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    Congo Kitabu []  2020-1-16 12:40

    Finishes out my collection of his books.

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    Congo Kitabu []  2020-1-16 12:40

    This is an absolutely knockout true-life adventure in Africa. Jean-Pierre Hallet tells of 12 action-packed years among the tribes of Africa. He became blood-brother to the tall "Watusi" and the fighter Masai, joined the Bwane Secret Society, lived among cannibals, and went on to share the life of the Congo Pygmies. Hallet was taught the art of killing a lion with a spear by the Masai. Does he succeed? You'll have to read the book to search out. One of the amazing African adventure books told by a man who lived an wonderful life. First Hardcover ver was 1964.

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    Congo kitabu []  2020-1-31 0:15

    amazing seller, recommend.

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    Congo Kitabu []  2020-1-16 12:40

    I first read this book to my 6th grade class in 1963. They loved it! I have recommended it to several reading groups. Jean Pierre Hallet created a life long impression on me with his autobiography.

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    Congo Kitabu []  2020-1-16 12:40

    The exploits of this man were almost superhuman. His ability to step inside the heads of tribesmen and a wide dozens of animals is astounding and insightful. He provides insight into African mindsets and culture I'm still processing. I'd call this a must read if you are interested in exceptional exploits or want for insight into African cultures.

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    Congo kitabu []  2020-1-31 0:15

    Jean-Pierre Hallet was an awesome man and larger then life adventurer. He confronted the realities of life in the Belgian Congo in the 1950s and 60s with courage, fascination and reforming zeal. He tells his story with remarkable frankness to the point where there a lot of occasions that I wondered whether this was all for real. He confronted racist colonial administrators, suspicious revolutionaries and leopards with the same steely gaze and sang froid. He earned the trust of local communities who had experienced the roughest treatment of colonialists, but who respected his deep humanity and courage. This simply extra-ordinary book will remain in my mind for a long, long time.

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    Congo kitabu []  2020-1-31 0:15

    Finishes out my collection of his books.

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    Congo kitabu []  2020-1-31 0:15

    Amazing book.

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    Congo kitabu []  2020-1-31 0:15

    I first read Congo Kitabu in the 60's while in high school and was in awe of this true-life adventure. I nearly got to meet the author but couldn't obtain a ride to where he was speaking. This is one of those books everyone ought to read, because it is a page-turner, but also because it talks about a troubled zone of the planet. This should be read with Out of America by Keith Richberg, a more current view of Africa. This is one of those books you'll never forget--it'll create a lasting impression and you'll wish to read it again.

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    Congo Kitabu []  2020-1-16 12:40

    I truly believe this book should be included in the teaching of black history, even though it is written as an autobiaraphy.

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    Congo Kitabu []  2020-1-16 12:40

    Amazing book.

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    Congo Kitabu []  2020-1-16 12:40

    amazing seller, recommend.

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    Useful review?

    Congo kitabu []  2020-1-31 0:15

    I first read this book to my 6th grade class in 1963. They loved it! I have recommended it to several reading groups. Jean Pierre Hallet created a life long impression on me with his autobiography.

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    Congo kitabu []  2020-1-31 0:15

    I truly believe this book should be included in the teaching of black history, even though it is written as an autobiaraphy.

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    Congo kitabu []  2020-1-31 0:15

    This is an absolutely knockout true-life adventure in Africa. Jean-Pierre Hallet tells of 12 action-packed years among the tribes of Africa. He became blood-brother to the tall "Watusi" and the fighter Masai, joined the Bwane Secret Society, lived among cannibals, and went on to share the life of the Congo Pygmies. Hallet was taught the art of killing a lion with a spear by the Masai. Does he succeed? You'll have to read the book to search out. One of the amazing African adventure books told by a man who lived an wonderful life. First Hardcover ver was 1964.

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    Congo kitabu []  2020-1-31 0:15

    What an wonderful man and character! I could hardly place the book down. He was a was a Belgian ethnologist, and I felt so fortunate to be able to later meet him in his African Arts in L.A., although he was more frail, as it was just a few years before he died. I remember reading of his humanitarian efforts for the Pygmys, his vast and intimate knowledge of Africa's people and animals, and his sadness at the devastation wrought politically to the Congo. He was truly admirable.

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    Congo kitabu []  2020-1-31 0:15

    The exploits of this man were almost superhuman. His ability to step inside the heads of tribesmen and a wide dozens of animals is astounding and insightful. He provides insight into African mindsets and culture I'm still processing. I'd call this a must read if you are interested in exceptional exploits or want for insight into African cultures.

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  • 0

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    Congo Kitabu []  2020-1-16 12:40

    What an wonderful man and character! I could hardly place the book down. He was a was a Belgian ethnologist, and I felt so fortunate to be able to later meet him in his African Arts in L.A., although he was more frail, as it was just a few years before he died. I remember reading of his humanitarian efforts for the Pygmys, his vast and intimate knowledge of Africa's people and animals, and his sadness at the devastation wrought politically to the Congo. He was truly admirable.

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    Useful review?

    Congo Kitabu []  2020-1-16 12:40

    Jean-Pierre Hallet was an awesome man and larger then life adventurer. He confronted the realities of life in the Belgian Congo in the 1950s and 60s with courage, fascination and reforming zeal. He tells his story with remarkable frankness to the point where there a lot of occasions that I wondered whether this was all for real. He confronted racist colonial administrators, suspicious revolutionaries and leopards with the same steely gaze and sang froid. He earned the trust of local communities who had experienced the roughest treatment of colonialists, but who respected his deep humanity and courage. This simply extra-ordinary book will remain in my mind for a long, long time.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Congo Kitabu []  2020-1-16 12:40

    I first read Congo Kitabu in the 60's while in high school and was in awe of this true-life adventure. I nearly got to meet the author but couldn't obtain a ride to where he was speaking. This is one of those books everyone ought to read, because it is a page-turner, but also because it talks about a troubled zone of the planet. This should be read with Out of America by Keith Richberg, a more current view of Africa. This is one of those books you'll never forget--it'll create a lasting impression and you'll wish to read it again.

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    Congo Kitabu: An Exciting Autobiographical Account of Twelve Adventure-filled Years in Central Africa []  2020-1-28 0:41

    Unbelievable story

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    Congo Kitabu: An Exciting Autobiographical Account of Twelve Adventure-filled Years in Central Africa []  2020-1-28 0:41

    I first read this when I was in high school -- when the book was published. This is a true-life epic. It reads like a novel, but even better.

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    Congo []  2020-8-20 18:0

    This book is beautiful good. For when it was written I can't say I know dozens and dozens about other books that were popular. I can say that almost everyone I know has a powerful dislike for the movie they created based on this novel. I however, always held the film as a classic silly favorite. That being said, the book felt a small boring to me. Maybe it's because I read it right after reading jurassic park, maybe it's just because its boring. In any event, if you're on the fence about reading this one, I'd say go for it anyway. The science aspect of the story is certainly cool. I just don't know that I'd ever read it a second time.

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    Congo []  2020-8-20 18:0

    I just got done reading the book and i have never read a book by Michael Crichton. I really enjoyed the film when I was small and thought hey why not test the book because the book is usually better than the movie. it is definitely better than the movie. I have no complains about the book. the only poor thing i will say is that the end allow me down a bit and seemed a bit rushed but over all the book was awesome. It kept me coming back and wanting to know what happened next and it actually had some really cool facts in it as well. im now reading Jurassic Park and am loving it. really glad my mate told me about him and his books. if you're looking for a book and a amazing story i would definitely obtain it. hope this helps

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    Congo []  2020-8-20 18:0

    This novel is undoubtedly well-written, though I felt the characters were more like sketches than true people, and the book far surpasses the film version. While the premise of the novel may seem ridiculous at times, it was fun (and educational in a lot of ways) to follow. Chrichton obviously does his research. I enjoyed his Jurassic Park novels more in terms of content, but the story here of a group of people (and one "talking" gorilla) trekking through the Congo to search out what happened to their colleagues on an earlier expedition is entertaining enough. There are a lot of over-the-top scenes and a bit too much conflict (civil war; a volcano on the verge of erupting; risky indigenous tribes in the jungle; dangerously-competitive corporate rivals; mutant, murderous gorillas; etc.), but if you can overlook the melodrama, it's a amazing read.

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    Congo []  2020-8-20 18:0

    CONGO (1980) follows the exploits of a little high-tech squad of explorers, in an international super-stakes race to search a unique diamond mine in the remote jungle, following up an advanced squad of explorers that was completely wiped out before is story is interesting in its own right - but provides an extra benefit of a history lesson into the Silicon Valley mindset of the computer high-tech world, in 1980 during the beginning of the Microprocessor Revolution (at the height of the Z-80 based CP/M and Pac-Man computer era, just before the world-changing introduction of the IBM PC using Microsoft DOS the next year... other than with specialized Video Android games built for expensive, Arcade-based consoles, costing a quarter for just about 3-4 mins of playing time, it was a "text-based" computer screen globe - with Windows based computers not gaining a full foothold with Windows 3.1, for another dozen years).

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    Congo []  2020-8-20 18:0

    Congo is another science fueled adventure by the Crichton. It is engaging, interesting and keeps you wondering what is going to happen next. Like most of his books, it is well researched and is filled with scientific facts. At the same time it is accessible and does not bog down. Rather, the facts are woven through the story in a manner which enhances the plot and moves it forward. The characters are well developed and rounded in that he avoids simple, one trait, flat characters. I only discovered Crichton and this is my 4th novel. It compares well with the excitement and adventure of Jurassic Park, The Lost Globe and Sphere.

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    Congo []  2020-8-20 18:0

    Outstanding read! This book was written in 1980 at the relative beginning of Crighton's writing career, but you can see already the level of genius in the meticulous crafting and attractive story telling that Crighton has become known for in his writings. In some ways, this novel could be regarded as a precursor to some of Crighton's later blockbusters such as Jurassic Park and Lost Globe as it is truly an exciting adventure book which takes us into the mysterious and unknown lands of Africa. But what makes this book a true masterpiece is the level of research and actual facts that Crighton has incorporated in this novel, giving it a sense of reality. I highly recommend this book.

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    Congo []  2020-8-20 18:0

    Though the language is a small dated at times (eg: saying Orientals for Asians) that doesn’t diminish the narrative at all. The story revolves around a young female gorilla named Amy who’d been brought to a lab as an infant after her mother was killed in the wild. Amy was taught to use sign language by Peter, a researcher, and could “speak” fluently. An expedition was formed to locate the ruins of an ancient town in the Congo rain forest and Amy and Peter were brought along. Various members of the expedition had different agendas for participating - scientific, exploratory, political, and amazing old fashioned financial - and were often at odds with each other. Ultimately the group finds much more than they anticipated. It’s a gripping read with exciting elements and unexpected twists that kept me fully mesmerized.

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    Congo []  2020-8-20 18:0

    I love Michael Crichton. You read this mesmerizing story, turning page after page. When you are done, you realize that you have learned something. Something about something Huge - and important. I love that talent and caring. I am sure a lot of people in this globe miss this man. Long May YouRun, wherever you are.

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    Congo []  2020-8-20 18:0

    I would have given this 5 stars but throughout the book there were pages i skipped because something was being explained in detail that actually had no bearing on the story. I'm not very technically minded but wouldnt mind reading about computer programmes they were using BUT at the beginning of the book, it nearly lost me as i struggled through several pages of computer jargon that wasnt necessary. For all that though the story was a amazing one, i just couldnt give it a 5.

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    Congo []  2020-8-20 18:0

    I have read most of Michael's books, and have seen all the movies created from them as well. I hadn't read Congo, but had seen the film, which was almost universally panned. I liked the film, but after reading this well written, researched and intense book, agree a bit with the film's critics. This story is so well written and so researched, it is a amazing read on a lot of levels. I read this one beautiful fast, as it kept me engaged completely. Michael is really missed by myself, as he had so much more to give us. Highly recommended!

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    Rumba Congo []  2020-2-2 20:57

    KEKELE IS A VOCAL HARMONY GROUP FROM THE CONGO IN AFRICA. THEY SING BEAUTIFULLY, WITH TRADITIONAL CONGOLESE RHYTMS AND INSTRUMENTS BACKING THEM UP. THIS CD SHOWCASES THEIR TALENT AND UNIQUE VOCAL STYLIZATIONS. I ENJOY LISTENING TO THIS CD A LOT.

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    Congo Mercenary []  2020-1-20 21:4

    First off I wish to say, like a lot of reviewers have already stated, that Col. Mike Hoare is a superb writer. He has an wonderful grasp on the English language and he writes seamlessly and perfectly. This makes for an enjoyable aspect of this book that really captured my interest was the undeniably romanticized notions of adventure I think we commonly associate with mercenary life. To this end, Col. Hoare delivers in brilliant fashion. We start with him detailing the rebellion and the chaos and confusion that followed his to form a mercenary unit, which he comes to call 5 Commando. He info the recruiting process, the vetting out of the less-then-desirable men, the short training they received, and the arms and equipment they were issued- although this was a challenge unto itself. Throughout the book he also info the strategies used, why he chose to give the orders he did, and the challenges they faced when executing these plans- in some cases relying heavily on luck.I found it infinitely insightful how the globe news media hampers his every move. These journalists approach the situation with a per-conceived notion that mercenaries are scum (getting to slay your fellow man is something most have problems with), and thus create their reports to fit this image, despite the numerous innocent civilians -both black and white in skin color- that his men save. Although this was a minor, albeit consistent, theme throughout the book, I felt it really opens one's eyes to the bias nature of news reporting on war. We all know news media loves to report on sensational stories, even if that means embellishing the story, but we see in this book the adverse affects it so similar to this theme, is how the communist globe gets in an uproar in help of the rebels, and we see first hand the how and why of these cold-war proxy wars. Each side puts blinders on, refusing to acknowledge the horrible atrocities committed by it's side, while promoting those committed by the other side, and much like the bias reporters, only focus on what they wish to see/hear.Another thing I thought was interesting was how the book was split into 3 sections. During the first one, we obtain a taste of the challenges faced by 5 Commando is training and fighting. Both the mercs and rebels are poorly trained. The rebels war with spears and WWII-vintage German Mauser rifles. As the book progresses, so too does the quality of soldering on both sides, as the Commandos obtain more training, better leadership, better arms and equipment, etc. But again, the rebels likewise start to improve in quality; Cuban advisers arrive to lead them, Chinese Aks and artillery start to arrive, and so forth. Although this is a real story through and through, I enjoyed how the book played out like a traditional story, increasing more and more in tension, with Col. Hoare always on the verge of defeat, and as the tension builds, it comes to a climatic l in all I enjoyed every bit of this book and look forward to reading Col. Mike Hoare's other books. Highly recommended.

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    Congo Ashanti []  2020-7-10 19:49

    The re-release of the Congos' previous album, Heart of the Congos, prompted a lot of to hail it as the best reggae album of all time. Blood and Fire wisely followed that up with a precisely remastered reissue of "Congo Ashanti". By then, however, it had been taken for granted by a lot of that the Congos either disbanded after HotC or that the quality of their releases did not and could not equal the perfection of HotC. I believe this perception to be wrong for a lot of reasons. Congo Ashanti is a much more lyrically mature album than HotC, with a much darker, more spiritual feel and several outright masterpieces (especially Jackpot and Nana). Where HotC was light and bouncy in places, quirky and strange in others, and somewhat inconsistent in its message, Congo Ashanti is straightforward and consistent in its notice of social justice. Buy this for every serious reggae fan you know.

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    Congo Mercenary []  2020-1-20 21:4

    I had first read this book back in the '80's and have wanted to re-read it a lot of times over the years. The story is just as compelling now as it was decades ago, and one huge improvement is the quality of this paperback over the pulp paper ver I had read back then. Hoare tell his story intelligently and seems to go out of his method to avoid self-aggrandizement in this acc of 5 Commando's key role in the Congo's war versus communist rebels in the '60's. While there is nothing in Hoare's writing that gives method to gratuitous detail, he starkly describes the vileness and viciousness of the rebels they were fighting. Those who like sanitized, revisionist history will likely offended.

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    Congo Mercenary []  2020-1-20 21:4

    This is a amazing book for those interested in mercenary battle in Africa, which has long been one of my interests.If you liked the film "Dogs of War" for example, this might be a book you would like.I also liked books by authors such as J.F.C. Fuller and Deneys Reitz on different earlier battles in Africa. "Congo Mercenary" gives a more modern example that helps fill out the picture, and gave me some factual info filling in gaps in my historical knowledge.

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    Congo Ashanti []  2020-7-10 19:49

    The previous reviewer does a amazing job of braking down the situation that characterizes the conception, recording, and acceptance of this album by The Congos. However, despite Lee Perry's absence from the controls, I consider this a very underrated album that deserves a careful listen. Cedric Myton is well known for his near-flawless falsetto and it is showcased here along with more traditional voicings in a method that fascinates me as a listener. He effortlessly shifts back and forth between singing styles from one verse to the next and sometimes even in the same line. Songs like "Jackpot," "Hail The Globe of Jah," "Days Chasing Days," and "Thief Is In The Vineyard" are exceptional and the others aren't poor either. While "Heart Of The Congos" is essential to any reggae collection, this album is worth buying if you are interested in the next best effort from a legendary artist. If Lee Perry had produced it, I imagine that it could have rivaled its predecessor.

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    Congo Life []  2020-1-17 0:35

    I'm always surprised and delighted that people who have endured such hardship (political and economic) can produce melody so full of joy. When I listen to Kekele, I search myself moving to the rhythm without is cd is an especially amazing selection of songs. If you have fun this CD, by all means listen to "Rhumba Congo." No doubt, you'll be dancing too!

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    Congo Acoustic []  2020-1-18 23:7

    This is happy, mellow music; melody that should be playing while you're relaxing on the porch with a cool is acoustic, as the title suggests, with vocals, guitars, percussion, and shots of brass. It is lively, but not the sort of thing to create you jump up and dance. Rather, it makes you wish to lean back and smile.

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    Congo Yambumba []  2020-1-18 23:7

    As my fourth Munequitos CD in my collection, this may be my favorite. Aside from being an outstanding group historically, they show a form of Rumba tastefully done - always locked in the groove... Amazing soloists, coros and group cohesiveness. This album is a amazing document to a long-standing group. Deservedly regarded as one of Cuba's best... Highly reccommended!

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    Congo Mercenary []  2020-1-20 21:4

    This review has two parts: comments on the story told by the book, and then comments about the book rst, the story. This is Colonel Hoare's private acc of his service in the Congo as a mercenary, helping the Congolese government place down a communist-backed revolt. Colonel Hoare is a amazing author, and his retelling of the happenings makes for a very fascinating read. This book may challenge any preconceptions you have about mercenaries and their use, and give you some insights into the mind of a mercenary commander. It documents the struggles he had getting his mercenary group (5 Commando) organized and trained, and of course their a lot of experiences through 18 months of service, including heart-wrenching accounts of the atrocities inflicted by the rebels on the European (mostly Belgian) is is better than any adventure novel--it really happened. If you are a student of military history, African history, or just like reading these types of stories, I highly recommend this for the book itself (e.g. the paper, binding, print quality, etc.). This is advertised as a reprint. To be more specific, this appears to be a reprint that was created by scanning an earlier printing and then reprinting it. The text is very readable, but is not "clean", like you would expect from a typeset edition. If you've ever scanned a B/W document (at 300 DPI, say) and printed it on your laser or inkjet printer, you'll obtain the idea. It's readable, but not perfect. This has two downsides: first, sometimes the text shows flaws in locations where the scanning was imperfect (the scanning head moved slightly or some such thing). Second, the pictures look like they were printed at very high resolution on a laser printer, and are not the high quality images that appeared in earlier editions of this book.I found this to be disappointing--thirty dollars isn't cheap. I have hardcover books (good ones) that cost less than this book, and for the I would have hoped that more care and attention would be place into its preparation. Scanning, followed by the use of OCR and several rounds of proofreading would have resulted in a boot with much better print quality. This may have something to do with the fact that Paladin Press is a little publishing house, and so they may not have the resources to dedicate to making a better-quality reprint. That, or they chose not to use them.I would describe this book as a trade paperback. The quality of the paper and binding seem to be on par with other books of this type that I own. Take care of the book, and it should latest a while, I would , is the book worth the $30 (plus shipping and tax)? If you really wish a book by Colonel Hoare, you don't have much of a choice, as earlier editions of his books are much in demand and very expensive. Personally, I'm happy with it.

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    Congo Mercenary []  2020-1-20 21:4

    I wasn't sure what to expect from this having heard a lot of stories about the author but all in all I search it very simple to read and very enlightening . He tells it like it was and makes us learn about what these guys were and were not.

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    Congo Mercenary []  2020-1-20 21:4

    Perfect acc of a significant period in the history of the Republic of the Congo-Leopoldville. The only lacking is in the dating of events. In that some descriptions are not in chronological more attention to the time periods would have been helpful.

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    Rumba Congo []  2020-2-2 20:57

    Regardless of one's musical preferences, this is simply attractive music. These old timers bring back pre-soukous rumba for the fresh millenium ... heavenly voices over that seductive guitar-driven Congo style. Never ceases to send shivers up the spine. The added advantages of modern recording technology is the pure clarity of sound one misses in the few 50's offerings available. Can't wait fot the follow-up. Hope these guys perform in Southern California sometime.

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    Rumba Congo []  2020-2-2 20:57

    I don't know what industry people got together to create this possible but this is a breath new seems to be getting wide distribution in the USA and actually copies to boot. This goes versus conventional wisdom that seems to believe that the only thing the public wants is speedy soukous, much of which is beginning to sound all the same. Nothing old fashioned about amazing imaginative melody and this is proof. Nearly 65 mins and you will shake your hips and buttocks.

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    Congo Mercenary []  2020-1-20 21:4

    This is an invaluable, extremely well-written acc of the mercenaries recruited to war in the Congo during the rebellion of 1964-1965. [As a Foreign Service Officer I encountered Mike Hoare and his mercenaries in Kindu, Coquilhatville, and Paulis.] Major (later Colonel) Hoare had an unusual background for a mercenary commander. Born in India, in Globe Battle II he served in the London Irish Rifles (perhaps in a staff position) and was mustered out as captain. He qualified as a chartered accountant in 1948 and then immigrated to South Africa, where he ran safaris and enjoyed sailing his little 1960-1961 he formed a mercenary force to serve Moise Tshombe in the breakaway province of Katanga in the Congo. Three years later, soon after Tshombe was named prime minister of the Congo, Hoare was summoned to Leopoldville, where he was charged by Tshombe and General Joseph Desire Mobutu to recruit, train, and lead a group of hundreds of mercenaries. For practical reasons, recruitment offices were established in South Africa and Southern Rhodesia. Hoare assembled hundreds of mercenaries, few of whom were experienced soldiers. He weeded out a number of recruits immediately and then provided brief training to the remainder. His 5 Commando included about 300 mercenaries who were initially organized in five troops stationed in central and eastern Congo. In August 1964 'rebels' controlled over half of the Congo and were threatening to topple the Leopoldville government. I search it astonishing that Hoare was able to recruit and train a disparate group of mercenaries and then provide uncommon leadership in a catch-as-catch-can series of military engagements. His acc of how he accomplished this should be highlighted in any chronicle of effective 'irregular soldiers.' Logistics and tactical intelligence were skimpy, his chain of command with the ANC (Congolese National Army) and Belgian military was ill defined, and his mercenaries were involved in massive fighting from the outset. Hoare presents a detailed acc of the men under his command, how he identified and promoted key officers and noncoms, and how he provided unflappable leadership as he improvised on a everyday basis. Despite modest and dreadful living conditions, his men displayed an esprit de corps that would be the envy of any professional army. The sense of camaraderie, as mercenaries were killed in a never-ending series of military engagements, was far various than what Americans learned about Hessian mercenaries during the Battle of Independence. Hoare's initial basic objective was to participate in assaults leading to the capture of Stanleyville, the headquarters of the Congolese rebel government. One group of mercenaries moved eastward from Coquilhatville, while the main mercenary body fought from Albertville to Kindu and onward towards Stanleyville. An overriding concern of the American and Belgian governments was the safety of over 3,000 foreigners who were being held hostage by the rebel government. Hoare envisaged that his force, supplemented by ANC soldiers and a group of Belgian military (whether 'mercenaries' or seconded by the Belgian government) would be able to sweep into Stanleyville and rescue these hostages. Another objective of Hoare's mercenaries was to rescue foreigners and Congolese who were being threatened and killed by the rebels. In Kindu, for example, at amazing private risk these mercenaries sallied forth to rescue tons of priests and nuns, as well as foreign residents who had been trapped in this maelstrom. In Stanleyville, Hoare's contingent arrived hours after a parachute attack by Belgium's elite Red Brigade saved the lives of the amazing majority of the foreign hostages. The U. S. and Belgium, in launching this attack, were extremely sensitive to African and globe opinion. Dragon Rouge (Stanleyville) was followed, two days later, by Dragon Noir, in which Belgian parachutists swept into Paulis, in northwest Congo, and then swiftly withdrew. Hoare's contingent was left to provide security in Stanleyville and, over the coming months, to foray throughout much of Orientale Province fighting rebels ("Simbas") and rescuing foreigners who often were being tortured and killed. This was a nasty slog where a little band of mercenaries and ANC units faced frequent ambushes from a sizable Simba force. They had several advantages: they were organized as a cohesive force with dynamic leadership and then received constant air help from the Congolese Air Force (organized and run by CIA and staffed by Cubans often recruited from Bay of Pigs veterans). Improvising daily, these mercenaries suffered significant casualties as they steadfastly pursued the rescue of trapped foreigners while killing countless Simba. The stories of those foreigners that they rescued and the circumstances in which they discovered brutally murdered hostages seemed only to strengthen the resolve of Hoare and his mercenaries. While the Belgians were supportive of Hoare's operations, his basic backers were Prime Minister Tshombe and General Mobutu, both of whom Hoare held in the highest regard. Often the mercenaries established civilian government in the towns they captured. They were also skilled in providing a sense of security that encouraged local tribes to turn versus their Simba invaders. Once the northeast Congo was reasonably secure, Tshombe and Mobutu encouraged Hoare to focus on 'cleaning up' a rebel-infested zone in eastern Congo. By then a lot of of the mercenary contracts had expired. Some of his key men had been killed or badly wounded. A substantial number of Hoare's initial contingent left the Congo, while others signed up to serve another tour with Hoare. Recruitment of hundreds of extra mercenaries became more difficult. Hoare was ruthless in screening fresh recruits and sent a number packing after a rigorous initial interview. His reconstituted mercenary force then set off for months of an extraordinarily difficult military campaign in which the rebels were increasingly better armed and trained. Weapons were flowing in from across the border in Uganda and Burundi and some Cuban 'volunteers' were engaged with the Simbas. Hoare maintained an esprit de corps as his little band of mercenaries, often improvising, endured ambushes and mortar attacks, as they systematically cleared an zone of thousands of square miles. During this constant and risky fighting, Hoare lost a number of his key officers nad noncoms, whose bravery was commonplace. One wonders why these men suffered such hardships and everyday life-and-death situations on a modest mercenary's pay. I can only ascribe this to Hoare's uncommon leadership and the sense of camaraderie that impelled them to war in a strange land with no true prospect of 'victory.' Hoare, at Mobutu's insistence, had extended his contract once. When Hoare's hero, Tshombe, was ousted by President Kasavubu, and then Mobutu,another Hoare hero, initiated a military coup, Hoare decided it was time to package it in. He turned over his mercenary command and departed to South Africa to rejoin his wife and son. CONGO MERCENARY, initially written in 1967, describes a facet of Congolese history that, even today, is known by relatively few observers. While the word 'mercenary' has pejorative connotations in the Western world, the mercenaries that Hoare shaped and commanded bring to mind Henry V's St. Crispin's Day oration: FROM THIS DAY TO THE ENDING OF THE WORLD, BUT WE FEW, WE HAPPY FEW, WE BAND OF BROTHERS; FOR HE TODAY THAT SHEDS HIS BLOOD WITH ME SHALL BE MY BROTHER; BE HE NE'ER SO VILE, THIS DAY SHALL GENTLE HIS CONDITION' AND GENTLEMEN IN ENGLAND NOW-A-BED SHALL THINK THEMSELVES ACCURS'D THEY WERE NOT HERE, AND HOLD THEIR MANHOODS CHEAP WHILES ANY SPEAKS THAT FOUGHT WITH US ON SAINT CRISPIN'S ME PERSONAL OBSERVATIONS Describing the happenings of the 1964-1965 Congolese rebellion reminds me of Akira Kurosawa's classic RASHOMON. Everyone saw it from their own perspective. Lloyd Garrison of the NEW YORK TIME endeavored to write a book on the Congo of the early 1960s. I remember when he called me and lamented that all his sources told a various story. Eventually, he abandoned his Congo book project. I have my own private perspective. I worked in and on the Congo from 1960 to 1966. During the period described my Mike Hoare, I was the Congo analyst in the State Department's INR/Africa (research and intelligence) om May through November 1964, except for vacation and my time back in the Congo, I wrote daily, early morning Congo situation reports for The Secretary, the White House, and about 40 other people in the Washington community. I became a 'point man' for what became the Belgian/U. S. military assault on Stanleyville and Paulis. I early concluded that this was the 'least worst' option to rescue the 3,300 foreigners being held hostage by an increasingly volatile, Stanleyville-based rebel government. In October 1964 I complained to the director of INR/Africa that we were getting no first-hand info from our embassy in Leopoldville on what was event in the complex military efforts to conquer the rebels and to rescue foreign hostages. I volunteered to go into rebel-infested provinces, which I did with a White House/State Department ter the fall of Stanleyville, I volunteered to return to the Congo to gather material for an official history of the Congolese rebellion through November 24, 1964. This I did with a CIA/State Department mandate. During my 1964-1965 trips to the Congo I found that:* Members of the Political Section of the embassy had never ventured outside of Leopoldville to report on what what occurring;* When I returned from my solo sorties into rebel-infested provinces, no one, except for the ambassador (with whom I was residing), expressed any interest in what I had uncovered (including two sacks of documents from the Kindu headquarters of General Olenga, which had been abandoned in amazing haste as Hoare's mercenaries approached);* While I had observed the Cuban pilots of the Congolese Air Force, no info of its role in Congo fighting ever came from the embassy (or from CIA intelligence reports shared with the State Department). The principal objective of my October-November 1964 trips into the Congo hinterland was to determine whether Stanleyville could be captured and the thousands of foreign hostages could be rescued by Hoare's mercenaries approaching from the south. Upon my return to Washington, I emphatically stated "No!". After encountering Hoare's mercenaries in Kindu, I thought it highly probable that this lightly-equipped force could be delayed for hours outside of Stanleyville, during which time virtually all the hostages would be slaughtered. (Though Hoare was confident that he could easily sweep into Stanleyville, in fact his column was delayed for hours by withering machine gun and mortar fire. Without the landing of Belgian paratroopers, persons I later interviewed in Stanleyville and elsewhere unanimously said that the hostages would have been killed without the Belgian/U. S. military action.( I encountered different mercenary groups during my 1964 and 1965 returns to the Congo. Learning about the mercenaries was ancillary to my basic objectives. Still, I gathered some impressions:* In Coquihatville, I encountered a rather rag-tag group of mercenaries led by Lt. Mueller, who stood out because of the Iron Cross he wore. [I was reminded of my written briefing for Governor Averill Harriman, as he prepared to meet with Belgian Foreign Minister Paul-Henri Spaak in early August, only days after the fall of Stanleyville. Based in part on perfect tribal reporting by David Grinwis, who was the CIA representative at our Stanleyville consulate, I concluded that the military insurrection in eastern Congo was spearheaded by Batatela/Bakuso tribesmen under General Olenga. Contrary to U. S. planning ('needed 10,000 units and 140 C-130s'), I concluded that the rigor of this tribal force would dissipate, once it experienced the urban life of Stanleyville and the politics of the rebel government. I advised Harriman that a well-organized group of 35 mercenaries could stop the rebel military move towards Coquilhatville. In fact it was stopped by 17 mercenaries and a tribe of pygmies with poison darts.]* In Kindu, I appeared with an M-16 and a .45. Because I was the only person with a flashlight, I participated in the evening military planning sessions. I was impressed by Hoare and his mercenaries. He seemed to maintain firm discipline regarding keeping weapons clean and cars maintained. I did not hear of any looting. The mercenary rescue of tons of priests and nuns was a remarkable achievement. The ANC was in the process of killing several captured rebels. I chose to stop this. With my M-16 I confronted a platoon of ANC soldiers. After some hesitation, the lieutenant turned over the prisoners. I place them in the back of a jeep, had a mercenary priest riding shot gun help in getting these prisoners to a field hospital and then on a plane to Albertville the next morning.* In March 1965 I was in Paulis. Rebels were close by. I slept in a hut latest inhabited by nuns who had been brutally murdered. My security was an empty beer bottle leaning versus the door and a cocked .45 by my bed.I encountered members of the 53rd Groupement. They were Southern Rhodesian mercenaries. From their tales, I concluded that they were robbers and thugs. One day their cook (who only spoke Lingala) served them the wrong type of potato. The cook was hoisted up on a truck and shot. Later I was with the local Congolese administrator, who had just returned from hiding in the bush. The commander of the 53rd Groupement came by and said hr 'wanted to slay the @#$%!&.' I slipped the safety off my .45 and asked whether he thought that I could slay him before he killed the Congolese.He backed off, at least while I was there. A distinctly various type of mercenary was also in Paulis. This was a group of Europeans. They seemed well organized and were putting armor plating on their vehicles. Hoare's second in command arrived on a C-46 piloted by a Cuban. Carlos, the pilot, misjudged and hit a heavy ant hill. While mercenaries were exchanging with the squad of a C-130,I and several others rescued Hoare's aide from the crumpled C-46 with gas streaming from its fuel tanks. I found much of what Hoare wrote in CONGO MERCENARY highly credible and a fascinating acc of who the mercenaries were and what they accomplished. Hoare was mistaken to ascribe the rebellion to the 'Communists.' I had heavy intelligence to prove that this was not the case, at least through 1964. Arms that seeped across the Sudanese and other borders almost all came from African countries that were endeavoring to aid the rebels. A lot of of these amm may have been of communist origin.Hoare was totally involved in tactical military operations. Thus he was ill informed as to what was transpiring in Leopoldville, Washington, and elsewhere. As a Foreign Service Officer I was appalled by the lack of meaningful military reporting from embassy Leopldville during the months leading up to the recapture of Stanleyville. This silence continued in the subsequent months, when Hoare's mercenaries were pacifying a lot of thousands of square miles of rebel-infested location and rescuing tons of foreign hostages. I conclude with tremendous admiration for what Colonel Hoare and his mercenaries accomplished. I regret that this has not been acknowledged in State Department reporting.

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    Congo Mercenary []  2020-1-20 21:4

    Col. Hoare is a very amazing writer. His book was an interesting look at the conflict in the early days of independence of the former Belgian Congo. The writer did not hesitate to discuss his failures as well as his successes while giving his opinion of the main participants in the Congo's early struggle to emerge from colonial rule. I would recommend this book be included in any study of that period of African history to give the reader a balanced view of the happenings that took place.

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    Congo Ashanti []  2020-7-10 19:49

    "Congo Ashanti" was the 1st lp the trio did after leaving Lee "Scratch" Perry's Blark Ark label after disputes over royalties and not good circulation of their now classic "Heart of the Congos" lp (a very common, sad tale in the melody industry).Columbia records snatched the trio up and from it came this lp. While it has nice moments, it has a very glossy, slick feel about it that is common to huge label releases in any genre, and thus lost part of its credibility in the reggae gardless, there was small method the band without Perry's studio guidance could have come close to matching the power of their prior effort- and Perry mused that even with his support there was small chance...he knew that "Heart of the Congos" was magic.I like a lot of of the songs on here despite having to obtain over the studio dumbfoolery of over-compression and the like to create their songs ready for the radio. While I should give this review fewer than 3 stars, i can not do so based on my love of this trio, and respect for what they tried to accomplish under horrific is lp is for the more rabid fan.

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    Rumba Congo []  2020-2-2 20:57

    I just saw them live in Berkeley latest night, and they were simply awesome to see playing together. The vocal harmonies, Congolese guitar rhythms, accompanying soulful sax, combined with the awesome scene presence of these all star legends created for a most memorable night. I have their Congo Life CD that is hard to stop playing, and latest night at the concert I bought the Rumba Congo one, which is packed with intricate congo rhythms and vocal styles. If you're a lover of globe music, you will love this CD!

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    Congo Life []  2020-1-17 0:35

    If you like the rhythms of salsa, but not the frenetic speed, you will probably have fun these Congolese playing, singing, and dancing "Rumba". Intriguing rhythms, and always happy, upbeat; almost impossible not to smile and begin moving to it..How the Congo in the midst of all its struggle and strife, managed to come up with these folks, and a lot of others like them, is a miracle that I am very grateful for, but do not understand.

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    Congo Mercenary []  2020-1-20 21:4

    Mike Hoare, Congo Mercenary (London: Robert Hall, 1967). A firsthand acc by the head of Commando 5 on a “rabbit shoot” to liberate the eastern Congo (including Stanleyville) from the Congolese rebels. The actual campaign turned out to have been much more difficult and problematical, but showed that in insurgent situations, speed is of the essence in tactical terms, but is most appropriate when coupled with strategic purpose. This work accents discipline and the weeding out “alcoholics, drunks, booze artists, bums and layabouts” who seem drawn to mercenary activity in that (and any other) era. The author also shows how “Column warfare from an infantryman’s point of view is most unsatisfactory.” Rough justice is also dealt out, not just to the “Simbas” but to mercenaries who act up (one who rapes a Congolese woman and then kills her has both of his huge toes shot off by Hoare). Stanleyville is indeed “the “Inner Station” of Conrad’s Heart of Darkness.” The book ends with the military coup of Joseph Mobutu who ousts President Kasavubu and Prime Minister Moise Tshombe. Mobutu would rule the Congo for decades, loot it of billions of dollars and never his mercenaries or his troops enough to hold them from behaving lawlessly. Penny wise and pound [email protected]#$%! would appear.

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    Congo Mercenary []  2020-1-20 21:4

    Was not nearly as interesting as I had thought it might be. It was well worth the read, however.

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    Congo Acoustic []  2020-1-18 23:7

    If you've never had the joy of hearing African famous melody before, this is a unbelievable put to start. Kinshasha (Congo) guitarist Mose Se Sengo lays down a delicious, exquisite hour of melody that... well, if it doesn't bring a smile and create you begin thinking, "let's dance," you're not fully alive. If you can manage to reflect a bit when you're not just grooving to this unbelievable music, you'll begin thinking about the wonderful encomium of cultures that produced it... the interlocking, wonderful cross-rhythms of African drumming, the feedback from the harmonious encounters with Portuguese folk song and Carribean calypso, the electronics that creep in despite the CD's acoustic orientation... delicious, wonderful. The recording is luminous, and conveys the ambience of little club in which you're a specially invited guest. You won't hear soaring, ego-oriented solos or attention-getting vocals; instead, you'll hear an interleaved, communal rhythmic collective statement that works on you and slowly overwhelms you, teaching you that the little variations in the vocals and rhythms attest to a private and spiritual statement that goes far beyond egoistic melody -- oh heck, listen to this CD!!!!!!!! This ROCKS. And it is very beautiful.

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    Congo Ashanti []  2020-7-10 19:49

    If you like the classic "Heart of the Congos" album, you need to pick this up. Too poor about the lame cover art...Sorry to break it to all you cats that think Lee "Scratch" Perry is some supreme-exalted Producer (of course he has lots of brilliant stuff) but there's lots of talented reggae musicians and studio techs, just because they don't have name recognition doesn't mean they don't lay it down first class! This album is hot, Cedric's vocals are passionate and soulful, the band is super tight. Check out the vocals on "Youth Man" and "Nana", this is roots reggae, it does not have the kind of spacey, atmospheric, and in my opinion, over-produced sound of "Heart of the Congos." I don't disparage this "slick" sound like others might, this is a band that was progressing, the idea that they moved on from working with Scratch and "lost credibility within the reggae world" is garbage. Don't be fooled by equating fame with brilliance. This album is brilliant, if you're looking to strengthen your collection and discover some new, classic roots, look no further. Peace.

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    Congo kaleidoscope []  2020-7-17 20:21

    Alice Cobble Henry has written an enlightening acc of Christian missionary activity in the former Belgian Congo from 1932 to 1956. This is an perfect resource for understanding what everyday life was like for the white missionary and the Congolese people. The author went to the Congo in 1932, accompanied by her parents, to marry Robin Cobble who had been laboring there for two years. Together they ministered to the Congolese people, providing medical care and schools. They raised four kids there and Robin Cobble's earthly remains were buried there in 1956.

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    Fury of the Congo [Movie]  2017-10-13 21:51

    Um Bongo. The 6th of Johnny Weissmuller’s forays into Jungle Jim’s khaki shorts proves to be a damp squib. It’s low on ideas and crudely constructed by director William Berke. Ok, lets not beat around the jungle bush, for the very young movie fan there is more than enough here to hold them rooted to the sofa. From hilariously poor spider designs to recycled animal fights, there’s no denying that young eyes can have fun whilst feasting on their burgers. Hell, the plot even has some intelligence to it, even if it’s a touch bonkers as drug lords seek to extract narcotic tinged glands from the Okongo, a half horse/zebra/antelope thingy that the makers have created up. But this is all told one of the weakest of the series and feels old hat as regards familiarity breeding contempt. 4/10

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    Swimming in the Congo []  2020-1-31 0:15

    Lovely, lovely story.

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    Swimming in the Congo []  2020-1-31 0:15

    "Swimming in the Congo" by Margaret Meyers is a very amazing novel that reads like a collection of short stories. It is told in the first-person by a girl, daughter of missionary parents, growing up in the Belgian Congo, circa 1960. The stories are focused on the narrator and her memories of her parents and the local people (Congolese and ex-pats) in and near missionary communities. Problems the seven-year narrator with contain the mix of American Protestant and African traditional beliefs she encounters; the meaning of the equator and scientific reality; and White racism towards the Congolese. Meyers' writing reads well and is simple to like. It would be interesting to see her story continued.

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    Constitution RD Congo [App]  2020-4-13 13:31

    Bien fait... Je versus recommande cette app vehicle elle répond bien

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    Constitution RD Congo [App]  2020-4-13 13:31

    Amazing

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    Christmas in the Congo []  2020-1-23 3:47

    I was expecting an album of African music, ala "Missa Luba". What I got was renditions of a couple of well-known Christmas songs and a few African songs. A lot of the album consisted of Earth Kitt reading African folk tales. That's alright if that's what you're looking for, but it's disappointing if you're buying the album to hear the specific kind of melody for which the Troubadours du Roi Baudouin are known.

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    Congo to Cuba []  2020-9-2 19:11

    Congo to Cuba is a fabulous CD and I ordered it for mates as a gift. I already own a copy and play it combines the BEST of both countries and the melody is awesome!!!

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    Swimming in the Congo []  2020-1-31 0:15

    ... you'll love SWIMMING IN THE CONGO! This is a collection of short stories that reads like a novel. In it, young Grace Birggen, the daughter of an agricultural missionary to the Congo in the 1960's, comes of age along the banks of the Congo River in what is now Zaire. The stories are beautifully written and the descriptions of her childhood in an emerging third-world nation are compelling. It is POISONWOOD without the poison. Yes, there are incidents of imperialism and racism, but those incidents are filtered through Grace's eyes, in much the same method that Scout narrates Boo Radley's and Tom Robinson's stories in TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and so will you.

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    Christmas in the Congo []  2020-1-23 3:47

    If you're looking for something various in terms of holiday music, check out this CD reissue of the 1963 recording Christmas in the Congo, originally issued on the Philips label. Included are 16 Congolese songs performed by Les Troubadours du Roi Baudouin, a boys choir formed by Father Haazen shortly after he arrived in Africa in the early 1950s. Following a tour of Europe, Les Troubadours became world-renowned, resulting in a recording contract with Philips. This was their second release and, since it’s less than 30 minutes, the additional zone has been filled by “Folk Tales of the Tribes of Africa," narrated by the one and only Eartha Kitt, which should please young and old alike. - See more at: [...]

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    Constitution RD Congo [App]  2020-4-13 13:31

    D'abord félicitation à vous Monsieur NDONNA d'avoir penser à réaliser ces applications et elles sont toutes bonnes mais il faut ajouter certaines performances comme par exemple le favori si je lis un article que j'ai beaucoup il n'y a pas moyen de l'ajouter au favori et en plus la barre de recherche il n'a pas moyen de chercher un mot, une phrase ou un article. Veillez à le faire svp pour nous facilités la lecture.

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    Congo to Cuba []  2020-9-2 19:11

    Putalittlemore melody on your CDs!!! Your amazing at what you do just give us a small more!!!

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    Congo to Cuba []  2020-9-2 19:11

    As Cuban and an AFRO CUBAN who has enjoyed our melody for more than 50 years it is never difficult to accept the fact that Africans came to cuba and to all of the caribbean light yrs before slavery took over in amerikka. We brought our culture, language religion and melody with us and even today in 2006 one only has to attention to see that our flava has never changed..even in hip hop..So to say that some people re-africanized the melody anything is a poor choice of words..how can you africanize what is already african?The truth is we as a cuban people identified with the mother land, brought the melody with us and got robbed

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    Constitution RD Congo [App]  2020-4-13 13:31

    amazing and amazing

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    Swimming in the Congo []  2020-1-31 0:15

    A unbelievable book, for all the reasons previous reviewers give. My own kids spent some growing-up years on the Kasai, a huge tributary of the Congo and had some lazy afternoons in a swim hole where we were beautiful sure there were no crocs due to the quick running water. Our time in Congo/Zaire began a few years after the moon landing, after Mobotu changed the names of cities and rivers. Fortunately, I cannot think of any missionaries in our zone who fit the "Madame of the Hard Mouth"! She would not have lasted long where we were--at the invitation and supervision of the national church. But no doubt this may have been a real experience in other mission enclaves in earlier years. It is interesting that the author locations this story toward the end of the 60s, that period following national independence when the power gradually shifted and Hard Mouths were no longer tolerated. Interesting also that she locations one of her first childhood stories, of daydreaming of being Henry Morton Stanley's Girl Friday ("I recognized the devoutly Christian soul beneath his cruelties, his grandiose boastings, and in return he trusted me.") in contrast to one of her last, of the 75-yr-old gardener, Wizamo, who had his hand sawed off as a teenage slave by King Leopold's enforcers on the rubber plantations. Stanley was Leopold's right-hand gunman in opening up the Congo River basin to Leopold's reign of terror. (see King Leopold's Ghost by Adam Hochschild) Grace's coming of age when she leaves childhood behind is also in Wizamo's story, her enlightenment of the true history. Wizamo tells a frightened Grace: "They no for almost killing me, you understand, but I have for sixty years because I didn't work hard enough as slave labor on the mondele's [white's] rubber plantation. I have pulled weeds from your mindele [whites'] gardens and thought of murder. It is well for you, all of you, that you are too strong to be touched." I look forward to reading her 2014 book.

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    Christmas in the Congo []  2020-1-23 3:47

    This CD is a must have for globe melody enthusiast and anyone who wants a special Christmas experience.

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    Congo to Cuba []  2020-9-2 19:11

    one of the best collections of high energy melody ever

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    Congo to Cuba []  2020-9-2 19:11

    as a listener of all sorts of interesting music, this complitation hits the spot. while i'm playing the cd i'm not sure if i'm in cuba or africa, but that doesn't matter. this is a must for those whoe like up tempo latin groove. hitting the repeat button over and over i feel the passion and soul of these artists. putamayo stepped to the plate, usually my only complaint is their compilations are too short, this one goes on......thanks for the groove...pete saloutos

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    Christmas in the Congo []  2020-1-23 3:47

    My parents played this album throughout my childhood every Christmas, and it brings me such joy to hear these songs now. It was an interesting time in America in the early 1960's, when people were exploring melody from other countries often for the first time. For me, this album equals Christmas spirit!

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    Christmas in the Congo []  2020-1-23 3:47

    My mother in law played this when my wife was a child. My wife loved hearing it again. (more so the melody tracks than the story telling tracks).

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    Swimming in the Congo []  2020-1-31 0:15

    and although I grew up in Nigeria, during the 80's, this book brought back so a lot of memories. Not only were her descriptions of the continent breathtakingly vivid, her pre-teen thoughts on topics like the unforgivable sin and sexuality also brought back memories. There is more to being a missionary kid in Africa than the "wildness" and Meyers captures the subtlties with grace and fluidity. Absolutely gorgeous.

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    Constitution RD Congo [App]  2020-4-13 13:31

    I am so satisfied with this

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    Congo to Cuba []  2020-9-2 19:11

    You really cant go wrong with anything from Putumayo

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    Congo to Cuba []  2020-9-2 19:11

    Every chop on this CD is a pleasure. It hits the sweet spot much as Africando's best recordings did. A fine dozens of musicians and styles, and very well place together. Putamayo hits a home run with this collection.

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    Congo to Cuba []  2020-9-2 19:11

    I heard one of the songs at the San Francisco Latin Movie Festival playing as the audience entered for the screening. I could not wait to ask the sound man for the title and I have not been disappointed. The songs I heard that night were Safiatou and the next song. Since I bought the CD earlier this year, I've been hooked. Very bright recording allows me to hear all the nuacnes of the melodic and percussion driven African and Latin music. I amazing find. I'm looking for other releases by these globe artist on this compilation. Go obtain it.

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    Congo to Cuba []  2020-9-2 19:11

    I found this album in, of all places, a Utah info station. They had bonus stuff from Utah, the west and international craftsmen. My husband is Cuban so it caught my eye. We both listen to it over and over, the beat gets under your skin. It is amazing for driving or doing housework. We also appreciated reading about the artists in the enclosed leaflet. If you like Latin melody you'll love this album. I plan on buying more from this company.

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    Swimming in the Congo []  2020-1-31 0:15

    Margaret Meyers, the daughter of a missionary family, grew up in The Congo in the 1960s, and this 1995 collection of short stories was part of her later MFA Thesis at the University of Virginia. Through them, she introduces her lead character, Grace, who views the globe with the freshness of childhood and shares her experiences with the reader. Her father tells her the equator goes right through their property and, at the age of six, she searches for it as if it would be a clearly marked path. Her favorite pastime is swimming in the river, a river she will miss terribly when she is sent off to boarding school a few years later. Her protestant Christianity is unquestioned and she's always exploring her own spirituality as well as making keen observations about the people around her. There are some memorable characters here, from her loving parents to the native Congolese who laugh at the foibles of the missionary families. There are the two spinster women with a secret, an unhappy former ballerina who has problem adapting to her life in Africa, and a Frenchman who loves his garden almost as much as he loves his constantly changing women. Through Grace's young eyes we see the cruelty of racism and the stirrings of independence as political changes are event in the 261 pages this is a quick and enjoyable read, one that I gobbled up in two sittings, letting myself travel to the lush globe of Grace's Congo and view it through her child's eyes. Mainly, it's about the people and she stays away from political analysis. She tells her stories simply and creates an atmosphere, and brings the reader right into her world. If I have any criticism at all, it is that some of the characters appear in just one of the short stories and I wanted to hear more about them as the book went on. But, alas, this is a book of stories, not a novel. I loved this book; it was a little trip into a globe that is now gone and which I will never obtain to know except for my reading. And it sure was an enjoyable journey. Recommended.

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    Christmas in the Congo []  2020-1-23 3:47

    It is amazing to hear what the Troubadors du Roi Baudoin do with Christmas music. A excellent companion for the Missa Luba.

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    Congo to Cuba []  2020-9-2 19:11

    I would give it more than five stars if I could. I was hooked from the first track and it just got better. My favorites are tracks 1,2,3, and 6. This cd had me all over the net looking for more from the artists, especially Balla Tounkara (#6), Chico Alvarez, and Alfredo Valdés.

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    Missa Luba & Christmas in Congo []  2020-1-18 23:7

    Amazing singing,percussion,-rebought it.

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    The Keys to the Congo []  2020-1-22 21:52

    In both vignettes and travel journal format, Irene tells of her Peace Corps experience in Zaire and Malawi, Africa. The imagery she provides makes you feel you are there as she crosses a bamboo plank bridge into her African experience. The book will create you feel wonder and amazement at the rugged beauty of the African continent, and the resilience of its people. At age 46 and later at age 69, Irene gave up a settled prosperous lifestyle in Key West, Florida to create a difference in the lives of others less fortunate by joining the Peace Corps. Through her thoughtful and humor filled writing your eyes visualize her experiences, and you too are there living vicariously through her words. This book is both informative, enjoyable, and will definitely excite your adventurous spirit. Have fun reading it as I urel Borgia, Ph.D.

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    Missa Luba & Christmas in Congo []  2020-1-18 23:7

    First heard this group of young children singing years ago and fell in love with the songs. I finally had to it from the amazing people of Amazon! Now I can listen to it in the vehicle when ank you frances comer

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    The Keys to the Congo []  2020-1-22 21:52

    I enjoyed Irene's experiences in the Peace Corp as I was also in South Africa, and Kiribati in PC. I thank you for this

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    Congo: Congolese Rumba (Rumba Congolaise) []  2020-7-18 19:51

    Classic Congolese rumba revisited. This is the melody as it sounded in its formative years in the 1950s, performed today by fine neo-traditional bands Rumbanella Band and Victoria Bakolo Miziki and two of the amazing surviving singers of that era - Antoine "Likembe Geant" Moundanda and Wendo Kolosoy (Wendo will be touring in the US in 2004).

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    Rwanda: with Eastern Congo (Bradt Travel Guide) []  2020-1-31 0:17

    It is sometimes difficult to get valid info about Rwanda but this tutorial does it all!

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    Stringer: A Reporter's Journey in the Congo []  2020-1-14 19:54

    An interesting memoir of Sundaram's experience in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Having completed school as a brilliant mathmetician, Sundaram gives this up and moves to the DRC to be a journalist. With no training and limited finances, he works his method through DRC hoping to search success as a journalist. Interesting, well-written memoir which provides an examination of DRC much various than the experiences I am having.

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    Stringer: A Reporter's Journey in the Congo []  2020-1-14 19:54

    Most authentic Congo memoir I've read. Although the author is well educated, he doesn't write condescendingly. I doubt he is really short on funds, though he lives like it. Interesting to hear tidbits about the immigrant populations/minority groups in the Congo - other that those from neighboring countries. I especially enjoyed this book because the author did not stop the story every few pages to copy/paste a list of facts, figures, and dates that sound like a reference book, but rather he cleverly worked them into the well-written chapters that don't read like journal entries. Thank you Anjan! I look forward to reading your next book.

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    Voice of Lightness: Congo Classic 1961-1977 []  2020-1-18 23:7

    I heard about this CD set on PRI's unbelievable program "The World". The songs are intricate and Rochereau's voice is beautiful. If you like African music, or would like to be transported to someplace warm and light this cold winter, you definitely wish to add this to your collection!

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    Congo: The Epic History of a People []  2020-1-26 21:10

    DAVID VAN REYBROUCK. CONGO: THE EPIC HISTORY OF A PEOPLE.NY: HarperCollins, 2014.David van Reybrouck has made an perfect history of Congo that is intimate, thorough, and accurate.I. INTIMATE HISTORY The a lot of Congolese, whose words from interviews (mostly from 2008) are introduced in the appropriate historical happenings he is relating, give a amazing intimacy to the book. The author quite correctly calls this “bottom-up” ere are fascinating bits of info one doesn’t usually search in general histories of Congo, such as a description of the travels to Europe and back of Butungu, recorded in Boloki, his own language—the only known text by a Congolese from the nineteenth e stories of the Congolese who accompanied the foreigners who dominate the pages of colonial histories give fresh insights into those happenings. For instance, Disasi Makulo was with George Grenfell when he set off with 400 soldiers of the colonial troops to “chart and pacify the region.” (76) Martin Kabuya told about his grandfather who served in Globe Battle I, in a Belgian-led troops fighting Germans in what is today Tanganyika. Albert Kudjabo, prisoner of the Germans during WW I, gave recordings that are of the only soldier from WW I whose voice we know is Congolese.Even happenings known only from written documents are given an intimate twist. For example, concerning the creation of what became Congo: “No one knew exactly where the borders of Leopold’s empire ere was no natural entity, no historical inevitability, no metaphysical fate that predestined the inhabitants of this zone to become compatriots. There were only two white men, one with a mustache [Stanley], the other with a beard [Leopold], meeting on a summer afternoon somewhere along the North Sea coast to connect in red pencil a few lines on a huge piece of paper.” (38-39)The author integrates visits to Congolese websites and interviews with Congolese with historical facts. For instance, on the section on Kimbanguism, he went himself to Nkamba, headquarters of the movement, and interviewed people there. And as usual, the author has a nuanced and insightful understanding of the growth of this metimes he wanders a bit far from strict history telling, as when he describes in long detail his visit to a famous melody concert in Kinshasa.He describes incredibly fascinating bits of intimate detail, such as that of Mobutu and Lumumba riding about Leopoldville on a motor scooter on Jan. 4, 1959, on their method to check out the ABAKO meeting that the Belgian mayor had cancelled with such grave n Reybrouck personalizes history: “My father was looking out the window. He saw a white Volkswagen Bug coming up the road…Suddenly, a volley of shots rang out…the Volkswagen careened to a e two women—…Madeline and her mate Aline—did not obtain out. Across the fronts of their floral dresses, large red spots were spreading…The Indian blue helmets had apparently taken them for white mercenaries…My father had been an eyewitness to the most popular photograph of the Katangan secession.” (317)With amazing fortitude, he enters the horrendous and frightening Makala prison to interview a man associated with the murder of the former president Laurent Kabila.II. THOROUGH HISTORYSecondly, this is a thorough history. And as Van Reybrouck comes closer to the present, he becomes more detailed. After an introduction to the country and his methods of 16 pages, the prehistorical section is only 12 pages, the early explorations and the Congo Free State 72, the Belgian Congo 166, the First Republic 54, the Mobutu era 114, and Congo since then 162, Then there are notes of the sources, endnotes, an index, and a large bibliography of 22 pages little print, all adding up to a heavy 639 pages. There are nine clear and easy maps. He covers all aspects of the past—economic, political, religious, artistic, sociological, etc. There is even a section on pop music, and its relation to power e description and analysis of the Belgian Congo period, for example, is excellent. He presents the impact of Belgian concepts of “tribe” on the implementation of the control of the colonized population. The impact of ethnographers and medical personnel is explained. After detailed descriptions, the economic aspects are succinctly summarized: “There is no other country in the globe as fortunate as Congo in terms of its natural wealth. During the latest century and a half, whenever acute demand has arisen on the international shop for a given raw material—ivory in the Victorian era; rubber after the invention of the inflatable tire; copper during full-out industrial and military expansion; uranium during the Cold War; alternative electrical energy during the oil crisis of the 1970s; coltan in the age of portable telephonics—Congo has turned out to include large supplies of the coveted commodity… As a rule, not a drop of fabulous profits trickled down to the larger part of the population…Nkasi, who once worked by the sweat of his brow to empty sacs of jewel-laden earth, profited very small indeed from the entire diamond business. Today he is not good as a pauper.” (119-120).The list of people in the acknowledgment section covers many, a lot of of the most illustrious names in the study of Congo, and in the sources and references (bibliography) sections one sees just about every possible credible book on Congo of use to his history of the nation from A to Z.And in presenting a description of sources in the “sources” section, he demonstrates a fine ability to distinguish the strengths and weaknesses of sources concerning the same subject. For instance, of the a lot of books on the subject, he states “No one out to create a serious study of the [Mobutu] era should omit the bulky study by Crawford Young and Thomas Turner, The Rise and Decline of the Zairean [Zairian] State.” (p. 575)III. ACCURATE HISTORYThirdly, this is accurate history. The author pointed out the key reality of the Belgian Congo: that in spite of some reforms of the CFS regime, “Belgium was not answerable to the people of the country. The government was not elected by them, nor did it consult them in any way.” (106) There is a thorough presentation of both the poor and the better parts of life in the Belgian Congo, the Belgian colony. .Of the leaders at the time of independence, Kasavubu, Lumumba, Tshombe, and Mobutu: “none of these men had ever lived under a democracy in their own country…The colonial regime itself was an executive administration.”(283) The following pages read like a murder mystery, as one by one these men are killed or dying, leaving only Mobutu. There is a delicate fine-tuning of how things were going in Congo, contrasting for instance the first decade of Mobutu’s presidency to later years. We lived through those years 1964-1993, and Van Reybrouck’s assessment is right on. It is not only accurate about events, but he captures the atmosphere of the period, and its evolution, with all the ncerning the devastating impact of structural adjustment programs of the IMF, “The IMF was out to reorganize the country, but in fact dismantled it.” (379) The excessive spending on himself by Mobutu is detailed. “Mobutu was a political schemer par excellence….He could be charming, friendly, and funny, but also manipulative, treacherous, and vicious.” (384)Van Reybrouck has a amazing handle on the broad picture and its essential ingredients. For example, of the 2nd Congo Battle starting in 1998: “the conflict was characterized by the aftershocks of the Rwandan genocide, the weakness of the Congolese state, the military vitality of the fresh Rwanda, the overpopulation of the zone around the Amazing Lakes, the permeability of the former colonial borders, the growth of ethnic tension due to poverty, the presence of natural riches, the militarization of the informal economy, the globe demand for mineral raw materials, the local availability of arms, the impotence of the United Nations, and so on…” (442)There is a fascinating portrait of Kinshasa up until 2010 in the latter sections of the r example, on buying off police: “Call it extortion or a form of ultradirect taxation, as long as the government doesn’t the policeman’s wages it won’t stop…A police uniform…guarantees its wearer a regular income, not from on high, but from the bottom up.” (487)There are all sorts of interesting insights, such as the rivalries between the different musical groups, and their supportive relation with the beer companies, and to the strong politicians, including Mobutu and Kabila. And too, there are insights on the a lot of churches, including those started or influenced by American evangelists, including Jimmy Swaggart. “At l’Armée de l’Eternel, young women ten, twenty or fifty dollars to have the preacher, Général Sony Katua ‘Rockman,’ perform the laying on of hands and so support them to search a husband, become pregnant, or obtain a visa for Europe. Wasn’t that brazen money-grubbing at the expense of desperate people?” (492) The leader of one Pentecostal church urged his members: “Let everyone who loves Jesus and Kabila stand up and clap…The Catholic Church watched it all from a distance and shook its head.” (496) “The ‘post-colonial trinity’ consisted of a corrupt political caste that entered an alliance with newfangled religions and pop stars raised on high by the business world.” (494)He described how Kabila, since 2006 election has followed the path of Mobutu, using violence and repression. In the final sections, Van Reybrouck visited the battle location of eastern Congo, and the Congo community in China, where a constant going and coming of merchants takes place. He compares the Lower Congo of yesterday with its current influx of Chinese and their e tremendous amount of Chinese involvement in Congo is detailed. And the final chapter actually takes put in China, in the city of Guangzhou. There the large Congolese population, estimated at two or three thousand, is involved mainly in trade with Congo in ways picturesquely outlined by the author.Unchauvinistic authorIn all this, Van Reybrouck is an unchauvinistic Belgian. For instance, “Leopold had sworn to place an end to the Swahilo-Arab slave trade, but in essence there was no difference between the life of a Central African domestic slave on the Arab peninsula and a boy in the household of a European official in Congo.” (62) After heart-wrenching descriptions of the atrocities of the Congo Free State, the author states “Leopold II had, at least nominally, set out to eradicate Afro-Arabic slave trading, but had replaced it with an even more horrendous system.” (94)The not good work conditions in the mines and in the fields of Congo in the earlier colonial period are described (as well as better conditions later). On the disorder right after independence: “Belgium had granted Congo independence in to avoid a colonial war, but it got one anyway. And it was its own stupid fault.” (296)The writing of this bookVan Reybrouck’s father arrived in Congo the first time in 1961, to work on the railroad in Katanga (Likasi). The author’s first trip to Congo was in 2003. He eventually took ten trips to Congo. He finished writing and had the book published in the original Flemish in 2010, so unfortunately does not cover the 2011 elections and happenings since then. The perfect English translation (by Sam Garrett) was published in all ErrorsNo book can avoid an occasional slip-up, but in these 639 pages errors of either content or typos are almost impossible to find. He does use some passé vocabulary: native, Pygmy, tribe, and jungle. That may be the fault of his translator, though not necessarily is is the first time to hear Mt. Ruwenzori called Mt. Stanley (12). A vestige of the Belgian educational system?It is doubtful that manioc was “more nutritious” than plantain or yams. (23)The Lualaba is not “unnavigable” except in certain parts (34)The Belgian Congo shared no border with Cameroon. That was Congo (RC). (130)The Kwilu revolt lasted until 1965, not 1964 (321).The analysis of Tutsi/Hutu sociology is a bit old school (p. 350 ff), and could be refined by the studies of Vansina and Newbury among others.I think the Air Zaïre joke on p. 390 was a play on the word “vole” as steal and ing the initial rather than the full first name of the author in the bibliography led to some possible mistaken identities. For example, I doubt that Janssens, E 1905 and 1979 are the same. (606) He confounds Stengers and Stearns (613)Minor typos/errors (page/paragraph)Bandundu (14/2)Ndombe (155/1)century (308/1) nzadi (332/1)Resume should be recourse (351/5)Tshisekedi was (434/2)Lyrical, dramatic, colourful historyVan Reybrouck is gifted with descriptive charm in the recounting of his adventures: “The jeep rattles its method through the demilitarized zone…We see more people out on the road. Women carrying yellow water tubs on their back, men leading reddish-brown cattle, boys with wooden bicycles loaded with sugarcane, bananas, or charcoal…” (518)He waxes lyrical at the end, summarizing centuries of Congolese culture and history: “It is no longer the sound of the slit drum that spread the news from village to village, no longer the dull thump of the tom-tom, no longer the crack of the whip, not the pealing of the mission bells, not the thunder of the train or the rattling of the drill in the mineshaft, no, it is no longer the ticking of the telegraph, the crackle of the radio or the cheering of the people that sounds the nation’s heartbeat today. It is not in the stamping of manioc in the mortar, not in the slap of water versus the canoe’s hull. The heart of this country is not in the rattle of weapons in the jungle, not in the table pounding versus the wall while a woman screams that she never wanted this, e fresh Congo reverberates to a various tone, the fresh Congo sings in the arrival hall of an airport thrumming with noise. It is the sound of tape, brown rolls of tape around packages and boxes, tape that screams as it is unrolled and grunts as it is torn….” (554)ConclusionAs Van Reybrouck returns at the end to Congo from China, he underlines the importance of Congo in globe history: “In the early twentieth century the rubber policies gave rise to one of history’s first major humanitarian campaigns. During both globe battles Congolese soldiers contributed to crucial victories on the African continent. In the 1960s it was in Congo that the Cold Battle in Africa began, and that the first large-scale UN operation was held…Congolese history has helped to determine and form the history of the world. The battles of 1998 and 2003 prompted the largest and most costly peacekeeping mission ever, as well as the first joint military effort by the European Union…the 2006 elections were the most complex ever organized by the international community. The International Criminal Court is currently establishing invaluable jurisprudence with the prosecution of its first defendants—three men from Congo. Clearly, the history of Congo has on any number of occasions played a crucially necessary role in the tentative definition of an international globe order. The contract with China, accordingly, is a major milestone in a restless globe in motion.” (555-6)Thus David Van Reybrouck ends a book on Congo’s history with flourish, a history that is intimate, thorough, and accurate.

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    Congo: The Epic History of a People []  2020-1-26 21:10

    Congo is an "up close and personal" kind of history book weaving anecdotes about people interviewed by the author into the timeline of Belgium's former colony that was truly illuminating, though a bit uneven, which may be due to limits on his source material. Reading the book for research, I was most interested in the Katangan Secession, but found treatment of that period beautiful thin. Van Reybrouck's private connection to the country comes through in the writing (his father worked on the railroads there) and I have to thank him for discovering the title of my next novel in his book.

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    Congo: Democratic Republic . Republic (Bradt Travel Guides) []  2020-2-7 18:56

    I have been interested in traveling to the Congo for ages and this is the first tutorial book Ive seen. I just received it earlier this week and I hold pouring over it. I am amazed by the research and writing. Even though the Congo is an extreme travel destination, the book is as readable as any tutorial to India or Guatemala. Because things are always changing in the Congo it's impressive that the author could place as much into concrete text as he did. A lot of it is "you'll have to see how it is when you arrive" but the color and info really support to create the journey more imaginable. I think this book will come in very handy next year when I finally visit!

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    Congo: Democratic Republic . Republic (Bradt Travel Guides) []  2020-2-7 18:56

    Very Goos

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    Stringer: A Reporter's Journey in the Congo []  2020-1-14 19:54

    I bought this book for my fresh kindle after hearing Anjan Sundarum on the Jon Stewart show. So glad I did. A few years ago Sundarum, a math student at Yale, of Indian descent and born in Dubai, decided to change his path and immerse himself in the Congo, aka the Belgian Congo under King Leopold and Zaire in the reign of Mobutu, who had assassinated, with CIA approval, Patrice Lumumba, the country's best hope for a true democracy. This is the Congo backstory that Sundarum uses as his ndarum chose a living arrangement with a family in one of Kinshasa's slums (he had no for a amazing hotel room, nor did he wish one), slowly developed his contacts, and became a stringer for the Associated Press, traveling to locations in the lawless gold and diamond-rich country where necessary journalists never ventured.What he produced in "Stringer" is far more than a tale of a young man's adventure. It is an illuminating acc of how, and why, one African country blessed with amazing natural riches has continually failed to lift its people out of poverty. The causes are complex. Occasionally I found Sundarum's reasoning a bit too pat. But he succeeds brilliantly in explaining the Congo like no other writer I've read.

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    Stringer: A Reporter's Journey in the Congo []  2020-1-14 19:54

    This honest and disturbing acc of a young man's determination to place himself where things were happening, i.e., in the situation of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where greatest danger lay, to establish his career as a journalist. It info the unfortunate effect of the Congolese determination to push back versus outsiders who would exploit the region's rich resources and simple path to leadership for those who promise to do that and quickly enrich the country's not good -- who, when elected, are quickly corrupted by the absolute power and wealth available to those who collaborate with the exploiters.

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    MBOTE!: Lives transformed in the African Congo []  2020-1-28 0:41

    I was astonished at the method Orv and Rub were able to take care of 20-40 children, days away from supplies, meet their academic needs, as well as emotional needs. Rub found that her memories of her mother's meals, cooking from scratch, were helpful. And Orv had a lot of an ingenious way of keeping the school supplied with protein, thanks to his growing up on a farm. Inspiring!

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