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    Fake Invisible Catastrophes and Threats of Doom []  2021-4-7 0:8

    If you read nothing else about the Earth’s climate, be sure to least read this book. This is especially necessary if you think you have already formed an opinion about climate change. You need to know the FACTS not our politicians’ is book by Dr. Patrick Moore is written at the high school level but has been praised by scientists at the forefront of climate physics. Plus, it’s highly trick Moore was the co-founder of Greenpeace, the world’s biggest environmental rtin Fricke, Ph.D. (nuclear physics)

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    Fake Invisible Catastrophes and Threats of Doom []  2021-4-7 0:8

    Fact filled, with copious references to actual science. A welcome relief from the Chicken Small crowd. It's nice to search a serious and sensible rebuttal to the propaganda that is widely dispensed as fact.

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    Fake Invisible Catastrophes and Threats of Doom []  2021-4-7 0:8

    So-called "environmental groups" started out with amazing intentions but they morphed into hugely profitable organizations running into the billions of dollars. Patrick Moore is a Greenpeace founder who left when they abandoned science and decided to chase cash instead. He now crusades to expose their deceitful ways by examining their claims and comparing it to the science and evidence. In each case, he conclusively proves that they are feeding us fiction to scare us into donating our money. Read this and you will be able to reassure your kids that we are not in an existential crisis after all. Whether you are concerned about global warming, plastics or polar bears, you will search your answers here.

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    Fake Invisible Catastrophes and Threats of Doom []  2021-4-7 0:8

    Amazing book. Really wraps up the climate change scam. Nicely referenced. Not much info on demise of a lot of civilizations in the past due to global cooling.

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    Fake Invisible Catastrophes and Threats of Doom []  2021-4-7 0:8

    An necessary read for anyone wanting to learn and think about climate issues, as opposed to reciting one dogma or another. There is nothing easy about the science of life, climate, and the evolution of our environment. Moore’s examples and discussions highlight the uncertainty and complexity of searching for true understanding of our globe and the effects of CO2 on the future. Clearly, the simplistic doom scenarios fed to us by alarmists and the media are not a find for truth or invitation to learn, rather, they appear to be an invitation to panic in ignorance. One must question the motives of anyone who naively or malevolently proclaims “the science is settled”.

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    Fake Invisible Catastrophes and Threats of Doom []  2021-4-7 0:8

    Patrick Moore has dedicated his life to understanding and reporting on the true globe and exposing fake invisible climate alarmism. The two images present how weather differs between Lugano and Geneva Switzerland. They are 135 miles apart, mostly in an east-west direction. Lugano is nestled in attractive Mediterranean weather. Lake Geneva in a winter storm sprayed freezing water that instantly turned to ice on this VW bus. The book, FAKE INVISIBLE CATASTROPHES AND THREATS OF DOOM is excellently written so you can understand all the lies that have been propagated about supposed disastrous man-made global warming. It is a very simple read. You will learn a lot about nature, the lies of the alarmists, and true causes of Earth's climate changes.

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    Fake Invisible Catastrophes and Threats of Doom []  2021-4-7 0:8

    I found what Mr Moore had to say about about climate change, ocean acidification, GMO's, nuclear power and other current doomsayer subjects to be fascinating reading. In fact I agree with the bulk of his theorizing but it is not what's between the covers of this book that I search troubling, it is the endorsements he chose for the back would think the author would call upon highly respected scientists to give a ringing endorsement to this book but instead we are presented with blurbs from Donald Trump and Mike Huckabee! No matter what your politics are certainly any thinking person would agree that these two men are not leading lights in the sciences. If anything they are more representative of the anti science community.With no backup from the science community for his beliefs, which fall outside of mainstream climate science, I have to wonder why would anyone pay attention to Patrick Moore?

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    Fake Invisible Catastrophes and Threats of Doom []  2021-4-7 0:8

    It is refreshing to explore fresh facts and arguments in these for us necessary questions. Patrick More has presented his arguments in a concise simple to understand way. In any discussion you should know your enemies reasoning. As one of the founders of Greenpeace, he can really nicely present how naked the emperor is. This book should be read by any one wondering about the strange policy decisions lade.

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    Fake Invisible Catastrophes and Threats of Doom []  2021-4-7 0:8

    This wonderfully readable book covers numerous aspects of the CO2/Climate Change debate. I was truly impressed with Patrick Moore's engaging writing style, and his ability to simplify and explain complex scientific concepts. He actually softened my views on GMO meal production, and the necessity of converting to Nuclear Energy. He really excels in his argument that increasing CO2 levels are not a poor thing for the earth - CO2 isn't poison, it's plant food!

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    Fake Invisible Catastrophes and Threats of Doom []  2021-4-7 0:8

    What we need are more scientists and authors giving us the facts rather than propaganda. Moore does this well covering all of the major locations of climate fear mongering plus a few more that are less popularized. I had to deduct 1 star for his frequent mentioning of evolution as the explanation for all life. That's one zone where he refuses (like so many) to interpret the data incorrectly.

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    Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom []  2019-12-27 18:0

    I thought it would be cuter & more imaginative. Love the adventure art on the cover. Has a amazing moral story in the end.

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    Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom []  2019-12-27 18:0

    The book arrived right on time . My son is excited to read it . It was well packed & we will be sure to order again . Thank you !

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    Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom []  2019-12-27 18:0

    My 8 year old reluctant reader loved this book. He devoured it in just a few hours and is anxiously awaiting me to buy him the rest of the books in the series.

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    Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom []  2019-12-27 18:0

    Amazing children book

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    Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom [Movie]  2017-10-13 21:49

    **The best movie in the series** _Raiders_ was amazing but suffered patches of slowness where the momentum was damaged - I know people who actually quick forward Raiders when Indy and Sallah explore the Well of Souls and start watching the movie again at the plane war sequence. _Temple of Doom_, however, is a non stop rollercoaster ride - a thrilling, violent and funny adventure. Spielberg's best action film, in my opinion. Violence, horror, sentimentality, thrills, comedy - _Temple_ has it all! _And more_!!! John Williams provides a superb Indian infused score performed beautifully by the ever reliable _London Symphony Orchestra_ probably my favourite musical score of the series too. Indy takes a severe beating in this adventure, famously losing his shirt sleeve in the process - whereas in the toned down Raiders rehash, _Last Crusade_, he merely gets a bit of dust on his hat. A amazing whirlwind of energy this movie is. Love it! - Potential Kermode

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    Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom []  2019-12-27 18:0

    Amazing for kids

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    Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom []  2019-12-27 18:0

    My eight year old seems to really like it and has read it a few times since receiving it from his birthday. I had hoped it would look more like a comic book or graphic novel since it has a slightly younger feel to the cover design but it was nicely illustrated and he liked it so... yay!

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    Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom []  2019-12-27 18:0

    My son loves to read the comic book style. Frankie didn't disappoint him.

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    Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom []  2019-12-27 18:0

    It is so exciting to watch small boys engage with text! Eric Wright really gets the heart of what boys are looking for. The character in these stories is a young boy, and the text is part in comic format, and part in prose so it keeps the reluctant reader moving along. My 9 year old grandson is a amazing reader, and he couldn't wait to dig into this one after reading Frankie Pickle and the Pine Run 3000. His 7 year old sister read and enjoyed it as well. Another winner!

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    Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom []  2019-12-27 18:0

    Show for an 11 yr old boy

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    Frankie Pickle and the Closet of Doom []  2019-12-27 18:0

    My grandson loves this book.

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    Library of Small Catastrophes []  2020-6-14 18:37

    Much as librarians can be trusted to help with issues in any category, the reader can turn to these poems for wisdom in any of life’s difficulties. In these pages, the definition of “American” is broken down. The word mercy is given no mercy in dissection. A “dead mother’s house” is catalogued according to each item it contains. Rape and violation are placed in plain text and of my favorite moments in this collection is this little section from “Object Permanence”:Only a god can take and givetime, but the one in front ofthe gun lasts ison’s work penetrates mysteries, unveiling understanding, experience, and tip for readers of all backgrounds and cultural identities. This collection demonstrates her mastery of content, creativity, and purpose; I highly and wholeheartedly recommend it.

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    Library of Small Catastrophes []  2020-6-14 18:37

    Everyone should read this book immediately!!

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    Disaster!: A History of Earthquakes, Floods, Plagues, and Other Catastrophes []  2019-12-26 18:52

    I subscribe to quite a few Kindle Bargain Book everyday e-mails in hope that I’ll search something interesting enough to spend a whole $1 on or obtain for free (free is good!)I’ve always been interested in disasters, how people cope despite the odds versus their survival, and the aftermath. So when Disaster!: A History of Earthquakes, Floods, Plagues, and Other Catastrophes by John Withington showed up in one of those newsletters for either for free or a buck, I figured, why not.I just hope I didn’t spend any cash on this turkey. Seriously, I read the book in an afternoon and found that I wanted my time back. About the only thing I liked about the book was the fact that the author did choose a few obscure disasters and managed to convey the info decently.I recommend this book if you are able to obtain it for a decent price (preferably free) and you are interested in a fairly superficial introduction to different disasters man-made and man-created.I give this book 3/5 stars as it really isn’t worth a second read.

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    Disaster!: A History of Earthquakes, Floods, Plagues, and Other Catastrophes []  2019-12-26 18:52

    So much info on Disasters that I have never heard about. I found this book a page turner.

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    Catastrophes and Lesser Calamities: The causes of mass extinctions []  2020-11-10 18:30

    Catastrophes and Lesser Calamities by Tony Hallam is a well written book on the subject of biological extinction through time . The volume is essentially a rewrite of the book he and Dr. Wignall wrote together in 1997 (Mass Extinctions and their Aftermath). While the latter is far more technical and probably more than the average person with an interest in paleontology and extinction happenings is willing to undertake, the show volume is written very much with the a vocational reader in e book has a very readable style, revealing the author's erudition in its sentence style, vocabulary choices (my favorite is "depauperate" with respect to a description of the diversity of a particular fauna), and thorough knowledge of the latest pertinent literature. He keeps his use of professional terms within reach of the primary reader and provides a glossary of terms at the end of the book. While he has some "attitude" with respect to certain issues, he addresses everything in a thoroughly gentlemanly manner, giving credit to the work of others, and when he disagrees with findings makes his point graciously and with evidential support. Students writing papers would do well to study his style and approach to e earlier book with Wignall addressed extinction as a series of specific events. It looks at each event, discussing the date, type specimens, and facies locales throughout the globe that help the likely diagnosis of mass extinction and reviews the scientific data that suggests how they might have come about. The show book looks at extinction as a process that effects life and evolution through time. While specific happenings are discussed in an organized way, the author focuses more on the nature of proposed extinction processes. The most commonly and widely known of these causes are the bolide impact, anoxic aquatic or atmospheric conditions, volcanism, and climate change, each of which is examined in depth using specific extinction happenings to discuss the e section I found most interesting was "Pulling the Strands Together." This was because it reminded me of other authors I've read on other subjects, the subjects of which seem to have implications for extinction as a is Stuart Kaufmann's work on self organized criticality which discussed, among other things, a topography of fitness within a set of parameters. He introduced a diagram illustrating, through the rise of peaks from a baseline terrain, that life tends to organize itself in such a method as to create optimal use of the fitness terrain. He notes that, when conditions are altered especially when rapid, those at the peak are not able to hop from one peak to a better one. Their failure to adapt brings about extinction, and others along the lower slopes create a transition to a fresh peak fitness profile. As Hallam notes, catastrophes may occur too quickly for a lot of taxa to adapt in a Darwinian manner, which leads to disappearance. However, where change is slow enough some taxa that seem to have disappeared may in fact simply have evolved into a descendant species. They sort of back down the old fitness slope and head off in a fresh direction.Another author that is brought to mind is the theorist Per Bak, who studies self organized criticality and happening probability. The discussion of periodicity/episodicity of extinction in Dr. Hallam's work reminded me of Dr. Bak's discussion of earthquakes, landslides, and related events. In this case, the author notes that the frequency of occurrence of any possible happening will lie along a curve that measures the probability of a given magnitude. In this instance, extinction might be seen as ranging from extinction of a single of species to the end of all life on earth. In short, Bak believes that all happenings that can occur will do so, but that they have a various probability of doing so. As with the disaster in Fresh Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, it isn't a matter of "if" but of "when" the happening will occur. The happenings as they occur through time, however, form an irregular curve with a lot of little peaks punctuated with the random introduction of a few very huge ones. The problem for disaster planners and others is that of prediction and preparation, so an effort is created to search a "periodicity" in the data that isn't necessarily there to find. This sounds very much like Dr. Hallam's discussion of the attempts to pin down a periodicity in the data of extinction events. Humans are very amazing at seeing patterns in random data, but ultimately all that can be said is that "if it has happened, it can happen."I'd recommend the book to anyone with an interest in paleontology, paleoecology, and extinction events. It would create a lovely book for an introductory course on earth history, or in paleontology, and an perfect syllabus entry for a course in earth science for teachers.A unbelievable book, full of information, and well written.

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    Catastrophes and Lesser Calamities: The causes of mass extinctions []  2020-11-10 18:30

    Hallam does a nice job outlining the potential causes of these happenings and pointing out that there's no single common cause, although changes in sea level and its oxygen content are often involved.A amazing read for those interested in the contingent nature of life on Earth.

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    Catastrophes and Lesser Calamities: The causes of mass extinctions []  2020-11-10 18:30

    A very interesting read. Most of the content was well explained. Could have been a small more decisive in his final opinions.

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    Catastrophes and Lesser Calamities: The causes of mass extinctions []  2020-11-10 18:30

    MANKIND DID NOT CAUSE THE EXTINCTIONS OF LARGE ANIMALS IN 11,500 B.C..AS THIS AUTHOR WOULD HAVE YOU BELIEVE.....GOOD READ THOUGH.

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    Library of Small Catastrophes []  2020-6-14 18:37

    Library of Little Catastrophes from Alison C Rollins is the type of debut collection that both satisfies and makes me look to future e satisfaction derives from how the poems work to paint pictures I can gaze at for hours and hold finding fresh colors. Each reading of each poem gave me some fresh nuance with which to understand the narrator, or the situation, or both. I also discovered fresh ways to better understand the globe around me and the different people with whom I share it. And I hope I learned some fresh things about myself, my capacity for empathy and for making various connections than I have at is a lot to obtain from a short collection of poetry. Yet there you have it. Until the next volume from Rollins, I will continue to read and think about this ed from a copy created available by the publisher via Edelweiss.

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    Disaster!: A History of Earthquakes, Floods, Plagues, and Other Catastrophes []  2019-12-26 18:52

    I collect books about disasters, not sure why, but there were quite a few in this book I had not heard of before, which gave me ideas about future purchases. I guess I liked it because it reminds me to always think that something could happen at any time, and to always be thankful for every day.

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    Catastrophes and Lesser Calamities: The causes of mass extinctions []  2020-11-10 18:30

    Nice updated listing of main extinction happenings in earth history and disertion on the main still accepted theorites explaining method these happened. No huge novelties or radical thoeries but some points were fresh for me like the frozen methan gases aculated in large cuantities in the bottom of cold seas and the possible climatic changes that could be cuased by them if they are realesed to the atmospher by higher ocean water temperatures.

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    Catastrophes and Lesser Calamities: The causes of mass extinctions []  2020-11-10 18:30

    This brief expose of how huge numbers of species kick the bucket at the same time is genuinely uplifting after the 2008 and 2012 elections.

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    Disaster!: A History of Earthquakes, Floods, Plagues, and Other Catastrophes []  2019-12-26 18:52

    I have this volume and one similar. Neither were impressive. The writer's style is decidedly non-scientific.. The expected accounting in the sense of archeological, geological and paleobiological evidence and material was not forthcoming. I expected more technical material from the text.

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    Disaster!: A History of Earthquakes, Floods, Plagues, and Other Catastrophes []  2019-12-26 18:52

    Service and product were excellent.

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    Disaster!: A History of Earthquakes, Floods, Plagues, and Other Catastrophes []  2019-12-26 18:52

    Very detailed info that is simple to understand. Each happening from BC to current times really held my interest. I liked the fact that the book contained more than just weather similar events.

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    Catastrophes and Lesser Calamities: The causes of mass extinctions []  2020-11-10 18:30

    VERY COOL.

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    Disaster!: A History of Earthquakes, Floods, Plagues, and Other Catastrophes []  2019-12-26 18:52

    This is a book that seems to be two various books melded together. Parts of it almost wish to be a reference book, sort of a mini-encyclopedia where you can look up different disasters and obtain a couple of pages worth of information. Other parts are more historical narratives telling a more complex story about certain incidents in history.=== The Amazing Items ===* I am an avid reader of history, and it is not often than I read of historical incidents that I know nothing about. This book caught me on a few, and not just items from the 3rd century BC. For example, one chapter in the book describes the "reign" of King Leopold II of Belgium in the "Belgian Free State of the Congo" during the end of the 19th century. It was an absolute disaster, with chilling tales of starvation, slavery, oppression and exploitation of the natives. I knew of the Belgian reign of this part of the world, but never knew how poor things were.* John Withington writes in a flowing, easy-to-read style. It can be a bit dry at times, but he avoids the long complicated paragraphs and obscure vocabulary of "serious" historians. This especially comes out in the latter parts of the book where the narratives are longer and more detailed.* The latest half of the book deals with "man-made" disasters, usually political misrule or terror, such as Nazi Germany or the Khmer Rouge. There is not a lot of fresh info in these narratives, but they are organized well, and provide concise and reasonably objective overviews of these historical incidents. They are, of course, a sampling of history, but provide a nice cross section of some of mankind at his worst.=== The Not-So-Good Items ===* I almost stopped reading the book during the early chapters. For example, one of the early chapters deals with floods, a lot of of which happened before the "modern" era of history, roughly the latest two centuries. The issue is that with older events, there are few info available, and only so a lot of ways to describe a flood. After after a few they all begin to sound alike. Related with other natural disasters, an earthquake in ancient Egypt sounds a lot like an earthquake in ancient China. The latter chapters are much better.* While a lot of of the historical records of disasters can be somewhat sketchy (how a lot of people really died at Pompei?), Withington seems to always take the highest available estimate and the worst possible scenarios. Fair enough, it is a book on disasters, but it would have been better to provide a more balanced look, perhaps by presenting a series of estimates. Similarly, some of the descriptions of horrors again seem to be based on the "worst case" of available accounts.=== Summary ===While I wouldn't say the book is a comprehensive look at all the disasters that have affected mankind, it is a very reasonable assortment of some of the major ones. A lot of of the earlier incidents have descriptions that sound very much alike, but the stories of more modern history are well done. I believe that Withington always errs toward the more severe and pessimistic side of available accounts, but I guess that is to be expected from a "disaster" writer.Overall, I did search a few things I was not previously aware of, and that always makes me appreciate a history book. Based on that, and the well-written summaries of a lot of incidents, I'd recommend the book for most any fan of history.

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    Disaster!: A History of Earthquakes, Floods, Plagues, and Other Catastrophes []  2019-12-26 18:52

    GREAT BACKGROUND READING

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    Catastrophes and Lesser Calamities: The causes of mass extinctions []  2020-11-10 18:30

    Very interesting description of periodic catastrophies. Just a small dry.

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    Catastrophes and Lesser Calamities: The causes of mass extinctions []  2020-11-10 18:30

    Other reviews on this page give a fair idea of the contents of this book and so, as with most of my science reviews, my main goal here is to describe the technical level so that potential readers can decide if this book is for them. (If you're interested, you can click above on "See all my reviews" for more. There are at least two pages.) This is especially urgent since one of the previous reviews (of the paperback edition) says that Hallam "keeps his use of professional terms within the reach of the primary reader..." while another reviewer (of the hard cover) says the book is more appropriate for spets than for general readers. I have seen only the paperback and it has a LOT of jargon, words such as "Frasnian", "tectonoeustatic", "chronostratigraphy", "brachiopod", and "paraphyletic". I still say this is a book for beginners because it doesn't require much prior knowledge. All of the terms the reader will need to know are defined in the book; a lot of are defined more than once, in case the reader has forgotten in the meantime. (That will often be the case.) One doesn't need to know mathematics, geology, chemistry, or the history of ere are also a amazing a lot of undefined terms but, in general, there is no need to know the definitions. They are mainly names of kinds of organisms and the point Hallam is making is that a lot of kinds of organisms went extinct at the same time. For example, it doesn't matter if you don't know how rugose corals differ from other corals; the point is that the kinds of animals that built reefs before the Permian extinction disappeared in that extinction. Some readers will be uncomfortable at first with getting the gist of an argument without understanding all the words, but I think most will obtain used to it.Hallam also has a very amazing chapter on the result of mass extinctions on evolution. In particular, a pair of graphs shows a remarkable change in diversification of marine life about the time of the Permian extinction and another in land life at the time of the K-T extinction. I have always been interested in evolution, so this is the most interesting thing about mass extinctions for me. And there is a final chapter on the Holocene mass extinction, which is currently being carried out by ere are two other books on mass extinctions which I have read and reviewed and which may be of interest. One is by Hallam and his colleague Paul Wignall. It covers essentially the same ground as the current book, but it is at a more technical level and it assumes the reader knows a lot of of the terms that are used in the current book. The spets that another reviewer mentioned would be much better off going directly to Hallam and Wignall, as would anyone who I familiar with the 5 words I cited above. Readers who absorb much of the vocabulary in Hallam might well like to go on to Hallam and e other book is by Douglas Erwin. This is more technical than Hallam but less technical than Hallam and Wignall. It also covers only one mass extinction, that of the end-Permian, and so there is less vocabulary to hold track of. The end-Permian is the most exciting for me, not only because it was more heavy than the others, but even more so because one of the groups that was nearly wiped out was the the synapsids, the ancestors of mammals. One more extinction in that group and we might not be here. Erwin also has an perfect discussion of the significance of carbon isotope sum, if you wish to learn the science of mass extinctions and not just descriptions, if you know only a small about palaeogeology and marine palaeobiology, if you like to work at learning, and if you're not intimidated by a lot of fresh words, This book is an perfect put to start. Some readers will search it so complete that they won't need more.

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    Disaster!: A History of Earthquakes, Floods, Plagues, and Other Catastrophes []  2019-12-26 18:52

    A chronological study of reasons why your never safe. I found the ancient disasters most interesting. Disasters I never heard of roll off the pages over and over. The wonderful numbers of people who were killed through history is astounding. Well written stories that are complete without going into too much detail. I finnish this book in two days what more can I say.

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    Disaster!: A History of Earthquakes, Floods, Plagues, and Other Catastrophes []  2019-12-26 18:52

    This is a very detailed, complete and well-organized listing of both natural and man-made disasters. It is informative and captivating at the same time!!!!!

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    Catastrophes and Lesser Calamities: The causes of mass extinctions []  2020-11-10 18:30

    This book presents a amazing deal of info on mass extinctions, and it provides an perfect overview of how geologists and paleontologists gather evidence of the causes of mass extinctions. What they can garner from the geologic record is amazing. He also discusses the theories of other geologists in a very respectful manner. Dr. Hallam pokes holes in the asteroid theory for the mass extinction 65 million years ago--wiping out the dinosaurs--although he says that the asteroid may have delivered the final blow to the already dwindling species of only quibble is that the author contains some small anecdotes about his research trips and the local people who helped him. He notes that he doesn't wish to sound patronizing, but he does--VERY patronizing to the point of being ever, this book does an perfect job of explaining what we can learn--and what has been learned--from the geologic record.

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    Catastrophes! []  2020-9-20 18:46

    Catastrophes! begins with one of my favorite quotes about civilization existing by geologic consent. This book flows from that axiom. Written by a geologist, it emphasizes the geological and geographical causes implicit in natural disasters. It starts by dropping us into the time of the Enlightenment when reason and logic began to overcome church dogma and superstition. However, tales in the book, often powerfully illustrated by first hand accounts, present us that reasonableness about our daily life on earth isn't as widespread as it could ere are so a lot of lessons from natural disasters. Some are learned, as we have enacted modern building codes and alert systems, and some are not since people still occupy hazardous land locations and fail to head warnings.I enjoyed the introduction where catastrophism as a concept of change was explained. The next chapters, on earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes and landslides include some geological jargon that may be a challenge for those not familiar with geology. Yet, I do not think the jargon puts it beyond the reader who has familiarity with science writing. Also, the numbers can be staggering. Values are warranted to present the comparative info of each happening described. After a while, the large numbers are hard to hold track of. Sometimes, they are difficult to comprehend (like the ancient rockslide of Beartooth Plateau that buried 1300 square miles).I was fascinated by the first hand accounts of the 1755 Lisbon earthquake and Pliny the Younger's letter describing the horror of Vesuvius. I gained a whole fresh perspective on blizzards. For each natural phenomena, Prothero explains the why of the event. The latest chapter gives perspective regarding our fears.I learned a lot I didn't know or never thought about. I would recommend this book to my geology mates and for those interested in science and society.

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    Catastrophes! []  2020-9-20 18:46

    I liked reading about the histories of catastrophes that have occurred in the past. But about chapter 10 where the author rambles on about anthropogenic global warming, I lost my interest in the book. The doentation for this chapter is very not good and sensational: very political and e first 9 chapters are interesting history, but the rest of the book is political opinion.

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    Catastrophes! []  2020-9-20 18:46

    Dr. Donald Prothero has a bonus for doing what few writers of science books can, making complex matters not only accessible to the non-scientist but also entertaining and "Catastrophes!: Earthquakes, Tsunamis, Tornadoes, and Other Earth-Shattering Disasters" is no Prothero's other more latest books, like "Greenhouse of the Dinosaurs" and "Evolution: What the Fossils Say and Why it Matters", "Catastrophes!" gives the reader a amazing primary understanding of the science at the heart of the matter (in this case Geology with a touch of Meteorology) and then goes on to give examples of that science at work in the globe in which we all live. This serves the reader to connect the weighty facts of the matter with the daily familiar. Within the anecdotes and historical accounts of disasters past and show Prothero lays out the triumphs of science which have helped save lives in the face of disaster alongside the awesome accounts of survival in adverse situations. Prothero also importantly reminds us that there are those who create unsubstantiated and even risky claims about the ability to predict disasters, illustrating clearly but without pontificating that we ignore critical thinking and reason in these situations often at our own peril.What really sets "Catastrophes!" apart is the distinction between the likes of natural disasters like earthquakes and tsunamis, and the slowly emerging dire situations that humans are, at least in part, responsible for. The latter portion of the book delves into problems arising with our changing Earth like climate change and overpopulation that are affecting the biggest percentage of the population, bar none. A lot of of us will live our whole lives and never see a blizzard, tornado, hurricane or earthquake - but we all have already been impacted by the changing atmosphere of our world. In short, Dr. Prothero's "Catastrophes!: Earthquakes, Tsunamis, Tornadoes, and Other Earth-Shattering Disasters" is an perfect read not just for enthusiasts of geology, or even those fascinated by natural disasters but for anyone who is impacted by our ever-changing Earth and by Dr. Prothero's count - that's all of us.

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    Catastrophes! []  2020-9-20 18:46

    This book chronicles some of the greatest natural disasters in human history and the mechanics that create them so deadly. With a clear, straight forward style, Prothero recounts the 1906 San Francisco Earthquake, the 2004 Indian Tsunami, The Amazing Scablands Floods and a lot of other such catastrophes that continue to remind us of just how fragile life is and how delicate our situation here on Earth is. That's the amazing part of this book; it's not just a shock & awe coffee table book with lots of pictures and scary captions. It's a book that weaves history and science together with a notice of humility before Nature. Best of all, the latest three chapters of the book focus on the ongoing crises of global warming and overpopulation. Prothero takes no prisoners his firm criticism of the current disinformation campaign the certain unique interest group's are promoting to hold the public ignorant of such grave threats to our livelihood. Naturally, some people have been place off by this seeming "side-track" into politics. However, there is no greater put to discuss the evidence for such threats than in a book like this one. This isn't just a book about the amazing and frightening power of Nature, it's also a call for action and awareness of our put and impact on the rest of planet around us.HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

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    Catastrophes! []  2020-9-20 18:46

    Catastrophes! may best be thought of as two books (and could have benefited from an internal division into books I and II). The first eight chapters focus on natural disasters, with chapters 1-8 devoted sequentially to earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes, landslides, floods, hurricanes and other storms, tornados, and blizzards. After this section--which comprises two-thirds of the text--Prothero switches tack, delving into planet-level geological happenings (ice ages, mass extinctions, and global warming) that, with the exception of a subsection on anthropogenic climate change, operate on a very various scale and timeline than the phenomena of the first section of the book. The final chapter of the book provides a ranking of disasters, and locations them in a context of destructiveness alongside more mundane (but also more deadly) phenomena such as disease, accidents, and over-population.(I personally would have liked to see chapters on heat waves and droughts, sink holes, and lake outgassing, but I suppose that these required to be chop for space.)Prothero's writing is lucid and straightforward, and he does a amazing job of clearly explaining relevant concepts in the brief zone available. Each of the first eight chapters begins by examining some of the most destructive latest examples of each kind of disaster, e.g., the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo and Hurricane Katrina, with numerous first-hand quotations from witnesses making the accounts all the more vivid. Prothero then moves on to prehistoric super-examples of these happenings (often operating at a nearly unimaginable scale!), before concluding with an overview of the science (in a lot of cases going beyond explanations of *how* they work, to discussing how we figured it out, as well as modern attempts at prediction and prevention). Each of these sections has its own sub-heading, and clear graphics support communicate concepts. Prothero also takes time to dispel myths about a lot of of these phenomena, e.g., that highway overpasses provide amazing protection from tornados, and provides private insight from his and his family's experiences living in disaster-prone e second section provides a more in depth examination of the history of research in each zone covered, with the development of thinking about ice ages particularly well explained. Prothero allows his private scientific judgement to shine through when evaluating the debates over the cause of the Cretaceous (dinosaur) extinction, and this makes for fascinating and informative (if not 100% unbiased) reading. The chapter on global warming begins by considering the cause of past warming events, before moving onto the evidence for man created global warming. Prothero gets slightly bogged down in this section, shifting from explaining the science to lamenting the ongoing disinformation campaigns versus climate research. This is a subject of considerable frustration to most geologists (including myself), and his emotions present through here, with the effect that his prose becomes less tight than in previous e final chapter provides a sobering overview of our misplaced fear of happenings like earthquakes, over much more damaging--and pressing--issues such as biodiversity loss, disease, and over-population.Overall, Prothero provides an perfect introduction to the history and science of natural catastrophes (and helpful references are provided for further reading at the end of each chapter).That said, Catastrophes! is not without minor thero's tone when confronting arguments he finds wanting can at times be overly dismissive (e.g., "half-baked", "completely demolished", etc.) and his frustration from long wars with creationists and climate sceptics--something I can personally sympathize with--causes him to periodically lose his temper (comparisons of climate sceptics to holocaust deniers are not overly helpful, for example). Similarly, side comments about 'Republicans' and the 'superstitious', can read as covering wider audiences--i.e., the religious in general or all Republican supporters--than he intends them astrophes! also suffers from some frustrating lapses in editing (really an problem with Johns Hopkins University Press). For example, a graph on p. 260 is labelled "almost 800,000 years of temperature and climate history" when it has no axis representing temperature, and covers a period of less than 700,000 years; 20% of GNP of Columbia in 1985 is said to be "$7.7 million" (instead of billion) dollars (p. 131); and the catastrophic discharge that formed the Scablands of Washington State is given as occurring at both 13.7 cubic meters a second, as well as "484 million feet/second" (presumably, cubic feet). Death tolls for different disasters also alternate amongst maximum and minimum estimates, e.g., Typhoon Nina is said to have killed 231,000 (p. 152), 90,000-230,000 (p. 297), and 170,000 (p. 174).These examples are relatively rare, however, and do not seriously detract from volumes of useful and well-sourced e bottom line: Donald Prothero's Catastrophes! provides a hugely useful and entertaining introduction to the geology of natural disasters, on both the human and global scale. Even with a lot of geology courses under my belt, I learned a lot and would recommend this book highly.

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    Catastrophes! []  2020-9-20 18:46

    Yes, this is a true science book, with lots of scientific info and thoughtful reasoning. But it is also a chronicle of the horrifying, destructive disasters that wreak havoc on this Earth, and the author doesn't skimp on the gruesome details. This combination - like rubber-necking at a vehicle accident while studying traffic hazards - makes for a amazing e author covers all the natural disasters that scare us, including me - tornados (one destroyed 1/4 of my childhood home, while the family was inside), earthquakes (I've been shaken by many, from Tokyo to California), volcanoes (a helicopter flight I took over Mt. St. Helens 1 year after the eruption was nightmare-inducing), and a lot of more. He discusses what causes them and info some of the biggest, scariest examples of each, whether from pre-history (like the Columbia River floods) or uncomfortably latest (2005's Hurricane Katrina.) There are lots of amazing photos, both in color & black & white, and charts to illustrate the concepts he e title, which I won't repeat here, makes you think the book just covers natural disasters (as in, caused by nature.) But in the later chapters, the author explains that the "Earth-shattering disasters" of the title contain catastrophes that we might just bring on ourselves. Ice-ages and global warming happenings that occurred in the past were solely products of things like wobbles in the Earth orbit and migration of the continents. But now they are being induced by human behavior in centuries rather than millennia. Talk about scary.Even scarier is the inside look at the difficulties the scientific community has in making politicians & the media pay attention to true risk. The author has been in the trenches, acting on behalf of scientists to confront & unmask non-scientists trying to disguise their personal agendas as scientific "alternatives." How can there be anyone alive today that doesn't know climate change is a product of industrialization? He explains how.But we're all guilty of inflating minor risks while minimizing major ones. Who would guess that you're in greater risk of dying from a natural disaster in boring Arkansas than shakin' & quakin' California? The beauty of this book is how the author teaches you about earth processes, while you think you're reading a Stephen King novel!

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    Catastrophes! []  2020-9-20 18:46

    Catastrophes! Earthquakes, Tsunamis, Tornadoes, and Other Earth-Shattering Disasters By Donald R. Prothero“Catastrophes!" is a first-rate look at natural disasters from a more paleontological approach. Inspired by the catastrophe of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, acclaimed science author and educator Donald R. Prothero provides not only a fascinating look at catastrophes by category but shares a lot of stories of the scientists and people affected by them. This captivating 360-page book contains the following twelve chapters: 1. Earthquakes The Earth in Upheaval, 2. Tsunamis The Sea Rises Up, 3. Volcanoes Hell’s Cauldron, 4. Landslides Gravity Always Wins, 5. Floods Raging Waters, 6. Hurricanes, Cyclones, and Typhoons Nature on the Rampage, 7. Tornadoes Funnels of Death 8 Blizzards White Death, 9. Ice Ages Frozen Planet, 10. Greenhouse Planet Too Hot to Handle?, 11. Mass Extinctions When Life Nearly Died, and 12. Can We Survive Nature—and Our Own Folly?Positives:1. Well-written, accessible, page turner of a science book. Mixes in historical narratives with science, fun and enlightening.2. A fascinating subject in the hands of a topic matter expert. With a Ph.D. in geological sciences and authorship of a lot of books and scientific papers, Prothero has earned my trust as a high-quality science writer.3. Amazing use of visual materials. Plenty of charts and photos.4. A solid introductory history to modern geology.5. Goes through the birth of modern seismology while narrating historical earthquakes.6. Throughout the book myths are debunked. “Many people believe in the myth of earthquake weather. Supposedly, amazing earthquakes happen during unusually hot days. In reality, there is no correlation between the occurrence of earthquakes and weather, daytime temperature, or time of day.”7. Wonderful facts. “As the Indian plate is pushed under the Burma plate, it produces a large subduction location that is responsible for the island nations of Indonesia and Malaysia. The fault line of this plate boundary formed a rupture about 400 km (250 miles) long and 100 km (60 miles) wide, which was located 30 km (19 miles) beneath the seabed—the longest rupture ever caused by an earthquake. The energy released by the quake was about 550 million times more strong than the atomic bomb that destroyed Hiroshima.”8. Goes through the various kinds of eruptions. “Not all volcanoes explode like Vesuvius, Krakatau, Tambora, or Mont Pelée. Hawaiian volcanoes, familiar from nature films, erupt with relatively thin lava flows but do not blow their tops in a catastrophic explosion.”9. Search out what country has the deadliest volcanoes and why.10. The underrated catastrophe of landslides. “A Richter magnitude 8 earthquake struck off the coast of Peru on May 31, 1970, to cause one of the deadliest landslides in latest history.”11. A look at some of the world’s deadliest floods.12. A fascinating look at the hurricanes of 2005. “The year 2005 was turning out to be the worst hurricane season in recorded history. By the end of the season in January 2006, there were a record 28 large, officially named tropical storms, and a record 15 had become hurricanes.”13. Search out the costliest natural disaster in American history.14. Debunking famous tornado myths.15. Inside the “Storm of the Century” 1993. “The storm caused about $6.6 billion in damage, making it one of the most costly blizzards in American history. Fresh Englanders may point to the blizzard of 1978 as more severe in their region, while the blizzard of 1996 was more severe in the mid-Atlantic states; however, for sheer size, volume, and destructiveness, the 1993 snowstorm was truly the Storm of the Century in North America.”16. The story behind Pangea “all Earth”.17. Perhaps one of the best answers to climate-change denialists. Prothero takes his gloves off and it’s a work of beauty. “The most popular of these was conducted by Naomi Oreskes in 2004, which looked at all papers published on the subject in the world’s leading scientific journal, Science, between 1993 and 2003. Of the hundreds of papers written by the world’s top scientists, 980 supported global warming and none opposed it.”18. A look at mass extinctions.19. Putting natural disasters in perspective. “Even AIDS, which is a relatively young epidemic (spreading only since the 1980s), has killed more than 25 million people worldwide, far more than any natural disaster.”20. Perfect gatives:1. Links provided are limited to figures and chapters. Notes are not provided.2. Not necessarily a catastrophe unless you are involved but sinkholes are becoming a hot-button subject of late.3. Never hurts to go over the scientific way and in this case from a geologist and or paleontologist perspective. It could be added in an appendix to avoid disrupting the flow of the summary, a fun and enlightening book on natural disasters. Prothero produces high-quality books for the masses to have fun and this one doesn’t disappoint. This book is a amazing mix of historical anecdotes and sound science. If you are looking for a fun book to read this summer and that will always be topical, this is it. I highly recommend it!Further recommendations: “Evolution: What the Fossils Say and Why It Matters” by the same author, “The Rocks Don’t Lie” by David R. Montgomery, “The Bible Unearthed” by Israel Finkelstein and Neil Asher Silberman, “Why Evolution Works (and Creationism Fails) by Matt Young, and “The Making of the Fittest” by Sean B. Carroll.

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    Catastrophes! []  2020-9-20 18:46

    When I was 10 years old we had a book to read in school about natural disasters. I remember being fascinated by the descriptions of the 1960 Chile and 1964 Alaska earthquakes, and trying to imagine the energy released by the 1980 eruption of Mount St.Helens, or the ability of a volcano to obliterate an entire city as Mont Pelée did in Martinique in 1902. It always left a lasting impression on me about the amazing power of nature.Dr. Donald Prothero has written a superb acc of the various kinds of natural disasters that occur, with examples both of how devastating these forces can be, but at the same time of how we need not necessarily be terrified of happenings that may be fairly low risk. It's written at the excellent level for people that are curious about the topic, but haven't studied or been trained in the topics to an advanced a geologist and paleontologist with decades of research and teaching experience, Prothero provides detailed explanations of the geologic forces responsible for these events, as well as realistic appraisals of the relative risk of each. One aspect I took note of is the need to educate yourself and become more informed, and therefore be able to create better ere are a lot of misconceptions that Prothero is fast to clear up, which probably lead to the fears some are held in:-­ California isn't going to fall into the Pacific Ocean. It's actually moving (slowly) towards Alaska.- Tidal waves and tsunamis are not the same thing. Tsunami means "harbour wave" and is not similar to tides at all.- The safest spot to stand during a tornado is not the corner of a house, nor under an overpass.­It's also demonstrated that happenings that strike terror into most people are nowhere near as deadly as other lesser known risks. Earthquakes invoke the most primal fears, yet the statistics present that heatwaves and blizzards are something to be far more alarmed by (as someone who lives in Australia that now experiences record heatwaves every Summer, this is very relevant).If you are like me and interested in this subject, but lack the advanced education or training in Earth sciences, this book is an perfect introduction with plentiful references to discover further.I could not recommend it highly enough for anyone with an interest in natural history.

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    Catastrophes! []  2020-9-20 18:46

    Donald Prothero's CATASTROPHES is a fascinating, informative and sometimes scary tutorial to the different natural threats unleashed on mankind - earthquakes, blizzards, typhoons, tsunamis, volcanoes, landslides, floods, etc. - along with self-generated catastrophes-in-the-making like global warming. As doented in Prothero's book, a 2011 Johns Hopkins University Press release, such happenings have played major roles in the shaping of civilization and will continue to do so in the future.A Professor of Geology at Occidental College, Prothero's expertise shines throughout the book as does his winning ability to create complex scientific phenomena easily understandable to lay readers such as yours truly. He examines each type of disaster in turn, leading off with earthquakes. He explains the science behind each disaster, describes popular - or infamous - occurrences of tsunamis, for example, and the impact each disaster had on countries/societies. After concluding chapters on Ice Ages, the Greenhouse result and Mass Extinctions, Prothero wraps up his book with a thought-provoking chapter entitled 'Can We Survive Nature - and our Own Folly?'The book is illustrated with tons of photographs, maps, diagrams and other short, CATASTROPHES is a fascinating tutorial to Mother Nature and the history-shaping forces she can unleash. Anyone interested in our ever-evolving planet will have fun this eminently readable, timely and thoughtful book. Recommended.

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    Catastrophes! []  2020-9-20 18:46

    As a lot of of you don't know, I am not a scientist, but I really have fun reading non-fiction books similar to true scientific methodology and Dr. Prothero's fresh book Catastrophes!: Earthquakes, Tsunamis, Tornadoes, and Other Earth-Shattering Disasters did not disappoint me on this fact. Dr. Prothero writes with a purpose, more on that later, and he created the science behind natural disasters so simple to understand that I started thinking that I was a scientist. But there is more too his fresh book than just the science, Dr. Prothero combined the science with chilling first-hand accounts of the devastation left behind from a lot of various types of disasters, spanning thousands of years. In addition, his book is nicely illustrated, both with the mechanisms that cause the different disasters' and images of the aftermath, which gave me a sense of awe at the depth and scope of the destruction. His book was so enjoyable for me to read, that I am writing my first book review for Amazon, EVER!! As you might have guessed, I highly recommend this e first four chapters deal with the Geological forces that shape our planet since its birth some 4.5 billion years ago. Dr. Prothero writes with passion as he describes the science and chilling first-hand accounts of the destructive aftermath left behind by Earthquakes, Tsunamis, Volcanoes and Landslides. From the birth of modern seismology to confirmation of plate tectonics, from P and S waves to Love and Rayleigh waves, to Elastic Rebound, the Hypocenter and Focus and all the info you need to know about faults. From a 10 year old British girl who recognized, from her studies, "receding waters and ocean and frothing bubbles meant disaster", page 60, saving her parents and a beach full of people in Thailand from the 2004 Indian Ocean Tsunami. From the devastation left behind in AD 79 on a peaceful day when suddenly there was a amazing explosion and dozens of rock, ash, and gas were spewed into the air as the eruption of Mount Vesuvius occurred, killing most of the inhabitants. The next time I buy a house I will place Catastrophes to work for me. Dr. Prothero examines in detail the various types of Landslides with illustrations and scientific explanations and you can bet that any fresh house I buy will not be near any of the locations that could slide a mound of dirt into my fresh home. There is so much more worth reading in these chapters, I search it all so chapters 5 thru 8, Dr. Prothero covers the meteorological disasters' with Floods, Hurricanes, Tornados, and Blizzards. For the past two weeks I have been reading about the floods in Minot and other North Dakota cities. They are dealing with record flooding and will continue to be threatened by the Souris River for days to come. It was a excellent time to reflect on Dr. Prothero's chapter on floods. In addition, Dr. Prothero gives us info on the death, destructions, and costs left behind from the 6 largest floods in recorded history. "Catastrophes" brought back some chilling memories of a disaster I happen to be caught right smack dab in the middle of in 1999. I was driving from Tucson, AZ to Washington D.C. On the Morning of May 3rd I left Roswell, NM and headed towards Oklahoma City. That afternoon I was driving east along interstate 40, I could see the huge thunderheads building in my mirrors and warnings were already being sounded on the radio of possible tornados. I had never seen skies like this before. I checked into a hotel, just off of I-40, near the center of Oklahoma Town when all hell broke loose around 5:30pm, it seemed like tornadoes were everywhere. I was staying at the Hampton Inn, they ushered all there guest into basement floor near the exercise room. I felt like I was down there for 10 hours, I was scared. Although I never saw the tornadoes, but I could hear the storms, I did see the aftermath as I was high tailing it out of city the next morning. For the next few days, "Tornado Alley" was swarmed. It was very sad for me to hear of the first deaths on the radio the next morning. Dr. Prothero explains the various types of air masses that need to converge in order to form a tornado. Now when I watch meteorologist warn us of impending destructive storms, I know what is taking put in the atmosphere. In amazing detail, Dr. Prothero covers the scientific mechanism that causes blizzards and hurricanes. From the amazing blizzard in 1993 to the "school house" blizzard in 1880's, to Hurricane Katrina and a lot of more!! Dr. Prothero gives chilling eyewitness accounts of the death, destruction, and the impact on societies and communities. However, the author gives accounts of the heroic efforts of some of the survivors of these amazing catastrophes. These chapters offer much more information!!!The latest four chapters, Dr. Prothero explains "Ice Ages", "The Greenhouse Planet", "Mass Extinction", and most importantly, "Can We Survive Nature-and Our Own Folly?". After reading these chapters, I now have more scientific ammunition to use versus those that would deny the science behind climate change. Dr. Prothero explained the science behind the Ice Age. From the 100,000 year wobble cycle of the planet to the land masses that blocked warm water currents from entering various regions making those regions colder, and so much more info that everyone concerned about our planet should know. In a step-by-step process the author takes the reader on an ice age journey through various scientific theories from the 1800's to today, naming the various scientist involved in the process and who got it right. It is truly a fascinating journey. In the next chapter, "The Greenhouse Planet", is probably one of the most necessary chapters to read. The author discusses climate change in detail and gives a stern warning that climate change may not be a gradual process as a lot of of us assume and is shaping up to be a destructive, costly deadly catastrophe of all. The illustration in this chapter can be scary. Please read this chapter multiple times. The next to latest chapter, "Mass Extinction", pointed out something's I did not know about when huge comets and asteroids impact the earth. I had always assumed either asteroids or comets where the cause of most major extinction events. However, the author goes through the huge 5 mass extinction happenings and cast a lot of doubt on this theory. He does not discount the importance of these major impacts, but he points out, rather remarkably, that the science does not quite match up to this scenario. He finishes this chapter with the 6th Extinction, this one is being caused by man and is a really eye opening read.With global temperatures and human populations rising along with the meal supplies shrinking, i.e. farming meal and fish supplies etc., Dr. Prothero gives a chilling acc of our species facing a major catastrophe yet to come. I was very satisfied to see Dr. Prothero point out a politician who denied climate change and the reason why, cash of course. There are so a lot of of our politicians that deny the science of climate change for their own private gain or beliefs. These politicians are supposed to hold us safe and be leaders when danger can engulfs us as a species, whatever that danger maybe. They are simply not leading us. As the amazing Richard Feynman once said in a 1955 lecture on the value of science; "It is our responsibility as scientists, knowing the amazing progress which comes from a satisfactory philosophy of ignorance, the amazing progress which is the fruit of freedom of thought, to proclaim the value of this freedom...Dr. Prothero understands the importance of leading us into a better globe and he did a amazing service to all of us by speaking out in this book. "Catastrophes!" provide us with the scientific info to sway those that would deny our future with pseudo-science and lies. Thank you, Dr. Prothero.

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    The Risk of School Rampage: Assessing and Preventing Threats of School Violence []  2019-12-18 20:46

    Eric Madfis fails to contain two successful approaches of targeting at-risk violence-prone youth in schools with evidence based diversions in Chicago from 2009 to show that saved 200 lives and $1.4B. You can read about it in the Comprehensive Psychology 2013 October problem or the May 2013 problem of Behavior Science and the Law. I testified about it before the US House of Representatives Judiciary Subcommittee on Crime Terrorism and Homeland Security 24 July 2012. President Obama spoke about it the next day. The US Justice Department gave $78M and the Chicago Public Safety Fund $50M, so I thinks it is a cost-effective, cost-beneficial approach. The material in this book is out of date and of not much practical value given the high cost of homicide.

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    The Art of Memory Forensics: Detecting Malware and Threats in Windows, Linux, and Mac Memory []  2020-12-3 19:30

    I took the memory forensics work at DefCon this year. That was an awesome introduction to Volatility. But I expected that it would still be difficult to obtain far into such a complex technical subject. Silly me. This book is so well structured and written. Makes memory forensics fun.

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    The Art of Memory Forensics: Detecting Malware and Threats in Windows, Linux, and Mac Memory []  2020-12-3 19:30

    A amazing text book. Classroom material, comprehensive. One of the best books in the digital forensics zone and the most detailed book in the volatile memory space.

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    The Art of Memory Forensics: Detecting Malware and Threats in Windows, Linux, and Mac Memory []  2020-12-3 19:30

    At this writing (Fall 2014) the Wiley instructor companion www service is not up to Wiley standards (yet). I wanted to try the code for this review, but the code section on the website only defaults to the creative commons license (both the code and license links). Same with all the chapters, they only display commons, a strawman syllabus and an intro letter. They only resource that is already up is the Powerpoint presentation, and at over 100 pages it is simply OUTSTANDING, which whets the appetite even more for the rest of the outlines, solutions, code, and much , Wiley, obtain with it! If you are considering buying this, add your vote in comments and Wiley might listen. I'll modernize this once we obtain the code, both with quality of the code and where it can be used. Going over the license so far, it is quite generous, much like GNU with an attribution link, although of course more robust beyond teaching (eg commercial) if you do obtain permission. The text itself has wonderful, up to date sploit and software info, patches, etc. but the site, for a book this costly, needs to be completed. I'm not recommending you pass on this because of it, but we won't be getting the full value for our purchase, nor will our students, until the website is UPDATE: SEE MICHAEL'S COMMENT ATTACHED TO THIS REVIEW. Although Amazon's automated system generally removes links, the comment gives complete and up to date online resources for this book, as the publisher's link is incomplete, and will not be updated. The publisher promotion of online evidence samples, code, etc. is not wrong or deceptive, it is just on github rather than the publisher's website as indicated. PLEASE VIEW THE COMMENT AND VISIT THE SITES INDICATED IN THE COMMENT BEFORE LEAVING A NEGATIVE REVIEW-- the resources ARE there, just not where advertised. Also, see Michael's other best seller at:  Malware yst's Cookbook and DVD: Tools and Techniques for Fighting Malicious Code .If you are price conscious, message that in addition to the generous web resources in the comment (including begin source/ freeware), the book is over 900 pages long, and PACKED with practical, use-it-now reference and learning tools. I've already visited the samples, and they are awesome, especially given that they cover the most frequent o/s permutations. Both Windows and Linux give the exact traces indicated, these authors are the true thing.

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    The Art of Memory Forensics: Detecting Malware and Threats in Windows, Linux, and Mac Memory []  2020-12-3 19:30

    I like the examples

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    The Art of Memory Forensics: Detecting Malware and Threats in Windows, Linux, and Mac Memory []  2020-12-3 19:30

    I have worked in I.T. for 15 years - in Windows system administration, database administration, and utility software development. About one month ago I started reading heavily on security, and planned for 2015 a shift in career focus to that discipline. So I bought this book and began to read. This had immediate payoff just 2 days ago when I noticed an email from our security squad that an IDS had detected a possible Trojan signature on one of our servers. Another yst ran a full AV scan, and when she found nothing, the email thread dried up. Not so convinced (I had just read the fact on Mandiant's www service that "100% of victims had up-to-date AV software), I triggered a complete memory dump on the server using LiveKD and began working on it with WinDbg commands and Volatility Framework. Within the first few hours, it appeared that there certainly looked to be a rootkit-like presence, but with my limited security knowledge and, even though I debug a kernel dump every now and then, I don't usually look at things like the IDT 2e entry, etc. However, 15 hours into researching my first real-life production issue, I completely narrowed down the source and contacted the security squad and acc management. This server would have continued to operate under the radar with the standard tools continually missing the malware's presence and caused who knows what problems. Thanks to one of the most well-organized, well-written, and informative I.T. books I have ever read, I was able to effectively isolate this piece of malware. This book is an absolute must for anyone even employed in I.T. with responsibilities over safeguarding company networks and infrastructure, and (unfortunately) these days, should probably be employed by anyone at all that plugs in an Ethernet cable or attaches to Wi-Fi! Outstanding material - thanks very much.

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    The Art of Memory Forensics: Detecting Malware and Threats in Windows, Linux, and Mac Memory []  2020-12-3 19:30

    Amazing read

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    The Art of Memory Forensics: Detecting Malware and Threats in Windows, Linux, and Mac Memory []  2020-12-3 19:30

    AMF is a volume of items you just have to know, or at least you have to know where to search it. The book is an essential reference, reasonably complete and well written. It reminds me of the classic Morse and Feshbach "Methods of Mathematical Physics". Like M&F, its contents must be ingested in little chunks when needed. It isn't a textbook entitled the principles of memory 's not a comprehensive handbook like Morse and Feshbach. But the current empirical field of memory forensics is not amenable to the kind of structural ysis that can be taught to graduate level physics students. My reason for not rating it five stars is the lack of a theoretical backbone. This is not a computer science book. This is a book about the volatility framework with app to the structure and function of computer memory. It is not a book about data structures or processes. It isn't really forensics, which is the presentation of scientific data and ysis in a court of law.If you buy the book as a practical handbook of memory forensics, as its authors say, "Art"; you will be pleased. It is a "What do I do now that I have downloaded and typed 'python '" I don't know of a better book,

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    The Art of Memory Forensics: Detecting Malware and Threats in Windows, Linux, and Mac Memory []  2020-12-3 19:30

    The photo listed is what was expected but I got an international edition instead which I do not know the differences in content (should not be a huge deal but kinda deceptive). Book was not packaged well and was slightly damaged on receipt which is what really ticked me off on top of being shipped later than expected.

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    T. rex and the Crater of Doom (Princeton Science Library) []  2020-6-10 18:48

    This book has been around for awhile, but I only now got around to reading it. What a treat! I really enjoyed Walter Alvaerz's insights into the scientific process of discovering what killed the dinosaurs, but what delighted me was his tale of how academic orthodoxy was challenged, derided, but eventually overcome by interdisciplinary collaboration. The huge takeaway notice for anyone who works in academic circles is this: Don't be so wedded to your view that you cannot learn from others. Contributions and insights can come from anywhere if you are humble enough to listen.

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    T. rex and the Crater of Doom (Princeton Science Library) []  2020-6-10 18:48

    This is the book that started it all: Dinosaur extinction by bolide from outer space. Catastrophic tsunamis. Intercontinental ejecta layer. Geologic evidence everywhere you look once you know where to look. And the laughingstock of serious geologists everywhere until the evidence started mounting up to where it couldn't be is is the story of Walter Alvarez and his colleagues and their careful science that yielded ideas, insights, and then, whammo! the Huge Idea that there might be an external component to the extinction of dinosaurs 65 million years ago. It is a forensic mystery worthy of "CSI" except this is the true deal, and the slog work of doing research took this band of scientists all over the globe in find of enlightenment. Leveraging fresh developments in dating techniques and the best minds in the field and out of it (did I mention that Walter Alvarez is the son of Luis Alvarez, the Nobel Award champion for physics?), the adventure is somewhat stalled until the discovery of oil company drilling cores from the Chixulub region of Mexico that confirm evidence of an impact in that region. It is an eleventh-hour discovery just as interest is waning and funding is running out - a development worthy of the "Nova" episode that it eventually much fun as it is to read mysteries, it is equally fun to read about the real-life trials and tribulations of a band of intrepid individuals who have a hypothesis and then are able to methodically try it, with startling results. One of the joys of this book is Alvarez's generosity toward those whose work supported him and propelled him forward, as well as his occasional head-scratching humility. This really isn't a vanity piece but it is a definite amazing read.

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    T. rex and the Crater of Doom (Princeton Science Library) []  2020-6-10 18:48

    The title is kind of silly. This is not a juvenile book. This is a serious but fascinating acc of the discovery of the K/T boundary, the mass extinction of the dinosaurs, and two scientist involved, a father and son by the name of Alvarez.

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    Scared Witless: Prophets and Profits of Climate Doom []  2020-11-9 18:33

    Larry Bell has written a thoroughly persuasive refutation of the global warming orthodoxy.He points out that the world has been warming since the end of the latest ice age, and that it might continue to warm regardless of what man does.He points out that the earth has not warmed during the latest fifteen years, despite increasing levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. And he points to evidence that long-ago periods of much higher carbon dioxide levels do not seem to have coincided with increases in global temperatures, nor did decreases in carbon dioxide levels coincide with dropping temperatures.He points out the manifest weaknesses of the computer models on which the claims that human-caused increases in atmospheric carbon dioxide are causing global warming are based.He doents the falsifying of temperature data and the misreporting of conclusions that went into key scientific reports used to help claims of man-caused global warming.He points to evidence that the West Antarctic Ice Sheet is not melting, nor are sea levels rising as a effect of such melting.Having thoroughly debunked the claims of man-caused global warming, he then shows the impracticality of our switching from fossil fuels to such “green” fuel sources as solar, wind, and biofuels.He makes the indisputable point that “global warming” provides a rationale for complete government regulation of every part of our lives. Small will remain of our individual liberties if those behind the warming scare have their Bell has created a convincing case that the global warming scare is more a political than a scientific phenomenon, and that one of its purposes is the redistributing of the wealth of the industrialized nations to rest of the nations of the m [email protected]#$%!&y, Author of "Radical by Nature: The Green Assault on Liberty, Property, and Prosperity."

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    Scared Witless: Prophets and Profits of Climate Doom []  2020-11-9 18:33

    If you are concerned about our environment and the science and lack of true science that gets into government policy, this is a book that will begin your mind.

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    Scared Witless: Prophets and Profits of Climate Doom []  2020-11-9 18:33

    As I test to search answers to the debate I found this book a amazing read. Highlighting the motivations as to why some would wish to continue work that may be a high stakes bet.

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    T. Rex and the Crater of Doom: Princeton Science Library []  2020-7-26 20:29

    I read this book after reading "The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs" due to that book referring to this one. The book was a detective story of sorts as it delves into the cause of the extinction of the dinosaurs and the find for evidence of the believed cause. While very interesting, it does obtain very technical at times and can be difficult to follow. Unless you have a background in the topic matters involved be prepared to read sections more than one time and to become familiar with unknown territory. If prepared to do that then worth reading. If not, read "The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs" and call it a day.

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    T. Rex and the Crater of Doom: Princeton Science Library []  2020-7-26 20:29

    This book has been around for awhile, but I only now got around to reading it. What a treat! I really enjoyed Walter Alvaerz's insights into the scientific process of discovering what killed the dinosaurs, but what delighted me was his tale of how academic orthodoxy was challenged, derided, but eventually overcome by interdisciplinary collaboration. The huge takeaway notice for anyone who works in academic circles is this: Don't be so wedded to your view that you cannot learn from others. Contributions and insights can come from anywhere if you are humble enough to listen.

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    T. Rex and the Crater of Doom: Princeton Science Library []  2020-7-26 20:29

    Short book (150 pages of text, tons more of footnotes). Simple read. Amazing story of discovery including all the mistakes, errors and luck that create up science. Experts in the field may likely search it overly simplistic, but don't read it for the recent academic info on the state of the science. Read it for the travelogue of a voyage of discovery and in that vein I give it 5 stars.I appreciate that Walter Alverez notes that there was and is some hot debate about the science, and honors those involved by not trying to quote blow by blow who said what to whom, but rather that to argue over uncertainties is part of being human and part of being a scientist. That is a key take-away from the book, that science is not a neat linear flow from darkness to light. There are a lot of misteps along the way.I message that several of the one-star ratings are from school children who were assigned the book in class and found the book boring. As they confess, it isn't actually that the book was boring but that any book about science was bound to be boring. Ouch, I am sure this book was carefully selected by the teacher as most likely candidate to entertain the students. It is too poor if even this book couldn't engage some of the kids, but hopefully others were turned on and will take their own voyage of discovery when their turn comes.

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    Noodleheads Fortress of Doom []  2020-7-23 20:30

    This series is so original, funny and totally captivating! - Love Fortress of Doom the newest addition to the series! Our grandson loves these books as do the kids in my class at school! I highly recommend!

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    Noodleheads Fortress of Doom []  2020-7-23 20:30

    Cute book!

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    Noodleheads Fortress of Doom []  2020-7-23 20:30

    This series is truly amazing, our almost 5 year old twins have been enjoying them for years. Every night for the past 3 years a Noodlehead’s book has been read at bedtime (as requested by the kids)....our kids continue to pick up on various things or “get” various jokes as they grow up. It’s amazing to see them appreciating all aspects of the stories and jokes over the years. I can not recommend this series of children’s book more.... they are cleaver, fun, interesting, educational, and overall silly. Two huge thumbs up!

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    Survival: Island of Doom [App]  2019-1-22 13:28

    I love this android game so much! I just want there was a map for Android device phones. I had this on my iPhone and it had a map but just switched to a Samsung S9. A map would be very heqlpful.

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    So much fun!! Doesn't appear quite as sharp on the Note 4 as it did on my older S3, which can only be expected but definitely doesn't detract from the game. The main problem I have is, while having little icons allows to see more of the android game itself, they're too little and difficult to tap. The d-pad suffers the same issue. Any support or info you can provide would be great! Thanks!

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    Amazing game! Kinda like an isometric Lost Vikings - swapping between characters to overcome obstacles. Worth buying if you like the free ver because it runs much faster without the ad.

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    Just the right amount of challenge & length for a amazing phone time assassin game. Loses 2 stars because the d-pad is in a not good and awkward place, making the android game infuriating sometimes. Needs various placement, or line - draw controls, like Creatures Ate My Birthday Cake has (also a amazing android game in this genre.)

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    Amazing game, but hasn't aged well - on modern phones the control buttons are miniscule, making the android game very difficult to operate.

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    Amazing game, not too simple not too hard. The latest gift level in second chapter is genius.

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    Wtf I paid for this android game why do I obtain ads on begin now? And they don't go away. Have to tap play now. That's why I launched the application in the first place...

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    Amazing graphics, perfect level design, and controls are actually fairly responsive. Unbelievable game!

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    This android game created my xperia play worth it. A very very clever puzzle game.

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    Thank you for adding 30 fresh levels!

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    I really hope you create more levels.

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    So amazing I actually paid for it!

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    Fuuuunnnnnn!

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    Amazing game. Very addictive. Love it.

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    Fantasic game...worth the cash

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    Perfect fun.

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    Cool

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    I installed this based on the review saying it is like the Lost Vikings which is one of my favorite android games from the 90's. I am satisfied about the purchase because the paid ver runs smoother than the free ver because of no ads. Each pig has unique abilities required to finish each puzzle stage. Be aware the free versions save android game does not transfer to the paid game. Would like to touch and drag method points for the pigs. Using a Galaxy S Captivate with Serendipity ROM

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    Aporkalypse - Pigs of Doom [App]  2019-10-15 13:55

    I really like this game. Reminds me of Chip's Challenge. Looking forward to more levels.

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    Dome of Doom [App]  2017-12-28 21:0

    Plz create a system how to change guns

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    Dome of Doom [App]  2017-12-28 21:0

    It's very pagal android game

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    Dome of Doom [App]  2017-12-28 21:0

    Not bad! just need a small bit modernize animations and add backpack in, add firstperson view, Remove ads, add customize player Hero etc.... oh there is a glitch when i just press exit the car while the car still running and it bug me out of the map and glitch hope you will fix that.

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    Dome of Doom [App]  2017-12-28 21:0

    I not a huge fan of these android games but it is so so so poor

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    Dome of Doom [App]  2017-12-28 21:0

    Very poor android game

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    Dome of Doom [App]  2017-12-28 21:0

    Gooooood I Love it gemes😅😅😅😅😅

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