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    Africa: The Real Story: A Caribbean American couple's 20 years of experiences living & travelling throughout West Africa. review []  2020-2-6 22:59

    This is an excellent, well-written book about a young couple's travels and experiences in Africa. The prose is simple to read, in plain English without pretense or highbrow ideas, no 50 cent words you must look up in the dictionary, no "better than thou" attitude, but just the true thing, the true Africa, the true truth from his perspective, which is as down to earth as you could want. With some editing of the profanity, this book could be a requirement for high school libraries, and is especially relevant for the young African-American. You will like this book no matter who you are, and whether or not you have any interest in Africa. It is that much fun to read.

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    Africa: The Real Story: A Caribbean American couple's 20 years of experiences living & travelling throughout West Africa. review []  2020-2-6 22:59

    A unbelievable book that provides a perspective that is special in presentation and content. If you have never been to Africa, are thinking of going, or are considering a return trip, this book is a must read.

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    Africa: The Real Story: A Caribbean American couple's 20 years of experiences living & travelling throughout West Africa. review []  2020-2-6 22:59

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    Africa: The Real Story: A Caribbean American couple's 20 years of experiences living & travelling throughout West Africa. review []  2020-2-6 22:59

    Right off the bat, the author grabs your attention with the jacket cover. A clever subterfuge.... One thinks dead slaves, behind bars, in prison, only to explore a various reality. In Africa, all is not what it seems. The level of detail is excellent, describing far-flung travels on this misunderstood continent. One can, and does, learn a lot from our African ancestors. Chronological delivery is fed the reader in hop-scotch fashion, a "flow from the soul". Myths and superstitions so prevalent yesterday carry forth to this day. Stick around for the strong ending. You will be surprised with this Caribbean American's viewpoint on white suppression and black enslavement that took put so a lot of years ago, but are haunting to this day. Michael Boyce, place your Hemingway on and obtain Book Two published. Your readers await.....

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    Africa: The Real Story: A Caribbean American couple's 20 years of experiences living & travelling throughout West Africa. review []  2020-2-6 22:59

    Attractive stories of travels through Africa. Humor woven in with real tales. I met Michael the author at an international trade present in Miami where we talked at length about Africa. Amazing guy. When Michael saw how interested I was he recommended that I download his book. Glad I did! Thank you Michael!

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    Nigeria and West Africa review []  2020-2-1 8:21

    I have a relative from this part of the world, so this audio presentation was of particular interest to me. I generally found it informative, though the presentation is perhaps not quite as systematic as it ideally could be. A further drawback is that, while a 2006 date is given, I believe this is a reissue of a 1992 production, so two necessary decades of history are missing.I won't attempt to summarize the presentation, but here are a few points which stood out for me:(1) Before Europeans arrived, Africans had established some fairly significant civilizations (not just villages and towns) which were essentially unknown to Europeans.(2) The British were pioneers in establishing the slave trade, and were also pioneers in eventually abolishing it. But with or without the slave trade, their economic interests were central in their involvements in this region and they often resorted to violence to maintain control.(3) Africans were complicit in the slave trade, often helping with kidnapping other Africans and other operations.(4) Though the presentation is ambiguous on this point, it seems that tribalism within Africa has (a) continued to prevent African social, political, and economic unity, (b) often resulted in horrific violence, (c) prevented establishment of stable government on any substantial scale, (d) prevented Africans from borrowing amazing ideas from other cultures around the world, and (e) facilitated European colonialism in Africa via a divide and defeat strategy.I fear that the prospects for Africa still aren't good, but hopefully the latest social uprisings in the Arab globe illustrate that one shouldn't give up commended for anyone with a powerful interest in this region but, again, hold in mind that this presentation is a bit dated.

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    The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 18:44

    This book surprised me. Yes, I am a large Rush fan and I have the utmost respect for Neil Peart. However, I read this based on my love of cycling and have a keen interest in the adventures it brings as well a the grueling nature of long touring on two wheels. So my expectations were that this would be a focus of the book. There was some of this but not so much in a technical nature and not much content was dedicated to that directly. I was not disappointed but realized I had assumed e direction of the book is much more of an over all experience of the journey and the education received along the way. Cultures, interpersonal relationships, conflict both huge and small, sympathetic reactions, tempers and personality conflicts. I was also impressed with the very begin and honest comments created throughout (some of which were really surprising coming from such a mild mannered author). Peart is never private about his criticisms as most of it is internalized....that is to say how he reacts to situations and people along the way. He can be judgmental at times but in his shoes I think anyone would be. He approaches the trip (and prose) as just a guy on a bike and not as a globe renowned lyricist and you can well imagine the tour taken here by a little group of strangers was difficult and it tested wills. However, the writing focuses on the authors means of taking it all in, being patient when there was none to spare, being assertive when needed and remaining a powerful individual as a member of a team. From The Masked Rider you will gain an insight to the author and you will probably think twice about taking such a journey. Mosquitos! Filthy floors! Sketchy toilets! Unbelievable people!A amazing read for anyone. Well written, open, honest, entertaining and very educational. Kudos to Neil Peart who clearly absorbed much about African culture and history which he shares key portions of to create the book much more internationally engaging. I have read reviews that state he did not have fun the trip and I disagree. He focuses on the difficulty of a lot of aspects of it yet he never misses a moment to share in the grandeur of Africa and a lot of of the interesting/perplexing/crafty/wise people who call it home. He certainly knew it was going to be a challenge which is why he took the journey to start with and he got just that.Highly recommended.

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    The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 18:44

    Peart did a amazing job keeping notes on his journey, and he was able to place together a unbelievable tale that brings us along on this small-group trek through Cameroon. Delving into his private quest to live through Cameroon's sights, smells, melody and the people he meets allow us peer into the mind of a truly amazing talent. Even his humanity is on scene as he internally deals with a rider who drags the group down, the unease of encountering checkpoints with heavily armed forces with dubious motives and even the catcalls and overt racism he encounters as a real minority Anglo in an African country. Most travelogues don't obtain this deep, but Peart brings us along for the ride, both in the saddle and between his ears.We've all faced adversity of one type or another, and Peart's diplomacy when faced with frustrating situations is a lesson I will take away and use myself.

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    The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 18:44

    This was Neil's first book, written several years before his next one (and which I'd read first, "Ghost Rider"), and provides a flashback that shows a bit of the person that Neil was. Set in the context of his cycling trip through West Africa (Cameroon), you obtain to see some of the country and people from a much more interesting and in-depth vantage. No tour [email protected]#$%!&?ing all the tourist traps and staying at hotel with all the modern amenities, the little group cycles through the countryside and spends the night at villages along the way. You obtain a glimpse into the lives of the people there, but it's also a somewhat superficial one, as the language barriers (Neil doesn't speak French fluently, and most of the Cameroonians don't speak English beyond a few words or phrases they've picked up) prevent much in the method of e cycling group also never seems to gel, the disparate personalities hold them from being anything more than temporary travelling companions. I would love to read a related book about other trips that he's taken, where he develops more of a relationship with his companions just to see how things differed. Neil recognizes how he does contribute to the overall stand-in she's of the group, but as he travels and comes to have epiphanies about their different personalities, it doesn't seem to create much impact in how he similar to them. He mentions Steinbeck's quote about allowing others to support you here as well, but "Ghost Rider" also never has long-term travelling companions like he does here, so it's not clear if he's changed much in that regard.He's beautiful frank about the challenges and day-to-day problems with the trip, including bouts with the local microbiota, and while a trip like this is (sadly) probably never in the cards for me for several reasons, it did remind me of some half-formed plans to spend the turn of the century on safari with my best friend. We never did that, but graduation for my oldest is approaching, and maybe in a few years I can convince my wife that this would create a amazing bonus for her.

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    The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 18:44

    I came upon Neil Peart's writing after watching a video my drummer had lent me ("A Work In Progress"). I had been so impressed with Neil's clarity, vision, and humility in the video, that I looked him up on the web to see what else I might find. On his web website I found some essays that he has written and was further impressed with his writing style. It was honest, open, intelligent, and conversational. I also noticed that he has written four books, three of them featuring bicycling or motorcycling. As a bicyclist, motorcyclist, musician, and writer myself, I had to dig in. I began with his first book, and was not disappointed.I loved the style AND content of this book (not an daily occurrence for me). Neil uses the writer's "show, don't tell" adage well, painting a picture of his bike tour that helps you to feel the heat, taste the dust, hear the blaring late-night music, and smell the sweat and sewage. In the midst of this, he relates his observations and thoughts clearly and honestly -- he doesn't sugar-coat his prose, rather he reveals what he experiences in all its warted ere are two things I might change with this book to create it near-perfect: 1. More photos. There is much discussion in the book of the perils of photo-taking in Cameroon, and the fact that Neil was willing to take risks for the sake of some of these images adds a sort of value to them for the reader. 2. I felt the book ended abruptly. I would love to have had more of a summary of his thoughts after the ride, a sort of Campbellian return of the character and teaching of the lessons rhaps a amazing implicit summary of my opinion on the book is the fact that I am already reading his next book, plan to read his others, and hope that he keeps on writing.

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    The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 18:44

    a superbly written acc of an insightful man's journey through Africa. For such an astounding musician to also be an adept writer is almost mind-boggling (and jealousy-inducing!). Some have argued that the author comes across as arrogant or condescending. I felt that any movements in that direction were nicely tempered by insightful self-reflections and assessments. That being said, I would certainly hate to be "Elsa" who comes across as old, lazy and whining - which perhaps she was - but the author sees fit to mention this at almost every turn. Maybe he's just being honest, but at times I did feel that this brilliant Canadian was dabbling in a tad too much hubris (directed at Americans and Africans).Any complaints about this marvelous work are easily offset by an engaging, highly intelligent, but readable account, of exploring Africa by bike. Not to mention a keen sense of humor, informed by a breadth of knowledge method beyond most "rockers." We all knew that Peart could write amazing rock songs; but in this work he really pushes the envelope and succeeds at a literary travelogue that can keep its own versus any other.I would have liked to have seen him participating in drum rituals or sessions with African drummers. That would have added so much to the text, but perhaps he wanted to avoid that and simply write as any other journeyer. Despite his marked cynicism, which one would expect from such a amazing mind, a true sense of humanity shines through. He gives life to those he encounters with all their frailties, but also strengths and l-in-all this is a lively, vivid and enriching journey that is worth every drop of ink on the ry, very entertaining.

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    The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 18:44

    This memoir of taking a month-long bicycle tour through Cameroon is as close as I'm ever likely to come to Cameroon or to taking a bike tour. But that doesn't mean I'm not interested in Cameroon: I just don't wish to endure the hardships that the 5 riders endured. Namely I don't wish to bunk down in the back of noisy bars, be bitten all night by mosquitoes, encounter drunken soldiers at military checkpoints, or subsist on sugary sodas and "rice with some kind of junk on it". Some aspects of his trip were also pleasant and fascinating, but you have to place up with the downside to obtain the upside. I'd rather read about it. His writing is sharp, observant, and never tedious. The description of the interpersonal dynamics between the 5 riders is clearly depicted too. It's the first book I've read by Neil Peart, and I've ordered another.

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    The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 18:44

    amazing book. my favorite of all his books. he's one of the best drummers. and a member of my favorite rock band. so i tend to devour all of his written material. he's led an interesting life. i respect that he needs time to himself because i can relate to that more than anything.

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    The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 18:44

    I'm a Rush fan and relate to Neil Peart after reading his first book "Ghost Rider", which I also recommend. I wasn't sure how I would feel about this one, but it turns out I found it quite enjoyable. It's not for everyone. Some might search it repetitive, but I have fun Neils prose and am amazed sometimes at how descriptive he is of locations he visits while bike riding (I'm assuming he didn't sit down and write this every stop). His adventures are interesting and eye opening. I didn't envy his journey as I did his journeys in Ghost rider....totally various concept and experience. One of comfort and wandering and one of grueling, somewhat risky and uncomfortable settings.If you enjoyed his other books, you will like this one too.

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    The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 18:44

    Rare is it when I read a book and feel as though I was on the journey with the author. Peart is able to pull you out of your everyday routine and take you across the globe on a fascinating bike ride through Africa. He was able to explain the trip in amazing detail and shares his feelings and thoughts in a method that you think you are his companion, not just an outsider reading a tale of a trip. I was hesitant to first read it, as other books look at the journey as a trip from point A to point B, however Peart is able to give amazing insight on the people he encounters and the trials of a bike ride through an unfamiliar land. I found his story uplifting and unique, making me want I had the time to take a "vacation" from myself, or the masks I wear, by bicycling in a far away place. He also makes a reference to the book "Dear Theo", which is another amazing read on the life of Vincent VanGough. This is a book I'm looking forward to reading again, or anytime I need an escape from the grind of life.

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    The Masked Rider: Cycling in West Africa review []  2020-1-16 18:44

    There is not much that hasn't been said about this book in it's tons of reviews. However, I found it very enjoyable and have always admired Neils's lyrics and philosophy. I, like most people expected to read a lot about "behind the scenes" Rush. Needless to say, I was sorely dissapointed. Perhaps Neil purposely neglected to talk about what was beyond the scope of the book. What we are left with is the real story about a cranky and obnoxious man who travels, sees, smells, eats and thinks and has no qualms about being true to his experience. What it means to him as a person, not just as a "white man", but as a concrete human being. Even when wearing a mask, he stays true to that. Throughout the trip, Neil bumps heads with virtually everyone, at times being downright rude. Anyone who does not know him or Rush may have a hard time relating to this pretentious and politically incorrect narrator. But it is that utter sincerity which permeates these pages and create it such a pleasure to read. A worthy book in the Objectivist tradition. If you know the latest losses in Neil's life, The Masked Rider is even more sad and uplifting to read. This book explores problems from a (very) self-centered point of view, but never losing track of the relativity of it all. Materialism and spirituality need not be opposing poles. So obtain naked and party!

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    To Timbuktu for a Haircut: A Journey Through West Africa review []  2020-1-23 0:36

    We all grew up thinking of Timbuktu as a magical far away put that somehow was necessary I history (and that was before "Where in the globe is Carmen SanDiego?"). The author is an experienced travel writer before he takes off on sort of a whim to visit this mythical city. He gives the impression that he has traveled in out of the method places, but in the first part of the book he spends a lot of pages griping about the inconvenience and unpredictability of transportation and lodging (or lack thereof) in getting to Timbuktu. His troubles are aided and abetted by his fixer, Mohammed. The book gets better after he leaves Timbuktu, with a new haircut, and heads out to hike in the rugged outback of Mali. There he bonds with his tutorial and his cook and their families and gets to see life as it really is, not as the imagined glories of Timbuktu. Timbuktu is a put of the imagination and a put that has been ravaged from its centuries earlier glory as a center of learning and repository of valuable manuscripts. Even before reading the book, I worried about the care of these valuable ancient pieces of learning. Now, with the invasion of fundamentalists who do not value learning, I worry more (the author was there after one takeover and before another). The book raises lots of issues. For me, the most necessary was the role of tourism and questioning what journey one is on.

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    To Timbuktu for a Haircut: A Journey Through West Africa review []  2020-1-23 0:36

    This is one of the most awesome books I have ever read. Not only is it a vacation and travel story, it is a history book on the find for Timbuktu and also a lesson on what small it takes in material possessions to have a truly meaningful life. There is a seamless integration of Rick's private journey of discovery with the historic find for Timbuktu by different earlier explorers. Rick's vivid and penetrating description of the land and it's people locations the reader right into the journey with him.I highly recommend this book to all readers regardless of their own specific list of favorite writers. An awesome journey very much worth joining Rick as he explores a globe of intrigue, mystery, beauty and a method of life by people who create the most of their existence by focusing on what is truly necessary in one's journey through life.

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    To Timbuktu for a Haircut: A Journey Through West Africa review []  2020-1-23 0:36

    Reading Rick Antonson's book on Mali took be back to 2006 and my fast trip through Mali. Having visited a lot of of the locations that Rick featured it was a amazing experience to witness someone who had been there before a travel book I believe it to be superb and a amazing method to feel Mali.And lo and behold he loved the same things about the locations - Mopti, Dogon, Timbuktu and Essakane - that I came to treasure. He writes very well, he experiences the true feel of the Niger River area, he captures you into his journey. And the two things that he loved most about Mali, that is Timbuktu and its manuscripts and Le Pays Dogon; his time in both areas will send me on a return trip to Mali to further experience that remarkable country. This book on Africa is as close to a true tutorial as anything written by Paul Theroux or investigated by Lonely Planet. I so enjoyed this book.

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    To Timbuktu for a Haircut: A Journey Through West Africa review []  2020-1-23 0:36

    This brought back memories of my own travels a lot of years ago to another part of the world. Author is a master of prose and the book includes a lot of interesting observations about Mali and its peoples. The addendum on their current tragedies was very moving.

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    To Timbuktu for a Haircut: A Journey Through West Africa review []  2020-1-23 0:36

    Mind- and life-changing - worth your time

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    To Timbuktu for a Haircut: A Journey Through West Africa review []  2020-1-23 0:36

    Part history of West Africa, part travelogue, part cautionary tale, and all adventure, Rick Antonson's book, To Timbuktu for a Haircut makes for an interesting read, The name comes from the Berber word "tin" meaning a well and "Bouctou" meaning woman with a huge navel and stands for a safe water well owned by a woman with a huge navel. But the word "Timbuktu represents mystery and adventure. Antonson decides to go there when he has some free time based on a comment his father created to him to go to Timbuktu for a haircut. Antonson gets there after a long trip by train, street and a river. Along the method he meets a dozens of people. The adventure continues when he is book is fun to read and especially useful for anyone contemplating a trip to some unusual place. Preparation is necessary but also being able to adapt to the unexpected.

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    To Timbuktu for a Haircut: A Journey Through West Africa review []  2020-1-23 0:36

    Antonson writes an perfect travel book. It is the story of his private journey to Timbuktu and he spares the reader neither criticism of the locations or difficulty inherent in the experience. He writes in a method that I felt I was riding along in his backpack — I could smell the heat, the garbage, the questionable food. I felt the sand in my mouth, my boots, and the fatigue of riding in a crowded 4x4. I also experienced his elation when he found the websites he went to see, especially the ancient manuscripts. I enjoyed Antonson's wry humour is is a delight to read because it is a "story" rather than a destination commended for those who appreciate exotic places, Africa, and extreme travel. I loved it.

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    To Timbuktu for a Haircut: A Journey Through West Africa review []  2020-1-23 0:36

    The concept for this trip is brilliant...as have most journeys to Timbuktu throughout history as the author clues us all into. The only moot pint I really have with the book is it peaks method too early. Because his journey is much like climbing Mt. Everest in that reaching the summit is THE story and the descent, as thrilling and even risky as it may become, is just not as captivating. The author reaches Timbuktu 2/3 of the method through the does he hold the pace up? Trekking across the Dogon country is fine but it's more icing on the cake than the cake itself. Nothing one can really do about this as that's the journey he took but the story does lose some steam after leaving ven all that, this guy can flat out write and this is a truly impressive travel essay. I look forward to his next adventure and he makes me proud I hail from Lotusland, too, when we have talented creative people like this living here.

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    To Timbuktu for a Haircut: A Journey Through West Africa review []  2020-1-23 0:36

    Even if you aren't really interested in Africa this is a amazing travel book on people, how they live, even "poor" they have hearts of gold. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and Antonson does a spectacular job telling the tale of his travels. If you are interested in Africa and its people this book is better than Dark Star Safari by istofer Ryan, Author of "Power Yoga For Prisoners and Others Desiring Change"Interview -

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    To Timbuktu for a Haircut: A Journey Through West Africa review []  2020-1-23 0:36

    I can't say enough about this read. I absolutely fell in love with your writing and the descriptions you used about all of your traveling, including people with whom you met and dealt with, the scenery, the history from certain eras that assisted in describing why and how you took this particular trip. I look forward to reading more of your experiences. My favorite author is Paul Theroux -- I do believe you gave him a run for his cash in a lot of aspects of your travel writing.

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    The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2019-12-30 19:11

    This is not the kind of book I would have ever thought to just pick up for myself. I live - literally - half a globe away from the people and locations described in this book; and my career life has been focused on alleviating a very various kind of suffering - that of families caught up in the public kid welfare system. I had a possibility meeting with the author, she asked for my cooperation in researching a story on kid welfare, and I thought I'd read her book just to gain some insight into her thinking and worldview. The Invisible Cure is gripping, compulsively readable, and resonated deeply with me in ways I did not expect. For anyone who has felt the frustration of challenging the prevailing orthodoxy in their own line of work, for anyone who has struggled to undertand how politics and greed can infect and corrupt even the most honorably motivated humanitarian projects, and for anyone who believes in the power and potential of grassroots community organizing as the most effective solution to community problems, this book is informatiive, affirming, and ultimately inspiring and uplifting, despite the grim topic matter. Highly recommended.

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    The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2019-12-30 19:11

    Before the international aid agencies got there, the Ugandans got it right. Thereafter, the more aid, the more HIV infections grew. What's wrong with this picture?Great book! I'd love an updated edition.

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    The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2019-12-30 19:11

    For anyone interested in HIV/AIDS in Africa, this is a must-read. Although formally trained as a molecular biologist, Helen Epstein is an perfect writer and paints an accurate picture of the history of the HIV/AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa, with a specific focus on Uganda, East Africa, and Southern Africa. A very moving book that helps us realize the ways in which we will end this horrible disease have small to do with huge pharma and a western-centered solution.

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    The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2019-12-30 19:11

    Interesting but out of date

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    The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2019-12-30 19:11

    Epstein does a amazing job intertwining her own story into the history of the epidemic in the late 80s-present day. There is a lot of technical and private info presented throughout which allows the reader to learn and empathize. This book is for public health junkies, people interested in the HIV/AIDS and also people who are interested in learning more about controversial topics. A very amazing read, my only complaint and the reason for 4 stars is that the flow of the book can feel choppy at points.

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    The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2019-12-30 19:11

    This author is amazing. She was able to summarize the HIV/AIDS situation in Africa and create sense of it. Loved this book and use parts of it when I teach this subject at a medium side university in the midwest.

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    The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2019-12-30 19:11

    The most necessary book published on AIDS in a long time, and one of the most necessary books of the year. If you liked Rachel Carson's Silent Spring or And The Band Played On, you will love this book. It is readable, impassioned and brilliant, and despite its savage denunciation of the failures of the West to deal with the AIDS crisis, it is an essentially optimistic work. Publishers Weekly in a starred review said it will save lives, and that is not hyperbole. I urge anyone who is interested in the greatest medical crisis of our time; anyone who is interested in Africa; anyone who is outraged by the failure of the UN, the WHO and the Bush administration to deal with this tragedy, to buy this book and give it to your friends. It is the kind of book that will change peoples' minds and will move continents. It will be read for years to come...

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    The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2019-12-30 19:11

    a nice journey about wanting to change the world, but winding up with and the understanding that society needs to change, a tough task

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    The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2019-12-30 19:11

    slightly used but still nicely kept. Had a sticker on the front that covered most of the cover so it was hard taking that off. otherwise it arrived on time and was very useful to me.

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    The Invisible Cure: Africa, the West, and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2019-12-30 19:11

    Epstein is a PhD biologist who went to Africa to set up a lab to study HIV and when the logistics did not work out she switched to writing journalistic accounts of disease experiences in Africa. Unlike other journalists, she often reads the basic scientific literature and then builds journalistic accounts off of that research. This is the case in the show book where she recounts the story of how indigenous recognition of the cause of HIV infection increases in Uganda produced a dramatically effective program to reduce AIDS infections and also the stigmatization of HIV. By Epstein's acc this effective intervention was finally blocked when the US program to address HIV (PEPFAR) insisted that Uganda promote an abstinence program, which was sharply various from the indigenous program. After the US intervention, HIV rates went back up. The first two thirds of this book are an perfect acc of the experience of HIV in African communities. The latest 1/3 of the book becomes a bit too polemic for my tastes.

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    My Summers in West Africa: The Account of a Medical Missionary review []  2020-1-9 19:21

    This book introduced me to a part of the globe of which I had no previous knowledge. It really showed me that we take so much for granted in our everyday lives in comparison to the people of West Africa. The fact that Dr. Evans took time from his own life to support the people there, really shows what a "special" person he really is. One aspect of this book that I really liked was the fact that if I got busy, I could place the book down and still come back to it later and be able to pick up right from where I left off and not feel lost. I found several of his stories to be VERY "entertaining"! Some of the alternative methods he used, due to the lack of supplies, were quite innovative and perhaps needed a bit of imagination! I definitely recommend reading this book if you are interested in how medicine is practiced in a third-world country. Also, the history of this part of the globe and how West Africans lead their everyday lives is written about in amazing detail.

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    My Summers in West Africa: The Account of a Medical Missionary review []  2020-1-9 19:21

    My summer in west africa was quite a read. From the interest of a young surgeon to go operate in a third globe country, to all the preparations it took to obtain there. To be amazed on how not good the quality of life was, the amount of all the ill people and the shortage of medical supplies. A surgeons quick thinking to work with what they had to support those in need and the a lot of hours in the OR. A summer adventure field with sadness, joy and love.

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    My Summers in West Africa: The Account of a Medical Missionary review []  2020-1-9 19:21

    “My Summers in West Africa” is a thought-provoking read. First, it provided a peek inside what it's really like to be a doctor in a remote area. No matter your training, what you're treating is dictated by the elements and poverty. Western care for women and children’s health, as opposed to the care for African women and children, is so starkly different. This book shines a light in the need for more aid to African health cond, yes, it's real that some of the medical care is more rudimentary in West Africa than we might be used to in more economically robust countries, but there also seems to be more humanity. I especially liked this sentiment (in Africa or not): "An old custom of mine is to ask the mothers of my young patients what their wishes are for their child's future." More than in the West, African medicine seems to be focused on what one man can do for his fellow men--rather than a series of machines and tests and squads of doctors who never have time to see their patients. I’m grateful for the technological advancements in Western care that can reduce pain and extend lives, but sometimes you have to ask yourself what cost has been ird, while reading this book, I thought to myself, “Does nothing ever change?” The author points out how, in 1995, distrust of Western countries led Islamic leaders to spread rumors that vaccines are meant to poison the African population--maybe even spread HIV. Twenty years later, nothing has changed. I just heard the same type of report on NPR latest week, in August urth and finally, it’s impossible for you not to wish more for the African men, women, and kids who are suffering from diseases that simply shouldn’t be a threat any longer. And if empathy for our fellow man isn’t enough to prompt Western governments and individuals to help, maybe this will: The author writes, “Western agencies who oppose sending aid to these African countries simply do not comprehend the importance of eradicating diseases like polio while they are still confined to a little zone in a faraway land like Nigeria. ... By leaving polio to flourish in little pockets of the globe..., we virtually guarantee that someday ... it will emerge in fresh locations. These fresh areas will contain the doorsteps of our grandchildren or our grandchildren's grandchildren.”

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    My Summers in West Africa: The Account of a Medical Missionary review []  2020-1-9 19:21

    I agree with the other reviewer about needing Google for most of the medical cases, but it was well worth it because you just don’t see or even hear about those kinds of injuries and diseases event in developed countries, and if you do its nowhere near this level. One look at the images in the back will present you just how drastically various the medical cases and life in general are in was a small massive on the history for me at first, but once I got to the meat of it I was hooked. The author really puts you there. He gives you an in-depth look into what life in a third globe country is really like. Some of the stories he shares are just wild, and I enjoyed discussing them with my mates and coworkers. Other stories create you realize just how fortunate we are to have modern medical care, clean water, food, air conditioning, ’s clear the author has a lot of respect for the Nigerian people as he discusses their outlooks and hardships. You can tell he truly cares and wants to bring awareness to the need for improving medical care for those who so desperately need it. It’s a real tragedy when a kid dies from something that would be completely preventable or treatable if only they’d been born somewhere else.I would strongly recommend this book to anyone planning on visiting a third globe country or to anyone who simply wants to know what’s going on outside their bubble.

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    My Summers in West Africa: The Account of a Medical Missionary review []  2020-1-9 19:21

    Dr. Evans' journals of his summers spent performing surgery in West Africa is truly an interesting read. I recommend this book for anyone currently in or interested in joining the medical field. Dr. Evans paints a clear picture in your mind of how incredibly various medical care is in this zone of the world. He also goes into detail explaining what everyday life is like for a lot of of the native people living there. He and his squad were able to become resourceful in caring for patients by doing the best they could with the limited supplies and patient housing. He and his squad helped a lot of women, children, and families volunteering their skills in West Africa. Dr. Evans' special sense of humor shines through on some of the more light hearted cases, but you will also feel the sadness experienced in other cases (especially involving the native women and children.) I'm still in school, but this book has inspired me to one day volunteer my medical skills in less fortunate locations of the globe in the future. Thank you Dr. Evans for all that you've done for these people!

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    My Summers in West Africa: The Account of a Medical Missionary review []  2020-1-9 19:21

    "My Summers in West Africa" is a well written read that serves as both entertaining and e book follows the accounts of a Florida Surgeon and his journeys to Nigeria to provide care as a medical missionary in a hospital lacking a lot of life saving e book is based on his journal entries while he was assisting at the hospital and his acc will begin your eyes to the tribulations faced in Nigeria. These contain unsanitary conditions, lack of medicines available, starvation and lack of health care offered to women and children. Dr. Evans shares how he overcame the difficulties due to the lack of necessary medical supplies while overseas and still provided life saving care.With his own supplies and the help and donations of other US doctors and hospitals Dr. Evans brought a lot of of his own supplies into West Africa and was able to perform hysterectomies and treat life threatening thyroid issues.While providing informative info highlighting surgical cases, Dr. Evans also offers interesting historical and cultural info as well as fascinating stories with the local residents and fellow missionaries he encountered during in his time in West is book provides clear expectations of what to expect should one choose such an necessary journey and serves not only as a guidebook for this journey but also as an inspiration for anyone who wants to follow in the doctors footsteps.

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    My Summers in West Africa: The Account of a Medical Missionary review []  2020-1-9 19:21

    The author's writing style and use of the subjects' own words is most effective. A lot of of the individuals he chose to report on had very interesting but sometimes shocking stories to share. The non-medical reader should have a powerful emotional fortitude before opening this book. A non-medical reader should also have ready access to a dictionary of Google addition to its medical component, this work also gives a amazing deal of insight into the beliefs, attitudes and culture of the Nigerian people. Dr. Evans's encounters and discussions with common citizens leaves a very positive and favorable impression. This is at a time when the news reports coming from Nigeria are never e author emphasizes the struggle, the difficult decisions and the frequent heartbreak that a mother faces in this corner of the world. She is forced to deal with malnutrition, a host of "ancient" infectious diseases and a wholesale absence of modern pharmaceuticals. The vivid accounts of deadly childhood diseases like malaria and Burkitt's lymphoma are most is book gives me a renewed respect for any health care worker who chooses to take his or her skills to a remote part of the world.I found this book to be a very enlightening and informative summer read and strongly recommend it.

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    My Summers in West Africa: The Account of a Medical Missionary review []  2020-1-9 19:21

    This book was written by my former partner and best friend, Richard D. Evans DO. I am proud to say that I had the opportunity to work with him and operate side by side for almost 20 years. I have witnessed the dedication and compassion that he brings to the table as he operates and cares for his patients. I remember well the stories he told of his experiences in West Africa and all of the images he brought back. This book is well written and captivates the reader from beginning to end. Richard also narrates his tail with interesting sidebars from history. Note that he went back to college after retiring from medicine and obtained a second Bachelors Degree in History, so he is a History Proffessor as well as a cannot support but be amazed at the number of surgeries he performed each month with such variety. As an Osteopathically trained Surgeon in Michigan in 1980's, he was well trained in Gynecology, Vascular, Urology, GI, ENT in addition to General Surgery. Today's surgeons do not obtain that amount of training and dozens as we did back then. He was the excellent surgeon for the job and there will never be a trained surgeon as he was - ever again. They would need at least four various surgeons to do what he did all by is book is a glimpse into the lives at the average Nigerian back at that time. It hasn't changed much since then and now we have Ebola to contend with. Who knows what other diseases are laying dormant in West e book is well written, very interesting, thought provoking and a very necessary read. I hope that a lot of others will read this and pass it on. I hope that more people will become aware of the issues these not good people face and will encourage our government to increase the support that we send to these unfortunate ith N. Marshall DO FACOS.

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    My Summers in West Africa: The Account of a Medical Missionary review []  2020-1-9 19:21

    This book was very interesting and informative. Dr. Evans used this book in critical thinking as part of our understanding of anatomy and the different diseases and conditions of the body.. it's awesome how our fortunate we are to have the resources of life saving technology.. West Africa was blessed to have Dr Evans and his expertise to help in saving individuals

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    My Summers in West Africa: The Account of a Medical Missionary review []  2020-1-9 19:21

    Dr. Evans book is very informative and gives the reader an inside look of the medical difficulties that the people in West Africa face. I truly understand now why women and kids in west Africa have so a lot of health problems.

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    The Afterlife Is Where We Come From: The Culture of Infancy in West Africa review []  2020-1-22 20:20

    That rare anthropology book that's both academically sound and eminently readable. Highly recommended!

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    The Village On The Edge Of The World: Travels In West Africa review []  2020-1-22 21:52

    A very interesting book written by a very adventurous woman. Well written with a sympathetic view of village life in The Gambia. Her observations about diet-induced lethargy are very telling. I want I was young enough to follow in her footsteps! Highly recommended!

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    The Village On The Edge Of The World: Travels In West Africa review []  2020-1-22 21:52

    a very adventurous woman traveling alone on a bike in west africa -- unusual and interesting, especially if you have traveled to that part of africa.

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    The Village On The Edge Of The World: Travels In West Africa review []  2020-1-22 21:52

    nice book

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    Jali Kunda: Griots of West Africa & Beyond review []  2020-1-23 3:51

    The CD is only the tease; it is the book that is great. Unbelievable pictures and informative text. It was originally produced as a box set of book and CD. The CD is readily available [if you seek the book, you really must ensure that it is the book which you are buying--sellers often do not highight this distinction], but the book is harder and more expensive to find. To understand West African culture, you have to understand the role and artistry of the griot or jali. The book goes a long method to helping us achieve this understanding.

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    Jali Kunda: Griots of West Africa & Beyond review []  2020-1-23 3:51

    The strengths of this cd are its traditional tracks. I'm not sure why Bill Laswell felt the need to add the techno touches. They don't work and at points they are almost embarassing. Most particularly during Lanmbasy Dub. This cd is 4 years old and that track is already boring and dated. The collaboration between Foday and Philip Glass is equally uninteresting. Thankfully there are only a couple of these dull "modern" e majority of this cd is field-recordings of different West African musicians playing their local traditional musics. These tracks are where this cd shines brightly and it never shines more brightly than on the balafon tracks. The balafon is a wood-keyed xylophone with gourd resonators that has a very distinctive and incredibly cool sound. Plus, it's not just the sound of this instrument, it's the people playing it! Absolutely brilliant balafon players on this cd! I would love to hear some amazing free-jazz musicians utilize one of these balafon players. It would be extremely cool to hear someone like David S. Ware delve into some rootsy, deeply West African-inspired melody with one of these guys. Which brings us to another moment on this cd... the one "modern" or "Western collaborative" track that does work.. the duo track with Pharoah Sanders and Foday (track 11). This thing is beautiful. I'm not sure why, but every time I listen to it I think of Sonny Sharrock. Not that it's like his style of playing or music, but something about it always makes me feel as if it is some sort of tribute or goodbye to l in all, and Laswell's bonehead electronica decisions aside, this is a amazing cd. The feeling of village life and spirit is really present. All the recordings were created outside so you not only hear the music, you hear the daily sounds of life show in the background and between tracks. The main instrumentation is kora, singers, and percussion, although it does vary from track to track. Sometimes it's just singers, sometimes it's balafon and singers, and there are also a couple nyanyer one-string violin tunes. Although I don't know exactly what the nyanyer looks like, it sounds like a rougher or granier ver of the njarka one-string violin. Maybe they are more-or-less the exact same instrument and this difference in tone can be solely attributed to a difference in string material. Either way, it will certainly be familiar to any of you who have heard more well-known greats like Afel Bocoum and/or Ali Farka finitely a worthy addition to your collection of West African traditional musics.

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    Jali Kunda: Griots of West Africa & Beyond review []  2020-1-23 3:51

    I couldn't believe that this got as low a customer review as it did, so I had to place in my two cents worth. this album has some wonderful melody on it--both the traditional pieces and the modern ones--if your a globe melody purist then you probably have a love hate relationship with bill laswell--but I love the guy--granted, he may place his touch on a few tracks of every album, but name another guy who has brought more international artists to an american audience--and not all of his tracks are techno--the track done with phillip glass is so attractive it brings tears to one's eyes--african melody is full of heart and passion--the most attractive human emotions--when they sing, it isn't for money, its because this wide unbelievable attractive tragic put we live fills them so full that they have to sing it out--the instruments are beautiful, the rhythms are beautiful--an album that I listen to routinely

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    Invisible Cure: Africa, the West and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2020-2-1 18:6

    This is not the kind of book I would have ever thought to just pick up for myself. I live - literally - half a globe away from the people and locations described in this book; and my career life has been focused on alleviating a very various kind of suffering - that of families caught up in the public kid welfare system. I had a possibility meeting with the author, she asked for my cooperation in researching a story on kid welfare, and I thought I'd read her book just to gain some insight into her thinking and worldview. The Invisible Cure is gripping, compulsively readable, and resonated deeply with me in ways I did not expect. For anyone who has felt the frustration of challenging the prevailing orthodoxy in their own line of work, for anyone who has struggled to undertand how politics and greed can infect and corrupt even the most honorably motivated humanitarian projects, and for anyone who believes in the power and potential of grassroots community organizing as the most effective solution to community problems, this book is informatiive, affirming, and ultimately inspiring and uplifting, despite the grim topic matter. Highly recommended.

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    Invisible Cure: Africa, the West and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2020-2-1 18:6

    Before the international aid agencies got there, the Ugandans got it right. Thereafter, the more aid, the more HIV infections grew. What's wrong with this picture?Great book! I'd love an updated edition.

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    Invisible Cure: Africa, the West and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2020-2-1 18:6

    For anyone interested in HIV/AIDS in Africa, this is a must-read. Although formally trained as a molecular biologist, Helen Epstein is an perfect writer and paints an accurate picture of the history of the HIV/AIDS pandemic in sub-Saharan Africa, with a specific focus on Uganda, East Africa, and Southern Africa. A very moving book that helps us realize the ways in which we will end this horrible disease have small to do with huge pharma and a western-centered solution.

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    Invisible Cure: Africa, the West and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2020-2-1 18:6

    Interesting but out of date

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    Invisible Cure: Africa, the West and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2020-2-1 18:6

    Epstein does a amazing job intertwining her own story into the history of the epidemic in the late 80s-present day. There is a lot of technical and private info presented throughout which allows the reader to learn and empathize. This book is for public health junkies, people interested in the HIV/AIDS and also people who are interested in learning more about controversial topics. A very amazing read, my only complaint and the reason for 4 stars is that the flow of the book can feel choppy at points.

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    Invisible Cure: Africa, the West and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2020-2-1 18:6

    This author is amazing. She was able to summarize the HIV/AIDS situation in Africa and create sense of it. Loved this book and use parts of it when I teach this subject at a medium side university in the midwest.

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    Invisible Cure: Africa, the West and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2020-2-1 18:6

    The most necessary book published on AIDS in a long time, and one of the most necessary books of the year. If you liked Rachel Carson's Silent Spring or And The Band Played On, you will love this book. It is readable, impassioned and brilliant, and despite its savage denunciation of the failures of the West to deal with the AIDS crisis, it is an essentially optimistic work. Publishers Weekly in a starred review said it will save lives, and that is not hyperbole. I urge anyone who is interested in the greatest medical crisis of our time; anyone who is interested in Africa; anyone who is outraged by the failure of the UN, the WHO and the Bush administration to deal with this tragedy, to buy this book and give it to your friends. It is the kind of book that will change peoples' minds and will move continents. It will be read for years to come...

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    Invisible Cure: Africa, the West and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2020-2-1 18:6

    a nice journey about wanting to change the world, but winding up with and the understanding that society needs to change, a tough task

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    Invisible Cure: Africa, the West and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2020-2-1 18:6

    slightly used but still nicely kept. Had a sticker on the front that covered most of the cover so it was hard taking that off. otherwise it arrived on time and was very useful to me.

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    Invisible Cure: Africa, the West and the Fight Against AIDS review []  2020-2-1 18:6

    Epstein is a PhD biologist who went to Africa to set up a lab to study HIV and when the logistics did not work out she switched to writing journalistic accounts of disease experiences in Africa. Unlike other journalists, she often reads the basic scientific literature and then builds journalistic accounts off of that research. This is the case in the show book where she recounts the story of how indigenous recognition of the cause of HIV infection increases in Uganda produced a dramatically effective program to reduce AIDS infections and also the stigmatization of HIV. By Epstein's acc this effective intervention was finally blocked when the US program to address HIV (PEPFAR) insisted that Uganda promote an abstinence program, which was sharply various from the indigenous program. After the US intervention, HIV rates went back up. The first two thirds of this book are an perfect acc of the experience of HIV in African communities. The latest 1/3 of the book becomes a bit too polemic for my tastes.

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    Lonely Planet West Africa (Travel Guide) review []  2020-2-10 18:55

    West Africa is one of the amazing emerging tourist destinations of the world. Amazing beaches, lively cities, dynamic culture, and still intact wildlife with improving accommodations, plus modest costs and amazing accessibility from Europe create this part of the globe an only lightly discovered gem. Then why this desultory and sketchy guidebook? When I first read Lonely Planet's 1993 West Africa guidebook I was amazed at the detail and insight. The fresh edition doesn't even provide info on visa regulations, and the visitor information is brief and limited. LP must be struggling with how to compete with TripAdvisor, etc. The respond is to provide more authorial insights and detail, not less. Bradt has grasped this with its a lot of detailed West Africa tutorials (though a lot of countries, notably Guinea, Guinea Bissau, and Benin are dated or absent). But Lonely Planet seems to have lost its edge. The fresh West Africa edition is not worth the money.

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    Lonely Planet West Africa (Travel Guide) review []  2020-2-10 18:55

    I used this book to select a hotel in Lome, TOGO and was quite disappointed. I think the authors used outdated website visit information...in general the info is quite superficial

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    Lonely Planet West Africa (Travel Guide) review []  2020-2-10 18:55

    The product was in the quality advertised.

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    Lonely Planet West Africa (Travel Guide) review []  2020-2-10 18:55

    I have an older edition (2006) of this book, bought for a trip back then to Mali and Senegal. When I dusted it off to prepare for a January 2020 trip to Côte d'Ivoire I found 35 little print pages of useful information, particularly on cultural matters and history. Since the bitter civil battle was underway when the history section was written, I decided to look for an updated guidebook. The current ver of this Lonely Planet West Africa tutorial is a mere skeleton of the 2006 edition--at least with respect to Côte d'Ivoire, with only 13 pages. If I was going a year from now I would wait for the 2020 Bradt Tutorial on Côte d'Ivoire due out September 2020.

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    The Rough Guide to West Africa (Rough Guides) review []  2020-2-12 19:18

    I bought this book to begin mentally planning a future trip to West Africa (take a month, go wander around) and realizing that Lonely Planet's book was a few years old, I went with my backup, the Rough e book is beautiful comprehensive - the info seems up to date and there's enough tidbits to create me think that someone actually visited these locations and reported firsthand vs relied on anecdotal evidence. Mainly I was interested in Senegal, since I wish to go there for the infamous Paris-Dakar rally along with Cameroon.But after reading the other reviews, I was like "Oh yeah, where IS Liberia?" and went back to the book to search it not there. What's up with that, Rough Guide?

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    The Rough Guide to West Africa (Rough Guides) review []  2020-2-12 19:18

    Very useful and informative!

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    The Rough Guide to West Africa (Rough Guides) review []  2020-2-12 19:18

    Just returned from Ghana, Togo and Benin and while I think some of the prices and phone #'s are getting a bit outdated over all it was a amazing support and beautiful spot on. The accomodation and getting there and around information was really helpfull. Alot of usefull information. I would recomend the book!

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    The Rough Guide to West Africa (Rough Guides) review []  2020-2-12 19:18

    Very useful!

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    The Rough Guide to West Africa (Rough Guides) review []  2020-2-12 19:18

    i was dissapointed with this tutorial book ... not so much because of the info it contained but because the maps were ilegible and therefor useless ...also because the info was not available easier by a detailed index ... i had to flic thru the pages to search the section i required so in my opinion poorly laid out ...it felt to me more like someones impression of the put rather than factual info which i would have prefered ...

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    The Rough Guide to West Africa (Rough Guides) review []  2020-2-12 19:18

    Kinda lame, they just completely left out Liberia!?Will report back after I have a possibility to use it in West Africa.

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    The Rough Guide to West Africa (Rough Guides) review []  2020-2-12 19:18

    Admittedly, Lonely Planet's ver is a couple years old now, but this Rough Tutorial is SO much better in terms of what to expect, how to obtain around, cultural aspects, what to bring, and a general cohesive overview of the region, it's sort of ridiculous. Lonely Planet's book is essentially useless compared to this. We're moving to West Africa for an extended stay, and this book has been helpful, informative, and even an interesting read. I'm glad that I waited for and then purchased this fresh release rather than just sticking with the guidebooks I had.

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    The Rough Guide to West Africa (Rough Guides) review []  2020-2-12 19:18

    I used this book while working for 4 months in West Africa. I tried to use it to travel around Ghana and found it beautiful much useless. Over half the book is cultural info and longwinded historical essays about the country. That's nice, but what I really wanted to know was how to obtain places, where to stay, is it safe, and how much does it cost. It's not good at listing public transportation. It will tell that there is a bus from Accra to Cape Coast but doesn't say where to obtain it, how much it costs, a time estimate, or even give the name of more than one bus company (and the one they listed is far from the best one in Ghana). The only thing it does semi-well is listing options for lodging and e tutorial also doesn't even cover Liberia or Ivory Coast. It's still better than Lonely Planet but that's only because Lonely Planet is so terrible.

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    The Rough Guide to West Africa (Rough Guides) review []  2020-2-12 19:18

    I was disappointed Liberia wasnt included in this edition, I was unable to search that explained before I bought it

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    Villages of West Africa: An Intimate Journey across Time review []  2020-1-17 23:27

    This stunning book of photography and narrative takes us to places, which a lot of of us may not otherwise visit. Cathi and Steven House are special in their ability to go into countries and in this case villages, victory the trust of the people who live there and photograph their families, their homes, their other structures and the land that surrounds them. A map provides an orientation to this special journey through villages with unfamiliar names, Timbuktu being the exception. Through these photographs you obtain a sense of the people and their everyday life in each place. The beauty of the people who are so warmly photographed gives you greater empathy for those who must live with the hardship of climate and battle in this part of the world. The narrative and images capture cultural traditions without judgment. Detailed pictures of colourful markets support you understand commerce and quite remarkably how people repurpose materials to serve necessary functions. Through images and narrative we understand how the people feed themselves, how they worship, how they make art and how they e authors see beauty in every put and are able to capture the special beauty of each place. This book is an art book and a travel book. One which you will return to on quiet afternoons to have fun the visceral, attractive photographs, the narrative which gives you history and helps make the sense of place, and moving quotations which give you a window on the authors’ souls. Selected poetry provides velvet touches to this awesome book. The authors talk about the kindness and generosity of the people they encounter on this journey and almost certainly this must be in part because those people answer to the begin souls of these travelers.

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    Villages of West Africa: An Intimate Journey across Time review []  2020-1-17 23:27

    How fortunate I am that Steven and Cathi House traveled and documented a put in the globe where most folks would never have the opportunity to visit. The images will take your breath away, capturing attractive tribal populations, adorned with their dress, their artful mud dwellings, and their friendly smiles. Having traveled to Mali in 2012, I am grateful to own this book which brings it all back. The quality of the photography is superb, and the informed commentary will please anyone who wants to understand and admire the mysterious beauty of West Africa.

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    Villages of West Africa: An Intimate Journey across Time review []  2020-1-17 23:27

    Through flourishes of poetry and dazzling imagery, this anthology of West African culture is both a mirror and a looking glass, reminding us of our potential by revealing people, places, and stories that we may have never otherwise known. The ruminations illustrated in this book depict lives thoughtfully and poetically lived, cadenced by handcrafted vernacular architecture that is placed with a soulful precision across the West African landscape. Steven and Cathi House have long traveled the globe collecting fresh pieces of themselves and their pedagogy that they search in far and forgotten places, cloaked in shadow, and shimmering just around unknown corners. This book, ‘Villages of West Africa: An Intimate Journey Across Time’, highlights their recent discovery, and locations you, the reader, there with them under the tingling warmth of the African sun.

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    Villages of West Africa: An Intimate Journey across Time review []  2020-1-17 23:27

    Another outstanding book from Steven and Cathi House. I highly recommend this book to anyone who appreciates attractive photography, interesting narratives, and learning about locations that they will (very likely) never have the opportunity to visit.

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    Villages of West Africa: An Intimate Journey across Time review []  2020-1-17 23:27

    Another attractive House book, this one looks at easy villages in West Africa. Text blends history with love of their subject, indigenous architecture, and contains quotes from well-known thinkers and observers. The images are stunning...just want they could be larger. Combines a studious approach with amazing affection and lush illustration. A treat!

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    Villages of West Africa: An Intimate Journey across Time review []  2020-1-17 23:27

    Stunning photographs transport you into the depths of West Africa. Steven and Cathi have a genius for capturing the spirit of areas where we don't have the opportunity to go. If you wish to obtain deep into the region this masterpiece will bring you there.

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    Villages of West Africa: An Intimate Journey across Time review []  2020-1-17 23:27

    The photographs are stunning! The authors paint a picture of everyday life with their narrations as they present off the attractive architecture and culture of West Africa through photographs. I’ve only been to Burkina Faso, but I would love to do a trip like this!

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    Villages of West Africa: An Intimate Journey across Time review []  2020-1-17 23:27

    This is a attractive and insightful book on the villages of West Africa. The photographs are stunning and the writing reveals the history, customs, and an appreciation, understanding, and admiration of these special cultures. I am writing this as a person who has been to West Africa tons of times and has a huge library of books on Africa. This book is unique and I highly recommend it.

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    Villages of West Africa: An Intimate Journey across Time review []  2020-1-17 23:27

    I bought this book and was very taken back by how unbelievable the images where in this book. I felt as if I had been through this awesome journey of Africa. The quality is priceless and worth what I paid. I highly recommend this book to anyone who is thinking about traveling to Africa.

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    Villages of West Africa: An Intimate Journey across Time review []  2020-1-17 23:27

    The word architecture often implies grand structures that are celebrations of our skill and symbols of our pride. In their book, "Villages of West Africa", architects and globe travelers Cathi and Steven House take a step back from modern grandeur to examine the grass roots of architecture. They take the reader on a fascinating journey where buildings literally grow out of the ing natural local materials, villagers construct their own homes and community buildings to fit an often-hostile environment. While our modern edifices are the esoteric province of experts, West African villagers come together as a community to support one another raise and repair their buildings by hand. Homes of mud and wattle might seem grim to us, but West Africans turn them into livable works of art built in geometric shapes and decorated with rhythmic eir sense of community, of interdependence, manifests itself in a lot of ways, from trade to religion to customs. Again and again, this book raises provocative questions: What is the meaning of the word rich? How does wealth relate to human happiness?The authors have spent nearly half a century together, learning, traveling, creating and sharing. Their eyes, hearts and minds work together in harmony. Their observations and insights are astute and intuitive. Steven and Cathi House's exploration of West Africa through thoughtful text and exquisite photography is a journey well worth taking.

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    Desert Travels: Motorcycle Journeys in the Sahara and West Africa review []  2020-1-19 21:26

    A amazing book by a well known author of motorcycling and touring books. Chris Scott is best known for his Adventure Motorcycling Handbook which is the pinnacle of motorcycle touring so it came as a bit of a shock to explore in the Kindle ver of Desert Travels that he no longer uses a motorbike and considers it too dangerous. This ver shows him, in a snapshot of history, initially describing his motorbike travels in Algeria and then following his Street to Damascus revelation, hitchhiking through the Gold Coast of Western African with their maniacal bus and taxi drivers. I was not sure which is more dangerous? The book itself keeps the reader interested and the Kindle is an updated ver of the original. A amazing read for those who, like me, sit at home and pretend to be adventure travellers. PG

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    Desert Travels: Motorcycle Journeys in the Sahara and West Africa review []  2020-1-19 21:26

    Shorter might have been better but the author chose instead to write not only about solo motorcycle travel in the desert but also later about his work as a guide, for which he admits no talent and the story in fact starts to splutter like a failing ignition system. By the book to read about how off street adventure travel was pioneered and marvel at our simplicity and naiveté and at how much we accomplished. I rode the Sahara a couple of years before the author so I was thrilled to search someone tell it like it was. More of that and less of the guided tours would have been better. Worth a read if motorcycle travel intrigues you.

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    Desert Travels: Motorcycle Journeys in the Sahara and West Africa review []  2020-1-19 21:26

    Amazing story about Desert Travels from the early 80s. A amazing snapshot in time to an era that has long passed. It is written in a story format so you feel like you are sitting at a campfire listening to an old traveler recount his trips. This story is more about the mindset of the trip and the adventures than a "guide book" type of journal. In other words, it isn't about going 400km to Tam and filling up at the BP, but more about taking a slightly various route on teh Piste and finding broken down folks, what they are like, where they came from and what they are doing out in the middle of the desert. Amazing items and well written.

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    Desert Travels: Motorcycle Journeys in the Sahara and West Africa review []  2020-1-19 21:26

    Well written and very down to earth. It turned out to be a surprisingly engrossing tale that I enjoyed very much.Just understand that this is a recounting of different journeys taken through the Sahara by the author and not a travel or tutorial book and you will not be disappointed. A tidbit of history is added for amazing measure and helps round out the work.Well worth the cost.

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    Desert Travels: Motorcycle Journeys in the Sahara and West Africa review []  2020-1-19 21:26

    I had never heard of any of the locations the author rode his bike. Very remote, very inhospitable and often dangerous. A true view of adventure in the most remote locations of north Africa. A compilation of several trips.

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    Desert Travels: Motorcycle Journeys in the Sahara and West Africa review []  2020-1-19 21:26

    Amazing desert adventure story

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    Desert Travels: Motorcycle Journeys in the Sahara and West Africa review []  2020-1-19 21:26

    Very evocative tutorial to touring Sahara, clearly based on private e author brings out the conflicts between motivation and practicality and the true need to chose one's traveling companions e comments on the mode of travel and the equipment are very down-to-earth.Would like to read more!

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    Desert Travels: Motorcycle Journeys in the Sahara and West Africa review []  2020-1-19 21:26

    Enjoyed the overall feel of the desert and history, but would have liked a map or two, an essential for travel books (in my opinion).

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    Desert Travels: Motorcycle Journeys in the Sahara and West Africa review []  2020-1-19 21:26

    Amazing encounters. really enjoyed it

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    Desert Travels: Motorcycle Journeys in the Sahara and West Africa review []  2020-1-19 21:26

    A collection of stories from various times that loosely reference each other. Some insights into desert travel but should have included more info on the equipment and techniques.

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    Travels in West Africa, Congo Français, Corisco and Cameroons review []  2020-1-19 21:27

    If you enjoyed Katherine Hepburn's spunky performance in "The African Queen" or delight when Elizabeth Peters' fictional Amelia Peabody prods a villain with her trusty umbrella, you will undoubtedly have fun the true adventures of Mary Kingsley in Africa. At thirty years of age, her parent having both died, the sheltered Miss Kingsley set off for the continent that had for so long ruled her imagination. Setting herself up as a trader in West Africa, she set out across treacherous swamps and uncharted regions, going where few white men - allow alone women - had ever ngsley wrote of her travels with a self-deprecating wit, impaling a lot of of the racial and cultural prejudices of her day. She vastly preferred, for example, the uncoverted "cannibal Fans" to the tribes influenced by missionaries. She distrusted the motives of the "civilizing" European forces, with amazing copy of this affordable Everyman edition, ably edited and introduced by Elspeth Huxley, is thick with favorite underlined passages. She writes of harrowing experiences as if she were recounting happenings at an ice cream social. Indeed, invariably dressed in proper Victorian garb throughout all her travels, she once escaped impalement in a android game trap set with spikes - her voluminous skirts saved her. Of an eight-foot crocodile attempting to climb into her canoe, whom Kingsley dealt a repelling blow with a paddle, she remarked, "This was only a pushing young monster who had not learnt manners."Travelling without the vast entourage that other explorers, such as Stanley, seemed to search necessary, she possessed an independence which bordered on eccentricity. She was, as Elspeth Huxley notes, at heart a lone wolf, always preferring to go her own method and create her own judgements about those she encountered. The hero of this indomitable, fascinating woman shines through her acc of her travels.

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    Travels in West Africa, Congo Français, Corisco and Cameroons review []  2020-1-19 21:27

    Travels In West Africa, KingsleyOf all the amazing women travelers such as Gertrude Bell and Freya Stark of Middle Eastern fame and Fanny Bullock Workman and Janet Wuslin of Eastern Asian and Himalayan note I would put Mary Kingsley of African renown greatest of all. I am familiar with the books and works of the others but Kingsley combines all the attributes of all amazing travelers, whether male or female. Though she derides her own literary style I search it excellent, she writes with a witty and self-deprecating style which I search engaging. After reading this book no one could doubt her courage and imperviousness to hardship and discomfort. She also seems to posses a quite extraordinary personality as she seems to obtain along well with practically everyone she meets. But first of all I search her intelligence to be first rate. Her five chapters on fetish are of necessary value to the anthropologist and student of West African culture, and her comment in the appendix on "Foreign Labor" [page 656 in the Dover edition] may be considered 's interesting to compare this work on West Africa to the popular explorer, Richard F. Burton's, "Travels in West Africa" It seems no two people could be more unlike. Burton, though at times brilliant and always interesting and an intellectual of the highest order, is of course extremely opinionated if not outright bigoted. Burton's attempt at humor or wit never comes through like Kingsley's does. Burton has outright contempt for non-Muslim Africans, perhaps justifiably so in the case semi-Christianized mission Africans. But whereas Kingsley also mistrusts the latter, she attempts to understand the pagan African, while Burton never does. While Kingsley's book is always lighthearted, Burton's work seems strangely macabre at times.I am not disappointed in this Dover Publishers edition I have

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    Travels in West Africa, Congo Français, Corisco and Cameroons review []  2020-1-19 21:27

    The book is interesting but it appears to be a not good OCR version. Could do with a LOT of editing!

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    Travels in West Africa, Congo Français, Corisco and Cameroons review []  2020-1-19 21:27

    I bought this book because it was supposed to be one of the 100 greatest adventure books of all time. While it does have narrow escapes and Mary Kingsley was very brave, there is too much discussion of "the African mind". I found the constant reference to the superiority of the European colonists very offputting. Of course it was written in the 1890's!

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