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    Departure Dash [App]  2019-8-9 13:0

    11/10

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    Departure Dash [App]  2019-8-9 13:0

    Fun to play, I'm already hooked!

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    Departure []  2020-1-6 18:53

    Nick Stone and Harper Lane have never met. He’s a successful venture capitalist. She’s a successful ghost writer. The one thing that they have in common is that they are on the same transatlantic flight, which crash-lands in a lake in a rural part of England. Some passengers die on impact. Some drown. Some survive only to grow old and succumb to old age within first Riddle’s novel feels like a knock-off of the TV series, Lost, as Nick and Harper create their method through this alternate reality in which they search themselves. The reader’s experience mimics that of the protagonists, both finding that they are in a quandary, succinctly noted by Harper herself at one point: “Stand-alone novel? Sci-fi? Thriller? Time travel?” Eventually, the author pulls back enough of the curtain that we figure it out. (So do Nick and Harper.)This is generally the type of story that I really enjoy: lots of diverse threads weaving together intricately. For the most part, Riddle weaves these threads well. His overall plot is epic and e story does have, in this reviewer’s opinion, a very distracting element in its telling. As the reader takes in the adventure, he or she must do it simultaneously from two various points of view: Riddle has chosen to write this book in first-person-present tense – but from two various characters. In one chapter, we see part of the story directly through Harper’s eyes: “I can only sit, in a daze.” Yet in the next chapter, we see a various part of the story through Nick’s eyes: “They call it the Palm. I call it hell.” Unfortunately, Harper’s and Nick’s voices are nearly identical. If a reader opened a page at random, there would be no method of knowing who doing the “telling” at that left me feeling like I have a crook in my neck from watching a tennis match at Wimbledon: back and forth and back and forth… A switch to an omniscient POV would have created the novel much more other weakness in the writing is the fact that there is an excessive amount of back story that is delivered to the reader via monologue – vis-à-vis one hero telling another either what is event in that moment or what has happened in the past. Again, a various choice of POV could have created the reader’s experience more r readers who don’t mind first-person-present POV, the author’s choice may not be a hindrance. His plot idea is inventive, and his characters are likeable. In the end, we are rooting for an M. Cordry, author of Kokopelli’s Thunder

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    Departure []  2020-1-6 18:53

    This is an wonderful stand alone novel with a horrifying catastrophe, a thrilling series of plot turns and an exciting romance.If you're a fan of dystopian post-apocalyptic novels, then this one should be at the top of your "must read" list! I love that it doesn't require a full series of books to complete, so it's a amazing story that you know will have some type of e characters were surprisingly in depth considering the nature of this genre. Usually action novels focus more on plot than hero development, but a decent amount of attention was placed on making you care for these characters.Riddle has made a remarkable book that had my full attention from begin to finish!

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    Departure []  2020-1-6 18:53

    I've read a couple of Mr. Riddles books, and I can't say I'm a large fan. His latest, Winter World, is by far the best of them, and also the benchmark for this book as I decided to work my method through his previous releases after reading it.On the plus side, he get's better and better for every book he writes. The negative; this book is not all that good. Departure suffers from being repetitive and long-winded, and at times I struggled to force myself to read everything. I plough through 2-3 books a week, and I rarely, if ever, quit on a book. This one came 's hard to give a review of this book without spoilers, so I won't even try. If you search yourself reading this book and not enjoying it that much, quit on the book, not the writer. This book is not for mentioned, Mr. Riddle really hit a home run for me with his recent novel, Winter World. I have already pre-ordered the next one, but I doubt I'll read everything he has published in the past as I usually do with writers who's work I like.2 stars, first half of the book seemed like a 4-5 star work.

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    Departure []  2020-1-6 18:53

    I think I'm done with A.G. Riddle...This is the second book of his that I've read (The Atlantis Gene was the first). I was really looking forward to this book. The synopsis grabbed me but the story itself quickly lost me. The premise of a plane crashing down onto a globe very various from the one it took off from got my attention. However, too a lot of other interfering factors detracted from an otherwise amazing e main character, NIck Stone, was a just too-good-to-be-true, take charge hero. He was method too much of a cliche. The leading female character, Harper, was depicted as being wishy-washy and incapable of making a decision who immediately swoons over e lesser characters were more of the same. It was exacerbated by the male narrator of the audiobook, who seemed to going for a sauve, "main in control of his surroundings", but really only achieved more of a William Shatner/Captain Kirk effect. The female narrator, by contrast, was ne of the story's developments interested me any. One side of the major conflict, once it was revealed, was just silly. It was the final straw.

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    Departure []  2020-1-6 18:53

    My initial impression of AG Riddle's style after attempting to read two books (Departure and Atlantis Gene) is that he enjoys writing these kinds of stories a lot. Soon enough you realize however, that he is not capable of delivering on the initial excitement generated in the opening chapters. For example, he isn't a pro at either setting up the scenes adequately or following through with any sort of meaningful hero development. You wish the plot to move and it gets stuck about halfway through each of these two works. You end up feeling used by the author for his own satisfaction in luring you in as his reader without delivering the momentum to hold you entertained and interested. It was frustrating. With both of these, I just suddenly place the books down at about the halfway point and kind of perused the remaining pages to see if I could rekindle the desire to read on.I just couldn't. So sorry for the negative review. I liked the idea of what these books promised in terms of imaginative characters, special technologies, and future-shocking humanity into thinking about it's development as an evolving species. Instead what I found was forgettable escapism that will no doubt appeal much more to those who prefer terminator stories with abundant action and not much thought behind them. I'm left disappointed.

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    Departure []  2020-1-6 18:53

    I think A.G. Riddle is a very amazing author, who call tell a story without any swearing, or explicit sex. (yes, there are still people out there who don't wish it in what they read). He develops his characters well, and keeps you in suspense all through the book. If you are in to that genre, then you won't be disappointed.

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    Departure []  2020-1-6 18:53

    I had just come off of back-to-back reads of Station Eleven, a well-written post-apocalyptic novel that I really enjoyed. When I read the Kindle sample of Departure, I got no clue it had any of the same themes, but I did see tips of it in the Amazon e Kindle sample got into the action very quickly and drew me in, which I always appreciate. The book as a whole did that to a lesser degree. It goes off on long, boring tangents about science and technology that I did not have fun very much. In fact, because I do much of my Kindle reading at bedtime, the begin of one of those tangents was a cue to me that it was time to close the Kindle and go to sleep.If you are interested in time travel, science fiction themes, multiple timelines and such, you may very much have fun this book. I did have fun the book, and I really enjoyed parts of it (especially the immediately post-crash portion). However, coming off of Station Eleven, it was very obvious that, while this book has its moments, the writing came off weak overall in my opinion. When reviewing a book, I search it difficult not to (even subconsciously) compare the book I just finished with the one I'm reading now. Because I focus a lot on writing skill when I'm reading, the method a book is written is weighted perhaps heavier than some other elements.If you have problem with suspension of disbelief, this is probably not your book. While the beginning is not all THAT out of the realm of possibility, it gets really wonderful the more it goes on. I understand this is often part and parcel of a science fiction book, but the level to which it was taken in Departure fairly boggled my ly, as I am not a fan of the romance genre, I was a bit place off by the need to wrap everything in a beautiful bow with a romance. This is not something I expect from a SF novel, and it felt a small too pat and engineered.

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    Departure []  2020-1-6 18:53

    I knew very small about this book before I began reading. Sometimes, you know so much about a book before actually reading it, that you begin having expectations about a book without having read it. So, this book was picked by our Time Travel group because of its popularity and amazing reviews on e Book starts amazing with a peril inducing plane crash and the chapters are short and come furiously. The action packed survival drama is highly the narrative continues and survival of main characters is not the key concern of the story...the action lags and the depth of the characters seem to really show...Not being able to relate to less than realistic characters was quite jarring and created enjoying the narrative a chore. I am a super fan of time travel and time travel was technically the heart of this story but the real heart of this story is a love story between the two main characters...and I guess my whole issue with this book is that its massive on the romance with completely wonderful characters that has a large plot regarding time travel, and an apocalyptic globe ending virus but all of those unbelievable and interesting info that I would normally love...come off as sub plots and secondary to the romance....Flesh out the characters....put the emphasis into the action...with a sub plot romance and this is a amazing book...as it is it needs some work.

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    Departure []  2020-1-6 18:53

    This was a long read but I didn't wish it to end. The story was a roller coaster ride with amazing characters. The balance and timing was well thought out; there wasn't too much of one hero or too small either and the amount of page time given each problem or flashback or hero seemed just right. I never once skipped over any scenes or dialogue. I kept looking forward to getting back to the story during the day when I was occupied with other things like regular e premise is chilling and somewhat disturbing. I know it's only fiction, BUT... Mr. Riddle created this scenario seem completely plausible in this day and age and that is frightening. Which created this story such a riveting one.

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    Departure []  2020-1-6 18:53

    This was the first book I've read by A.G. Riddle, and I was intrigued by the "Lost" like teaser (plane crash, mysterious place). Thankfully, the plot took the "Lost" angle in a whole fresh direction that was somewhat unexpected. The dual point-of-view (two main characters in first person swap narratives throughout the book) was both a small frustrating and yet a clever method for the author to lead up to a cliff hanger ... and then switch viewpoints for a few chapters, leaving you wanting to hold reading. All in all, this was a good, solid, sci fi book with some imaginative twists and a plot that kept my interest. Recommended.

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    Rehearsals for Departure []  2020-1-16 22:54

    You haven’t really heard this album until you listen to it while on a street trip alone down the Washington coast during the fall, while missing someone, then getting mcDonalds and feeling guilty and hating yourself, then getting renting a cabin in the woods and seeing some huge cedar trees, then taking a walk on a lonely beach while it’s raining. No. You haven’t really heard this album until you’ve done that.

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    Rehearsals for Departure []  2020-1-16 22:54

    Phew...I have to admit, there is no artist out there whose CD has created me cry. Until now. Listening to "Rehearsals For Departure" struck every melancholy chord in my body, bringing back sad memories of being dumped by girls and the joyful reminiscence of falling in love. Damien Jurado is the most talented "folk" singer in the shop today, in my opinion. Everything about the album is wonderful, from his voice to his precise harmonies to his skillful guitar playing. This is a CD to kick back and chill out to...perhaps one for a long vehicle ride home on a rainy night. Love it...5 stars.

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    Rehearsals for Departure [Vinyl] []  2019-12-24 20:58

    Damien Jurado's always been one of those artists whose melody I enjoyed every time I've heard it, but, oddly, never really went out of my method to do ough I've owned Rehearsals for Departure for years, I'd apparently never really listened to it. That all changed recently after I added it to my iPOD. Maybe it's the intimacy of listening with headphones, as opposed to begin air, but something snapped into place. I became so captivated by this album, I frequently found myself having to stop what I was doing to allow it soak in. I ended up replaying songs over and over, not because of musical hooks, but because of emotional ones. This album's a stunning piece of work!If I had to describe his melody in terms of other artists, I'd liken him to a more melodic, more dynamic, Tag Kozelek with a splash of a more subtle Will Oldham (Bonnie Prince Billy).A few high water marks:Ohio*--- Speaking of Tag Kozelek...this could easily be one of his songs...from the guitar picking, to the song structure, to the topic matter, but with more dynamic and engaging vocals. (Absolutely NO disrespect meant to either artist!). "...she belongs to her mother and the State of Ohio...I want she belonged to me..." Wow!Eyes for Windows --- Begins a stark ballad then ends with a discordant string encapsulated (soliloquy?). Easily one of the most heartbreaking things I've ever heard on a record. I don't know what the piece is or where it's from...and I don't wish to know, I like it in the context of this song. What I obtain from this song: Sometimes realizing you've moved on can be sadder than the original loss. The song then transitions beautifully into into the (relatively) upbeat Letters and The Same --- So very simple, yet so strong ...interesting classical-esque chorus -- one of the things that really works is the switching between stark and lush. That's the thing with this guy...he's able to create the easy ing forward, I plan to give his melody a much closer listen.*and yes, Tag Kozelek/SKM even has a song called Ohio too ; )

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    Rehearsals for Departure [Vinyl] []  2019-12-24 20:58

    After liking "Ghost Of David" I worked backwards to this, the proper predecessor. Just as the opener "Medication" was the best thing on "Ghost..", the first thing you hear here "Ohio" is again the standout track. It may have been over-exposure to Dylan in the womb, but those harmonicas just do something to me. For the remainder of this record Jurado walks beautiful close to the line dividing him from more traditional singer-song writers. For me this is not as amazing as his recent work.

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    Rehearsals for Departure []  2020-1-16 22:54

    This is a unbelievable album all the method through. It is also very well recorded. The CD ver is crisp and pure. The vinyl album is amazing on the A side. However, my pressing (a first edition) was very noisy on side B. A lot of ticks & clicks right out of the box. If you are a fan of "And now that I'm in your shadow, Ghost of David and Where shall you take me", then you need this album.

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    Rehearsals for Departure []  2020-1-16 22:54

    After liking "Ghost Of David" I worked backwards to this, the proper predecessor. Just as the opener "Medication" was the best thing on "Ghost..", the first thing you hear here "Ohio" is again the standout track. It may have been over-exposure to Dylan in the womb, but those harmonicas just do something to me. For the remainder of this record Jurado walks beautiful close to the line dividing him from more traditional singer-song writers. For me this is not as amazing as his recent work.

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    Point of Departure (NA) []  2019-12-18 20:40

    Amazing service - Thank you. This book meets my greatest expectations!

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    Point of Departure (NA) []  2019-12-18 20:40

    First a disclosure. Four Arrows was the chair of my doctoral committee, and as such, has played a critical part in my development as an activist and educator. I have read most of the books written by Four Arrows and this text is a critical read at this point in our history. In my words, I hear Four Arrows telling us that we as citizens of the globe have given up our authority to those who sow fear and malice to maintain their power and control. Our communities are falling, our schools are under attack, and our non-human brothers and sisters are losing their ability to survive. A deep understanding of an Indigenous Globe View and the importance of embracing that view for the amazing of all beings on earth, is now more critical than ever. Education reform in the US and the British Isles in the form of an intense effort to privatize our public education institutions and give them to for profit organizations is just one of the manifestations of this effort to undermine our communities for greed, power, and control. Misinformation, hegemony, and colonization are all tools used to silence those who have deep wisdom and knowledge that falls outside of the western worldview. It is certainly time to take our communities back and Four Arrows leads us in this quest. I highly recommend Point of Departure. Be ready to be pushed out of your comfort location if you like me have grown up with a western worldview.

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    Rehearsals for Departure [Vinyl] []  2019-12-24 20:58

    As a fast preface, I'd like to mention that this album was suggested to me at random. I only feel it important to state this as it may explain the tone of some of this review. I can say that I'm certainly glad it was as I have thoroughly enjoyed the experience. The "Plays" count on my iTunes currently sitting at 8 seems to shore up that sentiment. My immediate thought upon starting this album was... Jesus this is really familiar, a thought that would not leave me throughout the album and indeed still has rt of the reason for the familiarity may be that there isn't a single track on the album that doesn't remind me of another artist. In Mr. Jurado's defense this is not always artists that came before him and may in fact be to his ability. In my mind I can easily set him side by side with a lot of unbelievable musicians both past and present. Damien Jurado instantly conjures up memories of other singular musicians like Nick Drake, Elliott Smith and Pete Yorn. Hell some of his catchier tracks like "Honey Baby", "Letters & Drawings" and "Ohio" are almost patent rip offs of Pete Yorn Singles circa "musicforthemorningafter"... if he hadn't done it two years prior that ere are other songs that instantly remind me of very specific tracks. The cadence of "Tragedy" makes me think of "Feeding the Tree" by Belly, "Eyes for Windows" is almost assuredly an homage to Nick Drake's "These Things First" and "Tornado" feels like a revisit of "Barbarosa" by Sordid Humor. He's not without a small influence of his own though as the title track sounds like it was the blueprint for Jessica Lea Mayfield's first album "With Blasphemy so Heartfelt". Then there are the folk melody staple slow laments like "Curbside, "Love the Same" and "Saturday" to which I can attribute no one in particular but seem passed down through the history of the genre.I would not say the Damien Jurado has a amazing voice by any means but I will state clearly that he does have the rhythm, vision, arrangement skills and writing ability to invalidate the necessity. "Rehearsals for Departure" is an indie/folk album of the highest and if that's your bag baby I think you'll be deciding this is going to be a permanent part of your library by about 1:05 on track one of this album. It is a wonderfully cohesive album that hits the genre running on all eight cylinders and keeps firing properly for its full 36:40 duration. In the end I'm glad it was introduced to me and it is my pleasure to introduce it to you.P.S. He has a fresh album out this year that you may wish to add to your 2012 collection as is is my review from [...]

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    Rehearsals for Departure [Vinyl] []  2019-12-24 20:58

    Rehearsals For Departure shows Damien Jurado going for a more rootsy rustic sound than his debut record and it pays off well. album opener "Ohio" tells a fascinating story and is very touching in it's Nick Drake inspired music and warm gentle tones. "Honey Baby" and "Letters And Drawings" both sound alive and fabulous with their upbeat sound and catchy hooks. there's plenty of moody late night numbers as well, such as the brooding "Love The Same" and the final somewhat confusing title track. Damien has a method of writing very easy songs that don't waste time...they simply tell their story straight and obtain on with the next one. sometimes, his lyrics are a small too frail, such as on "Tornado," where the dramatic flair sounds best suited for an episode of Saved By The Bell. but then when you go back to the beginning of the album and re-listen to the lovely "Ohio" and all is forgiven.

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    Rehearsals for Departure [Vinyl] []  2019-12-24 20:58

    Phew...I have to admit, there is no artist out there whose CD has created me cry. Until now. Listening to "Rehearsals For Departure" struck every melancholy chord in my body, bringing back sad memories of being dumped by girls and the joyful reminiscence of falling in love. Damien Jurado is the most talented "folk" singer in the shop today, in my opinion. Everything about the album is wonderful, from his voice to his precise harmonies to his skillful guitar playing. This is a CD to kick back and chill out to...perhaps one for a long vehicle ride home on a rainy night. Love it...5 stars.

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    Point of Departure (NA) []  2019-12-18 20:40

    We all operate based on certain assumptions, beliefs and paradigms. However, a lot of of these have a common root in what Four Arrows describes as a dominant worldview. This is a worldview based on current materialistic paradigm of living, fear-based, disconnected, controlling, competing and dominating type of consciousness. This is the paradigm that stifles authentic human expression and spirituality, but our historic and cultural traditions had an alternative. Four Arrows examines in info alternative method of living rooted in indigenous tradition. He also examines the role of education in fostering and instilling our paradigms.I enjoyed reading this book, and used the quotes in my recently completed dissertation work.

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    Rehearsals for Departure [Vinyl] []  2019-12-24 20:58

    You're either going to love this album or you're going to hate it. If you're into Nick Drake's later stuff, acoustical Smashing Pumpkins, or mellow Radiohead the chances go up that you'll like it.I challenge you to the album and give it to a mate if you don't like it. Even if the album doesn't resonate with you there is a large possibility one of your mates won't play anything else in his or her CD player for a month after receiving this album.I think Rehearsals is one of the best albums of the 90's and should be place up next to Mellon Collie And The Infinite Sadness.

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    Rehearsals for Departure []  2020-1-16 22:54

    Damien Jurado's always been one of those artists whose melody I enjoyed every time I've heard it, but, oddly, never really went out of my method to do ough I've owned Rehearsals for Departure for years, I'd apparently never really listened to it. That all changed recently after I added it to my iPOD. Maybe it's the intimacy of listening with headphones, as opposed to begin air, but something snapped into place. I became so captivated by this album, I frequently found myself having to stop what I was doing to allow it soak in. I ended up replaying songs over and over, not because of musical hooks, but because of emotional ones. This album's a stunning piece of work!If I had to describe his melody in terms of other artists, I'd liken him to a more melodic, more dynamic, Tag Kozelek with a splash of a more subtle Will Oldham (Bonnie Prince Billy).A few high water marks:Ohio*--- Speaking of Tag Kozelek...this could easily be one of his songs...from the guitar picking, to the song structure, to the topic matter, but with more dynamic and engaging vocals. (Absolutely NO disrespect meant to either artist!). "...she belongs to her mother and the State of Ohio...I want she belonged to me..." Wow!Eyes for Windows --- Begins a stark ballad then ends with a discordant string encapsulated (soliloquy?). Easily one of the most heartbreaking things I've ever heard on a record. I don't know what the piece is or where it's from...and I don't wish to know, I like it in the context of this song. What I obtain from this song: Sometimes realizing you've moved on can be sadder than the original loss. The song then transitions beautifully into into the (relatively) upbeat Letters and The Same --- So very simple, yet so strong ...interesting classical-esque chorus -- one of the things that really works is the switching between stark and lush. That's the thing with this guy...he's able to create the easy ing forward, I plan to give his melody a much closer listen.*and yes, Tag Kozelek/SKM even has a song called Ohio too ; )

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    Rehearsals for Departure []  2020-1-16 22:54

    Rehearsals For Departure shows Damien Jurado going for a more rootsy rustic sound than his debut record and it pays off well. album opener "Ohio" tells a fascinating story and is very touching in it's Nick Drake inspired music and warm gentle tones. "Honey Baby" and "Letters And Drawings" both sound alive and fabulous with their upbeat sound and catchy hooks. there's plenty of moody late night numbers as well, such as the brooding "Love The Same" and the final somewhat confusing title track. Damien has a method of writing very easy songs that don't waste time...they simply tell their story straight and obtain on with the next one. sometimes, his lyrics are a small too frail, such as on "Tornado," where the dramatic flair sounds best suited for an episode of Saved By The Bell. but then when you go back to the beginning of the album and re-listen to the lovely "Ohio" and all is forgiven.

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    Rehearsals for Departure [Vinyl] []  2019-12-24 20:58

    One of the albums that started Damien's rise on the indie circuit, it still remains as vibrant and glowing as it did the day it was released. While he has went down a lot of various paths, this one is still a unbelievable introduction to his work. Some people still think it's his best albumeven, though, that is highly debateable and it is certainly a more easy piece despite its vast 's up there with Ghost of David, ....Shadow, Where Shall You Take Me, and possibly Brothers and Sisters.... His work is at its best for me when there are amazing melodies and lyrics that evoke a certain put and time with amazing spirit and detail. A lot of the songs on here are definitely a littler early and not quite up to par with his BEST stuff, and the production is also beautiful sparse, but it also has a lot of heart and melody. A very solid record.Ohio, Tragedy, and Curbside are a ridiculous trio to lead off the album and still they remain some of his best and most poignant songs. It's a bittersweet record leaning on the upside of nostalgia, unlike a couple of his albums like Ghost of David, which are very bleak and dark in comparison all the method through. Altogether a high recommendation here.

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    Rehearsals for Departure [Vinyl] []  2019-12-24 20:58

    You haven’t really heard this album until you listen to it while on a street trip alone down the Washington coast during the fall, while missing someone, then getting mcDonalds and feeling guilty and hating yourself, then getting renting a cabin in the woods and seeing some huge cedar trees, then taking a walk on a lonely beach while it’s raining. No. You haven’t really heard this album until you’ve done that.

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    Point of Departure (NA) []  2019-12-18 20:40

    This book review was posted with the hard cover edition, and some people told me the of this book was method to high, especially if they were to use if for one of their courses in university. I agree. Accidently, I place the review with the hard cover, and now I place it with the cover at a very reasonable for what the reader is to gain from Point of Departure.I situate Four Arrows’ fresh book Point of Departure, perhaps more so than any of his 20+ other books, as the tattoo marking of a 21st century Anthropocene writer/teacher/prophet, in the category of like author/critics: Bill McKibben (“Deep Economy” 2007), Naomi Klein (“This Changes Everything” 2014) and Elizabeth Kolbert (“Sixth Extinction” 2015). Anthropocene is the fresh geological era a lot of are arguing has distinctly emerged with a label that marks it as an unprecedented time of human impact on Earth’s dynamics (especially, since 19th century W. Industrialization). Typical characteristics are anthropogenic climate change and mass extinction of species. The globe has often been in trouble, you may say but arguably, there’s never been the accumulative anthropogenic geo-bio-cultural negative impact like we are seeing today. Something is terribly wrong, say all these critics, with the very method we envision humans and their relationship to planet Earth and its natural and ecological laws and I have read and studied the writing of Four Arrows (aka Dr. Don T. Jacobs) for the past ten years, he definitely ranks amongst my top six of the best contemporary educators. With Point of Departure, for its mere fearlessness alone, I rank currently no. 1 of the books any educator ought to read before stepping into the classroom tomorrow—that is, even if you don’t believe in the context called Anthropocene. FA’s teaching is that urgent and essential to humanity’s global problematique, of which another amazing educator Edmund O’Sullivan (after his mentor Thomas Berry) named as priorities: survive, critique, make (1). Four Arrows’s fresh book does a method to survive the Anthropocene, if not thrive. It also points to the evidence that we are more or less doomed to fail as civilization without the Indigeneous Worldview guiding the method in the next ur Arrows’s Indigenizing of society (2) especially, the Western Worldview, and the concomitant education project, I heartily help and have likewise been engaged for several decades. At age 70, Four Arrows is not backing down one bit on his critique and vision in to comfortably conform to mere “educational reform.” He, like O’Sullivan (and a rare few others) in the field of Education, create a distinction between such reforms and what is needed—that is, educational transformation. O’Sullivan (1999), offering an “ecozoic vision,” clarified that beyond changing the furniture around (i.e., reform criticism), we have to shift our zone completely whereby “transformative criticism suggests a radical restructuring of the dominant culture and a fundamental rupture with the past” because the dominator culture running the global, since industrial civilization, at least, is suffering an “entrancement [which] must be considered as a profound cultural pathology. It can be dealt with only in terms of a correspondingly deep cultural therapy.”(3)Four Arrows picks-up where O’Sullivan left off, and wrote, “In this book I propose that we have only these two worldviews [Indigenous and dominant/western] operating today. Paradoxically, only our original one can embrace the mandate for seeing complementarity. We may be able to embrace some things that emerged from the more latest and now dominant worldview but without returning to the primary precepts of our original [Indigenous or primal DNA sensibilities] instructions, we will continue to destroy our life systems.... As the following pages in this book reveal, the awesome system that emerged was seriously compromised by virtue of having a various worldview—one that is promoting and maintaining insanity...” (p. xii).There are so a lot of delicious nuances in Four Arrows’ educational philosophy for the Anthropocene that it would take a long essay to do them justice. Most exciting to me is that he decidedly comes forth as a conflict philosopher, theorist and pedagogue—whereby he continually forces readers, as well as himself, to confront, engage, and be troubled by the conflict of these two worldviews. His opening line of his Preface, tells it all: “Nature teaches us the importance of finding ways to bring seemingly conflicting opposites into harmony without destroying either one.... Is there a method to bring these two conflicting worldviews into harmony?” (p. xi)How are we going to bring them into complementarity? Is that even possible and to be recommended when Four Arrows is blunt that one of the pair of opposites is simply “insane”? He asks these troubling questions over in a hundred various ways and angles throughout the book; but he also is a pragmatist and common sense directions and praxis for all who want to engage the complex issues of the Anthropocene.I am left with a strong questioning that starts with: How much do we need to integrate the Indigenous worldview and what will that mean to our future? It so happens he is part of a planning squad of a lot of Indigenous peoples and others of mixed persuasions and cultural backgrounds for a September conference “Sustainable Wisdom: Integrating KnowHow for Global Flourishing” at University of Notre Dame. I’m sure he is presenting on this book and his radical only-two-worldviews theory. If you look at the endorsements for the book it is clear he has a amazing a lot of Indigenous leaders and scholars backing up his theory in principle and recommending the importance of his fresh book as a MUST r all the directions of my interests in Four Arrows’ controversial Indigenous philosophy of education, I’ll place my bet on its most necessary contribution to the Anthropocene will be in its pushing us to go further in conflict management/education development. His emerging conflict pedagogy, with a complexity of worldviews as contexts for conflict work, is a fascinating one (especially, as he brings forth a brand fresh method using the Medicine Wheel Directions to locate his theory of fear management/education via CAT-FAWN). Again, so a lot of interesting things in his work, but I shall close this review to state that if Mass Global Extinction (MGE) is a tidal wave upon us, equally, and interconnected to MGC, is Mass Global Conflict (MGC). It is the latter, via a fresh conflict pedagogy (Four Arrows’ "fearless" style) that may very well be the ‘bridge’ some of us are looking for as transformational criticism and praxis in education, and society as a whole.End Notes1. Excerpt and paraphrase from Maxwell, M. (2002). What is curriculum anyway? In E. V. O’Sullivan, A. Morrell, and M. A. O’Connor (Eds.), Expanding the boundaries of transformative learning: Essays on theory and praxis (pp. 13-22). Fresh York: Palgrave, 18.2. Four Arrows (Don T. Jacobs) (with England-Aytes, K., Cajete, G., Fisher, R. M., Mann, B. A., McGaa, E., and Sorensen, M.) (2013). Teaching truly: A curriculum to Indigenize mainstream education. Fresh York: Peter Lang.3. O’Sullivan, E. (1999). Transformative learning: Educational vision for the 21st century. Toronto, ON: OISE/UT and University of Toronto Press and Fresh York: Zed Books, 5, 3.

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    Rehearsals for Departure []  2020-1-16 22:54

    One of the albums that started Damien's rise on the indie circuit, it still remains as vibrant and glowing as it did the day it was released. While he has went down a lot of various paths, this one is still a unbelievable introduction to his work. Some people still think it's his best albumeven, though, that is highly debateable and it is certainly a more easy piece despite its vast 's up there with Ghost of David, ....Shadow, Where Shall You Take Me, and possibly Brothers and Sisters.... His work is at its best for me when there are amazing melodies and lyrics that evoke a certain put and time with amazing spirit and detail. A lot of the songs on here are definitely a littler early and not quite up to par with his BEST stuff, and the production is also beautiful sparse, but it also has a lot of heart and melody. A very solid record.Ohio, Tragedy, and Curbside are a ridiculous trio to lead off the album and still they remain some of his best and most poignant songs. It's a bittersweet record leaning on the upside of nostalgia, unlike a couple of his albums like Ghost of David, which are very bleak and dark in comparison all the method through. Altogether a high recommendation here.

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    Rehearsals for Departure []  2020-1-16 22:54

    You're either going to love this album or you're going to hate it. If you're into Nick Drake's later stuff, acoustical Smashing Pumpkins, or mellow Radiohead the chances go up that you'll like it.I challenge you to the album and give it to a mate if you don't like it. Even if the album doesn't resonate with you there is a large possibility one of your mates won't play anything else in his or her CD player for a month after receiving this album.I think Rehearsals is one of the best albums of the 90's and should be place up next to Mellon Collie And The Infinite Sadness.

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    Rehearsals for Departure [Vinyl] []  2019-12-24 20:58

    This is a unbelievable album all the method through. It is also very well recorded. The CD ver is crisp and pure. The vinyl album is amazing on the A side. However, my pressing (a first edition) was very noisy on side B. A lot of ticks & clicks right out of the box. If you are a fan of "And now that I'm in your shadow, Ghost of David and Where shall you take me", then you need this album.

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    Rehearsals for Departure [Vinyl] []  2019-12-24 20:58

    Rehearsals For Departure is absolutely brilliant. I work as a DJ at a college radio station and I have to admit that it's the most emotional and strong CD I've heard off the indie circuit in a long time. His Woodie Guthrie-esque folkiness is exactly what commercial radio is in deperate need of right now. Don't be surprised if you see his name all over the put soon.

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    Point of Departure (NA) []  2019-12-18 20:40

    We all have a worldview, an idea about the nature of reality. We may not be conscious of it, but we do. It shapes our thinking and our actions. Likewise, the worldview that is dominant at any point in history shapes our societies. If we want to address the imbalances in ourselves and in our societies, we need to understand that these imbalances are the product of our worldview. Moreover, we need to recognize that the worldview that made the issues faced by the globe cannot be used to fix them. For true solutions, we must look to our original worldview – the one that allowed us to live in relative harmony with our planet and with one another for most of human is is the argument of Indigenous elder and scholar Four Arrows in Point of Departure: Returning to Our More Authentic Worldview for Education and Survival. He estimates that between 5,000 and 10,000 years ago, we began to depart from “a moral that bound all life together.” This moral was a product of Indigenous worldview. Since that time, we have evolved an anthropocentric moral that separates life based on hierarchy. This moral is a product of Western worldview. Four Arrows contends that all religious, cultural, and moral systems are not worldviews unto themselves but are expressions of one or the other of these two fore the point of departure, Indigenous worldview regarded what we might call “God” as inseparable from humans, non-humans, and the rest of Nature. In this sense, all of life was seen to be inspirited. After the point of departure, which was perhaps prompted by the advent of agricultural surpluses and the resulting sense that we had mastered Nature, Western worldview came to regard “God” as separate from creation. This distinction between the interconnectedness of all and the separation of all explains the differences between Indigenous worldview and Western cause Indigenous thinking has been repressed and Western thinking has become dominant, the two worldviews are no longer in balance. The negative outcomes of this imbalance range from a likely “sixth mass extinction” to “religious dogma, absolute rule, class hierarchy, military expansion, slavery, land ownership, economic debt, domination of women, greed, jealousy, a centralized system of government (the state), and large-scale war.” Four Arrows explains that balance can be restored only by means of Indigenous ways: “Recognizing and implementing the ancient pre-departure beliefs will enable us to understand that we are truly connected, and let us to realize peace, respect, and sustainability again for the benefit of all human and non-human beings. It would be a mind shift from mutually assured destruction to mutually assured survival.”More than a philosophical treatise, Point of Departure is a handbook on Indigenous practice. Coupling Western scientific investigation with Indigenous self-authored experience, Four Arrows not only evidence of the a lot of phenomena attributed to Indigenous practice but also equips readers to adopt Indigenous methods themselves. He explains, “Theory is combined with recommendations for learning and praxis, and exercises are suggested for actualizing private and, ultimately, global transformation.”To this end, Point of Departure focuses on five aspects of Indigenous practice that can support to correct the imbalances of our Western thinking: trance-based learning, courage and fearlessness, community-oriented self-authorship, sacred communication, and the idea of Nature as All. To emphasize the holistic interdependence of these five aspects, Four Arrows locations trance at the center of a figurative Medicine Wheel whose four cardinal directions are fear, authority, words, and Nature. In this way, the reader is reminded that the outcome of all trance-based learning is determined by one’s orientation to each of these four other aspects of Indigenous ance refers to states of consciousness at the lower alpha and theta brainwave frequencies. Alpha is a state of light trance, and theta is a state of deep trance. Unlike the higher beta brainwave frequency of waking consciousness, trance frequencies give one access to “wisdom that is independent from reason and ego.” Four Arrows explains that this wisdom arises from “a vital energy within us and in the world, the source of which is creation itself.” Because Western worldview largely ignores this energetic realm in favor of the material realm, it denies that “all experience happens in two worlds at the same time.” Thus it “prevents us from fully learning.” Achieved through self-hypnosis and meditation, trance states can support us to undo negative subconscious programming by instilling fresh thinking, which in turn can lead to fresh behaviors. Point of Departure is full of firsthand accounts of how this process works, as well as easy techniques that anyone can use for the betterment of all.Fear relates directly to trance because in a state of heightened fear, we can enter a trance state and become unknowingly susceptible to subconscious programming by others. Owing to its grounding in trace-based learning, Indigenous worldview protects one from such external manipulation by orienting one toward internal energetic wisdom. It recognizes that one’s sense of separation from the inspirited realm is the source of fear and that courage is thus derived from realization of one’s interconnectedness with all. This kind of courage is not rooted in dogmatic certainty about reality but in acceptance of the unknown. The inspirited realm is regarded as the “Great Mysterious” – “an unexplainable power that manifests through countless beings, spirits, and matter.” When such courage accompanies our actions, we can become fearless enough to be selfless on behalf of others. Generosity is the highest expression of courage. Point of Departure metacognitive tactics for facing our fears so that we are not weakened by them but are able to use them to achieve private transformation and to practice ity relates directly to trance because trance-based learning fosters internal authority and self-authorship. This type of authority frees one from dependence on external authority, protecting one from potential misdirection. It also emphasizes that “the highest authority for all decisions comes from one’s personal, honest reflection on lived experience with the understanding that everything is related.” Thus Indigenous self-authority is rooted in firsthand knowledge but is oriented toward the community and the greater amazing rather than toward ego fulfillment. This focus on the community ensures a balance between the individual and the collective – in contrast to Western worldview’s emphasis on obedience to external authority for the amazing of a few. Within Indigenous societies, this balance is further reflected in the fact that authority is nonanthropocentric, nonhierarchical, and noncentralized. Point of Departure provides concrete ways to determine the sources of authority that tutorial our decisions and actions so that we might embody our full potential as individuals on behalf of the human community.Words relate directly to trance because the language that we use in self-hypnosis to instill subconscious ideas has a critical impact on the effectiveness of this practice. For example, negative words like not or won’t should be avoided because they “do not form photos in the mind.” In contrast, positive phrasing that uses the show progressive verb tense results in active photos that facilitate creative visualization and orient one toward change. This orientation is at the heart of Indigenous worldview and is evident in Indigenous languages themselves, which “emphasize process, subjectivity, transformation, and living connections with a more verb-oriented structure.” In contrast, “Indo-European languages emphasize categories, objectivity, permanence, and a separation from Nature with a more noun-oriented syntax.”The Indigenous orientation toward transformation is spiritual, as reflected in the fact that “the concept of god is a verb in most Indigenous languages. For example, in Lakota, Wakan Tanka (god) is literally the ‘great mysteriousing.’” Point of Departure shows us how to balance the left-brain language favored by Western worldview by using Indigenous right-brain language to “more authentically describe reality, enhance relational ethics, reduce deception, and manage unconscious thoughts and behaviors.”Nature relates directly to trance because the “vital energy” that we access while in a trance state is the same energy that animates the world. Just as we can commune with this energy through self-hypnosis and meditation, we can commune with this energy when we are immersed in Nature and mindful of the wisdom that Nature imparts. Indigenous worldview regards Nature as the ultimate teacher and source of experiential learning. Vision quests, for example, are done while one is alone in Nature. And animals can model right behavior, demonstrate the interconnectedness of all, and symbolize spiritual lessons particular to one’s own circumstances. In contrast, Western worldview fosters a separation from Nature that deprives us of this kind of knowledge. Moreover, its hierarchical “discrimination versus Nature” is “the foundation for human discrimination versus other humans.” Without a spiritual connection with Nature, we have lost our spiritual connection with one another. For the amazing of our human relations and the salvation of our ecosystems, Point of Departure implores you to “be courageous in using what you learn from Nature in word and deed to bring balance back into the world.”The chapters on each direction of Four Arrows’ Medicine Wheel employ a range of Western scholarship and Indigenous experiential knowledge to illustrate the differences between Indigenous worldview and Western worldview. The chapter on trance-based learning contains a complement to the ideas of Miguel Ruiz in The Four Agreements. The chapter on courage and fearlessness contains an overview of Western philosophy’s idea of courage alongside an acc of how both Mohandas Gandhi and Huston Smith led lives that demonstrated Indigenous transformative learning. The chapter on community-oriented self-authorship contains a discussion of MRI studies confirming that whole-brain functioning is enhanced when Indigenous right-brain orientations toward fear are combined with Western left-brain knowledge. The chapter on sacred communication contains a comparison of the linguistic theories of Benjamin Lee Whorf and Noam Chomsky. The chapter on Nature as All contains an assessment of the life of Ohiyesa (aka Charles A. Eastman), a Santee Dakota who graduated from Boston University School of Medicine in 1890 and straddled the Indigenous and Western worlds.Point of Departure does not claim that the holistic orientation of Indigenous worldview is special to Indigenous peoples or that the individualistic orientation of Western worldview is special to Western peoples. Rather, the holistic and the individualistic orientations are two halves of a single whole. Each is one half of the human mind. Thus each is a product of human experience. What Indigenous worldview shows is that Indigenous peoples actively worked to maintain a balance between the two by coupling their left-brain material experience with their right-brain spiritual experience. They were well aware of the risks of moving too far in one direction or the other. Four Arrows writes, “The ancient stories helped to make cultures that held on to the balance because of what they taught.”Today, the excesses of Western worldview have produced forces that are intentionally, systematically, and maliciously working versus our collective best interests. But the solution does not lie in fighting the left-brain system with left-brain approaches. The worldview that made our issues cannot be used to fix them. Rather, the solution lies in adopting right-brain practices that can complement our Western worldview. The war is a spiritual one, and we must become Indigenous warriors. Four Arrows writes, “If the reader uses this special Medicine Wheel and its interactions to consider everyday choices, feelings, issues and deep-seated beliefs, my vision tells me we have a possibility to support restore the globe for the seventh generation.”Point of Departure is a special and profound book. It a lucid presentation of ideas that are often rendered in the overly abstract language of metaphysics. This is a large achievement! More than that, it presents easy techniques for putting Indigenous worldview into practice. Perhaps most remarkable is its appendix, where Four Arrows tells two private stories that illustrate the effectiveness of Indigenous methods – stories whose outcomes are “miracles” when seen through Western worldview but are fully understandable when seen through Indigenous worldview. Anyone can achieve related outcomes using trance-based learning. It’s a matter of remembering that “fear an opportunity to practice a virtue; authority comes only from honest reflection on lived experience with the realization that everything is related; words and other forms of communication are understood as sacred vibrations; and Nature is the ultimate teacher.”

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    Rehearsals for Departure []  2020-1-16 22:54

    As a fast preface, I'd like to mention that this album was suggested to me at random. I only feel it important to state this as it may explain the tone of some of this review. I can say that I'm certainly glad it was as I have thoroughly enjoyed the experience. The "Plays" count on my iTunes currently sitting at 8 seems to shore up that sentiment. My immediate thought upon starting this album was... Jesus this is really familiar, a thought that would not leave me throughout the album and indeed still has rt of the reason for the familiarity may be that there isn't a single track on the album that doesn't remind me of another artist. In Mr. Jurado's defense this is not always artists that came before him and may in fact be to his ability. In my mind I can easily set him side by side with a lot of unbelievable musicians both past and present. Damien Jurado instantly conjures up memories of other singular musicians like Nick Drake, Elliott Smith and Pete Yorn. Hell some of his catchier tracks like "Honey Baby", "Letters & Drawings" and "Ohio" are almost patent rip offs of Pete Yorn Singles circa "musicforthemorningafter"... if he hadn't done it two years prior that ere are other songs that instantly remind me of very specific tracks. The cadence of "Tragedy" makes me think of "Feeding the Tree" by Belly, "Eyes for Windows" is almost assuredly an homage to Nick Drake's "These Things First" and "Tornado" feels like a revisit of "Barbarosa" by Sordid Humor. He's not without a small influence of his own though as the title track sounds like it was the blueprint for Jessica Lea Mayfield's first album "With Blasphemy so Heartfelt". Then there are the folk melody staple slow laments like "Curbside, "Love the Same" and "Saturday" to which I can attribute no one in particular but seem passed down through the history of the genre.I would not say the Damien Jurado has a amazing voice by any means but I will state clearly that he does have the rhythm, vision, arrangement skills and writing ability to invalidate the necessity. "Rehearsals for Departure" is an indie/folk album of the highest and if that's your bag baby I think you'll be deciding this is going to be a permanent part of your library by about 1:05 on track one of this album. It is a wonderfully cohesive album that hits the genre running on all eight cylinders and keeps firing properly for its full 36:40 duration. In the end I'm glad it was introduced to me and it is my pleasure to introduce it to you.P.S. He has a fresh album out this year that you may wish to add to your 2012 collection as is is my review from [...]

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    Rehearsals for Departure []  2020-1-16 22:54

    Rehearsals For Departure is absolutely brilliant. I work as a DJ at a college radio station and I have to admit that it's the most emotional and strong CD I've heard off the indie circuit in a long time. His Woodie Guthrie-esque folkiness is exactly what commercial radio is in deperate need of right now. Don't be surprised if you see his name all over the put soon.

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    Flight Status Tracker ✔️Arrival & Departure Guide [App]  2019-10-29 13:45

    Garbage

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    Lines of Departure (Frontlines Book 2) []  2020-1-10 19:1

    Returning to the fascinating universe he's created, the second novel by Marko Kloos is entirely solid follow-up to his first novel Terms of Enlistment.When we pick up with the main hero five years after the happenings of the previous novel, things have gone even further downhill for humanity. Now the North American Commonwealth military, the one latest bastion of and stability, is feeling the civilization toppling strain of vastly overpopulated Earth, and having to war two wars; one versus the still very alien 'Lankies', 80ft tall quadrupeds with superior technology, and the antagonistic forces of the Sino-Russian Alliance (a ill-defined nation created up of Russia and China). Gone is the feeling of superiority, replaced with a feeling of desperation as the NAC military is stretched to the breaking e story does an admirable job at depicting life in the NAC military as it appears to be the only thing standing in the method of a complete collapse of the entire western hemisphere. IT also, surprisingly, allows us to see beyond the gritty urban sprawls of the rioting welfare cities of Earth, of how the 'middle class' of this fresh globe lives in a sequence that honestly created me tear up a little.But then as soon as it's over we're back to the war. And unfortunately, this battle isn't as interesting as it appears to be on the surface. Once again I have to give the highest praise to Kloos for using his own combat experience for creating scenarios that feel realistic, but at the same time once again suffer from an over-use of military jargon. As much as I tried, I found the combat sequences to just be a bit tiring and dragging on for too long.His problems with the characters still have yet to change, as outside of the larger handful of characters that we're supposed to care about, there's a dozen more than serve no purpose and take up zone on the page. My suspension of disbelief was also strained as the main protagonist continues to defy heavy odds and survive versus both the SRA and the Lanky aliens, who lose some of their exoticness within this novel (though still remain as alien as ever). There's also the case that the main hero has the greatest luck in the universe, surviving things that otherwise murdered everyone around him or hooking up with highly necessary characters both fresh and returning almost by chance. Most of the time, it's fine and that's what a protagonist does, but it all seemed just a little bit too e basic conflict that dominates the back half of the book drags on for far too long, and while well written using his experience, Mr. Kloos still lacks enough descriptive skill for me to really tell what is shooting at what. I wasn't even aware that the starships in this universe were bound to physics until this book started mentioning that they had to perform a very The Expanse like mode of deceleration via flipping a starship and retro-burning to slow down enough obtain anywhere.But all in all, despite the same general problems that I had with the previous book and a lack of general interest in the basic conflict, Lines of Departure is still an perfect read and I highly recommend it.

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    Flight Status Tracker ✔️Arrival & Departure Guide [App]  2019-10-29 13:45

    Works but too a lot of clicks and harder than other related apps.

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    Next Departure - Cheap Flights, Mistake Airfares [App]  2019-12-7 13:19

    gotta for this and they wish a card on gile. no thanks

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    Lines of Departure (Frontlines Book 2) []  2020-1-10 19:1

    The first in the series was a amazing first novel. The second is a small less than the first, but you might expect that the second might be a small better with the author having gained some experience from the first. You would be e second picks up more or less where the first leaves off. The characters are older and have moved up or at least on in their careers, but any development seems to have been stuck at the end of the first novel. The novel reads more as a documentary style briefing than a scifi novel. You still end up rooting for the protagonist, but you aren’t going to think much about the tactics, strategy, supply lines, or any of the other things that tend to obtain [probably too much] word count in modern space/mil opera. I read the book on a flight from Detroit to Las Vegas. It’s a very quick read with no huge words (or ideas) to slow you e squad/company level stories still work well, but the overarch goes sideways; reminiscent of the teenage pulp science fantasy of the mid 1980s. So just turn off your brain, read the words, and root for the hero.

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    Lines of Departure (Frontlines Book 2) []  2020-1-10 19:1

    Another worthy installment in this franchise. Powerful overtones of Starship Troopers and the Forever War, but as in the first episode, you dont mind. Note- if you are a scifi puppy(less than 40) and you haven't read either of those, you must e situation on earth continues to deteriorate as the Lankys toss humanity off its worlds to claim them as their own. Grayson runs into his old buddy Fallon as his ship is sent to a water storage and scientific study moon to resupply. Mutiny is in the works as the command is given to commandeer the locals meal stuffs. Word arrives through some refugee SRA ships that the Lankys have arrived in earth's home system...Then the Lankys present up at the moon. Can humanity pull it together?Kloos does a nice job of building suspense, I just only finished book 2 and am ready to dive into number 3 in this series.I will books 4 and 5. No higher tribute can be paid. Amazing stuff!Ouch- I should have waited. I $4.99. They're on now for .99. Jeez, I got hosed on this deal

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    Lines of Departure (Frontlines Book 2) []  2020-1-10 19:1

    Kloos knows how tell a amazing yarn, with powerful characters and brisk plotting. His future Earth is a social and political dystopia, overcrowded, violent, impoverished, ill-governed--it's so poor it's actually a bit implausible, but Kloos weaves his tale around his fictional reality with verve. His greatest invention are humankind's mysterious foes, the e military tech is an modernize on Heinlein's vision of powered armor, but this military is far from RAH's idealized MI. It's an troops fighting stubbornly in an often questionable and increasingly desperate is would be a five-star review but for some of the howling inconsistencies--but, to be fair, some of these are important for his plot. For example (spoiler alert), the Lankies and humans are both starfaring societies, busy colonizing planets and competing for control of habitable systems. But if you have the tech to travel between stars, don't you also have the tech to exploit all the vast resources in the home system? And, Earth forces use lots of recon drones, but no combat or police drones. I could go on but it would give away a lot plot ese are minor issues--the occasional plot holes just add a small spice. A worthwhile series, look forward to finishing it.

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    Lines of Departure (Frontlines Book 2) []  2020-1-10 19:1

    It took me about four months to obtain back to this series, but I’m glad I did. Several years have passed since the first novel and the giant alien “Lankies” are kicking human posteriors all across the galaxy stealing colony globe after colony globe from them. Our hero, Andrew, has switched military professions again becoming a “combat controller”—a position which makes orbital jumps with the troops, keeps track of opponent and friendly units, and calls in air help and orbital strikes. Because there aren’t enough combat controllers, Andrew gets moved from unit to unit with amazing regularity and makes a heck of a lot more jumps than most troops. It’s a clever method of keeping the reader in the is series is somewhat depressing to read as the outlook for humanity is very bleak, but at the same time, the action scenes are amazing and Andrew is winning little victories out of the larger mess of things, which balances out the overall dismal picture. This book also shows that the largest threat to humanity is not the faceless creatures they are fighting but the infighting and the factionalism within our species. It’s nicely done. The characters are well drawn and the missions and similar issues are well conceived. If you’re looking for a fast fun read, this book will please.

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    Lines of Departure (Frontlines Book 2) []  2020-1-10 19:1

    The Skinny: in the second installment of Marco Kloos' Frontline series, the story picks up five years after the happenings of Terms of Enlistment.Andrew Grayson has traded in his neural networks job to become a combat controller. As such, he is on the frontline in the war versus the seemingly unstoppable isn't doing well. The Lankies are quickly taking planetary colonies, killing colonists like so a lot of ants and terraforming those colonies to suit their own needs. Earth's only defense is to strike those colonies after the fact with mega-ton warheads, leaving said colony unserviceable for both anwhile, Earth is far from a united front. The location battle between the Northern American Commonwealth (NAC) and the Sino-Russian Alliance (SRA) still rages, even in the face of species create matters worse, the NAC is unable to hold its earth-side communities fed and happy. Violent uprisings are a too common occurrence and the members of the home defense corp are rebelling versus unlawful e Pretty: like Terms of Enlistment the action in this book is amazing and plenty. This novel had more focus. It still seemed like I was following Grayson around in his first person narrative on a wild ride of "then this happened", but the focus was more tightly held e Good: Grayson still doesn't feel like a fully fleshed character, but Kloos is getting better at it. My most memorable part of the story was not the action filled battles, but the sparse chapters dedicated to Grayson reconnecting with his e Bad: this novel was tighter than the last, but it still has an episodic feel to it that is sometimes frustrating. Kloos speeds up when I wish him to slow e Ugly: the novel ends on not exactly a cliffhanger, but definitely a moment meant to suck you into anticipation of the next novel, which is available; however, for readers such as myself that like to jump back and forth and not read a series straight through, it is a oughts: this is not a series that will be one of those "most loved" books you have ever read. They are military science fiction, massive on action and sometimes the "science" is best left as "don't think about it too hard, just accept it".It's an enjoyable series for light action/adventure reading.

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    Lines of Departure (Frontlines Book 2) []  2020-1-10 19:1

    Lines of Departure starts 5yrs after Enlistment, and sees Grayson and Halley just re-signing their contracts to re-enlist back with their respective jobs. Grayson is now a ‘Combat Controller’, someone who leaps with a squad of soldiers and calls in fire help etc, allowing them to complete missions versus the Lankies.Halley continues to astound as a Dropship Pilot, having done so well, she is now teaching recruits for a stint as she is so brilliant that they wish her passing on her skills to fresh ings are going poorly for Humanity though as they can search no method to stop the Lankies, and they continue to take colony after colony, just turning up, gassing the roaches that live there (the humans), and then re-terraforming the planet to their liking in a matter of months, killing any other humans that they create matters worse, Humanity is still split between the North American Commonwealth and the Sino-Russian Alliance and they continue to war versus each other as humans are too stupid to rally versus a common foe and test and support each other, they would rather slay each other over minor cultural differences – it is far more logical of is book sees Grayson being sent about on different missions and doing variousGrayson finds himself aboard a ship filled with ‘Home Defence’ soldiers, what used to be his previous unit when he fought on Earth, and some other Marines, and they quickly work out, that the ships are actually a fleet of troublemakers, being sent to some backward colony.On arrival, things turn interesting when the Soldiers are asked to turn on the is book is far better than the first, more thinking, in that the first was a blend of Starship Troopers meets Black Hawk Down, whereas in this one, Kloos has his own storyline, and has developed the story about the Characters and the alien invasion.His Hero work has grown as well, Andrew has more depth to him, and his relationship with Halley grows as well. The interactions with the soldiers and the colony makes this an interesting story, and it would be a fascinating real-life with the first book, the Military knowledge and the technology used is brilliant, adding to the quality of the story, giving it a bit of additional depth, and adding some additional realism to it.Overall, this is a unbelievable sequel, I think better than the original, and well worth the read, and more to the point, it really creates more interest for the remainder of the series, which I am now also reading. Amazing for those that like Mil Sci-Fi.

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    Lines of Departure (Frontlines Book 2) []  2020-1-10 19:1

    This was a cool find.  Think Scalzi-spacebattle-scyfy, only more hero driven.  Future, aliens, believable science, Earth moving to anarchy, government spending all their on zone ships and colonization, military life, fighting to save humanity, learning who the true opponent so like Scalzi, the books are full of F-bombs. I got a lot of shade for pointing this out after the first book, but I'm sticking to it.  I'm not niave, I know how stereotypical soldiers talk.  I also know some soldiers who don't.  It'd be easier to swallow if it presented itself as a hero trait of one or two characters.  But to have EVERYONE dropping F-this and F-that all the time just wares me out--almost lazy.  Don't tell me you HAVE to swear when you write military novels, I don't believe it.  There's no gory violence. Can't we leave out the lazy language too?Anyway...The story is fun, and I recommend it to all who can handle the language.  There's another book in the series written, and one more due sometime in the future.  I'll probably take a break and wait until the 5th book is out before moving to book 4.Happy Reading!

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    Next Departure - Cheap Flights, Mistake Airfares [App]  2019-12-7 13:19

    subscription.

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    Next Departure - Cheap Flights, Mistake Airfares [App]  2019-12-7 13:19

    amazing application as it allows me to be kept in the loop on awesome flight deals.

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    Lines of Departure (Frontlines Book 2) []  2020-1-10 19:1

    In my review of Mr. Kloos' first book, Terms of Enlistment, I marked it down to four stars instead of five because, despite very much enjoying it, it felt like an incomplete story. Terms of Enlistment introduced a bunch of characters and plot elements, detailed an incredibly tense instigating event, and then just ... ended. It was Act I and Act II without an Act III. It wasn't a cliffhanger so much as a feeling of a story left nes of Departure is Act III of Terms of Enlistment. I'm not sure why this particular chapter in the battle versus the Lankies was split into two books, but Lines of Departure reads like the second half of a single (long book) and continues to develop its characters and alien warfare story in a method that's consistently engrossing. I enjoyed the first book, but Kloos improved in this one by giving us some true emotional stakes for the protagonist and building on the consistently entertaining story started in Terms of Enlistment.I sped through this book in several days and would recommend it to anyone who enjoys amazing military sci-fi, with the caveat that you *must* read Terms of Enlistment first. I'd suggest buying both Terms of Enlistment and Lines of Departure and reading them as a single book. Unlike Terms of Enlistment, Lines of Departure ends the story at a reasonable place, expanding the universe and setting the scene for future encounters while also resolving most plotlines introduced in Book 1. I immediately went out and bought Book 3.

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    Lines of Departure (Frontlines Book 2) []  2020-1-10 19:1

    A amazing sequel, but as a "reservist," I was offended by the author's repeated denigration and portrayal of the "reservist" General in the story. Come on, man! Why ruin a amazing story by adding this unnecessary jab at the "Reserves?" I was frankly offended. Reserve forces serve an necessary purpose, maybe not as crucial as the active force, but still... WE SERVE and bleed the same as any other Soldier. Totally turned me off and I won't be reading the rest of the series on principle alone. Might remind the author that "reservists" read books too. Otherwise, this is a amazing story and this is a amazing author.

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    dash [App]  2018-9-26 21:9

    Awsome!

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    dash [App]  2018-9-26 21:9

    Stops occasionally when trying to transfer thus successfully blocking access to funds when trying to create on-the-go.

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    dash [App]  2018-9-26 21:9

    Works well with my company Amazing choice made.

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    dash [App]  2018-9-26 21:9

    Hmmmm Dive and dash into the

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    dash [App]  2018-9-26 21:9

    Nice. Cool.

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    Coves of Departure: Field Notes from the Sea of Cortez []  2020-7-14 19:6

    Part travelogue, part natural history, and part philosophical musing, John Farnsworth entertains, informs and provokes the reader. His prose is sophisticated and simple to read. It’s been years since any book has interested and entertained me as much.

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    Coves of Departure: Field Notes from the Sea of Cortez []  2020-7-14 19:6

    One of the editorials said "Think of it as a field tutorial to delight" which rings rather true. This book is about interacting with nature, about writing about nature, and about writing itself. I come away thinking I should write my own field notes, amateur though I am. And I come away with a huge smile.

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    The Departure (English Subtitled) - Special Edition [Blu-ray] []  2020-7-27 0:5

    As a masters level social worker/ psychotherapist and as a Buddhist I found that I could completely relate to the joys the anxieties, and the dilemna of the priest in this attractive documentary. Helpers wish to give everything that they possibly can to all of their clients and loved ones. But there also needs to be a balance with self care so that we can continue to give. It is a very precarious balance to achieve. For those of us who are also Mahayana Buddhists it becomes a spiritual mission.

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    The Departure (English Subtitled) - Special Edition [Blu-ray] []  2020-7-27 0:5

    Attractive documentary. Must watch for anyone working in social services.

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    The Departure (English Subtitled) - Special Edition [Blu-ray] []  2020-7-27 0:5

    not great... was the feeling i came away with

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    Coves of Departure: Field Notes from the Sea of Cortez []  2020-7-14 19:6

    Amazing read! Very relaxing and thought provoking

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    The Departure (English Subtitled) - Special Edition [Blu-ray] []  2020-7-27 0:5

    An perfect movie depicting real life struggle of one's Dharma path.

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    Coves of Departure: Field Notes from the Sea of Cortez []  2020-7-14 19:6

    Coves of Departure, John Farnsworth’s eloquent tales of adventure, natural history, and the art of learning and teaching, is various from most ecological explorations. Unlike Muir, Dillard, Leopold, and others who write the natural world, Farnsworth’s explorations are not solitary. And that’s what makes this book such a a professor of literary natural history and writing at Santa Clara University, each spring he offered a short course in Baja California, land and sea. Before embarking on their journey, each student was assigned a species to research, then encounter in the wild, resulting in a reflective report on the expedition, with a focus on the assigned species.Each group of a couple dozen students and three sea-worthy adults circumnavigated Baja’s Isla Espiritu Santo archipelago by kayak, some days swimming with whale sharks, others tracking blue-footed boobies and frigate birds. One exercise Farnsworth presented: diving with snorkels, name as a lot of vertebrates as you can in thirty minutes. On land, they looked at bats, cacti, and their relationship, among a lot of other examinations of the desert islands of Baja, an “ecology of stubbornness.”Sometimes the journey was simply survival: would they round the headland and reach their beach camp before poor weather and approaching night got them? Farnsworth’s belief in his students and his self-deprecating humor support drive the journeys. And his students’ energy, high jinks, and devotion to their inquiries give them purpose and hope for our future.Farnsworth’s exploration extends to the philosophical. He considers how best to teach natural history. And writing? He views natural history literature as storytelling, saying “...the point of connection—naturalist to nature—is the point where natural history becomes indistinguishable from art.”Two niggling criticisms: This natural history memoir needs a more come-hither title to draw potential readers to its illuminating prose. More important, the book needs a map.

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    Coves of Departure: Field Notes from the Sea of Cortez []  2020-7-14 19:6

    I smiled my method through this entire book. I was one of Dr. Farnsworth's students, and was blessed with the opportunity to go on a second expedition to Baja California Sur as his teaching assistant. Reading this book truly felt like going back for a third r anybody who is interested in natural history, ecology, and finding curiosity in mundane moments, this is the book for you. Dr. Farnsworth served as a Senior Lecturer at Santa Clara University, and has a teaching style that definitely set him apart from other professors. He will teach students the background on any particular topic, and then have them go out into the field and experience it themselves, "letting nature do the massive lifting." He has always challenged his students to think outside the box. For example, my favorite writing exercise of Dr. Farnsworth's class was to "write about everything you missed on your method to class today."He carries this same spirit through his book; challenging the reader to slow down, be present, and look around. He weaves his special private story/perspective into this colourful narrative of his experience as a University Professor taking ~20 students on a trip to a desert island to write, listen and observe. He writes about his experience as the professor, but also empathizes deeply with the experience of the hn makes the reader feel equally as necessary as the writer. 10/10 would recommend.

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    The Departure (English Subtitled) - Special Edition [Blu-ray] []  2020-7-27 0:5

    The movie is about a man whose role as a father appears to be his own spiritual awakening . He's is a former punk-turned- Buddhist-priest in Japan. His everyday life is consumed with needs and demands of people on the brink of suicide all the while he is struggling with his own health, being a husband, a father, demands for his own self-care, and the challenges of enforcing boundaries with people who are in trauma. It's a beautifully crafted film. At face value it would seem like a provocative subject (suicide), but it's refreshing in that it lacks the sensationalism of suicide in Japan. It's a tender and raw portrait of an individual captured in warm light and with comfort food.

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    The Departure (English Subtitled) - Special Edition [Blu-ray] []  2020-7-27 0:5

    I enjoyed how Lana Wilson drew us into the globe of Nemoto, the monk who counsels the suicidal. She starts out by allowing us to meet him at one of his workshops meant to present the suicidal the impact that death would have on them and all they search important. She shows us the Nemoto the monk's little family and precious 2 year-old boy who seems to be somewhat neglected by the monk. Over the course of this gut-wrenching documentary, she shows us why Nemoto has withdrawn from his beloved boy. Nemoto tells his own life story of how he became a Zen monk dealing with the suicidal. We are shown so a lot of illuminating things about life and death in this documentary. A statement by Nemoto serves as an apt theme: "Life is about walking down our path toward our death."

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    The Departure (English Subtitled) - Special Edition [Blu-ray] []  2020-7-27 0:5

    Inspiring touching documentary. I have both a amazing interest in Buddhism and suicide prevention. Namaste.

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    Coves of Departure: Field Notes from the Sea of Cortez []  2020-7-14 19:6

    The jacket blurb calls this a "literary natural history," so I expected to learn about the Sea of Cortez and the surrounding area. Instead I learned a lot about the professor who wrote the book and what he experienced taking students into the field. That's fine if you wish to know more about the academic experience, but it just wasn't what I thought the book would be. That said, the book is well written and, especially for people already invested in the field, an interesting read.

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    The Departure (English Subtitled) - Special Edition [Blu-ray] []  2020-7-27 0:5

    This was an awesome movie that really digs into the realities of depression and suicide but still a practical hope for the future. Recommended for anyone interested in Buddhism, Japan, mental health and life in general.

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    Coves of Departure: Field Notes from the Sea of Cortez []  2020-7-14 19:6

    I am writing from Barcelona, Spain where, for the first time in my life, I have been inspired to review a book on Amazon. I learned that Coves of Departure was first available for on Monday and decided to my copy right away. I jumped right in and finished reading in under 24 hours.I am a small embarrassed to admit that I am not especially fond of animals (my allergies don’t help) and certainly don’t know that Latin names for any particular species. I found the author’s storytelling to be completely accessible despite the fact that I am a novice naturalist. I also found the structure of the book to add a lot to my experience as the ch more importantly, however, I was struck by a number of the book’s huge ideas. What makes us experience wonder and awe? What is “normal” and what is not, and what difference does it create in how we experience the globe around us? How closely do we really perceive our environment? How does science intersect with art?Although I read tons of books every year, it’s rare that I read one that changes the method I think about and interact with the world. Since reading the book I have found myself subconsciously thinking about what it is that causes wonder and awe. Why did I feel so excited to see my first waterfall in Iceland but after more than a week I barely took message of the tons I drove right past? Why did I obtain so excited about seeing the latest of the Huge 5 on safari and not the animals that created their homes in our campsite? How can I continue to search ways to experience joy in daily experiences?Coves of Departure has surely inspired me to travel to Baja and have other related experiences with nature. But I am even more grateful for the impact Dr. Farnsworth’s words have had on me and the method I experience the every day.

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    Coves of Departure: Field Notes from the Sea of Cortez []  2020-7-14 19:6

    This is a very readable acc of taking students out for a field trip to spot nature, add to their life lists and do some science. The Sea of Cortez is the main zone with a particular group poised to run into poor kayaking weather. Their professor, a former dive trainer, is not only responsible for the students but for his own notes and training up his teaching assistant. The local kayaking operators know far more about the sea than anyone, including that poachers are stealing all the sea cucumbers. Eels feature largely. And seals, dolphins, crabs....We also see the Californian mountains which are home to the revived population of Condors, and spend days with the amazing professor learning about their care and feeding, their soaring and tournament from other raptors and vultures. This contains a hawk circling with a crowd of turkey vultures, separating and swooping on a monster that knew turkey vultures weren't a threat.Anyone studying biology, ecology, different environments and the work needed of scientists, will not only have fun this read but be filled with hope and cheer. Hold up the amazing work.I would have loved images but my ARC had none. Bibliography P205 - 208. I counted seven names that I could be sure were female.

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    The Departure (English Subtitled) - Special Edition [Blu-ray] []  2020-7-27 0:5

    This film is provacative. It shows the streuggle of one as a helper who has no boundaries to support himself. If one wants to be compassionate one must be compassionate to oneself. The depiction of Self-No-Self becomes confused and blurred with Self and Other, a common error. And bound-less and no boundaries are confused with no-boundaries-with-others in every day reality. It is interesting to see the monk become both teacher and student. However his lack of egolessness creates his own paradox: he can die for his students but they cannot live unless they have him as their teacher., dualism at its worst. As humans seek and then discard real reality this film is fascinating. As anyone looking for role model of a therapist this is horrendous. It is a amazing film in showing what happens to us all; it works as a significant parable which we can recoginize ourselves frequently living by striving to not die. Conversely, it is in those moments I am awake to my impermanence, I live.

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    The Departure (English Subtitled) - Special Edition [Blu-ray] []  2020-7-27 0:5

    A fascinating but low-key documentary following the life of a man dedicated to stopping suicides. His overwhelming concern for others, however, takes a toll not only on his family but also his health.

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    The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World []  2020-1-26 23:28

    It's very rare for me to give up on a book, but give up on this book I great-grandparents came to the U.S. from an eastern European country and, fortunately, wrote stories and letters about their lives, which I read long after they were dead. Reading these personal accounts, along with two trips to my ancestral homeland and lots of ancestry research, led me to and start reading THE GREAT DEPARTURE.Unfortunately, the book seems a relentless horror story of human exploitation. There is much description of "misery" experienced by those who came to America, of their "trafficking" by unscrupulous agents, of the supposedly horrific conditions they encountered, of "terror," fear, and abject disappointment. At a lot of points I felt as if I was reading the story of concentration camp victims -- not people who willingly traveled across an ocean to begin fresh e accounts of my great-grandparents (who were not related, but came separately to America in the early 20th century) are full of fascinating info about their voyages to the U.S., their adjustment to a strange fresh country, passing through Fresh York and Chicago, and carving out fresh lives in the upper Midwest. Their stories describe the culture of Americans (or "the English," as my great-grandmother called them), as opposed to that of the Slavs back "home." They describe lots of hard work, a lot of rewards, a steep learning-curve, some humorous incidents, as well as some difficulties. (My great-grandfather wrote of his warm relationship with the local "Indians," who loved his accordion music.) Their stories are really unbelievable adventure tales.While I'm sure my great-grandparents did experience painful times, their lives were not about victimization. I am certain they viewed themselves as fortunate people.Why is THE GREAT DEPARTURE so relentlessly negative? Why the victimization slant? Is that really the WHOLE story of the "mass migration from Eastern Europe"?

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    The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World []  2020-1-26 23:28

    With all the problems in the USA over immigration laws and enforcement, I found it very interesting to read the history of immigration challenges and laws invoked over the years around the world, especially Europe prior to and during WWII. I recommend this informative book to anyone seeking better understanding on immigration problems in our current day politics and lives.

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    The Falling Away: Spiritual Departure of Physical Rapture?: A Second Look at 2 Thessalonians 2:3 []  2020-5-4 18:45

    EXCELLENT discussion of II Thessalonians 2:3 ... I would advise anyone confused about a Pre-Tribulation rapture to read this small gem!!

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    The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World []  2020-1-26 23:28

    Very comprehensive book about the reasons behind immigration and the results of leaving ones country of origin. The findings cover over a hundred years to the present. History does indeed repeat itself with no clear answers on how to cope with the globe situations that evolve with decisions created by people in power. The story does not have an ending yet and probably never will.

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    The Falling Away: Spiritual Departure of Physical Rapture?: A Second Look at 2 Thessalonians 2:3 []  2020-5-4 18:45

    Thank You very much for exceptional teaching on the Rapture. This teaching of the departure makes the only right sense and understanding of this word in the context of the entire Rapture in 2 Thessalonians 2:3

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    The Falling Away: Spiritual Departure of Physical Rapture?: A Second Look at 2 Thessalonians 2:3 []  2020-5-4 18:45

    The case created for a physical removal of the Church who is inextricably connected to the Holy Spirit as a unit declared by Jesus is very well created in this treatise and is,after reading this book, a fact in my mind - I cannot wait anymore for maranatha tim, even so come Lord Jesus come Your Bride awaits You.

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    The Falling Away: Spiritual Departure of Physical Rapture?: A Second Look at 2 Thessalonians 2:3 []  2020-5-4 18:45

    This book gives solid and sound exegetical reasons for 2 Thess. 2:3a speaking of a departure and not a spiritual falling away. It gives sound evidence of when, whether before,during, or after, the rapture will occur. I recommend this book for all Christians, whether you believe the rapture to be real or not. A amazing read that makes you think.

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    The Falling Away: Spiritual Departure of Physical Rapture?: A Second Look at 2 Thessalonians 2:3 []  2020-5-4 18:45

    Very informative and biblical!

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    The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World []  2020-1-26 23:28

    It reminded me so much of the neighborhood that I grew up in! The memories of the various languages that were spoken and all of the various foods that were shared in our neighborhood will always remain with me. Thanks you for the perfect book!

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    The Falling Away: Spiritual Departure of Physical Rapture?: A Second Look at 2 Thessalonians 2:3 []  2020-5-4 18:45

    While admitting that it is a minority view, Dr. Woods presents 10 reasons why 2 Thessalonians 2:3 refers to the rapture of the church and not apostasy in the church. He provides both exegetical and historical reasons supporting this view. If this view is correct then it provides definitive proof of a pre-tribulation rapture of the church. This short but necessary book will challenge skeptics of the pre-tribulation rapture view, while also giving confidence to those who are expecting the pre-tribulation snatching up of the church. Furthermore pan-tribulationists, those who avoid the study of Bible prophecy expecting that it will all "pan out" in the end, will be compelled to rethink their position in light of the implications of 2 Thessalonians 2:3.An necessary work that all should read and ranatha!

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    The Falling Away: Spiritual Departure of Physical Rapture?: A Second Look at 2 Thessalonians 2:3 []  2020-5-4 18:45

    I liked the book. It's well thought out and informative.What drove me crazy was all of the typographical errors.Dr. Woods, Please have somebody proofread your books.

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    Departure: Cuckquean Cleaning, Reluctant Lesbian, Messy Sucking (The Billionaire's Charity Book 2) []  2020-1-28 22:24

    I didn't think this story could obtain hotter but wow was I wrong I may have to go take a cold parture: (Cuckquean Cleaning, Reluctant Lesbian, Back Door Licking, Messy Sucking) (The Billionaire's Charity Book 2)

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    The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World []  2020-1-26 23:28

    Zahra describes the experiences of Central European emigrants, and the policies of nations that affected those who migrated during the fin de siècle, throughout both Globe Wars, the Cold War, and beyond. Zahra’s intent is to reveal patterns in emigration and immigration policies among Eastern and Western states. Her book contrasts with other historians, who predominantly focus on the quantities of Europeans migrating to the United States. Instead, Zahra locations the focus of The Amazing Departure on the motivations for Europeans to emigrate, the effects that their leaving had on their homeland, and how European governments attempted to prevent emigration from event (6).Zahra reveals a plethora of patterns in emigration policies among European and North American states that emerge in the late nineteenth century and continue to this day. The patterns contain ideas on mobility and freedom, state control of emigration as a means to achieve political goals, the influence of mercantilist ideas, using ethnic groups as scapegoats, and the adjustment of policies in to encourage the immigration of preferred migrants. One of the more interesting patterns is the conflicting view between Eastern and Western powers on what freedom is. To Western states, freedom was inextricably tied to mobility, and was increasingly considered a “human right,” whereas Eastern states “sought to protect the ‘freedom’ of citizens by keeping them at home” (55, 246).Initially, emigration was seen as a major issue for government. Mercantilist philosophies that valued the population as a source of economic and political power, left governments fearful (9). Attempts, such as the of Jewish travel agents in 1889, were created to stop the mass exodus of people (23-24). As it became clear that states could not halt emigration entirely, they began to take a more opportunistic approach by utilizing emigration as a means to serve their goals. Zahra points out that “emigration came to be seen as a potential solution to different social and political problems,” which resulted with several European states developing tactics aimed at encouraging or forcing “undesirable” or “surplus” citizens to leave (10). Some states achieved this through the establishment of penal colonies, while others gave in to rising nationalist trends by attempting to homogenize their population. Ironically, this effort at homogeneity had the side-effect of endowing marginalized communities with increased mobility, and therefore, at least in some sense, increased freedoms (10, 17). In summary, Zahra’s The Amazing Departure is a masterful examination of the patterns of emigration in the modern age.

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    The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World []  2020-1-26 23:28

    Have fun reading about the immigrants from 1872 about 1900 I'm still reading. My grandfather came from Bohemia in 1882 I search this period of time the most interesting enjoyed the book.

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    The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World []  2020-1-26 23:28

    One of the best works regarding the Amazing Migration from Eastern Europe. Lest we should forget where so a lot of of us came from.

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    Departure: Cuckquean Cleaning, Reluctant Lesbian, Messy Sucking (The Billionaire's Charity Book 2) []  2020-1-28 22:24

    Very amazing author

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    The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World []  2020-1-26 23:28

    Necessary contribution to understanding the large migration of Eastern Europeans, especially from the Hapsburg Empire, during the late 19th and early 20th centuries, including the reaction of Imperial officials to such migration. Well-researched, well-written, and very informative.. The author is a MacArthur Genius Fellow and this book confirms this was a wise choice.

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    The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World []  2020-1-26 23:28

    I have always wanted to know why my ancestors/grandparents emigrated from Poland ,which did not exist at the time 1880's. This answers some questions . This book info the why countries embraced migration for some while hoping to retain others. When Catherine the Amazing welcomed in Germans and Poles to Russia as beneficial colonists on her western borders, these same people suffered when nationalism took rope as a whole benefited when laborers went were the work was, not burdening there homeland when unemployed, but returning with wages to spend at home. The states were in a quandary when it couldn`t meet conscription quotas when it decided to wage war. Then the populace became assets of the ad they left when they did.

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    The Great Departure: Mass Migration from Eastern Europe and the Making of the Free World []  2020-1-26 23:28

    This book is extraordinarily well researched and very well written. Though I bought this book to gain insight into why my ancestors may have emigrated from Eastern Europe, I also received ideas that support to explain the current “migration panic” regarding the U.S. southern border. Highly recommend.

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    The Falling Away: Spiritual Departure of Physical Rapture?: A Second Look at 2 Thessalonians 2:3 []  2020-5-4 18:45

    There’s a amazing of debate among godly believers on the timing of the Rapture. Andy Woods puts together a balanced, reasoned approach to the problem surrounding the definition of the term “apostasia” in 2 Thessalonians 2. I believe he rightly chooses the definition early church leaders used, not because they were early church leaders alone, but because in context, apostasia meaning a “physical departure” makes better a “Berean” and read this with your Bible in hand. Read the context for yourself, apart from any commentary or teacher you follow. Allow the Holy Spirit tutorial you.

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    The Falling Away: Spiritual Departure of Physical Rapture?: A Second Look at 2 Thessalonians 2:3 []  2020-5-4 18:45

    Truly appreciate Andy"s work on this topic as he brings in irrefutable evidence from past scholars and the early church, and also the fine work at context clarity and word usage and studies. Have not seen a rebuttal that with facts of the text but as always, when someone does not know why they stand factually where their doctrine lies, they will pick on an authors education and intelligence, only to keep to the weakness of their own private accepted traditions. They lose on all counts here. When you read this don't be one who is holding to a private tradition view and bringing their doctrine to the text, instead of allowing the text to develop their doctrine. There is always a time to review and grow in doctrinal accuracy, and that is every day... Amazing job Andy... Mysteries of scripture are clearer as faithful men strive for understanding truth through study of the text, with the direction of the Spirit. God's blessings.

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    The Falling Away: Spiritual Departure of Physical Rapture?: A Second Look at 2 Thessalonians 2:3 []  2020-5-4 18:45

    A highly highly perfect well written book that is deep and rich with scholarship on eschatology's two most talked about topics I believe that Dr. Woods groundbreaking work in this book will take the prophecy globe by storm. Five stars all the way

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    Deadly Departure: Why the Experts Failed to Prevent the TWA Flight 800 Disaster and How It Could Happen Again []  2020-7-21 18:41

    Very well-written. Don't listen to the negative reviewers who gave low marks just because the author didn't into the conspiracy theory. That theory was given it's due coverage here and debunked. Anyone familiar with the workings of government at any level can understand agency infighting and the other things that delayed the refocusing of this on the real cause. An awesome play-by-play of how investigators were able to literally place all the pieces together to come up with the most likely cause of this tragedy. I really enjoyed the method the author pulled the a lot of various story lines together into a coherent, comprehensive story.

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    Deadly Departure: Why the Experts Failed to Prevent the TWA Flight 800 Disaster and How It Could Happen Again []  2020-7-21 18:41

    When TWA flight 800 exploded shortly after takeoff on July 17, 1996, the immediate speculation centered around a terrorist attack. This premature conclusion was based on some eyewitness accounts and political circumstances that fomented such speculation. Christine, though, shows how careful examination of the wreckage has shown, almost conclusively, that the airliner was brought down not by a terrorist bomb or missile, but by an explosion in the nearly empty center wing ristine writes her book in the style of an investigative reporter, with windows into the lives of a lot of of the people connected with this tragedy. You come to know a lot of of the victims, the crew, and investigators as she threads her method through the tangled story.Having a somewhat technical background, I found myself frequently wishing the author had included more engineering detail in her narrative. I think the average reader, however, will search the level about right - especially those who tend to focus more on the human element than the engineering ristine's main thesis is that an explosion in the nearly empty center fuel tank brought down the jetliner, that Boeing and the FAA had reason to know a design defect could cause such an explosion, that they chose economy over saving people's lives, and that it's bound to happen e first of these claims has been born out and accepted by the scientific investigation of the crash. Having exhausted all the other possibilities (including missiles and bombs) the investigators have concluded with high probability that the explosion resulted from faulty wiring and a volatile mixture of fumes and air in the center wing tank. The second claim also seems to be established. Flight 800 was not the first explosion of a fuel tank, and the volatile properties of the gaseous mix in a hot, nearly empty fuel tank were known. In fact, Boeing took extraordinary precautions to prevent an ignition source within the tank precisely to avoid such an explosion. I think it's also fair to say that the design decisions were largely based on economics, and not strictly on making the planes as safe as possible for the flying public. Christine illustrates how fuel inerting systems exist, and how they are used on military aircraft to prevent fires. I'm not sure Christine fully establishes her fourth claim - that it could happen again. Of course, nothing is perfectly safe, so there is always a finite probability that another explosion will occur. But it's not clear that preventing ignition sources by design and proper maintenance (there is powerful evidence that old wiring was the ignition source on flight 800) is inherently less sure than inerting systems.I think Christine should also have spent more time developing her argument about designing for safety instead of economy. She seems indignant at the prospects of economic equations that let for a certain percentage of fatalities before spending on a cure. Yet we all create these decisions each day. Pedestrians in Fresh York City, for example, hardly ever wear bicycle helmets, even though a certain percentage of pedestrian deaths would be eliminated if everyone wore head protection. Somewhere, in the back of our minds, each of us decides that somehow the risk of death is insufficient to encumber us with the cost and inconvenience of wrapping our head in plastic-shrouded Styrofoam. Similarly the existence of cost-benefit economic equations that let for a certain chance of mid-air explosions is not, in and of itself, immoral. The true problems are quantitative: What are the probabilities? What value do they assign to human life? What are the costs?Unfortunately, Christine does not with the question quantitatively, which is my only true complaint about this book. As I said, however, I don't think Christine intended to write to an audience of aeronautical engineers. As famous science I think she's written a fine book. I certainly found it entertaining. I read the entire thing on a flight from Portland to Boston (well, I had about 50 pages to finish when I got to my hotel). It's one of those books that grips you. One you can hardly place down. And, yes, every once in a while, as I read the book at 37,000 feet, I found myself wishing that Boeing had used fuel inerting.

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    Deadly Departure: Why the Experts Failed to Prevent the TWA Flight 800 Disaster and How It Could Happen Again []  2020-7-21 18:41

    Although it's been 20 years, we haven't forgotten the ill-fated Flight 800. The author tells us a lot about the passengers and the investigation, and how she concluded the cause was a fuel tank explosion, not the terrorism that's been so touted in famous news and documentaries. People might prefer a more dramatic story, but in this case, she gets to the bottom of a design flaw. Her research and reporting probably makes it safer for everyone to fly.

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