic view of the cosmos in the sense that a lot of Hasidic Jews apparently believe that God had made abstract, mystical, universal aspects of all things related to the Platonic concept of “Forms.” This, I suspect, was why, despite the differences that may exist between Platonic philosophy and Jewish, Christian or Islamic theology, a lot of Jewish, Christian and Muslim scholars have been able to embrace Platonic philosophy with very few reservations, especially in the Middle Ages. One mistake that Prof. Johnson makes is to claim that the mystic always “experiences something transcendent.” While monotheists typically view their God as transcendent, not all religions do. A lot of forms of Hinduism, for instance, believe in the concept of “Advaita Vedanta”---that is to say, non-Dualistic Vedanta, a belief that the divine literally manifests itself in the entire world. Again---while the emphasis on a transcendent god is a logical and legitimate focus for a course on the mystical traditions within Judaism, Christianity or Islam, not all religions believe that the divine is transcendent or separate from the globe in any way. Another mistake which this professor makes is that he claims that “Messianism is only significant” in the Shi’ite tradition with the figure of the Mahdi. This is inaccurate. Both Sunnis and Shi’ites believe in a Messiah; it is just that Sunnis believe in only one messiah, while Shi’ites believe in two. ALL Muslims---whether Sunni, Shi’ite, or from lesser known sects---join Christians in accepting Jesus as the messiah---the Quran makes it clear that this is, in fact part of Islamic theology---except for the fact that Muslims do not worship Jesus; they simply believe that he is a amazing prophet who will, in fact, conquer evil at the end of time. Shi’ites, by contrast, believe in two messiahs---Jesus and the Mahdi. Counter to what Prof. Johnson claims, it is not Muslims who descend from Ishmael---who, it should be remembered, is also considered by Muslims to be a prophet along with Abraham, Isaac and Jacob---but in reality, it is all ARABS---NOT just Muslims---who are descended from Ishmael, regardless of what religion they practice. This fact, by the way, is confirmed both by two Jewish sources---the ”Jewish Antiquities” of Philo and another book by the same name, the “Jewish Antiquities” of Josephus, as well as by several Muslim sources---namely, the “Sirat Rasulullah” (Biography of the Messenger of God) by Ibn Ishaq (the first major biography of the prophet Muhammad ever written, which starts at the creation of the globe and ends with Muhammad’s death) of Ibn Ishaq (704-770 CE), the “Qisas al-Anbiya” (Stories of the Prophets) by the popular historian and theologian Ibn Kathir (1300-1373), and the “Tarikh ar-Rusul, al-Umam wa al-Muluk” (“History of the Messengers, Nations and Kings”) by the popular historian and theologian Abu Ja’far Muhammad ibn Jarir al-Tabari (839-923 CE). The common biological origins of Arabs and Jews is also confirmed by the results of genetic testing. All in all, this is a very fascinating course for anyone who is interested in the mystical elements of the three Abrahamic religions---Judaism, Christianity, and Islam---and in comparing these three traditions in a more general sense.

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    Gnosticism and Christianity in Roman and Coptic Egypt (Studies in Antiquity & Christianity) []  2020-1-16 10:17

    This book is a collection of essays by the author of which only the first and longest one was not previously published. For everyone interested in the development of early Christianity or Gnosticism (which the author treats as a separate religion) in Egypt, this work is literally needed reading. It is at its best as a primer into the different sources and how they fit into a mosaic of Christian and Gnostic development. The essays with the following subjects, each in its own chapter:(1) Current problems in the study of early Christianity in Egypt.(2) Christian and Jews in First Century Alexandria.(3) Ancient Alexandria in the "Acts of Mark."(4) A Coptic Homily "On Riches" attributed to Saint Peter of Alexandria.(5) Enoch in Egypt.(6) A Coptic Enoch Apocryphon.(7) Gnosticism as a religion.(8) Gnostic Ritual and Iamblichus's treatise "On The Mysteries of Egypt."(9) Gnostic iconography.(10) The figure of Seth in Manichaean literature. The author argues that early Christians were part and parcel of the Jewish community of Alexandria before Trajan's extirpation of the Jews of Alexandria, and that their development was distinct from Christianity's development in Rome, Syria and elsewhere. Coptic was developed as a language in translating the Christian and Old Testament books from Greek into a language for Egyptian use, and Christianity and Gnosticism (growing out of Jewish origins separately from Christianity) came closely together for a period (actually certain Christian leaders adopted some Gnostic mysticism in their development of Christianity) before separating permanently. He also argues that Gnosticism is indeed a religion and worthy of independent study. Author Pearson brings together sources from the Old and Fresh Testaments, the Apocrypha, Dead Sea Scrolls, Nag Hammadi codexes, Hellenistic Jewish writers, Patristic literature and different other letters, codexes and writings. The end notes are copious and form perfect avenues for further study by themselves. As the author states, this work a window into the globe of early Christianity and Gnosticism in Egypt, and provides an perfect primer for further study and research. I highly recommend this work for everyone interested in the early development of Christianity.

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    Gnosticism and Christianity in Roman and Coptic Egypt (Studies in Antiquity & Christianity) []  2020-1-16 10:17

    this book has some of the best scholarship on gnosticism, its fantastic. Perhaps you have read books on the topic a lot of them like i have but this one touches topics that no other seem to even bother with for example " the book of jeu" a gnostic text form the berlin codex no one seems to even bother with. as well as a chapter on gnostic gems. I highly recommend this book for anyone interested in gnosticism . In this book you will search corners of gnosticism not explored like in other books by they author or other authors on gnosticism. this book is invaluable .

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    The Japanese and Christianity: Why Is Christianity Not Widely Believed in Japan? []  2020-1-19 21:28

    Dr. Lee does a amazing job covering all aspects of a subject that is so complex, even the experts argue the root cause of the problem. It's broad enough to cover everything without going into unnecessary depth, making it extremely accessible to the casual reader.

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    The Japanese and Christianity: Why Is Christianity Not Widely Believed in Japan? []  2020-1-19 21:28

    Must read for all missionaries and missionary children raised in Japan. An informed outsiders view of the Land of the Rising Sun.

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    The Japanese and Christianity: Why Is Christianity Not Widely Believed in Japan? []  2020-1-19 21:28

    Especially critical book for future missionaries to Japan! It's not so deep in detail and history, but it gives you enough to certainly have a handle on the complex relationship between Japan and Christianity.

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    The Japanese and Christianity: Why Is Christianity Not Widely Believed in Japan? []  2020-1-19 21:28

    This saying reflects the importance of Shintoism in Japanese family traditions, the trend toward "Christian" (western-style) weddings, and the popularity of Buddhist funerals. It also reflects the failure of Christian evangelists to bring more than a little percentage of Japanese into the fold. Beginning with Portuguese Jesuits in 1549, thousands of westerners representing every Christian denomination have worked in Japanese missions. Today, fewer than 2% of Japanese identify themselves as Christians. Why?This book is the author's doctoral thesis from Leiden University in Amsterdam. He was a twenty-year veteran in Christian ministries when he began to compile different scholarly writings into one coherent explanation of the enigma that is Japan's put in Christendom. I think he succeeds in presenting a coherent explanation, but it's NOT a easy one! This is a long, dense, thorough examination of Japanese history, culture, and psychology and how a lot of factors have combined to create this country so resistant to Christian 's academic writing and has not been altered to conform to anyone's idea of "good light reading." It opens with pages and pages of "endorsements" by experts, has more pages and pages of explanation of methodology, and the footnotes at the end of every chapter will give you a LOT more info than you wanted. Dr. Lee also has the academician's habit of telling you what he's going to tell you, then telling it to you, and then telling you what he's told you. College professors do this in why the five stars? Because, if you're patient and can do some skipping, there's a really amazing book in here. Lee's handling of this extremely complicated topic makes it understandable even to those of us who are not experts in the field. Of particular interest is the influence which Christianity and Christian missionaries have had on the development of modern Japan; an influence which is disproportionate to the numbers of Japanese who are professed Christians. If you're interested in Japan and Japanese culture, you shouldn't miss this one. It's fascinating reading.

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    The Japanese and Christianity: Why Is Christianity Not Widely Believed in Japan? []  2020-1-19 21:28

    Dr. Lee's comprehension of and passion for the problems that stand versus the salvation of the Japanese are obvious. This book is very impressive--well researched, easily understood and extremely well documented: a must for anyone with a heart for the Japanese people.

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    The Japanese and Christianity: Why Is Christianity Not Widely Believed in Japan? []  2020-1-19 21:28

    Having just finished this, first of all do understand this is a thesis that's been created available as a book and possibly a bit prematurely.I picked this up hoping for a solid overview of the history of Christianity in Japan along with some critique of how the Japanese church and foreign missionaries could be better placed to contexualise the Gospel, I ended up feeling it didn't really obtain there.I'm not sure if this kindle ver I read was an OCR of the print edition but there was a lot of typos and the layout created it harder than it need be to read. Generally there's a fluidity and simplicity to the author's writing that means you can carve through it faster than most theses; yet there's enough turns of phrase that are awkward, along with repetitive rhetoric that it gets a bit frustrating if you're expecting an edited book.I felt that it is a powerful critique to Western involvement in the Japanese Church and whilst trying to encompass it all it's simply isn't thorough enough. The author clearly has read a lot in researching this subject yet some of the errors in happenings or references left me unsure how acquainted he was with some of it. I found that it jumped from anecdote to anecdote sometimes with a century between them trying to thread the needle on an arguments that often ended in a non sequitur. It's one of those books that I felt only half of it was on the but that's mingled in with the other half of unnecessary content. I felt it was trying to be factual on one hand yet had enough private determinations that it shaded most Western Christian activity in Japan as negative. Whilst it was trying to span the spectrum of missionary and indigenous church beliefs in Japan, also it never established really what was the Gospel, as in what was the point of Christianity.Overall I felt that it might be better to begin with Atsuyoshi Fujiwara's Theology of Culture in a Japanese Context that attempts to cover related ground, yet in more academic language, and putting it within a framework and critique of Niebuhr's missiology.

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    The Japanese and Christianity: Why Is Christianity Not Widely Believed in Japan? []  2020-1-19 21:28

    For those who are interested in why Japan is not opening up to Christianity, this will be a amazing book to start.

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    The Japanese and Christianity: Why Is Christianity Not Widely Believed in Japan? []  2020-1-19 21:28

    This book is the best overview of Christian history of Japan that I have read. Finding books that cover not only the 16 th century, but also post Globe Battle 2 is difficult. I choose this rating because I gained such a huge amount of info from the book. It is not difficult to read! I would recommend this for all adults interested in Christianity in Japan.

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    The Japanese and Christianity: Why Is Christianity Not Widely Believed in Japan? []  2020-1-19 21:28

    on understanding the barriers to Japanese believing in Christianity. A short but comprehensive must-read if you work with Japanese people.

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    Orthodox Word []  2020-5-13 18:43

    If you via Amazon you are getting convenience, but that said the Monks are slow adding you to the list. There are no advertisements in the little bimonthly about 45 pages and you obtain them months after the original publication date. Still this is created by people who are living the faith, and for a little price, you obtain a glimpse into it. I have fun every problem and think if someone is interested in the Orthodox faith this is a amazing put to start. If you obtain it now, it will present up on your door around Pascha. Merry Christmas. /TKL

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    Disproving Christianity and Other Secular Writings (2nd edition, revised) []  2020-1-20 20:9

    The Book Title is slightly misleading (but, aren't all book titles slightly misleading?)The Book is chiefly about (as David clearly states in the SECOND EDITION NOTE):-'condemning and disproving fundamentalist Christianity and Biblical literalism'and:-'critiques of religiosity' (NOT 'condemning', the two words means DIFFERENT things)Knowing this is very important, so that one may read the book its INTENDED CONTEXT.. . . . . . . . . . .As a Christian, I found David's book sometimes Challenging, sometimes Helpful (in different ways), AND OVERALL A VERY GOOD READ.I would recommend 'Disproving Christianity' to anyone with an intestest in Christianity and/or Christians (this doesn't ONLY mean Atheists of Different Kinds, but ALSO Christians AND people of Any Religion).End Note : I am aware that a lot of Christians might hate David's book (as possibly David too), just as a lot of Christians believe I worship Satan because just because they don't like a lot of my Art for 'Being Sinister' (where I don't see my Art as Sinister at all).~andrew

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    Disproving Christianity and Other Secular Writings (2nd edition, revised) []  2020-1-20 20:9

    The thing I liked most about this book is that I learned so a lot of fresh things from it. The fresh things were stories from the Bible that I'd never heard in fifty-one years as a Christian and contradictions in there that I had heard existed but were never told about specifically. There are few grammatical and punctuation errors. This was a pleasant read.

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    Disproving Christianity and Other Secular Writings (2nd edition, revised) []  2020-1-20 20:9

    This book is easily understood, enlightening, respectful, and a fast insight to a non-believer's mind. It answers questions a lot of Christians have for non-believers in a peaceful manner. It's a fast read and will begin your mind to not only the Christian religion, but religion in general. I highly recommend reading this book. I like that book not only had the Bible verses in questioned attached, but it stuck to one ver of the Bible. This would be an amazing book to give any theist that question why a person wouldn't believe in the god of the Bible. I hope you have fun reading this book as much as I did.

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    God's Favorites: Judaism, Christianity, and the Myth of Divine Chosenness []  2019-12-19 19:2

    Coogan manages most of the time, but not always, to avoid being overly dismissive of those of his readers who still may actually believe in God, and that the Bible is actually inspired, although not by necessity a literal history book. But his debunking of the idea that the Bible is teaching that a certain group is God's favorite is such a welcome breath of new air, that I can not dismiss his well-written rhaps there is a middle ground between taking the Bible literally--and rejecting all of it completely out of hand. Coogan never finds that middle ground here, but brings up perfect historical and theological points which are worth consideration. Much as his awesome text book on the Old Testament gives fresh insights into the Scriptures and how we got them, this short and readable (but highly literate) book will, if the reader is willing, expand your perspective.His occasionally condescending dismissal of anything remotely resembling respect for the Bible's inspiration or of anyone who might believe there is a true God out there dings the book 2 stars for me, but it is still worthwhile and excellent.

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    God's Favorites: Judaism, Christianity, and the Myth of Divine Chosenness []  2019-12-19 19:2

    Fascinating and well-argued book that gives true insight into Biblical scholarship.

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    God's Favorites: Judaism, Christianity, and the Myth of Divine Chosenness []  2019-12-19 19:2

    Michael Coogan's book, "God's Favorites: Judaism, Christianity, and the Myth of Divine Chosenness" is a timely work which addresses primary human tribalism in Christianity, Judaism and Islam, and how all feel that they are chosen of God. Michael Coogan is a historian rather than a theologian which is probably best since theologians tend to keep very uncompromising views that generally aren't begin to subjects such as this one. This book has been released just as a lot of people are wondering how a loving God could be so brutal in the Old Testament of the Bible. Coogan's work is well researched and very simple to read. Clearly, it is meant to be popularly read as opposed to being read by graduate students in the Harvard classroom. However, as a famous work geared to the public, this book stands to be a amazing influence on a lot of people. It also explores the roots of American exceptionalism beliefs. At the end of the day, whether you believe in God or not, it is time for us all to acknowledge that God is not responsible for our atrocities. It is time for God to stop being blamed for our hatred of others and this book will support in the discussion of the tribal tendency to act with violent disregard of others while blaming God for the action. IF you are closed to any discussion of God not having a chosen people, this book will not be a amazing choice for you.

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    Disproving Christianity and Other Secular Writings (2nd edition, revised) []  2020-1-20 20:9

    Disproving Christianity is the best secular book I have read. The author walks you through several conflicting or contradicting passages with no mockery whatsoever. He also points out that several passages are outdated even to practicing christians. It certainly is a must read for everyone who is (to know that the Bibile includes absurdities, to accept its imperfectness) or was a christian (to reinforce the choice). An eye-opener in the best sense.

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    God's Favorites: Judaism, Christianity, and the Myth of Divine Chosenness []  2019-12-19 19:2

    As with all of Coogan's works, this book was excellent. I highly recommend it. A timely notice of reason and clarity from one of the amazing biblical scholars of our day, taking head-on the tribalism that is so prevalent in humans, and in particular, religion. It was shorter than I expected. I actually [email protected]#$%! was longer with even more detail. But an perfect book.

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    God's Favorites: Judaism, Christianity, and the Myth of Divine Chosenness []  2019-12-19 19:2

    Michael Coogan’s God’s Favorites: Judaism, Christianity, and the Myth of Divine Closeness is based on the claim that the while the Old and Fresh Testaments of the Bible are chock full of wisdom, they are not divine documents; rather, they are human documents laden with tribalistic prejudices in which the writers project their self-interest into their notion of their e Bible writers who create claims of divine closeness are being tribalistic and painting a binary world: us vs. them. The belief that one’s tribe is chosen has “pernicious effects.”Coogan studies the “capricious god” of the Old Testament and argues that writers imposed a rational actor to massage over the wanton acts of the Old Testament e Fresh Testament God continues to be a tribalist serving the interests of the biblical writers. When confronted with biblical passages of tribalism in which God loves one person and hates another, St. Paul tries to gloss over such a cruel despot but does so unconvincingly. Coogan also shows how Paul’s notion of Christianity is in conflict with Matthew’s, which is in conflict with St. e Fresh Testament pivots away from calling the Jews as the chosen people to calling the Christians the chosen ones by engaging in what Coogan calls “supersessionism.”At the end of the book, Coogan critiques American exceptionalism and concludes that all forms of exceptionalism are based on the narcissism and arrogance of al faith and true humanity, Coogan argues in his conclusion, are based on loving the stranger and letting go of one’s binary tribalistic view of the world. In about 130 pages of well written prose, this book is very readable and instructive. Recommended.

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    God's Favorites: Judaism, Christianity, and the Myth of Divine Chosenness []  2019-12-19 19:2

    Michael Coogan is certainly not out to create mates in God’s Favorites. He looks at different biblical texts not in the context of being something sacred, but rather the observations and perspectives of the presumably mortal people who wrote them. He also discusses how the power struggles, acts of vengeance, and persecutions have been legitimized because a given people were “chosen” These feelings have obviously been brought forward into show day in our politics and how we treat ogan attempts to accomplish a lot in a beautiful short volume. I think while he did a solid job of digging into the different biblical texts; the connectivity to happenings of the show or even 1800s history really required to be created stronger. I feel beautiful powerful about his core point that chosen-ness or perceived chosen-ness has led to some beautiful poor things in this world. It’s on solid footing, but from a modern perspective “If your own house is burning down, why should I care about Rome”? This means: biblical text and interpretation are nice, but the moment in time readers can actually do something about is for thought a small too moored in the past.

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    Disproving Christianity and Other Secular Writings (2nd edition, revised) []  2020-1-20 20:9

    While, for some, this book may include much that is already well known, this accomplished young author has managed to intelligently, and respectfully, assemble a body of evidence that thoroughly, and quickly, disproves Christianity - without using the typical level of long-winded contempt that a lot of atheist authors seem to rely on in their arguments - that I think should be the fresh first and latest books of the "Holy Bible"! ..[I think] they'll be unbelievable bonuses at Christmastime..!

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    Disproving Christianity and Other Secular Writings (2nd edition, revised) []  2020-1-20 20:9

    I'm only on page 6 and it feels as if I wrote this book myself. I predict that this book will continue to impress me to the end! If my opinion changes I'll change my avis-24

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    God's Favorites: Judaism, Christianity, and the Myth of Divine Chosenness []  2019-12-19 19:2

    God’s Favorites: Judaism, Christianity, and the Myth of Divine Chosenness by Professor Michael Coogan asks the question: “Does God … have favorites? Does God really prefer some individuals and groups over others?” Throughout his book he argues that it is neither reasonable nor rational to think that God would focus God’s attention on the Jews, a small, isolated, relatively unimportant group of people. Baruch Spinoza, a Dutch/Jewish philosopher of the 17th Century was excommunicated by the Jews for holding that same opinion. Spinoza was a amazing scholar and philosopher who analyzed the Bible thoughtfully and carefully. Like Michael Coogan, Spinoza demonstrated again and again that the Bible is “faulty, mutilated, tampered with, and inconsistent.” Spinoza and Coogan point out that “we don’t know the authors, circumstances, or dates of a lot of biblical books. Moreover, “we cannot say into what hands they fell, nor how the numerous varying versions originated; nor, lastly, whether there were other versions, now lost.” As Coogan points out again and again, the Bible is a amazing and instructive story, but we cannot trust its truth value as history. He says that we should read the Bible “not as divine revelation… but rather as what various writers thought about God and how they projected on God their own views.”In his latest chapter Coogan tells us that in his view “gods do not choose people, either groups or individuals. Rather, people choose a god and then assert that that god has chosen them or their ancestors… We should abandon the myth of divine chosenness…. Fundamentally, we are all one tribe, one species, with no group, ancient or modern, specially chosen.”Michael Coogan is a former Jesuit who is now a professor at the Harvard Divinity School. His book is carefully argued and presented with a lot of footnotes included at the end of his book that I found helpful and instructive. His book is carefully organized and written for a general audience. That said, scholars and his students at Harvard will search that he has been rigorous in his approach to his subject, but has been careful to be clear and avoid the jargon that makes some academic writing pretentious and unreadable. His conclusions seem reasonable to me, but those readers who are real believers in the Bible as literally the Word of God are going to search much to object to in Coogan’s book.

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    God's Favorites: Judaism, Christianity, and the Myth of Divine Chosenness []  2019-12-19 19:2

    I do not mean the title of this post in a poor way. I held a lot of ideas, but I had never really seen them addressed before reading this book. I went to a very religious college and was surrounded by a lot of very amazing people. One class that I took was called "The Bible as Literature." It was the first time, I had heard from a religious person that maybe not all the stories in the Bible are completely real. A lot of of the stories can be found in the folklore of other cultures before they were ever written down in the Bible. A amazing example is Jonah and the Whale. This story also appears in writings of a number of other cultures. This book also goes a long these same lines that the Bible may not be a divine book. While I am no longer a practicing christian, I do believe that there are a lot of parts of the Bible that are amazing and can lead someone to lead a remarkable life. I also believe that for those who focus on the wrong parts of the Bible, it can lead to disaster (the Spanish Inquisition is the more popular example, but there are a lot of others as well).One huge issue I have had with the Bible is the claim that there was one chosen people. Why would God chose only one group of people to care about. Why would he not care about all the groups. The rational I had heard about this in the past is that the other groups were unrighteous. Their parents or ancestors may have know the "truth" and left it, but why would God turn his back on their decedents. I am glad to have read this book and would suggest it to anyone else who is interested in learning more. Ultimately you will have to decide how you feel about his interpretation.

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    Disproving Christianity and Other Secular Writings (2nd edition, revised) []  2020-1-20 20:9

    David G. [email protected]#$%!&?epresents a fresh generation of atheists. After the sometimes strident insistence on secular understanding presented by the "Four Horsemen," [email protected]#$%!&chens, Dennett and Harris, it's refreshing to read "Disproving Christianity." As much as I appreciate the Four Horsemen, I deeply admire the gentleness and lack of hostility McAfee demonstrates while pointing out inconsistencies and contradictions in the Christian Bible. Even if you happen to disagree with a particular reading he presents, you will search it difficult to refute the entire body of issue passages evident in the Bible as clearly and kindly laid out in this book. There are too a lot of to beral Christians probably have already rationalized their method from some of the more egregious contradictions and inconsistencies McAfee highlights. Perhaps they realize their brands of Christianity have evolved into something other than Biblical canon. The book seems to be aimed squarely at Biblical literalists and at those who can't reconcile modern, evolved Christian understandings with unevolved Biblical teachings -- but probably don't realize they can'ccinct, easily readable, even-toned writing makes this a must-read book for anyone involved, past or present, with using the Bible to justify belief.

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    Disproving Christianity and Other Secular Writings (2nd edition, revised) []  2020-1-20 20:9

    Amazing ammunition for your next family reunion with the ultra-Xians relatives!Quick read! Lots of amazing talking points!

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    God's Favorites: Judaism, Christianity, and the Myth of Divine Chosenness []  2019-12-19 19:2

    The author is a top Old Testament scholar who claims his atheism makes him more objective than believing scholars. He endorses an either/or proposition: either the Bible is a human document or a divine document - but it includes flaws, ergo, it’s a human document. The chance of some middle ground gets no press here. The book is very clearly written, and raises valid concerns about the Bible, particularly the tribalism in the Old Testament; yet is has small value for a Bible believing Christian such as myself. The Old Testament Case For Nonviolence by Matthew Curtis Fleischer a better approach that sees God’s revelation as progressive; ie, revealed in stages across time. Coogan, unfortunately, has place the baby and it’s bathtub in the same dumpster.I deplore tribalism and elitism in any form to the point of refusing to eat or animal products of any kind because of the elitism and cruelty inherent in “processing” (as they like to say) animals. Moreover, I’m politically progressive and generally opposed to the current mode of capitalism. In other words, I’m not an ultra conservative evangelical. But there are benign approaches to the ethical problems of scripture. If you are skeptical, I recommend joining the Sojourners and Patheos Progressive Christian Fb pages or groups.While in-group versus out-group thinking is totally dangerous, historical context is everything in judging whether opposition to a particular group or nation was justified. The Hebrews had true and risky enemies. How a lot of are opposed to the battle on terrorist groups? Most help it. How a lot of really believe no battle or military action was ever justified? Very few! I have no doubt the ancient pagans were amazing people just as were ancient Jews and Christians. However, to suggest God opposed certain religions says nothing about the merits of “other religions” generally - so we can imagine amazing people with genuinely poor religions existing in ancient times without feeling any animosity towards Hindus, Muslims, etc. But what would have created these pagan religions “bad”? We don’t know because we don’t know what would have happened if they had endured. Neither do we know what malevolent supernatural entities might have cloaked themselves behind the masks of these bygone religions.I think we have a filter for rightly dividing the “word of God.” The church has long maintained that “God is love.” We see this revealed clearly enough in the revelatory person of Jesus Christ. What would Jesus do? Probably not eat meat from factory farms or hate Muslims or separate parents from their kids at the southern border!

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    God's Favorites: Judaism, Christianity, and the Myth of Divine Chosenness []  2019-12-19 19:2

    Coogan, whom I had as a professor when I was at Harvard, is an awesome teacher, scholar, and writer. Like a lot of of his predecessors, his work is most convincing when it is scholarly, and somewhat less compelling when he ventures into theology and the politics of our time. You can read a summary of his arguments in the description of the book and the other reviews, so I will not belabor that here. I think my concern is primarily this: well of course one could create this argument. I mean, of course there are a lot of issues with the idea that God somehow chooses a certain group of people as God's favorite. Did Coogan need to write a fresh book on this? I'm not sure. I mean his scholarly work and the work of a lot of scholars before him helps us to see that the Bible was compiled by fallible humans. We need not go very far to see the practical issues of groups of people insisting that they are right/chosen/preferred by God. I guess I am not sure to whom Coogan is really writing this book. Most who read it and like it will already have agreed with him and his arguments before they read the book. Because they will have read these arguments or come to these conclusions via the other scholarly and compelling theological literature that has created this same argument in one form or another a lot of times before. And if the reader does not already agree with Coogan's arguments, I'm not sure that this book will somehow convince them or place them over the edge where they are like, "Oh, yeah, after all these years of thinking [fill in the blank] was God's chosen people, now I see where I've gone wrong." It also would be really hard to read this in a seminary or rabbinical school because I don't see how it gives much room for the reality of the history and theologies of these faiths. I suppose one exception might be someone reading this in an religious studies course as an undergraduate - it might, in that case be fresh and compelling in ways that it would not be for other audiences. But in that case I would really prefer to see them come to their own conclusions based on engagement with basic texts and then material about the culture/context from which the texts emerged. I'm not sure having M. Coogan spell it out for you like this is nearly as compelling as coming to it on your own through engagement with the literature. Anyway, I don't mean to be so hard on him - I mean, he is BRILLIANT and awesome and I will never be the scholar or professor he is. That said, I'm just not sure this book gets the right tone or contributes to these sorts of conversations in a method that is particularly productive.

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    Disproving Christianity and Other Secular Writings (2nd edition, revised) []  2020-1-20 20:9

    ...if the proofreading and editing was better. The punctuation errors at closing quotes weren't asbad as the several instances where a completely wrong word was used in put of the correct word because it sounded or looked like the correct e other four stars are earned by the cohesive nature of the arguments and citations provided. Properly used, this book should provide any freethinker or epistomologist with all the ammunition they'll ever need to destroy anything a road preacher or other evangelist throws at them.I'd love it if this book were turned into an interactive flowchart application where questions would be asked of a believer about what they believe, and then take them to the appropriate rebuttal.

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    Disproving Christianity and Other Secular Writings (2nd edition, revised) []  2020-1-20 20:9

    David G. McAfee has place together a great, concise, simple to read book for disproving one of the world's biggest religions. I like that the author tackles a single task. Rather than a book on disproving all religions or promoting atheism in general, McAfee aims his attention towards Christianity to highlight some logical flaws within the doctrines. This logical, non-emotional approach used in the book makes for an enlightening read.

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    Pagan Christianity []  2020-1-22 22:42

    I grew up in a protestant environment. Frank Viola nails the Sunday routine that's surprisingly alike in all modern churches. What we consider "worship service" is based, not on the first century example but on practices from early pagan cultures. Sort of shocking to me, but it did create me smile and shake my head a lot of times (and even grin a couple of times) when I recognized a whole string of sacred cows that have no basis in scripture (including of worship, sermon, the small fence that divides the leader from the congregants, and a lot of more). Created me realize the truth of what his research shows. No matter how a lot of beautiful fresh dresses you place on a cow or what you call it, it still remains a cow. I really appreciated the descriptions of what actually constituted Christian worship in the first century. I've read and studied the Bible since I was a child, yet after reading Pagan Christianity, I'm seeing all these things with fresh eyes. Incredible. If we'd follow the Fresh Testament examples of what actually went on when first century Christians got together, we certainly wouldn't obtain sleepy or sit there mutely wondering what was for lunch, because everybody show participates. Yep, everybody. Worship is not a spectator sport. This book is a stimulating read, and it's based on solid research--all documented. It's one of those life-changing books that comes into your life quietly--and leaves you changed. I liked it so much that I've ordered a complete library of Viola's books. I wish to know more!

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    Pagan Christianity []  2020-1-22 22:42

    I remember when I was called to my pastor's office to begin my own church, he stated that I was going to need a huge building because of the other two churches down the road which had people that came to me when they had questions.I told him that the Lord laid it on my heart to begin it from my own home as they did in the days of old. This is my dream come real to read this after all those years, that was around 1998 or 99. I didn't have it all together, but I tried to do it by the book, now this is an awakening for all Christians that truly believe. There will be an increase in knowledge in the latest days. Guess what they're here!!! Please obtain this book, I don't know the authors but with all of my heart I endorse this book,Ricky Thompson (M.O.G) your brother in Christ...

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    Christianity Today []  2020-5-13 18:42

    Amazing reading. The church in America is changing. Articles support awareness.

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    Christianity Today []  2020-5-13 18:42

    Amazing value on the subscription. Amazing articles.

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    Mere Christianity []  2019-12-24 20:51

    It is difficult to limit my excitement about this classic work by C.S. Lewis. I first read the book while in college and now I am taking several fellows through the book in a little group setting. It is a timeless classic that is as real today as when it was originally penned by Lewis as a series of talks given in London over the BBC during the challenging days of WW2. One must remember the historical setting when they read through the work. Because this is a compilation of a series of talks, Lewis did not assume that the people who heard his first series of lectures necessarily heard the lectures in the second series. As a result, one might think he is mildly repetitive. As you work through this amazing book take some time to digest the material in each chapter and reflect upon the material that Lewis covers and the thoroughness of his argument and perspectives. The book is a chronology of the thinking processes Lewis went through as his spiritual journey traveled from atheism and reluctantly to Theism and ultimately to Christianity. It is amazingly refreshing and valid for any reader. One thing I have discovered about Lewis is that he typically packs more into one sentence than most authors do in a paragraph. I cannot recommend this work high enough.

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    Pagan Christianity []  2020-1-22 22:42

    I believe every Christian should read this book it will bring you closer to God not farther away. You will be shocked to learn what is wrong with our church "system". I bought this book because I was seeing things in the "church" that does NOT line up with scripture. We are now starting a home group.

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    Pagan Christianity []  2020-1-22 22:42

    It is an interesting book but I can't support but message the conspicuous absence of the Sunday worship/Sabbath issue. I guess the writers are ok slaughtering the sacred cows of others but not their own.

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    Mere Christianity []  2019-12-24 20:51

    As someone else has already said, whatever this ver or specific seller this is looks like garbage and looks like it was printed and bound by somebody in their basement after printing out the text file from a torrent. There's no publisher info, at all. I want I would have looked at this more closely as soon as I got it, as it stands now it's likely too late.Go this classic somewhere else.

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    Mere Christianity []  2019-12-24 20:51

    I did not realize this was a 'print on demand' ver when I ordered...but it soon became apparent:The book is horribly formatted: it is missing breaks, indentations, chapter headings, etc. There is no variation in font or type size to distinguish between sections...it looks as though the text were copy-pasted into an editing program (which was not used to edit) and printed.I have included a couple of images to illustrate what I am complaining is shabbiness has rendered a classic unreadable. 1 star for the low only.

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    Mere Christianity []  2019-12-24 20:51

    I have no complaint with the content, or with the writer. This post applies specifically to the e-book sold by Amazon Digital Services LLC,ASIN: B07BTLGV65 e-edition. The opening page of this book states,*A Distributed Proofreaders Canada eBook*This eBook is created available at no cost and with very few restrictions. These restrictions apply only is (1) you create a change in the eBook (other than alteration for various display devices), or (2) you are making commercial use of the eBook. If either of these conditions applies, please check with an FP administrator before ere is no indication that this is the case in the description, and in a fast review of the pages, the setup appears more like a book, and in fact is the exact same copy at the website. I hope that Amazon did obtain permission to distribute this, but if they did, they should create a note somewhere in the book.

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    Christianity Today []  2020-5-13 18:42

    I had allow the subscription lapse. But I'm glad to be a subscriber once again.

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    Mere Christianity []  2019-12-24 20:51

    Mere Christianity is a GREAT book, but DO NOT BUY THIS VERSION.- It has NO text justification so that each line is a random length and a lot of lines are a single word (see picture)- It has NO paragraph spaces, chapter headings, or page numbers- It has weird text at the begin for what appears to be a digital ver of the book (see photos)It looks like someone copied all the text from a webpage, place in a document and just hit "print" without any editing or formatting or anything. DO NOT BUY this version.

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    Mere Christianity []  2019-12-24 20:51

    it looks like this book was typed and printed out by an eight year old on his mom's laserjet printer. Sentences stop after a few words and are continued on the next line. EVERYTHING is left-aligned making it difficult to read. Extremely disappointed.

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    Mere Christianity []  2019-12-24 20:51

    What a disappointment in the quality of the print. No format. All runs together. No separation of paragraphs. Not even like printed Word documents. I have this book in earlier versions that have all been just fine. This POD product should never be sold. The content is great, having read the book a few years ago. It is just the book with a fancy cross on the cover that is a not good read and buy.

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    Pagan Christianity []  2020-1-22 22:42

    I was recommended this item by Dr. Timothy R Jennings. I decided to the Audio CDs. The plastic casing was imperfect; not closing properly. Amazon did not hesitate to me a replacement or a refund. In the end, I just kept the CDs for myself (they were originally to be a present).The content of this 'book' (from 2008) is eye-opening. We have been removed from the Biblical faith of the early church and have thought that what we practice today is genuine Christianity. Well, in your case it may well be, as the adornments have small to do with actual internal beliefs. But it seems that we need to strip away all that clutters, and live out our faith as Christ and the Apostles did. Easier said than done? You are probably right. However, this book should be needed reading for every soul who confesses Christ as his/her Saviour. The effect would a simple, practical faith that looks not to prelates and buildings and rituals and forms of religion but to the inner temple of God. Do I recommend it? Only if you are willing to work through the discomfort that is inevitable if a change is to be wrought. Sincerely, Chris HARLE.

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    Christianity Today []  2020-5-13 18:42

    I began reading a friend's subscription off and on latest year was extremely impressed with the quality of writing and thoughtful approach Christianity Today takes with some compelling and timely problems that surround daily headlines. I don't mean this condescendingly, but some religious magazines I've come across in the past seem to lack an understanding of viewpoints often pushing on readers a very narrow and often erroneous viewpoint. I have found that CT often provides carefully researched and well-thought out arguments offering the reader a possibility to understand the problems with enough background and insight to draw their own conclusions. As a staunch secularist myself and firm believer in allowing individual free-will, I search that CT is an smart read with a amazing understanding of both Biblical principles and theological theory. I would highly recommend this magazine.

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    Christianity Today []  2020-5-13 18:42

    I am not a prude, but I do follow the bible and that means I have conservative views with regards to Christianity. Some articles were nice. But some were far too liberal and do not follow the bible teachings. It is a far various magazine than when Billy Graham was involved.I still was going to renew and continue to ignore the more liberal view articles, but Tag Galli, their Editor In Chief, created sure that didn't happen.

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    Christianity Today []  2020-5-13 18:42

    Every problem has at least one article that I read, but the vast majority is advertising for Christian colleges and the articles are simply not interesting to me. I won't renew my subscription.

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    Mere Christianity []  2019-12-24 20:51

    The content of the book is great. One of the best arguments for the Christian faith of all time. But this ver is unreadable. The entire book is unformatted--from the table of contents to the end. Lines are broken into little pieces and there are not breaks between paragraphs. Worst book print job I have ever seen. Unless you wish to be disappointed, leave this ver alone.

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    Pagan Christianity []  2020-1-22 22:42

    This is beyond excellent. The scholarship is exceptional. The truths explored are strong and clear. This book unveils the traditions made by man that has watered down, bound up, and hindered the real Church of Jesus Christ. Reading this will change your life if your heart is begin to the Holy Spirit. You'll be amazed when you see how we have been blinded to the simplicity and purity of the church Jesus wants to build in the earth. You will learn how to shake off the chains, but others who are comfortable in their traditions may not appreciate your fresh views or freedom. Read this. Read the references. This can be a manual that will enhance your understanding of the Word of God because it will enable you to read it without the glasses of tradition hindering your vision.

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