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    Data-Driven Decision Making and Dynamic Planning []  2019-12-18 20:45

    Informative, resourceful, this book has its own data bank explainingdata terms. Offers examples and model tactics includingplaning meetings offering squad building and ANK HOPE PHD for GLOBE CONSULTATIVE REVIEW FOUNDATION

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    Schools and Data: The Educator's Guide for Using Data to Improve Decision Making []  2020-1-8 18:26

    The book itself is OK in regards to being the correct item ordered, but there is a large rip in the inseam of one section inside the book. It should have been discounted more.

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    Schools and Data: The Educator's Guide for Using Data to Improve Decision Making []  2020-1-8 18:26

    Great

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    Schools and Data: The Educator's Guide for Using Data to Improve Decision Making []  2020-1-8 18:26

    I taught a section on statistics to educators back in 2001 and the textbook we used was a "statistics without the statistics" coursepack which failed to satisfy anyone. I am certain, however, that if I had Dr. Creighton's Schools and Data, my students would have felt more comfortable and learned a amazing more. With its specific examples for the schools and lack of jargon this volume definitely fills a need in regards to ubiquitous Ed School quantitative research syllabi. It not only explains statistics like t tests, z scores, and correlation coefficients, but it also provides perfect rationale for where and how they should be used in our schools. Such illumination is most welcome as a lot of teachers-to-be think statistical measurement is a waste of time. Dr. Creighton shows readers exactly how to use the SPSS and GB-STAT programs--down to the exact functions to enable and click--which will create performing calculations and determinations far easier than most people expect. We live in a time wherein the public is gradually starting to explore the importance of the phrase "research based" so a book like this is invaluable as a means to bettering the education of kids as it helps to separate the amazing from the trendy when it comes to instructional way (not to mention all the other ways in which statistical analysis could improve the functioning of the schools as well). It was an perfect buy.

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    Schools and Data: The Educator's Guide for Using Data to Improve Decision Making []  2020-1-8 18:26

    Amazing work for data analysis.

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    Schools and Data: The Educator's Guide for Using Data to Improve Decision Making []  2020-1-8 18:26

    Thank you. Excellent condition.

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    Schools and Data: The Educator's Guide for Using Data to Improve Decision Making []  2020-1-8 18:26

    The book looks like its never been used! I think that's great... Also the text is simple to read and understand

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    Schools and Data: The Educator's Guide for Using Data to Improve Decision Making []  2020-1-8 18:26

    Perfect book.

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    Schools and Data: The Educator's Guide for Using Data to Improve Decision Making []  2020-1-8 18:26

    Simple read!!!! I learned a lot.

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    Data-Based Decision Making (Essentials for Principals) []  2020-1-22 18:33

    This book is a guideline to map out constructive plans for schools to target their improvement and scientifically aim for the bullseye of you target.

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    Statistics for Business: Pearson New International Edition: Decision Making and Analysis []  2020-9-24 19:26

    Pros: The text itself does an perfect job at presenting primary concepts and examples, and relating the material to realistic scenarios as one encounters in the business globe (quality control, political polling, etc.) The starting point of the text is appropriate for those with no prior knowledge of statistics or, perhaps, data presentation. Thus, the first chapters aren't exactly page turners. Nonetheless, I search Stine's later chapters (14/30 onwards) provide a amazing shelf companion for those occasionally needing to refresh their knowledge of different tests and inference ns: My main problem with this *Kindle edition* comes from the fact that a relatively huge number of issues and exercises at the end of chapters call for datasets on a CD which is not supplied with this digital version. Sadly, the publisher's www service is of small support here. If only there existed some sort of technology that would let people to files remotely...

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    Statistics for Business: Pearson New International Edition: Decision Making and Analysis []  2020-9-24 19:26

    Exactly as advertised.

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    Statistics for Business: Pearson New International Edition: Decision Making and Analysis []  2020-9-24 19:26

    Needed book for college statistics class. Was exactly as described. Can't comment on the material because I despise statistics, but I passed the class.

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    Statistics for Business: Pearson New International Edition: Decision Making and Analysis []  2020-9-24 19:26

    Amazing book with helpful exercises an comprehensive content.

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    Statistics for Business: Pearson New International Edition: Decision Making and Analysis []  2020-9-24 19:26

    Useless info never used any of it just powerpoints

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    Statistics for Business: Pearson New International Edition: Decision Making and Analysis []  2020-9-24 19:26

    Really amazing book

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    Statistics for Business: Pearson New International Edition: Decision Making and Analysis []  2020-9-24 19:26

    The organization of this book (or lack thereof) was really confusing. The concepts aren't thoroughly covered/well explained. Even the end-of-chapter issues had wrong answers and weren't clear in what they were asking. My professor even hates the book, but the department chose it.

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    Statistics for Business: Pearson New International Edition: Decision Making and Analysis []  2020-9-24 19:26

    This book is really good, very helpfull. Beware of certain mistakes in it though. Also, the hardcover ver has Z-score and t-score tables. This ver doesn't!

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    Statistics for Business: Pearson New International Edition: Decision Making and Analysis []  2020-9-24 19:26

    I passed, thanks to the support from this book!

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    Statistics for Business: Pearson New International Edition: Decision Making and Analysis []  2020-9-24 19:26

    This was a fantastically-designed textbook with amazing graphics and layout for the visual learner. I kept a copy of my own even after the class was over.

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:7

    amazing condition

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:5

    Thank You!

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:6

    amazing condition

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology) []  2020-2-1 20:5

    Thank You!

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:6

    Very simple book to follow!

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:7

    Very simple book to follow!

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:5

    amazing condition

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    Real-World Data Mining: Applied Business Analytics and Decision Making (FT Press Analytics) []  2019-12-24 20:1

    Took a course where this was needed reading. Delen is a brilliant guy, I just [email protected]#$%! filled in the gaps better. Read it and you'll see, 4 stars!

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology) []  2020-2-1 20:5

    Very simple book to follow!

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:5

    If you are trying to understand data-driven decision making within the educational context, this author and this book should be on your non-negotiable must read list.

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:7

    Thank You!

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:5

    A useful text for considering when and how to create the best use of data to tutorial instruction change, school change, and district change.

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:6

    If you are trying to understand data-driven decision making within the educational context, this author and this book should be on your non-negotiable must read list.

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:6

    Thank You!

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:7

    If you are trying to understand data-driven decision making within the educational context, this author and this book should be on your non-negotiable must read list.

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology) []  2020-2-1 20:5

    If you are trying to understand data-driven decision making within the educational context, this author and this book should be on your non-negotiable must read list.

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    Real-World Data Mining: Applied Business Analytics and Decision Making (FT Press Analytics) []  2019-12-24 20:1

    Beautiful amazing book. It could've been a small more detailed but it's amazing overall.

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:7

    A useful text for considering when and how to create the best use of data to tutorial instruction change, school change, and district change.

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:5

    Very simple book to follow!

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    Transforming Teaching and Learning Through Data-Driven Decision Making (Classroom Insights from Educational Psychology Book 0) []  2020-12-22 20:6

    A useful text for considering when and how to create the best use of data to tutorial instruction change, school change, and district change.

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    Principles of Risk Analysis: Decision Making Under Uncertainty []  2019-12-24 20:1

    there are not a lot of books that obtain into this topic as does this one. the print quality is a bit on the down side, but the contents are solid and worth the of the book.

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    Principles of Risk Analysis: Decision Making Under Uncertainty []  2019-12-24 20:1

    Excelent book!!!

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    Principles of Risk Analysis: Decision Making Under Uncertainty []  2019-12-24 20:1

    OK, I’m continuing in my graduate program and the first text was lost in a move, so I had to it again. There’s nothing wrong with the content, it’s a comprehensive overview of the subject. However, this second copy has a completely broken binding. My class starts in just a few days, so I don’t have time for an exchange. I guess I got a deal, given the list price, but spending over $150, one would expect the quality of the binding to be sufficient to keep the text together for at least a term. It’s going to be in pieces after one use.

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    Network Meta-Analysis for Decision-Making (Statistics in Practice) []  2020-7-12 18:39

    Amazing book

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    Principles of Risk Analysis: Decision Making Under Uncertainty []  2019-12-24 20:1

    amazing Book with amazing Information!! a book that gets into the weaves of Risk.

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    Principles of Risk Analysis: Decision Making Under Uncertainty []  2019-12-24 20:1

    Great!

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    Elements of Critical Thinking: A Fundamental Guide to Effective Decision Making, Deep Analysis, Intelligent Reasoning, and Independent Thinking []  2019-12-18 20:36

    I expected a well-written academic work on the topic of critical thinking, one which would both explain the act of critical thinking in a sophisticated method and provide helpful tools to grow therein.What I got was a poorly organized book, bereft of real, thought-provoking content, and oozing with useless platitudes that restate what any somewhat-educated reader would already know too well. I counted a lot of grammatical, formatting, and spelling reover, the man is clearly biased and hopelessly confused on moral and spiritual matters. On page 70 he endorses moral relaltivism, but a few pages later condemns the Third Reich as objectively evil. He constantly berates the reader with evolutionary propaganda, and even (at the book's end) expects us to believe that creationism is incorrect because he believes the design argument by analogy to be a false analogy (incorrectly), and yet provides no reason not waste time on this book. I am confused as to how it is so high on Amazon's list for books on this verbs 14:7: Go from the presence of a foolish man, when thou perceivest not in him the lips of knowledge.

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    Elements of Critical Thinking: A Fundamental Guide to Effective Decision Making, Deep Analysis, Intelligent Reasoning, and Independent Thinking []  2019-12-18 20:36

    This book is an perfect adumbration of critical thinking techniques in general. However, in chapter 8 the author uses an argument versus gun control as an example of formal (Aristotelian) logic. How ironic would it be if the author of this book on critical thinking voted for Donald Trump?! I mean, anything is possible at this point.I should also mention that the author, ironically, does not seem to understand formal logic. For example, he doesn't seem to understand what Affirming The Consequent and Denying The Antecedent are. Affirming The Consequent takes the form: if A, then B; B, therefore A. This assumes that only cause A leads to result B. That is, it assumes that the converse is also true. But what if cause C also leads to result B? Therefore, if B, then either A or C. This formal fallacy occurs because a person fails to consider that more than one "if" can effect in a "then".Denying The Antecedent is basically the negative ver of Affirming The Consequent. It would take the form: If A, then B; not A, therefore, not B. The issue with this form, again, is that is assumes that there is only one cause for B. What if there were more than one cause for B? Then even if not A, then there could still be B. For example, if C, then B. In this case, we would say if either A or C, then B. Not A, then, would not be enough information. We would need to know the status of C, as well. This is the formal fallacy of Denying The recapA proper form would be the following:If A, then B; B, therefore A.OrIf A, then B; not B, therefore, not is must be true, because an A always results in a B, so if there's no B, there's no r instance: If the sun is out, it is day. It is not day, therefore, the sun is not out. This is a proper firming The Consequent and Denying The Antecedent effect from attempting to take any form other than the two proper proper forms:If A, then B; not A, therefore not B. (Denying The Antecedent)If A, then B; B, therefore A. (Affirming The Consequent)Both of the latter are fallacious. They assume that A is the only cause of B.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-2-1 19:26

    This is more interesting than other Hollins' productions I've bought (and didn't like -- they've been removed from the marketplace.)At least the sentences are a small bit more interesting... but at times truly bizarre. (Talking about what reversible decisions are ,comparing them, a non-reversible decision is "shaving your cat"... say what? I'm wondering if this wasn't spun from "skinning a cat.") At times the adjectives seem like someone went thru and randomly used something to replace one adjective with a related one -- but not one I would assume a native English speaker would ever me of the content -- which seemed, at times, gratuitously added to fatten the ebook -- seemed like it was spun from other content.What I like best -- the summaries at the end of the chapters of the mental ems like "mental models" are the subject du jour... as there are at least two other books coming out about it (with some of them starting from a related put -- a 1994 Commencement Speech at USC by Warren Buffett's well-regarded partner, Charlie Munger) -- and another one by another prolific author in the private development ter having gone thru the summaries and then gone back if the summaries weren't sufficient to provide clarity, there were some things which were just plain wrong... or e first is the one which I mention in the headline. Confirmation bias is talked about as if it's a conscious choice. It's not. You can know all you wish about conbias and it's not going to stop you from doing it. It's hard to even see it in yourself,, and it takes quite a bit of humility to even start to see a bit of it. (Which is why political discussions tend to go off the rail.)Confirmation bias is part of the human condition. It's as much a part of us as our visual blindspots. It serves self-protective functions in the psyche -- very powerful ones at that.Okay, so that's #1.#2 -- Kahneman's System #2 thinking. Anyone who represented system #2 thinking in such an incomplete method has NEVER read Kahneman. While system #2 is more thoughtful, it, too, has shortcomings. (UGH!).I doubt Kahneman would recognize the descriptions of system #1 and system #2 from the description in this book. They are that far off, dumbed down and trivialized.I'm of mixed feelings about this. The summaries are helpful. The summary of all of the models at the end are just about all you need. There's so much unnecessary fat in this book (which is amusing, in a very cynical way; that is -- in wondering how these sentences or analogies were come up with. But you may not have the same curiosity I have in reverse engineering how people make stuff, like I do.)This MIGHT even be worth $3.99 to you. The Charlie Munger premise is a amazing one. Whether this is the best put to acquire extra mental models (many of which you've probably already heard) is questionable.If this is a subject of interest to you, google around a bit, look at other book descriptions, check out wikipedia.And if you're really up to it -- read Kahneman's "Thinking Quick and Slow." There's so much there to chew on, which goes far beyond the system 1 and system 2 thinking... it's well worth the read. It's probably one of the most profound books I've read (which I did back in 2014).You will learn a lot more about clear thinking, and how we humans obtain distorted views of the world, than probably any collection of mental models will give you.Updated: while doing some research on other topics, I see the book by Shane Parrish will cover 109 mental models ... and you can actually search the list on his blog at fs dot blog. Some with articles (if I had to guess... more than 30.)While mental models are indeed powerful, one of the things to recognize is that models DELETE information. It's necessary to recognize both the strengths and weaknesses of models (which this book does not do.) Some models are going to work better in some knowledge domains better than re models is just a scratch into the surface of thinking and making better decisions. Without the wisdom that comes from weaknesses and strengths, they can lead you in the wrong direction if used incorrectly.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-2-1 19:26

    The book is well written. I liked the understandable language the author used. It wasn't too long or too short. Most models of the book are useful to know and I am a small bit better thinker after reading the book. However, it wasn't perfect. For example, models 27 and and 28 Pareto Principle are both forms of power law distributions. Things should be created as easy as possible, but no more simpler. Why separate models?Book also doesn't have enough synthesis. It has some in the form of five separate parts that can be seen as five coherent ensembles, but that is not enough. These models are more closely similar than book shows. If you are not familiar with these models before you read the book, some of the necessary relationships between models are missed. For example, System 1 that is represented in the model 12 is the reason why people overestimate the meaning of a Black Swan that is represented in the model 7.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-2-1 19:26

    I am reading 5 books right now on improving thinking through structured techniques. I like this book because the models are diverse, the book is short, and the latest chapter could be used like a roledex for thinking. It is not as paradigm breaking as other books when it comes to ideas but it is pragmatic with amazing roi on the reading time. I also reccomend hard copy books or e books vice audio. These books works best when you take notes and reflect.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-8-1 18:38

    This book draws on a very big, powerful, and necessary conceptual assumption that I have found invaluable. That is the concept that we can and should envision thinking in terms of using representations (such as models and rules) to organize our ideas, focus our attention, and support explain our actions. This aligns very well with the pragmatist philosophy of education in terms of learning to think by using concepts more effectively as tools and with the psychological research into the use of models in terms of “mindware” that helps us think more effectively. The idea of extracting the best mental models from the different disciplines and learning to adopt them skillfully and appropriately to our own thinking is a particularly promising one that I agree with strongly. The book starts out very powerful with an excerpt from Charlie Munger’s inspiring popular speech about mental at’s why I was so dismally disappointed by this truly poor book. Not badly written, just very badly researched. It is so full of misunderstandings, misrepresentations, and misconceptions of the models it describes that I found myself struggling just to obtain through it even though I was excited by the theme of the book. It reads as if the examples and descriptions were drawn from skimming random web pages rather than reading the books that describe the models and examples in re, I realize that we’re often trying to generalize here from a specific discipline to a template we can apply more broadly, we’re not trying to master the disciplines these models are drawn from. And arguably the book may succeed in doing that sometimes. But the explanations of the models frequently use examples that don’t even create sense in light of the method the models are used in their original disciplines. That’s not promising. The author uses the example of a mode to illustrate regression toward the mean, which doesn’t work in a lot of cases, making it a particularly poor example. He admits to not understanding much math, as if that’s a amazing thing for writing a book about models, but that’s not the problem. It’s the ability to explain the models to other people that is necessary here. And that’s what is done so poorly. Unfortunately the issue isn’t limited to just math. Using the story of the black swans to test to create a point about the value of drawing on statistical likelihood is another example of a bizarrely inappropriate literary device the author relies on. The story has generally been used to create the opposite point, in particular by Taleb whom he cites regarding the idea. Taleb’s point is that what we see most of the time is not necessarily what we should always expect, making this a particularly confusing choice for explaining how the models of statistical distributions should be used to support us understand the likelihood of ese are not exceptions, the book is full of examples that seem to have been drawn at random by skimming web articles about famous books without actually reading those books. If the purpose was to illustrate that someone who doesn’t do the homework can still manage to explain models they only superficially understand, it may succeed at that aspiration. But I’m concerned that actually learning to use these models for more than trivial issue solving and decision making might take a better understanding of them than this book provides. It isn’t a poor list of models, although it seems somewhat arbitrary in places, it’s mostly the explanations of the models that I found weak, superficial, and confusing. I strongly recommend the concept the book is based upon but I’d be surprised if most people learned much about actually using these mental models from reading this book, except perhaps by accident in some cases. It isn’t hard to search amazing books about mental models I can recommend instead because they give a better sense of the models themselves. These would contain for a begin Twenty Thinking Tools by Phillip Cam which focuses particularly on fundamental tools for reasoning together, The Philosopher’s Toolkit by Julian Baggini which focuses on the tools for analysis of ideas, Mindware by Richard Nisbett, and Foresman’s Critical Thinking Toolkit.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-8-1 18:38

    I found this an simple and clear read. It reinforced and expanded a very practical array of models that one can immediately apply to my everyday life and create me a more decisive, courageous and clearer ry satisfied to have read this and it will be simple to refer back to models to reread and reinforce.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-9-16 18:47

    This is more interesting than other Hollins' productions I've bought (and didn't like -- they've been removed from the marketplace.)At least the sentences are a small bit more interesting... but at times truly bizarre. (Talking about what reversible decisions are ,comparing them, a non-reversible decision is "shaving your cat"... say what? I'm wondering if this wasn't spun from "skinning a cat.") At times the adjectives seem like someone went thru and randomly used something to replace one adjective with a related one -- but not one I would assume a native English speaker would ever me of the content -- which seemed, at times, gratuitously added to fatten the ebook -- seemed like it was spun from other content.What I like best -- the summaries at the end of the chapters of the mental ems like "mental models" are the subject du jour... as there are at least two other books coming out about it (with some of them starting from a related put -- a 1994 Commencement Speech at USC by Warren Buffett's well-regarded partner, Charlie Munger) -- and another one by another prolific author in the private development ter having gone thru the summaries and then gone back if the summaries weren't sufficient to provide clarity, there were some things which were just plain wrong... or e first is the one which I mention in the headline. Confirmation bias is talked about as if it's a conscious choice. It's not. You can know all you wish about conbias and it's not going to stop you from doing it. It's hard to even see it in yourself,, and it takes quite a bit of humility to even start to see a bit of it. (Which is why political discussions tend to go off the rail.)Confirmation bias is part of the human condition. It's as much a part of us as our visual blindspots. It serves self-protective functions in the psyche -- very powerful ones at that.Okay, so that's #1.#2 -- Kahneman's System #2 thinking. Anyone who represented system #2 thinking in such an incomplete method has NEVER read Kahneman. While system #2 is more thoughtful, it, too, has shortcomings. (UGH!).I doubt Kahneman would recognize the descriptions of system #1 and system #2 from the description in this book. They are that far off, dumbed down and trivialized.I'm of mixed feelings about this. The summaries are helpful. The summary of all of the models at the end are just about all you need. There's so much unnecessary fat in this book (which is amusing, in a very cynical way; that is -- in wondering how these sentences or analogies were come up with. But you may not have the same curiosity I have in reverse engineering how people make stuff, like I do.)This MIGHT even be worth $3.99 to you. The Charlie Munger premise is a amazing one. Whether this is the best put to acquire extra mental models (many of which you've probably already heard) is questionable.If this is a subject of interest to you, google around a bit, look at other book descriptions, check out wikipedia.And if you're really up to it -- read Kahneman's "Thinking Quick and Slow." There's so much there to chew on, which goes far beyond the system 1 and system 2 thinking... it's well worth the read. It's probably one of the most profound books I've read (which I did back in 2014).You will learn a lot more about clear thinking, and how we humans obtain distorted views of the world, than probably any collection of mental models will give you.Updated: while doing some research on other topics, I see the book by Shane Parrish will cover 109 mental models ... and you can actually search the list on his blog at fs dot blog. Some with articles (if I had to guess... more than 30.)While mental models are indeed powerful, one of the things to recognize is that models DELETE information. It's necessary to recognize both the strengths and weaknesses of models (which this book does not do.) Some models are going to work better in some knowledge domains better than re models is just a scratch into the surface of thinking and making better decisions. Without the wisdom that comes from weaknesses and strengths, they can lead you in the wrong direction if used incorrectly.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-9-16 18:47

    I was astounded by the quality and presentation of the material in this book. Not only did I search myself recommending it before I finished it, I will be reading it again and referencing it frequently until I have all the models easily at hand for my use. Bravo! Extremely well done!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-9-16 18:47

    I found this an simple and clear read. It reinforced and expanded a very practical array of models that one can immediately apply to my everyday life and create me a more decisive, courageous and clearer ry satisfied to have read this and it will be simple to refer back to models to reread and reinforce.

    0  


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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-11-22 18:33

    The book is well written. I liked the understandable language the author used. It wasn't too long or too short. Most models of the book are useful to know and I am a small bit better thinker after reading the book. However, it wasn't perfect. For example, models 27 and and 28 Pareto Principle are both forms of power law distributions. Things should be created as easy as possible, but no more simpler. Why separate models?Book also doesn't have enough synthesis. It has some in the form of five separate parts that can be seen as five coherent ensembles, but that is not enough. These models are more closely similar than book shows. If you are not familiar with these models before you read the book, some of the necessary relationships between models are missed. For example, System 1 that is represented in the model 12 is the reason why people overestimate the meaning of a Black Swan that is represented in the model 7.

    0  


  • 0

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-11-22 18:33

    I already had a book on mental models, but it was so huge and complex that every time I started reading it, I got overwhelmed and would place it down.Hollins' book is straight to the essentials. I absolutely loved it. One of the best I've read from inking clearly is the ultimate skill. And this book has already helped me begin thinking more clearly and making wiser decisions. I'll be getting the sequel. Thanks, Peter!

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-11-22 18:33

    One of the most interesting and fun to follow books that I have read regarding the method our mind can support us (or trick us) in various aspects of life. It provides you a amazing overview of what mental models are, and how a lot of of them can create your life easier, if applied correctly. It is not a deep-theoretical book (if you are looking for that, better go for specific books by researchers on each of the mental models covered), but applying one of the mental models provided from the book: it gives you a amazing overview and ready to be applied principles, that for most people should be enough. I really liked the method it is written, and some of the models were really interesting. I think it is a amazing starting point to know better about the specifics of some of the models and principles discussed, but applying the Pareto Principle and the Law of Diminishing Returns: "20% of resources will aid you in achieve the 80% of results". This book is part of that 20%.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-11-26 18:20

    I was astounded by the quality and presentation of the material in this book. Not only did I search myself recommending it before I finished it, I will be reading it again and referencing it frequently until I have all the models easily at hand for my use. Bravo! Extremely well done!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-10-4 18:23

    The book is well written. I liked the understandable language the author used. It wasn't too long or too short. Most models of the book are useful to know and I am a small bit better thinker after reading the book. However, it wasn't perfect. For example, models 27 and and 28 Pareto Principle are both forms of power law distributions. Things should be created as easy as possible, but no more simpler. Why separate models?Book also doesn't have enough synthesis. It has some in the form of five separate parts that can be seen as five coherent ensembles, but that is not enough. These models are more closely similar than book shows. If you are not familiar with these models before you read the book, some of the necessary relationships between models are missed. For example, System 1 that is represented in the model 12 is the reason why people overestimate the meaning of a Black Swan that is represented in the model 7.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-10-6 18:26

    Overall a amazing book. Hollins has acquired a huge list of mental models that are interesting and useful. I give it 4 instead of 5 because it lacks some unifying principles and prioritization of the models. Most of the mental models seem isolated, and some are more strong than others. The book alone won't change your life, but some of the models, if applied shrewdly and with critical thinking, probably can.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-10-10 18:31

    This is more interesting than other Hollins' productions I've bought (and didn't like -- they've been removed from the marketplace.)At least the sentences are a small bit more interesting... but at times truly bizarre. (Talking about what reversible decisions are ,comparing them, a non-reversible decision is "shaving your cat"... say what? I'm wondering if this wasn't spun from "skinning a cat.") At times the adjectives seem like someone went thru and randomly used something to replace one adjective with a related one -- but not one I would assume a native English speaker would ever me of the content -- which seemed, at times, gratuitously added to fatten the ebook -- seemed like it was spun from other content.What I like best -- the summaries at the end of the chapters of the mental ems like "mental models" are the subject du jour... as there are at least two other books coming out about it (with some of them starting from a related put -- a 1994 Commencement Speech at USC by Warren Buffett's well-regarded partner, Charlie Munger) -- and another one by another prolific author in the private development ter having gone thru the summaries and then gone back if the summaries weren't sufficient to provide clarity, there were some things which were just plain wrong... or e first is the one which I mention in the headline. Confirmation bias is talked about as if it's a conscious choice. It's not. You can know all you wish about conbias and it's not going to stop you from doing it. It's hard to even see it in yourself,, and it takes quite a bit of humility to even start to see a bit of it. (Which is why political discussions tend to go off the rail.)Confirmation bias is part of the human condition. It's as much a part of us as our visual blindspots. It serves self-protective functions in the psyche -- very powerful ones at that.Okay, so that's #1.#2 -- Kahneman's System #2 thinking. Anyone who represented system #2 thinking in such an incomplete method has NEVER read Kahneman. While system #2 is more thoughtful, it, too, has shortcomings. (UGH!).I doubt Kahneman would recognize the descriptions of system #1 and system #2 from the description in this book. They are that far off, dumbed down and trivialized.I'm of mixed feelings about this. The summaries are helpful. The summary of all of the models at the end are just about all you need. There's so much unnecessary fat in this book (which is amusing, in a very cynical way; that is -- in wondering how these sentences or analogies were come up with. But you may not have the same curiosity I have in reverse engineering how people make stuff, like I do.)This MIGHT even be worth $3.99 to you. The Charlie Munger premise is a amazing one. Whether this is the best put to acquire extra mental models (many of which you've probably already heard) is questionable.If this is a subject of interest to you, google around a bit, look at other book descriptions, check out wikipedia.And if you're really up to it -- read Kahneman's "Thinking Quick and Slow." There's so much there to chew on, which goes far beyond the system 1 and system 2 thinking... it's well worth the read. It's probably one of the most profound books I've read (which I did back in 2014).You will learn a lot more about clear thinking, and how we humans obtain distorted views of the world, than probably any collection of mental models will give you.Updated: while doing some research on other topics, I see the book by Shane Parrish will cover 109 mental models ... and you can actually search the list on his blog at fs dot blog. Some with articles (if I had to guess... more than 30.)While mental models are indeed powerful, one of the things to recognize is that models DELETE information. It's necessary to recognize both the strengths and weaknesses of models (which this book does not do.) Some models are going to work better in some knowledge domains better than re models is just a scratch into the surface of thinking and making better decisions. Without the wisdom that comes from weaknesses and strengths, they can lead you in the wrong direction if used incorrectly.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-10-10 18:31

    Overall a amazing book. Hollins has acquired a huge list of mental models that are interesting and useful. I give it 4 instead of 5 because it lacks some unifying principles and prioritization of the models. Most of the mental models seem isolated, and some are more strong than others. The book alone won't change your life, but some of the models, if applied shrewdly and with critical thinking, probably can.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-10-10 18:31

    One of the most interesting and fun to follow books that I have read regarding the method our mind can support us (or trick us) in various aspects of life. It provides you a amazing overview of what mental models are, and how a lot of of them can create your life easier, if applied correctly. It is not a deep-theoretical book (if you are looking for that, better go for specific books by researchers on each of the mental models covered), but applying one of the mental models provided from the book: it gives you a amazing overview and ready to be applied principles, that for most people should be enough. I really liked the method it is written, and some of the models were really interesting. I think it is a amazing starting point to know better about the specifics of some of the models and principles discussed, but applying the Pareto Principle and the Law of Diminishing Returns: "20% of resources will aid you in achieve the 80% of results". This book is part of that 20%.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-11-9 18:30

    This is more interesting than other Hollins' productions I've bought (and didn't like -- they've been removed from the marketplace.)At least the sentences are a small bit more interesting... but at times truly bizarre. (Talking about what reversible decisions are ,comparing them, a non-reversible decision is "shaving your cat"... say what? I'm wondering if this wasn't spun from "skinning a cat.") At times the adjectives seem like someone went thru and randomly used something to replace one adjective with a related one -- but not one I would assume a native English speaker would ever me of the content -- which seemed, at times, gratuitously added to fatten the ebook -- seemed like it was spun from other content.What I like best -- the summaries at the end of the chapters of the mental ems like "mental models" are the subject du jour... as there are at least two other books coming out about it (with some of them starting from a related put -- a 1994 Commencement Speech at USC by Warren Buffett's well-regarded partner, Charlie Munger) -- and another one by another prolific author in the private development ter having gone thru the summaries and then gone back if the summaries weren't sufficient to provide clarity, there were some things which were just plain wrong... or e first is the one which I mention in the headline. Confirmation bias is talked about as if it's a conscious choice. It's not. You can know all you wish about conbias and it's not going to stop you from doing it. It's hard to even see it in yourself,, and it takes quite a bit of humility to even start to see a bit of it. (Which is why political discussions tend to go off the rail.)Confirmation bias is part of the human condition. It's as much a part of us as our visual blindspots. It serves self-protective functions in the psyche -- very powerful ones at that.Okay, so that's #1.#2 -- Kahneman's System #2 thinking. Anyone who represented system #2 thinking in such an incomplete method has NEVER read Kahneman. While system #2 is more thoughtful, it, too, has shortcomings. (UGH!).I doubt Kahneman would recognize the descriptions of system #1 and system #2 from the description in this book. They are that far off, dumbed down and trivialized.I'm of mixed feelings about this. The summaries are helpful. The summary of all of the models at the end are just about all you need. There's so much unnecessary fat in this book (which is amusing, in a very cynical way; that is -- in wondering how these sentences or analogies were come up with. But you may not have the same curiosity I have in reverse engineering how people make stuff, like I do.)This MIGHT even be worth $3.99 to you. The Charlie Munger premise is a amazing one. Whether this is the best put to acquire extra mental models (many of which you've probably already heard) is questionable.If this is a subject of interest to you, google around a bit, look at other book descriptions, check out wikipedia.And if you're really up to it -- read Kahneman's "Thinking Quick and Slow." There's so much there to chew on, which goes far beyond the system 1 and system 2 thinking... it's well worth the read. It's probably one of the most profound books I've read (which I did back in 2014).You will learn a lot more about clear thinking, and how we humans obtain distorted views of the world, than probably any collection of mental models will give you.Updated: while doing some research on other topics, I see the book by Shane Parrish will cover 109 mental models ... and you can actually search the list on his blog at fs dot blog. Some with articles (if I had to guess... more than 30.)While mental models are indeed powerful, one of the things to recognize is that models DELETE information. It's necessary to recognize both the strengths and weaknesses of models (which this book does not do.) Some models are going to work better in some knowledge domains better than re models is just a scratch into the surface of thinking and making better decisions. Without the wisdom that comes from weaknesses and strengths, they can lead you in the wrong direction if used incorrectly.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-11-9 18:30

    I was astounded by the quality and presentation of the material in this book. Not only did I search myself recommending it before I finished it, I will be reading it again and referencing it frequently until I have all the models easily at hand for my use. Bravo! Extremely well done!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-11-9 18:41

    I wouldn't say this is one of Peter Hollin's best books and I prefer more of his earlier works. I'm still giving it 5 stars because it's still a well-written book and also both concise and comprehensive! There's plenty of hints provided to support in decision making and problem-solving where he also uses the mindset of known billionaires, athletes, and people in academia as an example. He goes through it using mental models which are structures on how you should think in certain situations and explains how these successful people's thought process create them more efficient in their fields or in life in general. One of my favorite mental models that I've picked up was from the earlier chapter which was Minimizing Regret. He used Jeff Bezos as an example in this mental model. I'm a person who instantly regrets a decision created if it turned out to be a failure. It might seem over the top but I'm not kidding when I say I regret buying the orange flavored gum instead of picking the apple flavored one. The regret will stick to me throughout the day but after reading that part of the book, I think I'm now able to reduce my regretful behavior and it will also support me pursue things I wish to do where regret and overthinking keeps on holding me back.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-11-9 18:41

    One of the most interesting and fun to follow books that I have read regarding the method our mind can support us (or trick us) in various aspects of life. It provides you a amazing overview of what mental models are, and how a lot of of them can create your life easier, if applied correctly. It is not a deep-theoretical book (if you are looking for that, better go for specific books by researchers on each of the mental models covered), but applying one of the mental models provided from the book: it gives you a amazing overview and ready to be applied principles, that for most people should be enough. I really liked the method it is written, and some of the models were really interesting. I think it is a amazing starting point to know better about the specifics of some of the models and principles discussed, but applying the Pareto Principle and the Law of Diminishing Returns: "20% of resources will aid you in achieve the 80% of results". This book is part of that 20%.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-11-1 18:21

    The book is well written. I liked the understandable language the author used. It wasn't too long or too short. Most models of the book are useful to know and I am a small bit better thinker after reading the book. However, it wasn't perfect. For example, models 27 and and 28 Pareto Principle are both forms of power law distributions. Things should be created as easy as possible, but no more simpler. Why separate models?Book also doesn't have enough synthesis. It has some in the form of five separate parts that can be seen as five coherent ensembles, but that is not enough. These models are more closely similar than book shows. If you are not familiar with these models before you read the book, some of the necessary relationships between models are missed. For example, System 1 that is represented in the model 12 is the reason why people overestimate the meaning of a Black Swan that is represented in the model 7.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-11-1 18:21

    One of the most interesting and fun to follow books that I have read regarding the method our mind can support us (or trick us) in various aspects of life. It provides you a amazing overview of what mental models are, and how a lot of of them can create your life easier, if applied correctly. It is not a deep-theoretical book (if you are looking for that, better go for specific books by researchers on each of the mental models covered), but applying one of the mental models provided from the book: it gives you a amazing overview and ready to be applied principles, that for most people should be enough. I really liked the method it is written, and some of the models were really interesting. I think it is a amazing starting point to know better about the specifics of some of the models and principles discussed, but applying the Pareto Principle and the Law of Diminishing Returns: "20% of resources will aid you in achieve the 80% of results". This book is part of that 20%.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-11-10 18:27

    This is more interesting than other Hollins' productions I've bought (and didn't like -- they've been removed from the marketplace.)At least the sentences are a small bit more interesting... but at times truly bizarre. (Talking about what reversible decisions are ,comparing them, a non-reversible decision is "shaving your cat"... say what? I'm wondering if this wasn't spun from "skinning a cat.") At times the adjectives seem like someone went thru and randomly used something to replace one adjective with a related one -- but not one I would assume a native English speaker would ever me of the content -- which seemed, at times, gratuitously added to fatten the ebook -- seemed like it was spun from other content.What I like best -- the summaries at the end of the chapters of the mental ems like "mental models" are the subject du jour... as there are at least two other books coming out about it (with some of them starting from a related put -- a 1994 Commencement Speech at USC by Warren Buffett's well-regarded partner, Charlie Munger) -- and another one by another prolific author in the private development ter having gone thru the summaries and then gone back if the summaries weren't sufficient to provide clarity, there were some things which were just plain wrong... or e first is the one which I mention in the headline. Confirmation bias is talked about as if it's a conscious choice. It's not. You can know all you wish about conbias and it's not going to stop you from doing it. It's hard to even see it in yourself,, and it takes quite a bit of humility to even start to see a bit of it. (Which is why political discussions tend to go off the rail.)Confirmation bias is part of the human condition. It's as much a part of us as our visual blindspots. It serves self-protective functions in the psyche -- very powerful ones at that.Okay, so that's #1.#2 -- Kahneman's System #2 thinking. Anyone who represented system #2 thinking in such an incomplete method has NEVER read Kahneman. While system #2 is more thoughtful, it, too, has shortcomings. (UGH!).I doubt Kahneman would recognize the descriptions of system #1 and system #2 from the description in this book. They are that far off, dumbed down and trivialized.I'm of mixed feelings about this. The summaries are helpful. The summary of all of the models at the end are just about all you need. There's so much unnecessary fat in this book (which is amusing, in a very cynical way; that is -- in wondering how these sentences or analogies were come up with. But you may not have the same curiosity I have in reverse engineering how people make stuff, like I do.)This MIGHT even be worth $3.99 to you. The Charlie Munger premise is a amazing one. Whether this is the best put to acquire extra mental models (many of which you've probably already heard) is questionable.If this is a subject of interest to you, google around a bit, look at other book descriptions, check out wikipedia.And if you're really up to it -- read Kahneman's "Thinking Quick and Slow." There's so much there to chew on, which goes far beyond the system 1 and system 2 thinking... it's well worth the read. It's probably one of the most profound books I've read (which I did back in 2014).You will learn a lot more about clear thinking, and how we humans obtain distorted views of the world, than probably any collection of mental models will give you.Updated: while doing some research on other topics, I see the book by Shane Parrish will cover 109 mental models ... and you can actually search the list on his blog at fs dot blog. Some with articles (if I had to guess... more than 30.)While mental models are indeed powerful, one of the things to recognize is that models DELETE information. It's necessary to recognize both the strengths and weaknesses of models (which this book does not do.) Some models are going to work better in some knowledge domains better than re models is just a scratch into the surface of thinking and making better decisions. Without the wisdom that comes from weaknesses and strengths, they can lead you in the wrong direction if used incorrectly.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-11-10 18:27

    There are a number of books out there on "mental models." This is one of the better ones. I don't always agree with the author but he seems to have found a lot of amazing concepts here that everyone should know. I did disagree with his presentation of "Black Swans." Yes, each individual black swan happening can be regarded as an outlier and ignored for some purposes BUT the number of Black Swans out there seems to be increasing. We have had three major ones in less than 20 years, each various from the other. People have to be prepared for the fact that black swans occur more than you think and the next one may be very various from 9/11, the mortgage crisis of 2007-8, and COVID-19. In general, this book is well worth the price. PS. Read the summary of the 30 models at the end of the book FIRST, then read the book including the ending summary (yes, read it again, THEN write out a list of the 30 models. Hold it handy. It's a useful list.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-12-5 18:23

    Overall a amazing book. Hollins has acquired a huge list of mental models that are interesting and useful. I give it 4 instead of 5 because it lacks some unifying principles and prioritization of the models. Most of the mental models seem isolated, and some are more strong than others. The book alone won't change your life, but some of the models, if applied shrewdly and with critical thinking, probably can.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-12-7 18:34

    This is more interesting than other Hollins' productions I've bought (and didn't like -- they've been removed from the marketplace.)At least the sentences are a small bit more interesting... but at times truly bizarre. (Talking about what reversible decisions are ,comparing them, a non-reversible decision is "shaving your cat"... say what? I'm wondering if this wasn't spun from "skinning a cat.") At times the adjectives seem like someone went thru and randomly used something to replace one adjective with a related one -- but not one I would assume a native English speaker would ever me of the content -- which seemed, at times, gratuitously added to fatten the ebook -- seemed like it was spun from other content.What I like best -- the summaries at the end of the chapters of the mental ems like "mental models" are the subject du jour... as there are at least two other books coming out about it (with some of them starting from a related put -- a 1994 Commencement Speech at USC by Warren Buffett's well-regarded partner, Charlie Munger) -- and another one by another prolific author in the private development ter having gone thru the summaries and then gone back if the summaries weren't sufficient to provide clarity, there were some things which were just plain wrong... or e first is the one which I mention in the headline. Confirmation bias is talked about as if it's a conscious choice. It's not. You can know all you wish about conbias and it's not going to stop you from doing it. It's hard to even see it in yourself,, and it takes quite a bit of humility to even start to see a bit of it. (Which is why political discussions tend to go off the rail.)Confirmation bias is part of the human condition. It's as much a part of us as our visual blindspots. It serves self-protective functions in the psyche -- very powerful ones at that.Okay, so that's #1.#2 -- Kahneman's System #2 thinking. Anyone who represented system #2 thinking in such an incomplete method has NEVER read Kahneman. While system #2 is more thoughtful, it, too, has shortcomings. (UGH!).I doubt Kahneman would recognize the descriptions of system #1 and system #2 from the description in this book. They are that far off, dumbed down and trivialized.I'm of mixed feelings about this. The summaries are helpful. The summary of all of the models at the end are just about all you need. There's so much unnecessary fat in this book (which is amusing, in a very cynical way; that is -- in wondering how these sentences or analogies were come up with. But you may not have the same curiosity I have in reverse engineering how people make stuff, like I do.)This MIGHT even be worth $3.99 to you. The Charlie Munger premise is a amazing one. Whether this is the best put to acquire extra mental models (many of which you've probably already heard) is questionable.If this is a subject of interest to you, google around a bit, look at other book descriptions, check out wikipedia.And if you're really up to it -- read Kahneman's "Thinking Quick and Slow." There's so much there to chew on, which goes far beyond the system 1 and system 2 thinking... it's well worth the read. It's probably one of the most profound books I've read (which I did back in 2014).You will learn a lot more about clear thinking, and how we humans obtain distorted views of the world, than probably any collection of mental models will give you.Updated: while doing some research on other topics, I see the book by Shane Parrish will cover 109 mental models ... and you can actually search the list on his blog at fs dot blog. Some with articles (if I had to guess... more than 30.)While mental models are indeed powerful, one of the things to recognize is that models DELETE information. It's necessary to recognize both the strengths and weaknesses of models (which this book does not do.) Some models are going to work better in some knowledge domains better than re models is just a scratch into the surface of thinking and making better decisions. Without the wisdom that comes from weaknesses and strengths, they can lead you in the wrong direction if used incorrectly.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-12-18 20:11

    I wouldn't say this is one of Peter Hollin's best books and I prefer more of his earlier works. I'm still giving it 5 stars because it's still a well-written book and also both concise and comprehensive! There's plenty of hints provided to support in decision making and problem-solving where he also uses the mindset of known billionaires, athletes, and people in academia as an example. He goes through it using mental models which are structures on how you should think in certain situations and explains how these successful people's thought process create them more efficient in their fields or in life in general. One of my favorite mental models that I've picked up was from the earlier chapter which was Minimizing Regret. He used Jeff Bezos as an example in this mental model. I'm a person who instantly regrets a decision created if it turned out to be a failure. It might seem over the top but I'm not kidding when I say I regret buying the orange flavored gum instead of picking the apple flavored one. The regret will stick to me throughout the day but after reading that part of the book, I think I'm now able to reduce my regretful behavior and it will also support me pursue things I wish to do where regret and overthinking keeps on holding me back.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-12-18 20:11

    I am reading 5 books right now on improving thinking through structured techniques. I like this book because the models are diverse, the book is short, and the latest chapter could be used like a roledex for thinking. It is not as paradigm breaking as other books when it comes to ideas but it is pragmatic with amazing roi on the reading time. I also reccomend hard copy books or e books vice audio. These books works best when you take notes and reflect.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-12-18 20:11

    I already had a book on mental models, but it was so huge and complex that every time I started reading it, I got overwhelmed and would place it down.Hollins' book is straight to the essentials. I absolutely loved it. One of the best I've read from inking clearly is the ultimate skill. And this book has already helped me begin thinking more clearly and making wiser decisions. I'll be getting the sequel. Thanks, Peter!

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-12-19 20:13

    Overall a amazing book. Hollins has acquired a huge list of mental models that are interesting and useful. I give it 4 instead of 5 because it lacks some unifying principles and prioritization of the models. Most of the mental models seem isolated, and some are more strong than others. The book alone won't change your life, but some of the models, if applied shrewdly and with critical thinking, probably can.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-12-19 20:13

    One of the most interesting and fun to follow books that I have read regarding the method our mind can support us (or trick us) in various aspects of life. It provides you a amazing overview of what mental models are, and how a lot of of them can create your life easier, if applied correctly. It is not a deep-theoretical book (if you are looking for that, better go for specific books by researchers on each of the mental models covered), but applying one of the mental models provided from the book: it gives you a amazing overview and ready to be applied principles, that for most people should be enough. I really liked the method it is written, and some of the models were really interesting. I think it is a amazing starting point to know better about the specifics of some of the models and principles discussed, but applying the Pareto Principle and the Law of Diminishing Returns: "20% of resources will aid you in achieve the 80% of results". This book is part of that 20%.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-12-20 20:12

    Overall a amazing book. Hollins has acquired a huge list of mental models that are interesting and useful. I give it 4 instead of 5 because it lacks some unifying principles and prioritization of the models. Most of the mental models seem isolated, and some are more strong than others. The book alone won't change your life, but some of the models, if applied shrewdly and with critical thinking, probably can.

    0  


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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-12-20 20:8

    This book draws on a very big, powerful, and necessary conceptual assumption that I have found invaluable. That is the concept that we can and should envision thinking in terms of using representations (such as models and rules) to organize our ideas, focus our attention, and support explain our actions. This aligns very well with the pragmatist philosophy of education in terms of learning to think by using concepts more effectively as tools and with the psychological research into the use of models in terms of “mindware” that helps us think more effectively. The idea of extracting the best mental models from the different disciplines and learning to adopt them skillfully and appropriately to our own thinking is a particularly promising one that I agree with strongly. The book starts out very powerful with an excerpt from Charlie Munger’s inspiring popular speech about mental at’s why I was so dismally disappointed by this truly poor book. Not badly written, just very badly researched. It is so full of misunderstandings, misrepresentations, and misconceptions of the models it describes that I found myself struggling just to obtain through it even though I was excited by the theme of the book. It reads as if the examples and descriptions were drawn from skimming random web pages rather than reading the books that describe the models and examples in re, I realize that we’re often trying to generalize here from a specific discipline to a template we can apply more broadly, we’re not trying to master the disciplines these models are drawn from. And arguably the book may succeed in doing that sometimes. But the explanations of the models frequently use examples that don’t even create sense in light of the method the models are used in their original disciplines. That’s not promising. The author uses the example of a mode to illustrate regression toward the mean, which doesn’t work in a lot of cases, making it a particularly poor example. He admits to not understanding much math, as if that’s a amazing thing for writing a book about models, but that’s not the problem. It’s the ability to explain the models to other people that is necessary here. And that’s what is done so poorly. Unfortunately the issue isn’t limited to just math. Using the story of the black swans to test to create a point about the value of drawing on statistical likelihood is another example of a bizarrely inappropriate literary device the author relies on. The story has generally been used to create the opposite point, in particular by Taleb whom he cites regarding the idea. Taleb’s point is that what we see most of the time is not necessarily what we should always expect, making this a particularly confusing choice for explaining how the models of statistical distributions should be used to support us understand the likelihood of ese are not exceptions, the book is full of examples that seem to have been drawn at random by skimming web articles about famous books without actually reading those books. If the purpose was to illustrate that someone who doesn’t do the homework can still manage to explain models they only superficially understand, it may succeed at that aspiration. But I’m concerned that actually learning to use these models for more than trivial issue solving and decision making might take a better understanding of them than this book provides. It isn’t a poor list of models, although it seems somewhat arbitrary in places, it’s mostly the explanations of the models that I found weak, superficial, and confusing. I strongly recommend the concept the book is based upon but I’d be surprised if most people learned much about actually using these mental models from reading this book, except perhaps by accident in some cases. It isn’t hard to search amazing books about mental models I can recommend instead because they give a better sense of the models themselves. These would contain for a begin Twenty Thinking Tools by Phillip Cam which focuses particularly on fundamental tools for reasoning together, The Philosopher’s Toolkit by Julian Baggini which focuses on the tools for analysis of ideas, Mindware by Richard Nisbett, and Foresman’s Critical Thinking Toolkit.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-12-20 20:8

    I am reading 5 books right now on improving thinking through structured techniques. I like this book because the models are diverse, the book is short, and the latest chapter could be used like a roledex for thinking. It is not as paradigm breaking as other books when it comes to ideas but it is pragmatic with amazing roi on the reading time. I also reccomend hard copy books or e books vice audio. These books works best when you take notes and reflect.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-12-24 20:8

    This is more interesting than other Hollins' productions I've bought (and didn't like -- they've been removed from the marketplace.)At least the sentences are a small bit more interesting... but at times truly bizarre. (Talking about what reversible decisions are ,comparing them, a non-reversible decision is "shaving your cat"... say what? I'm wondering if this wasn't spun from "skinning a cat.") At times the adjectives seem like someone went thru and randomly used something to replace one adjective with a related one -- but not one I would assume a native English speaker would ever me of the content -- which seemed, at times, gratuitously added to fatten the ebook -- seemed like it was spun from other content.What I like best -- the summaries at the end of the chapters of the mental ems like "mental models" are the subject du jour... as there are at least two other books coming out about it (with some of them starting from a related put -- a 1994 Commencement Speech at USC by Warren Buffett's well-regarded partner, Charlie Munger) -- and another one by another prolific author in the private development ter having gone thru the summaries and then gone back if the summaries weren't sufficient to provide clarity, there were some things which were just plain wrong... or e first is the one which I mention in the headline. Confirmation bias is talked about as if it's a conscious choice. It's not. You can know all you wish about conbias and it's not going to stop you from doing it. It's hard to even see it in yourself,, and it takes quite a bit of humility to even start to see a bit of it. (Which is why political discussions tend to go off the rail.)Confirmation bias is part of the human condition. It's as much a part of us as our visual blindspots. It serves self-protective functions in the psyche -- very powerful ones at that.Okay, so that's #1.#2 -- Kahneman's System #2 thinking. Anyone who represented system #2 thinking in such an incomplete method has NEVER read Kahneman. While system #2 is more thoughtful, it, too, has shortcomings. (UGH!).I doubt Kahneman would recognize the descriptions of system #1 and system #2 from the description in this book. They are that far off, dumbed down and trivialized.I'm of mixed feelings about this. The summaries are helpful. The summary of all of the models at the end are just about all you need. There's so much unnecessary fat in this book (which is amusing, in a very cynical way; that is -- in wondering how these sentences or analogies were come up with. But you may not have the same curiosity I have in reverse engineering how people make stuff, like I do.)This MIGHT even be worth $3.99 to you. The Charlie Munger premise is a amazing one. Whether this is the best put to acquire extra mental models (many of which you've probably already heard) is questionable.If this is a subject of interest to you, google around a bit, look at other book descriptions, check out wikipedia.And if you're really up to it -- read Kahneman's "Thinking Quick and Slow." There's so much there to chew on, which goes far beyond the system 1 and system 2 thinking... it's well worth the read. It's probably one of the most profound books I've read (which I did back in 2014).You will learn a lot more about clear thinking, and how we humans obtain distorted views of the world, than probably any collection of mental models will give you.Updated: while doing some research on other topics, I see the book by Shane Parrish will cover 109 mental models ... and you can actually search the list on his blog at fs dot blog. Some with articles (if I had to guess... more than 30.)While mental models are indeed powerful, one of the things to recognize is that models DELETE information. It's necessary to recognize both the strengths and weaknesses of models (which this book does not do.) Some models are going to work better in some knowledge domains better than re models is just a scratch into the surface of thinking and making better decisions. Without the wisdom that comes from weaknesses and strengths, they can lead you in the wrong direction if used incorrectly.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-12-24 20:8

    I am reading 5 books right now on improving thinking through structured techniques. I like this book because the models are diverse, the book is short, and the latest chapter could be used like a roledex for thinking. It is not as paradigm breaking as other books when it comes to ideas but it is pragmatic with amazing roi on the reading time. I also reccomend hard copy books or e books vice audio. These books works best when you take notes and reflect.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2021-1-7 18:51

    This is more interesting than other Hollins' productions I've bought (and didn't like -- they've been removed from the marketplace.)At least the sentences are a small bit more interesting... but at times truly bizarre. (Talking about what reversible decisions are ,comparing them, a non-reversible decision is "shaving your cat"... say what? I'm wondering if this wasn't spun from "skinning a cat.") At times the adjectives seem like someone went thru and randomly used something to replace one adjective with a related one -- but not one I would assume a native English speaker would ever me of the content -- which seemed, at times, gratuitously added to fatten the ebook -- seemed like it was spun from other content.What I like best -- the summaries at the end of the chapters of the mental ems like "mental models" are the subject du jour... as there are at least two other books coming out about it (with some of them starting from a related put -- a 1994 Commencement Speech at USC by Warren Buffett's well-regarded partner, Charlie Munger) -- and another one by another prolific author in the private development ter having gone thru the summaries and then gone back if the summaries weren't sufficient to provide clarity, there were some things which were just plain wrong... or e first is the one which I mention in the headline. Confirmation bias is talked about as if it's a conscious choice. It's not. You can know all you wish about conbias and it's not going to stop you from doing it. It's hard to even see it in yourself,, and it takes quite a bit of humility to even start to see a bit of it. (Which is why political discussions tend to go off the rail.)Confirmation bias is part of the human condition. It's as much a part of us as our visual blindspots. It serves self-protective functions in the psyche -- very powerful ones at that.Okay, so that's #1.#2 -- Kahneman's System #2 thinking. Anyone who represented system #2 thinking in such an incomplete method has NEVER read Kahneman. While system #2 is more thoughtful, it, too, has shortcomings. (UGH!).I doubt Kahneman would recognize the descriptions of system #1 and system #2 from the description in this book. They are that far off, dumbed down and trivialized.I'm of mixed feelings about this. The summaries are helpful. The summary of all of the models at the end are just about all you need. There's so much unnecessary fat in this book (which is amusing, in a very cynical way; that is -- in wondering how these sentences or analogies were come up with. But you may not have the same curiosity I have in reverse engineering how people make stuff, like I do.)This MIGHT even be worth $3.99 to you. The Charlie Munger premise is a amazing one. Whether this is the best put to acquire extra mental models (many of which you've probably already heard) is questionable.If this is a subject of interest to you, google around a bit, look at other book descriptions, check out wikipedia.And if you're really up to it -- read Kahneman's "Thinking Quick and Slow." There's so much there to chew on, which goes far beyond the system 1 and system 2 thinking... it's well worth the read. It's probably one of the most profound books I've read (which I did back in 2014).You will learn a lot more about clear thinking, and how we humans obtain distorted views of the world, than probably any collection of mental models will give you.Updated: while doing some research on other topics, I see the book by Shane Parrish will cover 109 mental models ... and you can actually search the list on his blog at fs dot blog. Some with articles (if I had to guess... more than 30.)While mental models are indeed powerful, one of the things to recognize is that models DELETE information. It's necessary to recognize both the strengths and weaknesses of models (which this book does not do.) Some models are going to work better in some knowledge domains better than re models is just a scratch into the surface of thinking and making better decisions. Without the wisdom that comes from weaknesses and strengths, they can lead you in the wrong direction if used incorrectly.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2021-1-7 18:51

    I was astounded by the quality and presentation of the material in this book. Not only did I search myself recommending it before I finished it, I will be reading it again and referencing it frequently until I have all the models easily at hand for my use. Bravo! Extremely well done!

    0  


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    Useful review?

    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2021-1-7 18:51

    I am reading 5 books right now on improving thinking through structured techniques. I like this book because the models are diverse, the book is short, and the latest chapter could be used like a roledex for thinking. It is not as paradigm breaking as other books when it comes to ideas but it is pragmatic with amazing roi on the reading time. I also reccomend hard copy books or e books vice audio. These books works best when you take notes and reflect.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Elements of Critical Thinking: A Fundamental Guide to Effective Decision Making, Deep Analysis, Intelligent Reasoning, and Independent Thinking []  2019-12-18 20:36

    As a leader in a commercial business I read for entertainment and to support me understand how to be more efficient in our organization. This book has taken principles of other books, some which I found slow and too theoretical, and provided anecdotes that let the reader to understand situations and also convey the same in an easily digested way. Is it a scholarly work? No. Is it practical? Yes. In the end, your level of satisfaction will be driven by either of those 2 expectations. Simple read and , it isn’t much of a stretch to connect today’s political leadership with the propaganda of the Nazi days... is it the writer’s bias or is it the method it is outlined? Others have created that connection, and the work he laid out does create the case that the current style of leadership does favor private attacks over substance, which could lead people to create decisions based on emotions, rather than logical facts. I am begin to being wrong, and also understand my political bias might be in play, but I favor the latter, and that sounds too close to reality, and scary. Consider the Muller evidence, and the fact that for most of Trump’s supporter, a latest survey claimed 0% of the people felt the facts will not weight in their decision to re-elect. Winston Churchill said something to the result that “The best argument versus democracy is a five-minute conversation with the average voter. “In business, all of the facts obtain trumped by brand affiliations and private preferences, hence so much goes into marketing. When the needs arises, the student appears, and so I found this book timely and enjoyable.

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    Elements of Critical Thinking: A Fundamental Guide to Effective Decision Making, Deep Analysis, Intelligent Reasoning, and Independent Thinking []  2019-12-18 20:36

    Tired of thinking what they wish you think? Read this book and learn how to think for yourself. We are taught what to think, now, learn how to think.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-2-1 19:26

    This book draws on a very big, powerful, and necessary conceptual assumption that I have found invaluable. That is the concept that we can and should envision thinking in terms of using representations (such as models and rules) to organize our ideas, focus our attention, and support explain our actions. This aligns very well with the pragmatist philosophy of education in terms of learning to think by using concepts more effectively as tools and with the psychological research into the use of models in terms of “mindware” that helps us think more effectively. The idea of extracting the best mental models from the different disciplines and learning to adopt them skillfully and appropriately to our own thinking is a particularly promising one that I agree with strongly. The book starts out very powerful with an excerpt from Charlie Munger’s inspiring popular speech about mental at’s why I was so dismally disappointed by this truly poor book. Not badly written, just very badly researched. It is so full of misunderstandings, misrepresentations, and misconceptions of the models it describes that I found myself struggling just to obtain through it even though I was excited by the theme of the book. It reads as if the examples and descriptions were drawn from skimming random web pages rather than reading the books that describe the models and examples in re, I realize that we’re often trying to generalize here from a specific discipline to a template we can apply more broadly, we’re not trying to master the disciplines these models are drawn from. And arguably the book may succeed in doing that sometimes. But the explanations of the models frequently use examples that don’t even create sense in light of the method the models are used in their original disciplines. That’s not promising. The author uses the example of a mode to illustrate regression toward the mean, which doesn’t work in a lot of cases, making it a particularly poor example. He admits to not understanding much math, as if that’s a amazing thing for writing a book about models, but that’s not the problem. It’s the ability to explain the models to other people that is necessary here. And that’s what is done so poorly. Unfortunately the issue isn’t limited to just math. Using the story of the black swans to test to create a point about the value of drawing on statistical likelihood is another example of a bizarrely inappropriate literary device the author relies on. The story has generally been used to create the opposite point, in particular by Taleb whom he cites regarding the idea. Taleb’s point is that what we see most of the time is not necessarily what we should always expect, making this a particularly confusing choice for explaining how the models of statistical distributions should be used to support us understand the likelihood of ese are not exceptions, the book is full of examples that seem to have been drawn at random by skimming web articles about famous books without actually reading those books. If the purpose was to illustrate that someone who doesn’t do the homework can still manage to explain models they only superficially understand, it may succeed at that aspiration. But I’m concerned that actually learning to use these models for more than trivial issue solving and decision making might take a better understanding of them than this book provides. It isn’t a poor list of models, although it seems somewhat arbitrary in places, it’s mostly the explanations of the models that I found weak, superficial, and confusing. I strongly recommend the concept the book is based upon but I’d be surprised if most people learned much about actually using these mental models from reading this book, except perhaps by accident in some cases. It isn’t hard to search amazing books about mental models I can recommend instead because they give a better sense of the models themselves. These would contain for a begin Twenty Thinking Tools by Phillip Cam which focuses particularly on fundamental tools for reasoning together, The Philosopher’s Toolkit by Julian Baggini which focuses on the tools for analysis of ideas, Mindware by Richard Nisbett, and Foresman’s Critical Thinking Toolkit.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-2-1 19:26

    I was astounded by the quality and presentation of the material in this book. Not only did I search myself recommending it before I finished it, I will be reading it again and referencing it frequently until I have all the models easily at hand for my use. Bravo! Extremely well done!

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    RTI Applications, Volume 2: Assessment, Analysis, and Decision Making (The Guilford Practical Intervention in the Schools Series) []  2020-1-22 18:36

    Product was exactly as described and arrived quickly!

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-8-1 18:38

    The book is well written. I liked the understandable language the author used. It wasn't too long or too short. Most models of the book are useful to know and I am a small bit better thinker after reading the book. However, it wasn't perfect. For example, models 27 and and 28 Pareto Principle are both forms of power law distributions. Things should be created as easy as possible, but no more simpler. Why separate models?Book also doesn't have enough synthesis. It has some in the form of five separate parts that can be seen as five coherent ensembles, but that is not enough. These models are more closely similar than book shows. If you are not familiar with these models before you read the book, some of the necessary relationships between models are missed. For example, System 1 that is represented in the model 12 is the reason why people overestimate the meaning of a Black Swan that is represented in the model 7.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-10-4 18:23

    This book draws on a very big, powerful, and necessary conceptual assumption that I have found invaluable. That is the concept that we can and should envision thinking in terms of using representations (such as models and rules) to organize our ideas, focus our attention, and support explain our actions. This aligns very well with the pragmatist philosophy of education in terms of learning to think by using concepts more effectively as tools and with the psychological research into the use of models in terms of “mindware” that helps us think more effectively. The idea of extracting the best mental models from the different disciplines and learning to adopt them skillfully and appropriately to our own thinking is a particularly promising one that I agree with strongly. The book starts out very powerful with an excerpt from Charlie Munger’s inspiring popular speech about mental at’s why I was so dismally disappointed by this truly poor book. Not badly written, just very badly researched. It is so full of misunderstandings, misrepresentations, and misconceptions of the models it describes that I found myself struggling just to obtain through it even though I was excited by the theme of the book. It reads as if the examples and descriptions were drawn from skimming random web pages rather than reading the books that describe the models and examples in re, I realize that we’re often trying to generalize here from a specific discipline to a template we can apply more broadly, we’re not trying to master the disciplines these models are drawn from. And arguably the book may succeed in doing that sometimes. But the explanations of the models frequently use examples that don’t even create sense in light of the method the models are used in their original disciplines. That’s not promising. The author uses the example of a mode to illustrate regression toward the mean, which doesn’t work in a lot of cases, making it a particularly poor example. He admits to not understanding much math, as if that’s a amazing thing for writing a book about models, but that’s not the problem. It’s the ability to explain the models to other people that is necessary here. And that’s what is done so poorly. Unfortunately the issue isn’t limited to just math. Using the story of the black swans to test to create a point about the value of drawing on statistical likelihood is another example of a bizarrely inappropriate literary device the author relies on. The story has generally been used to create the opposite point, in particular by Taleb whom he cites regarding the idea. Taleb’s point is that what we see most of the time is not necessarily what we should always expect, making this a particularly confusing choice for explaining how the models of statistical distributions should be used to support us understand the likelihood of ese are not exceptions, the book is full of examples that seem to have been drawn at random by skimming web articles about famous books without actually reading those books. If the purpose was to illustrate that someone who doesn’t do the homework can still manage to explain models they only superficially understand, it may succeed at that aspiration. But I’m concerned that actually learning to use these models for more than trivial issue solving and decision making might take a better understanding of them than this book provides. It isn’t a poor list of models, although it seems somewhat arbitrary in places, it’s mostly the explanations of the models that I found weak, superficial, and confusing. I strongly recommend the concept the book is based upon but I’d be surprised if most people learned much about actually using these mental models from reading this book, except perhaps by accident in some cases. It isn’t hard to search amazing books about mental models I can recommend instead because they give a better sense of the models themselves. These would contain for a begin Twenty Thinking Tools by Phillip Cam which focuses particularly on fundamental tools for reasoning together, The Philosopher’s Toolkit by Julian Baggini which focuses on the tools for analysis of ideas, Mindware by Richard Nisbett, and Foresman’s Critical Thinking Toolkit.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-10-4 18:23

    There are a number of books out there on "mental models." This is one of the better ones. I don't always agree with the author but he seems to have found a lot of amazing concepts here that everyone should know. I did disagree with his presentation of "Black Swans." Yes, each individual black swan happening can be regarded as an outlier and ignored for some purposes BUT the number of Black Swans out there seems to be increasing. We have had three major ones in less than 20 years, each various from the other. People have to be prepared for the fact that black swans occur more than you think and the next one may be very various from 9/11, the mortgage crisis of 2007-8, and COVID-19. In general, this book is well worth the price. PS. Read the summary of the 30 models at the end of the book FIRST, then read the book including the ending summary (yes, read it again, THEN write out a list of the 30 models. Hold it handy. It's a useful list.

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    Mental Models: 30 Thinking Tools that Separate the Average From the Exceptional. Improved Decision-Making, Logical Analysis, and Problem-Solving. []  2020-9-16 18:47

    I wouldn't say this is one of Peter Hollin's best books and I prefer more of his earlier works. I'm still giving it 5 stars because it's still a well-written book and also both concise and comprehensive! There's plenty of hints provided to support in decision making and problem-solving where he also uses the mindset of known billionaires, athletes, and people in academia as an example. He goes through it using mental models which are structures on how you should think in certain situations and explains how these successful people's thought process create them more efficient in their fields or in life in general. One of my favorite mental models that I've picked up was from the earlier chapter which was Minimizing Regret. He used Jeff Bezos as an example in this mental model. I'm a person who instantly regrets a decision created if it turned out to be a failure. It might seem over the top but I'm not kidding when I say I regret buying the orange flavored gum instead of picking the apple flavored one. The regret will stick to me throughout the day but after reading that part of the book, I think I'm now able to reduce my regretful behavior and it will also support me pursue things I wish to do where regret and overthinking keeps on holding me back.

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