Read frontiers of astrobiology reviews, rating & opinions:

Check all frontiers of astrobiology reviews below or publish your opinion.

100 Reviews Found

Sort by: Most Accurate (default) | Newest | Top Rated

  • 0

    Useful review?

    Frontiers []  2020-7-26 22:19

    Being a large Journey fan at their zenith (1979-1986), I enjoyed hearing this album again. I specifically like some of the album tracks that were not huge radio hits - my favorite on this album is "Rubicon". A lot of memories of seeing Journey live 3 nights in a row in Phoenix with my best mate and my only concern in the globe was who was going to be able to borrow their parents' vehicle to obtain to the shows! I miss Steve Perry being in the melody globe - his awesome voice has been silent method too long.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Frontiers []  2020-7-26 22:19

    I really love this album, especially for the song 'Faithfully'. Glad to have found it on Amazon. Now, if the film video from the VHS for this album can be re-released, I will be first in line to buy it!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Frontiers []  2020-7-26 22:19

    THIS IS MY FAVORITE ALBUM OF ALL TIME. Steve Perry with Jonathan Cain writing most of the songs created the album more credible than their previous work. Faithfully is by far my favorite song of all time. I can listen to it and I just fall apart and cry because Steve Perry sings it with such feeling you can feel the passion pouring out of him. Separate Ways, Send Her My Love, After the Fall, Troubled Child, Edge of the Blade and Rubicon are all my fresh favorites on this album. I love the gift tracks especially Only the Young and Ask the Lonely. Steve Perry gives fresh meaning to the phrase LEGEND. That's what he is with this album and his other album either solo or with Journey. He will be remembered that method forever with future generations to come. Journey without him is just another band but with him it is legendary.

    0  


    Add your opinion on frontiers of astrobiology or scroll down to read more reviews ↓

     

  • 0

    Useful review?

    Frontiers []  2020-7-26 22:19

    I have always contended, and still do, that the Frontiers album was and is Journey's best album overall. It was, of course, released when Jouney was at their peak both as individual musicians and as a band. The album's melody is at once more agressive than Escape, shows amazing growth in their writing skills, takes more risks than they did on Escape, and the album is just more consistant across the board. So, what impact does remastering and expanding this album have? It is a notable improvement across the board!All of the songs sound better due to the remastering. The largest single knock on this album was how overwhelming some felt J. Cain's keyboards where on the original mix. While I have never agreed with that view, the mix between Cain's keyboards, Schon's guitar, and Perry's vocals seems to have a better blend ere are four songs added to this album that were originally recorded from this general time frame; Only The Young, Ask The Lonely, Only Solutions, and Liberty. The first two can be found on Journey's Greatest Hits disc. The latest two, I believe, have not been issued as studio recordings before outside of Only Solutions (which I believe was on the original "Tron" soundtrack). So, what impact does adding these do to the disc? It actually takes a amazing overall disc and makes it better! All four songs still feel like vintage, top-of-the-heep Journey and actually create the album feel more complete. The only method they could have created this a "better" album would have been to remove the one song that has never sounded good, "Back Talk". Of course, that would not create for a very amazing re-issue from a historical standpoint, so there was no method that would happen.With this re-issue, in my opinion, most fans only need three albums to fully have fun Journey, Infinity (remastered and expanded version), Escape (re-issued and expanded - not sure why they didn't bother remastering this one???), and this one. Those three in rotation would leave a listener "Journeying" to heaven. Regardless, this CD is an absolute must, even if you have the original CD release and especially if you haven't owned this album since the original vinyl!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Frontiers []  2020-7-26 22:19

    After the somewhat uneven Escape, featuring fresh member Jonathan Cain, we arrive at Frontiers! By now, the fresh lineup has had one album and one tour under their belts. The songwriting, recording, and live playing have gelled, and it's time to crank out a masterpiece.If you follow the band's progression, you search certain milestones where the band shifted into another gear, and jumped forward. The first was with the album Infinity, and Steve Perry joining the band. The next milestone was with Departure, and a solid album of amazing songwriting and playing. Jonathan Cain coming on board helped with the next milestone, and that is this album. Really, this starts the best and most mature recording period of the band, with the classic trio of albums: Frontiers, Raised on Radio, and Trial By Fire. These together may not include the majority of songs typical in the greatest hits collections, but the band reached a point to where they could do amazing things and not have to depend of writing hits. They could move to the next level and write and play melody that they really enjoyed, and we can rt of what makes this album so amazing is that there are no weak or wimpy tracks. The surprise addition of [email protected]#$% rockers shows the band in a whole fresh light. Chain Reaction is very cool and strong, but even the more pop-oriented lead-off single Separate Ways has both pop-hooks and melody, and powerhouse production (check out those guitars and drums too!) This may be their most cohesive album, with all the songs working well together and next to each other.Okay, if you don't have this, go ahead and click on the important buttons. Then, load it in the CD player, crank it up, and enjoy! Even the production and mixing have a bigger and more stadium-oriented sound, so you obtain a small more of a live presentation of the band (one of their highlights) over other albums. The packaging artwork is nice too.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Frontiers []  2020-7-26 22:19

    This album, especially after the inclusion of the 4 gift tracks for this edition, is one of the best of the 80's along with Journey's other smash hit "Escape". On most days I would agree with another reviewer's opinion of the one "bad" song on this disc "Back Talk". However, sometimes when I listen to it I can almost obtain to the end of the song before it drives me nuts. It sounds like Steve Perry was attempting to sing in a completely various style and even talking through some parts of it. In any case, this is an perfect album and I would recommend buying it to anyone who loves amazing melody where you can actually understand the words. On a side note, I would also recommend buying all of Journey's albums rather than getting any of the compilation discs, especially after they reissued a lot of of them with extra tracks. Why? Because, unlike some bands who rarely had anything besides singles on their albums worth listening to, just about everything Journey ever place on an album was amazing melody if not necessarily being worthy of a top ten smash hit("Infinity, 1978" through "Trial By Fire, 1996" only).

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Frontiers []  2020-7-26 22:19

    There has been a resurgence of Journey melody and I am satisfied to see it as I think Journey is, in my opinion, the best group that ever existed and Steve Perry the best vocalist. Their melody stands the try of time. I believe Frontiers is the best album they ever released and Journey was at their best in 1983. The first five songs have videos that can be found on youtube. There are four additional songs from other albums on the CD version. It is rare that you search an album that has all amazing songs on it unless its a greatest hits album. This is one of those rare albums. You might also check out on youtube "Journey Frontiers and Beyond." That will give a story line for Journey for the newer fans or those of us who wish to stroll down memory lane.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Frontiers []  2020-7-26 22:19

    Second Round of the excellent marriage not as powerful as escape But beautiful closefavorites for meSeparate ways worlds apartSend her my loveFaithfullyAnd After the fall with randy Jackson on bass who would Replace Ross Valory In future records

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Frontiers []  2020-7-26 22:19

    There are some remixing/rerecording shenanigans going in the tune "Only Solutions" -the original intro guitar part has been replaced. The main difference between the tracks on this album and the selections for comparison on the Time3 set is that -everything- on this fresh Frontiers album is louder -and therefore has less dynamic range- from multiband limiting with a lot of makeup-gain. Still a amazing album, but it is a "different" album. You can never really know the source of a remaster unless it's specifically stated. Was a fresh pre-master made from the source? Was the pre-master used? Or was a 16-bit digital file from the late 1980's sent through yet another limiter? Wouldn't mind some metadata.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Frontiers []  2020-7-26 22:19

    Petty sure you know who Journey is and are just buying a 2nd or 3rd copy of this album

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Astrobiology: A Brief Introduction []  2020-4-1 19:3

    I'm just in the second chapter, and the reading is slow, because the book is full of ideas you usually don't think about in your everyday life. You need time to digest all the fresh information, to imagine all the fresh ideas, to correlate them with your show knowledge and ose reviewers who wrote that the book wasn't exactly for a layman, were absolutely correct. At least, you should remember what chemical bonds are (ionic, covalent), have some notion about nuclear and other fundamental physics etc. I mean, if you already have some knowledge of that, the reading is more meaningful for 's not a book just about extraterrestrial life. It's more about what life is, what can it be based on, how could it originate and evolve, what are important conditions for that, and whether it's possible that life develops somewhere else.If you can measure value of the book by 'density' and amount of info it contains, this book costs every dollar of its price.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Astrobiology: A Brief Introduction []  2020-4-1 19:3

    Greta book for a newbie because it offers a wide but shallow snapshot of material relative to astrobiology. It will, however, be very disappointing for anyone who is looking for in-depth material.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Astrobiology: A Brief Introduction []  2020-4-1 19:3

    Highly recommend.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Astrobiology: A Brief Introduction []  2020-4-1 19:3

    this is a amazing starting point, with references at the ends of the chapters. very worthwhile as an introduction to astrobiology. for science-oriented readers.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Astrobiology: A Brief Introduction []  2020-4-1 19:3

    This book contained content parallel to the U of Edinburgh Coursera Astrobiology course taught by Charles ell, who suggested it as supplementary reading. It provides a small more in depth look at the topics than a primary level Cousera course was able to cover. An earlier free text is available to download from Rice U, but it is the earlier (2007) edition. So much changes so quickly. The later ver seems appropriate if if it comes at a is introductory text is exciting reading, a page turner for those with even a mild interest in astrobiology. There is nothing in the content out of range for anyone willing to think a small about the material. No science or math degrees required. Yet, the text may very well send the unsuspecting reader in find of the next level of e Kindle price was reasonable.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Astrobiology: A Brief Introduction []  2020-4-1 19:3

    As the title says, it's a brief introduction. It does dig into some subjects - like physical chemistry explanations for carbon vs. silicon based life - at a chemistry 201 level, and overall provides a amazing overview of major topics. It's a amazing put to begin if you are looking for an intro with references to more in-depth details.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Astrobiology: A Brief Introduction []  2020-4-1 19:3

    Amazing book for beginners. The topic matter is complex and vast, but the book touches the science of astrobilogy mastery.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Astrobiology: A Brief Introduction []  2020-4-1 19:3

    I read this for a course for beginners who do not have a science background. Awesome topic. But a third or more of the book is very heavily chemistry. It suggests that you can skip parts.. .but I am usually reluctant to skip a whole section of a book just in case I miss something interesting.I know physics better than chemistry; but admittedly this topic is necessarily a chemistry massive topic. However, I felt that there was a bit too much chemistry in it. Too a lot of long explanations about bonds, molecules, ill, the first third and latest third are great.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Astrobiology: A Brief Introduction []  2020-4-1 19:3

    A fascinating look at the question of whether we are alone in the galaxy or even the universe, and all the things that had to go just right for us to be here reading about it. And where else are you going to search a calculation of the upper bound for the number of cows that could possibly exist on Mars?

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Astrobiology: A Brief Introduction []  2020-4-1 19:3

    As a chemist, this book is almost like reading an amazing novel on the physical aspects of the creation of the universe and potential life beginnings.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Biological Cosmology, Astrobiology, Extraterrestrial life []  2020-1-25 3:25

    This is an intriguing book consisting of articles written by eight astrobiologists. The authors employ plausible scenarios favoring the panspermia paradigm which promulgates the idea that microbial life was made in interstellar zone just after the Huge Bang and has been circulating throughout the universe ever since. Using stellar winds, comets, asteroids, cosmic dust, and other processes, life [email protected]#$%!ched a ride seeding the Earth (a fresh Darwinism?) and other planets/moons in our and other solar systems; microbial life literally permeates the universe and we, and other worlds,are being seeded even today. Their evidence does not provide "proof", but an interesting argument is created with supporting references from reputable sources along with their own research. Their ideas are speculative and radical, but so were relativity and quantum mechanic when they were introduced in the early 1900's.Evidence contains "fossils" (debatable but promising) found in meteorites, multiple and credible bio-markers found in meteorites, genetic anomalies discovered in microbial life on Earth, indications of life before Earth formed, complex organic molecules found everywhere in interstellar zone and on comets and asteroids, curious extremophile survival capabilities, pandemics which historically followed Earth's passage through comet tails, organisms found in the upper near-space atmosphere where there should be none, etc. The question of whether or not the complex organic molecules found in interstellar zone (using spectroscopy) are random pre-curser molecules, parts of once living organisms or, are actual desiccated viable microbes, is thought ere are a lot of compelling and thought provoking ideas covered in this book and I cannot do justice here in covering them. The latest increases in reputable scientific publications on this topic indicates a growing interest in panspermia; maybe the authors are on to something very spectacular. Their book is worth the

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology []  2020-9-20 18:44

    A small dated, but a amazing history lesson with a focus on different areas involved in research. The author puts a private perspective on the work being done to uncover some of the most elusive challenges facing physics in the modern world. The author makes some assumptions about the readers' level of understanding but gives very clear and "non math/science" descriptions of what is being studied and why it is necessary - with a historical overlay that provides necessary and interesting context.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology []  2020-9-20 18:44

    Anil and his editor Amanda Cook, cobbled together an awesome book, combining science, cultural, physical and anthropological geography, geology, travel to exotic and revered scientific areas on earth, then providing glimpses into both deep zone and quantum mechanics. (This sentence is a microcosm of much of the style of the book.)I reveled in some amazingly poetic prose as he described the areas that housed or supported an awesome array of telescopes located in locations few care to venture. Fortunately for us, he went to those often hostile locations and spent as much time writing on the geographies mentioned above, as the hard-core science that motivated their ’s a complex story. It contains acronyms and names enough to dissuade a reader from continuing, but then he slips in something fascinating about locations or an Ideas, both here on earth and into the multiverse.He is careful to contain a multitude of scientists and help personnel, past and present, who labor in difficult locations without much recognition or human comfort. It’s a Who’s Who of science, and very few keep awards or devices, theories or systems named for them, all do their part to bring knowledge to we who glibly keep it from our simple chairs.If nothing else resonates with the reader, the glossaries and indices at the end of the book can be used for further study and ur stars only reflect my inability to understand huge sections of the scientific prose, not the author’s vast knowledge or broad-based education, which is quite stunning.I found that having Google Earth and Wikipedia close by enabled me to stop and see a lot of of the locations and photos contained in his writing. Pictures in the text or at the end of the book would have created this far more enjoyable.If one reads only what they can easily understand, this will be well worth their investment in time. As my father used to say “Eat the meat and spit out the bones

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology []  2020-9-20 18:44

    This was a fascinating overview of the state of physics at the time the book was written (2010). The author takes you to websites around the globe crucial to different aspects of physics research and engagingly explains what they're doing and why it's so significant. We're introduced to some of the key players involved and the often extreme conditions they're willing to endure for the sake of knowledge. Along the way, we are also introduced to terms and concepts important for understanding the academic conversation. A background in or familiarity with the topic would be helpful but is really not important to have fun this book. Thank you!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Biological Cosmology, Astrobiology, Extraterrestrial life []  2020-1-25 3:25

    This is one of the least objective science books I've ever read. The authors cherry-pick sources that are in line with their central argument and don't go into detail regarding alternative explanations of ized phenomena. I don't mind private manifestos, just not in a form of thinly vailed insult to contemporary science.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology []  2020-9-20 18:44

    I'm still in the middle of this and working on it, but it's a fascinating read. Lots of amazing top drawer physics, but no translator required for an old biochemist whose head damage while trying to wrap it around atomic and nuclear physics class a couple of centuries ago.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology []  2020-9-20 18:44

    Extraordinary book- wonderfully written - about the nuts and bolts, the really hard work behind the hard earned insights that shape our cosmologies. In frozen Siberian lakes to shivering cubic hectares of ice and unspeakably deep caves- searching for the subtle particles that reveal the nature of our universe.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology []  2020-9-20 18:44

    What a unbelievable book! Join Anil Ananthaswamy on his pilgrimage around the globe to visit as a lot of of the most famous, and unusual, Observatories that he can obtain to. In his 2010 book “The Edge of Physics” Ananthaswamy shares his experiences on this global journey. Along the method he interviewed some of the top minds in astronomy and theoretical physics, seeking answers to a lot of of the most pressing questions in modern science: Is Supersymmetry a valid theory? Is there actually a Higgs Boson?* And the hunt for Cosmological Neutrinos and the Neutralinos. As a layman-reader I really enjoyed this book although there were portions of the text that left me feeling somewhat overwhelmed by the complex theories of particle physics and the mysteries of cosmological history. But Ananthaswamy is very amazing at explaining these difficult concepts, his writing is layman friendly and very readable. Part travel log, part history and cutting edge science, this entertaining book left me hungry for more of the same. Starting out in California, USA, the author visits the Mt. Wilson Observatory and takes a side trip to visit a Camaldolese Monastery in the Santa Lucia Mountains to spend some time with one of the resident Monks and experience some really dark skies. From there he continued on to more exotic locations; the VLT at Cerro Par Observatory in Chile’s Atacama Desert; the Karoo region of So. Africa, possibly the future home of the SKA (Square Kilometer Array)— the other contender is in Australia; the controversial observatories atop Mauna Kea, Hawaii and with IceCube in Antarctica drilling for the Square Kilometer Neutrino Detector. The list goes on but, for me, the high point was his visit to CERN in Geneva, Switzerland to see ATLAS: the large particle detector for the Huge Hadron Collider (LHC). While touring each facility the author discussed the ultimate goals of the scientists and engineers work and live there. And what are those goals? High on everybody’s list was a theory that combines General Relativity and Quantum Mechanics but they would also like to confirm Supersymmetry, look for validation to String Theory and the Multiverse. Ananthaswamy’s description of CERN and ATLAS is breathtaking. Working and doing research at CERN is definitely not for the faint of heart. With the dawning of the Zone Age it wasn’t long before fresh observatories were being sent to “The Final Frontier” in the form of satellites like Hubble and Planck that can “park” at one of the Lagrangian Points to create their observations. And so the book closes with a look to the future when a fresh generation of scientists, and their tools, will be rewriting the composition and history of our universe. I thoroughly enjoyed this challenging book and I highly recommend it to anyone interested reading about space, time and the universe. I had no technical or downloading issues with this Kindle edition.(* Higgs Boson was Discovered at CERN in 2012)Last Ranger

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology []  2020-9-20 18:44

    Anil's book includes various stories relating to Physics experiments conducted in various parts of the world, most of them remotely located. Travelling to those desolate locations is the adventure part. Describing the instruments and the experiments along with the relevant background in Physics. The mix of Physics and adventure makes this book very exciting. A background of high school Physics is enough to understand the ting with the 60 inch and the 100 inch telescopes at Mount Wilson near Los Angeles, built by George Hale in the beginning of 1900s. Peeping through these telescopes, the popular astronomer Edwin Hubble and his equally popular assistant Milton Humason, found out in the early twentieth century that the various galaxies are retreating from each other. This gave rise to the concept of an expanding Universe. Extrapolating this expansion backwards in time led to the now widely accepted Huge Bang theory. Later George Hale built a 200 inch telescope in Mount Palomar, further south to escape the light pollution caused by the growing town of Los e action then moves to a deep mine in Minnesota at Soudan. At the bottom of this abandoned mine is a very sensitive detector for detecting Cold Dark Matter. It is now postulated that most of the matter in the universe consists of dark matter, which is not visible to us as normal matter consisting of atoms. It does not include the regular subatomic particles like electrons, protons and neutrons etc. Instead it is speculated to include a very weakly interacting particle called neutralino. The sensitive detectors consist of ultra-pure germanium and silicon crystals cooled to 40 degree micorokelvins, just a shade above the absolute zero of -273 degree celsius. The detectors have not detected any neutralinos yet. The find is on !The action then shifts to Lake Baikal in Russia. It has a neutrino observatory deep beneath the ice. Neutrinos, discovered by the popular physicist Wolfgang Pauli, are copiously generated by our Sun. They move quickly rarely interacting with any matter in its path. Millions of them pass through our bodies each second and we don't even know about them. There are very energetic neutrinos which are generated in the galactic centers. Studying them could give us clues about the formation of galaxies. Neutrinos form a streak of blue light when they hit water. A large amount of pure water contained in Lake Baikal acts as a natural detector for these rare neutrinos from the center of the stop is the Cerro Par in the Atacama Desert in Chile. Just 12km from Pacific coast, on a mountain 2635 meters high, there is Very Huge Telescope (VLT) consisting of 4 telescopes each of 8.2 meters in diameter. The telescopes are used in conjunction with an advanced spectrograph (which can detect various light colors or absence of any color, coming from various sources). This is one of the most advanced telescopes in the globe used to study the is a zone which will most likely house a radio telescope called the Square Kilometer Array. Unlike an optical telescope, which consists of mirrors and lenses, radio telescopes consist of a an array of radio antennas, all of them connected to a radio receiver. The combined signals are scanned for sources like Pulsars and Quasars which emit only radio waves, and no light. Radio telescopy was started by Karl Jansky when he first observed radio signals coming from the center of our galaxy, the Milky Way. The zone of this telescope is likely to be finalized this year (2012). A mention is created of GMRT (Giant Meter Radio Telescope), an array of 30 dishes each of 45meters in diameter, located about 50 miles north of Pune in India. Indian astronomer Govind Swarup built each antenna cheaply from 16 tubular steel frames tied by steel age now shifts to the most desolate of all places, Antarctica. The experiments, called BESS, are conducted by launching balloons packed with detectors. These detectors look for anti matter. Anti matter is opposite of matter. They annihilate each other when they come in contact. It is speculated that there is some anti matter in the universe. Some stars and galaxies may be created of antimatter. Matter and anti matter may have formed in nearly equal amounts during the birth of the universe, and thereafter most of the anti matter got annihilated on contact with matter. A few hundred miles from the balloon begin site, at the south pole is an experiment called IceCube, which has sensors dug deep into ice cores, to look for neutrinos. It is related to the Lake Baikal neutrino observatory, but operating in most extreme is the very popular large particle collider in Europe (spanning the borders of Switzerland, France, Italy) called Huge Hadron Collider (LHC). Consisting of a heavy underground ring several kilometers in diameter, it generates highest energies on the planet to accelerate the protons and create them collide. Built to understand the beginning of the universe, it looks for a particle known as Higgs Boson, which is also called the God particle (incidentally Peter Higgs himself is an atheist). One of the detectors which looks for the aftermath of the collisions, is called ATLAS, which consist of heavy superconducting magnets. If confirmed, Higgs Boson will begin a fresh chapter in wards the end of the book, it also mentions about newer telescopes in space, i.e. Planck launched in 2009 to study the Cosmic Background Microwave radiation in greater detail. Laser Interferometry Zone Antenna (LISA), to be launched later this decade, will consist of 3 satellites positioned at the vertices of a triangle, million miles apart, to detect gravity waves. The gravity waves, if detected, would represent a ripple in the fabric of zone and time.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Conceivability: What I Learned Exploring the Frontiers of Fertility []  2020-1-27 23:37

    This book is an incredibly well written and well researched tutorial to infertility. It is place together so well, chapter by chapter, stepping through so a lot of layers of infertility treatments and losses, and through the author's own experience as well. The chapters delve into individual infertility therapies (Clomid, IUI, IVF, accupuncture, third party, egg quality, others) and each chapter has a large wealth of knowledge and research on each topic (as well as fascinating commentary on regulations, social implications, ethics, etc). But even with these in-depth yses, the book also maintains momentum all the method through, following the author through her long journey to grow her family. I feel like this book is her third baby!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Conceivability: What I Learned Exploring the Frontiers of Fertility []  2020-1-27 23:37

    Mrs. Katkin has written as thorough a discussion of infertility and the ordeal through which assisted reproduction technology of a lot of approaches finally provided two kids of her own genome and her husband as anyone outside the profession could desire. Any politician or cleric who hasn't read it has no business passing any sort of judgement on the procedures or the women who seek their help. Those who say it's versus "natural law" should butt out; no one in their target audience is listening! I absolutely commend Mrs Katkin for her courage and especially for her love! Denis Keleher, M.D.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Conceivability: What I Learned Exploring the Frontiers of Fertility []  2020-1-27 23:37

    Conceivability is a must-read for all would-be parents, and anyone who is curious about the necessary subjects it covers: fertility, egg and sperm donation, and how fertility is treated more as a business than as a medical problem here. I learned so much from this book that I bought several copies for everyone I know who is hoping to begin a family, and even some people who already have is book is not just informative, it's a page-turner. As you travel through Katkin's private journey, you keep your breath as she tries yet another approach to her infertility issues. Luckily, Katkin's hard work, research, and wonderful persistence pay off. We all have something to learn from her and her story.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Conceivability: What I Learned Exploring the Frontiers of Fertility []  2020-1-27 23:37

    This is a story of struggle, setbacks, and finally success. Infertility is a b*tch and to know about options is much needed. It all costs so much cash and to spend so much time, mostly being frustrated and disappointed, that the expensive medications aren’t working or that the doctors aren’t willing to support further, can create women who wish to be mothers feel angry, alone and after years of trying, the wish to giving up is strong. So having other options and reading success stories, create them hope ank you to the publisher and NetGalley for a copy of this eBook for an honest review.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Among Muslims : Meetings at the Frontiers of Pakistan []  2020-6-27 18:55

    I've read several of Jamie's nature books but had not read this one. However, a fresh experience with Pakistani culture has prompted me to investigate this work of hers.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Quest for Immortality: Science at the Frontiers of Aging []  2020-2-6 21:57

    A small long winded. Could chop 30% of the words without losing anything.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Quest for Immortality: Science at the Frontiers of Aging []  2020-2-6 21:57

    This book seems beautiful biased to me. While he seemingly makes a case for open-minded thinking, the wording he uses to describe some research and attitudes other than his own can be vaguely derisive and insinuate incompetence. I didn't read much, even though it was a textbook for one of my classes.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Biological Cosmology, Astrobiology, Extraterrestrial life []  2020-1-25 3:25

    Never bought his central argument.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology []  2020-9-20 18:44

    I don't read quick and so I had the talk application added at this time. (Don't know how I did it but it worked this time) I love the writing in its daily speech. Loved the history behind the topic. I learned that we are not far from this time period and I even had enter action with some of the people that were involved with the time line. My son was even in Chile where the telescope was being used. My family live in close proximity to the person that was involved with the Palomar Observatory. While going on in ones life you really are not aware of history being created and when you do it can just blow you away. So fantastic. Have not finish the book yet but have other things going but will hold the task on the front burner. Give it a try. Also if you have a challenge with reading search out how to use the talking books and hope you can connect with locations you have not tried before. Oh this is not too techy so far. Those that are visual learners can picture or photo in your minds eye what is being said, or that is how I am able to obtain what is going on. Satisfied trails to discovery.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology []  2020-9-20 18:44

    I did have fun this book, especially the author's visits to facilities all around the world, including Antarctica. I did search the explanation of some of the concepts to be a bit over my head. I used to have fun reading Asimov's non-fiction books because he could take the most difficult concept and explain it in terms anyone could understand, but this one lost me at times. Nevertheless, there is much fascinating info which IS understandable and I'd recommend this book to anyone interested astronomy or astrophysics or just likes knowing more about our unbelievable universe.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Edge of Physics: Dispatches from the Frontiers of Cosmology []  2020-9-20 18:44

    Well I really enjoyed reading this book a lot of years after my first encounter with physics and chemistry. Awesome how small we were taught in years past. At this much and much higher level, knowledge becomes relative and understanding is just temporary and faint. Yet I couldn’t place this book down as it place the history of this science together from visits to different experimentation sights and described their past research results and their consequences. Highly recommended.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Quest for Immortality: Science at the Frontiers of Aging []  2020-2-6 21:57

    The author keeps repeating himself, chapter after chapter. I finally place it down and into the donation box.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Quest for Immortality: Science at the Frontiers of Aging []  2020-2-6 21:57

    Dr. Andrew Weil provides an endorsement on the back cover saying "This is by far the best book I've read on the science of aging." I wonder why. It is definitely NOT the best book I've read on the science of aging. Better are: Austad, Steven N. Why We Age: What Science Is Discovering about the Body's Journey Through Life. (1997); Clark, William R. A Means to an End: The Biological Basis of Aging and Death (1999); and Hayflick, Leonard. How and Why We Age (1994)--see my reviews at All three of these books explain aging and the evolutionary necessity for death better than Olshansky and Carnes.I think what Andrew Weil liked about this book is the authors' endorsement of alternative medicine and their mention of Dr. Weil as "a leading proponent of this approach...emphasizing the importance of the natural healing and protective powers of the body in a method that is identical to that of evolutionary medicine." (pp. 146-147) It should be understood that while the authors endorse the principles of evolutionary medicine they do not endorse the use of a lot of famous meal supplements as a means of gaining longevity, including some advocated by Dr. Weil. Of course, Weil advocates their use for "optimum health" not as a means to anything like immortality. See his engaging best-seller, Eating Well for Optimum Health: The Essential Tutorial to Food, Diet, and Nutrition (2000).What this book has going for it is a clear statement of the demographic facts about aging and death, and some amazing arguments explaining why the facts are as they are and not as we would like them to be. In particular, we are warned about the "Prolongevists" who create unsubstantiated claims about the chance of living very long lives or of attaining immortality. They start with the Taoists and the alchemists, through Roger Bacon and Luigi Cornaro, to the unnamed "advocates of extreme prolongevity" who, it is implied, believe that "meditating and eating new fruits and vegetables" will lead to "an ageless body and timeless mind," (p. 235), and they debunk them all. In a sense, theirs is an extended argument versus buying any snake oil (in bottle or book form) that promises anything beyond the actuary tables. Clearly Olshansky and Carnes see their book as a clear-eyed "answer" to authors like Deepak Chopra , the mesmerizing author of Ageless Body, Timeless Mind (1993) and a lot of other books, who would have us believe in pollyannaish possibilities.While I agree that some kind of counter balance to the feel-good fuzziness of some Fresh Age authors is necessary, I think that Olshansky and Carnes may have damage their cause by not emphasizing the fact that humans need hope perhaps as much as they need factual knowledge. Furthermore, I think the authors may have aimed a small below their readership; witness the fact that the word "senescence" virtually does not appear in the book and is not in the index. Also, do they really think that their readers need to be advised (see page 35) that Tao is pronounced "Dow"?Nonetheless, this is an beautiful book and an simple read. I particularly liked the chapter on antioxidants, which makes it clear that such supplements are unlikely to be of any value in fighting senescence. Also perfect is the Appendix which is a "Life Table" giving years and days of life remaining for males and females at any age from 0 to 110 along with the probability of living to the next birthday. If you're male and a year old all the method up to being 29-years-old, you have a 99.9 percent probability of living to your next birthday. If you're a female, extend that to age 41. If you're a fifty-year-old woman, you have, on average, 11,651 days of life left.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Quest for Immortality: Science at the Frontiers of Aging []  2020-2-6 21:57

    I picked up a copy of The Quest for Immortality: Science at the Frontiers of Aging after watching Dr. Olshansky discuss his book and problems associated with human aging on Orange County Tv in early January. Having been intrigued by the changes I've seen in my own body through the decades, I found Olshansky's perspective on aging to be fascinating and refreshingly honest. With a copy of his book in hand..., I flipped it over to search endorsements from what I have since discovered is a strong set of authorities on aging. I was most surprised to search a glowing endorsement from Dr. Andrew Weil, who suggested that this was the best book on the science of aging that he had ever read. Over the years I have come to admire, respect and trust Dr. Weil, and now having read the book he so heartily endorsed, I can see why Dr. Weil and this authoritative group would provide such laudatory comments. What these authors did was, perhaps for the first time that I've seen, provide the general public with a scientifically accurate view of human aging that is easily digestible by everyone. None of the hype; no lies about how we can all stop or reverse aging or achieve an Ageless Body and Timeless Mind as suggested by Deepak Chopra (I've read all of his books); none of the exaggeration or lies about stopping or reversing aging by eating vitamins or antioxidants; and none of the hoopla like that coming from the globe of anti-aging medicine where they would have you believe that aging can be reversed with the use of hormones or mind control. Olshansky and Carnes use the first chapter to take the reader on what I found to be a fascinating journey through the history of thought on aging and death. I discovered that the 120 year lifespan thought by a lot of to be the scientific view of how long we can all live, actually comes from a passage in the Old Testament. The origin of alchemy came not from any amazing desire to transmute lead into gold for aesthetic purposes - gold was sought after because people thought it would create them live longer if they ate it. What I found most fascinating was the description of the legends passed down through the centuries designed to convince people that much longer lives are possible, legends that have created their method into contemporary literature and the ommercialization of anti-aging products (which are described in some detail later in the book). Olshansky and Carnes avoid criticizing directly any of the modern longevity salesmen. What they do instead is allow us look at the historical and contemporary globe of aging through their eyes, which then makes painfully obvious how those who know very small about aging, are trying to exploit the general public for profit. Not surprisingly, this shameless exploitation has been going on for thousands of years. In later chapters, Olshansky and Carnes explain why life expectancy cannot rise to the levels claimed by a lot of scientists; why there is a scientific reason to expect a link between when and death occur; how medical technology contributes to our longer lifespan; the real story behind antioxidants and how scientists may be closing in on a genuine pharmaceutical fountain of youth; the frontier of genetic engineering that will change life and death as we know it; and how the modern approach to medicine may not be the best approach we need to take when it comes to the diseases and disorders associated with growing older. It is also obvious now why Dr. Weil so heartily endorsed this book, because Olshansky and Carnes echo Weil's perspective that one of the best ways to deal with health issues associated with growing older is to enhance the body's ability to heal itself. The Quest for Immortality deserves the accolades it has received. I anticipate that the anti-aging industry is going to be very upset about being exposed for having perpetuated a three-thousand year old legend about human aging and longevity. The authors of these anti-aging books are going to be even more upset for having been exposed as either frauds, or trying to create the public feel guilty about aging in order to persuade them to buy their worthless or unproven products. Ignore them all. Olshansky and Carnes know the science, they authoritatively inform us that the most necessary elements of aging are within our control, and they explain in easy and clear language why most people have the opportunity to enhance the quality of their life, no matter how old they are, and how such improvements can be achieved. Finally, someone who knows what they're talking about is willing to tell us the truth about aging!!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Conceivability: What I Learned Exploring the Frontiers of Fertility []  2020-1-27 23:37

    Honestly, this was a tough read for me and a reproductive endocrinologist and infertility doctor.Elizabeth shares her journey through 9 years, 7 miscarriages, 8 IVF stim cycles, 10 doctors in various countries to have 2 kids via surrogate. She reflects on less than compassionate providers, mistakes in her care, and practices she feels were not beneficial for her. All stories are necessary to share but I do hope that anyone reading the book realizes that her journey is not the norm for all. I hope readers know that a lot of people build their families with medical treatments from compassionate providers. I appreciate her willingness to share her story and appreciate the attention she brings to the infertility and miscarriage - common yet still not discussed issues.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Conceivability: What I Learned Exploring the Frontiers of Fertility []  2020-1-27 23:37

    A thought provoking book on contemporary topic

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Conceivability: What I Learned Exploring the Frontiers of Fertility []  2020-1-27 23:37

    I was encouraged to read this book after going through a related experience with a girlfriend of mine who was trying to conceive for a lot of years with her husband. She would always struggle to share her experience with me because she felt that as a man I would not understand her struggles. After reading this book I really felt as though I could understand what my mate went through. I was very thankful that Liz exposed her real vulnerability to the globe in the hopes that other women would have the courage to test and test again to conceive and always have hope that success may be right around the corner. The take away here is that just because a doctor is telling you that you can’t have kids doesn’t mean that they are correct. Always use your heart as your motivation to search the answers you seek.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    From Walden to Wall Street: Frontiers of Conservation Finance []  2020-1-26 22:19

    A premise of this useful and provocative fresh book is that, as necessary as the achievements of land conservationists have been over a century or more (from Yosemite to the local bike path), much more land needs protection if we're ultimately going to "save the planet" (or something short of that). Further, editor Jim Levitt and his varied contributors know that today's political economy has changed dramatically, that the flow of capital, the power of markets, and the availability of fresh financial instruments have made whole fresh opportunities for those pragmatists and visionaries who "love the land" and wish to protect it.While the historical sweep of From Walden to Wall Road (extending from the Boston Common in the 1630s to Theodore Roosevelt and beyond) is fascinating, it is only the beginning. This is not just that usual tales of amazing wide begin locations courageous protected from rapacious developers. (Who could object to that?) Rather, this little volume serves as both inspiration and -- more importantly -- a street map to some of the fresh pathways to financing the protection of unique natural and cultural lands in the 21 century.Levitt, himself a former personal sector management consultant, and his co-authors provide examples of and guidance on the most necessary emerging land conservation techniques. They offer an array of fresh perspectives - from a Globe Bank veteran, a corporate forester, and nonprofit entrepreneurs, among others - on the fresh globe of land protection in America: innovative transactions that will utilize resolving loans, tax credits, limited development, carbon sequestration credits, and conservation banking.I suspect that the leaders in land conservation - today and in the years to come - will know this necessary addition to the conservation literature.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Among Muslims : Meetings at the Frontiers of Pakistan []  2020-6-27 18:55

    As a native of Pakistan who has lived in the U.S for over 25 years, I have always been interested in what Western writers are writing about Pakistan and people of Pakistan. I bought 2003 edition of this book latest Christmas for a light reading. When I started to read it, I could not place it away. Jamie had visited the Northern Locations in early 1990's. She talks about not just attractive landscaps but ordinary people. People she met during her travel to Gilgit and Skardu. "Gilgit going"! that's exactly what the locals with small English knowledge would say anywhere in Pakistan. She is not judgemental but paints a attractive portraits of life in that part of the world. People might not have lots of luxuries but they are contended with what they have and present unbelievable hospitality to visitors. She had lots of access to women in that part of world. It is nice to read a story of people beyond the prejudice which exists among the Western media. There are no Mullahs and no Talibans in this story. A young Western woman travels fearlessly in this distant, remote part of Pakistan. I have not seen most of these locations but found myself visiting these locations through this book. What's even more impressive that Jamie revisits the same locations 11 years later and meets a lot of of those women again. Lots has changed since her latest visit. Progress in terms of roads, electricity and internet has come in a lot of locations but people are still the same. Kathleen Jamie's book is unbelievable and I strongly recommend it to all. It is as if I was there visiting those attractive locations for few days!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Conceivability: What I Learned Exploring the Frontiers of Fertility []  2020-1-27 23:37

    I want this were available when I started my fertility journey 6 years ago. It would have saved me a lot of time, money, and heartache.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Quest for Immortality: Science at the Frontiers of Aging []  2020-2-6 21:57

    Well written and easily understood. Those who are searching for the Fountain of Youth should read it to search that their find is fruitless. They should understand that the human body is not built to latest forever. It does latest our lifetime, so have fun the day.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Among Muslims : Meetings at the Frontiers of Pakistan []  2020-6-27 18:55

    Jamie has a completely personal, but well informed and integrated view of what she is looking at. Because she writes like an angel she can then bring it to us so freshly. If you havent already, obtain her other books!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Quest for Immortality: Science at the Frontiers of Aging []  2020-2-6 21:57

    This book was recommended to me by a college friend. It was not the kind of book I thought it was but it's still rather is book is about what could happen in the future years and what type of people there will be at that time. The seller was very prompt and I received the book within a week of ordering it. No problems, I would order from this person again.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Conceivability: What I Learned Exploring the Frontiers of Fertility []  2020-1-27 23:37

    Really enjoyed this book. Relevant and informative. I already knew a chunk of the information discussed in terms of different types of ivf treatment, but it was nice to hear someone else’s story. Ive has multiple cycles of IVF and don’t shy away from learning more. I recommend this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Among Muslims : Meetings at the Frontiers of Pakistan []  2020-6-27 18:55

    The book was somewhat slow, but overall an interesting read. I felt there was an underlying orientalist bent towards women, even though it seems that the author's intention is to be as objective as possible. As another reviewer mentioned, it is necessary to remember this book describes a little subset of people in is also interesting to note that the book was republished after 9/11, due to a surge of interest in learning about Islam and Muslims. I don't think it's a amazing book to read if that is your intention - there is the danger of extrapolating what you learn from this book to all Muslims. But I would recommend it to those who are already familiar with the region (Pakistan) or the religion, as it is likely to give you a fresh insight into the tremendous diversity within the Muslim community.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Conceivability: What I Learned Exploring the Frontiers of Fertility []  2020-1-27 23:37

    Liz Katkin weaves together her private struggle to conceive with the recent research in a book that is not only informative but also incredibly engaging and simple to read. She brings to light tactics and techniques that a lot of in the US are unaware of. I already read the book and bought another for a friend.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    From Walden to Wall Street: Frontiers of Conservation Finance []  2020-1-26 22:19

    As a conservation finance professional, I navigate and pack financing options for land and water protection interests on a everyday is book has stretched my thinking and added a lot of techniques to the list of possibilities - it also focuses on the personal shop - the business - of land conservation.Population growth and development further drive efforts to keep on to our natural and cultural identity. This book goes a long method in strengthening those addition, the editor blends history and financing techniques in an interesting and insightful manner.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Quest for Immortality: Science at the Frontiers of Aging []  2020-2-6 21:57

    A very thoughtful book that explains the science of aging and debukes the a lot of potions and psuedo-science marketing we hear about. Just a easy recommendation for exercise and a healthy diet to have fun our life as we age.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Quest for Immortality: Science at the Frontiers of Aging []  2020-2-6 21:57

    Amazing book

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Quest for Immortality: Science at the Frontiers of Aging []  2020-2-6 21:57

    I read The Quest For Immortality latest spring with some expectation that my preconceptions about aging research would be seriously challenged. Instead, afterward I had the impression that, if this is the best these authors can do to debunk the claims of "prolongevists," then I'm more confident than ever that substantial life extension will be a reality in the near future.Olshansky and Carnes agree with a variation of the commonly held "wear and tear" theory of aging--a ver which holds that aculated, random unrepaired damage, over time, causes aging. In their view, aging is not programmed by evolution, but results because our cells, though remarkably amazing at repairing random DNA damage, still do not do so perfectly. But in stating this, Olshansky and Carnes have to ignore some fairly obvious rst, somatic cells have, in vitro, been brought from a senescent state back to a more youthful state. So it is clear that not all somatic cells suffer from degraded DNA that induces senescence; it is also clear that the senescence of at least some cells is not the effect of random DNA errors, or it could not be so easily cond, nowhere is this supposedly critical random DNA hurt quantified. Nowhere do they tell you how prevalent the aculated hurt is, how a lot of or what genes it affects, or what tissues suffer most from it. In contrast, adherents of other theories can at least quantify certain aspects of things such as hormone levels or telomere though this book is written in an entertaining style that is well-targeted to the lay reader, I cannot give it more than three stars, not only because I think their reasoning is not persuasive, but also because I think their writing has been deficient in several places. Some examples:(1) On p. 187, they begin a chapter by saying that telomerase was discovered in 1998, and reported with amazing fanfare. This is not true. I have not been able to search the exact date of discovery, but telomerase was discovered no later than about 1989; this appears to revolve around work done by Carol Greider and Cal Harley at Cold Spring Harbor NY. The 1998 discoveries involved consequences to cells (renewed ability to divide) when telomerase was activated in those cells.(2) One of the authors starts the book with a foreword in which he heaps scorns on the misguided health concerns of his in-laws--not a high note on which to start a supposedly serious discussion!(3) In a related vein, another chapter starts with several derogatory remarks about the work of Michael Rose with fruit flies. Later, they speak of him in a more complimentary way. If the authors don't think much of Rose's work, fair enough; but they should just say so, and forthrightly tell you why. There seems a puzzling contrast between the various comments created about Rose's work.(4) Around page 192, in discussing caloric restriction experiments with animals, they suppose that the control animals were allowed to "lay around and obtain fat," so that the findings would not be generalizable to other normal (not obese) animals. The usual assumption would be that the caloric intake of both groups would be regulated, at various levels. There is no confirmation that this was not the case. Some clarification could be helpful here.Olshansky and Carnes have used questionable reasoning elsewhere as well. In an article in Scientific American around the time of the book's release, they paint a whimsical picture of what humans would be like if we were designed by nature to live decades longer than we do. Knee joints would be equipped for durability, not speed. Throats would be shaped to prevent choking. And so on. But nature does not design animals to hang on during an extended period of decline; and the aim of prolongevists is likewise not to extend a terminal period of decline, but to preserve youthful functioning. So it's not clear what their purpose is in putting forth this fictional ing research is a field sorely in need of clarification of necessary questions that are not adequately addressed by this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Among Muslims : Meetings at the Frontiers of Pakistan []  2020-6-27 18:55

    An perfect book. A special and insightful set of observations about this extraordinary part of the world, currently so geopolitically tense.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    No Frontiers []  2020-11-24 19:58

    Amazing album for modern Irish Folk. Lots of nostalgia.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    No Frontiers []  2020-11-24 19:58

    Hearing Mary Black sing "Say a Small Prayer for you" is alone, worth the price of the album. With her paradoxically powerful and innocent voice, she breathes fresh life into that exciting, sing-along song. Every time my "random" function on my CD player selects that song, I turn the volume up and sing along.But there are a lot more treats on this album. COLUMBUS, with its smooth rhythms and bright, expansive vocals puts me in the excellent mood for taking a street trip every e album is just one fun, tender, folk/pop gem after another. It isn't my number one favorite of Mary Black's albums, but if I ever lost it ... I'd replace it immediately. It's not only an essential ingredient in a Mary Black collection, but its subtle cheer is also an essential ingredient in the recipe for a amazing day.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    No Frontiers []  2020-11-24 19:58

    i bought this CD as a blast from the past- love Mary Black's voice, have seen her live- finding a couple of the songs a bit dated but still amazing to hear it again. I must say though am disappointed that this is not avail in mp3 format, AND that once i went to download into my computer with the rest of my melody it will not allow!!! so Reaaally a blast from the past only can listen in outdated format.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    No Frontiers []  2020-11-24 19:58

    How do you go about producing a record by an artist with a voice that is as clear as a mountain stream and as sweet as honey? First, you create sure that you have a collection of songs that are worthy of the voice. Second, you create sure that nothing in the production process, including musical arrangement, intrudes on the magic of the singing.Take a bow Declan Synott. This record is quite breathtaking in its beauty. Mary Black is Ireland's greatest undiscovered treasure. No Frontiers is a unbelievable song rendered unforgettable by the astonishing vocals displayed by Black. Her rendition of Columbus is almost can switch between pop, blues, jazz and folk with a fluidity that is awesome. Hear her sing Say a Small Prayer and marvel at the freshness and vitality she brings. Hear her sing Carolina Rua where she turns a jaunty ditty into a rollicking is record is not perfect, and I am glad. Perfection is, by its nature, too often bland. This record is flawed but is nonetheless an exquisite thrill. Buy it now!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    No Frontiers []  2020-11-24 19:58

    Amazing cd, esp Columbus

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    No Frontiers []  2020-11-24 19:58

    Recording wise, this is one of the few CDs that hi-end audio stores use to try and showcase their systems. Need I say more?Musically, the songs are very enjoyable - a small pop-ish with an Irish touch. The arrangement is extremely good, flowing seamlessly with Mary's clear voice.Overall, it's one CD you have to own. If you are into hi-end audio and own a hi-end turntable, you've got to hunt down the vinyl ver of this record. It sounds much much better on vinyl.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    No Frontiers []  2020-11-24 19:58

    Mary Black is a long-time favorite of mine. Rearranging my CDs recently, I realized this one was missing, and re-ordered immediately. To the best of my knowledge, she's never created a poor recording, but this one is my favorite.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    No Frontiers []  2020-11-24 19:58

    Maybe it's because this album came along at a unique time in my life; maybe it's because this was the first Mary Black album I ever owned; and maybe because this album includes some of the most attractive and sophisticated songs and singing I've ever heard, that I can honestly say that it remains one of the best albums I have ever owned. I am always transported back to musical magic when listening to the title track--it is still as exciting to listen to as when I first heard "No Frontiers". "Carolina Rua" is a lilting, uplifiting song of amazing joy. "Columbus" is a dark, deep song about restlessness, and who would think that anyone could write and record a song titled "Fat Valley of Pain"? Yet Mary Black pulls it off, and this album is one succession of amazing songs. I own six Mary Black albums, but this still remains my favorite. Best of all, I'm just glad I discovered this amazing singer, who has added such pleasure into my life.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    No Frontiers []  2020-11-24 19:58

    Mary Black has a truly wondrous voice; were I able to sing, this is exactly what I would wish to sound like. I have some definite favorites on this CD; "No Frontiers," "Past the Point of Rescue," "Columbus," "Another Day," and "The Fog in Monterey." I bought my copy of "No Frontiers" nearly a decade ago, and those songs are ones I hold returning to, over and over again. The arrangements are wonderful, acoustically-oriented with tight percussion and a few jazz touches thrown in for amazing measure. It works wonderfully, and often has an infectious energy.If "No Frontiers" has a major weakness, it is in the uneven choice of material. "The Shadow," while very well-perfomed, is nonetheless rather overwrought, "Shuffle of the Buckled" is depressing (I usually skip through it), and I have no idea why Black saw the need to cover "I Say a Small Prayer." I've since learned that this unevenness in choosing material is typical of a lot of of Mary Black's CDs, but have also decided that she's well worth hearing despite it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    No Frontiers []  2020-11-24 19:58

    I bought this disc 3 years ago. Since then, these songs have become a legend for me. This is the kind of melody which enchantes e lyrics is sophisticated, the instruments subtle, and latest but not the least, the quality of sound is simply can sit back, and listen from the beginning to the favorite songs are No frontiers (also contained on the unplugged album of The Corrs), and The Shadow.But it`s hard to create such statements as ry Black lovers may search Loreena McKennitt, Suzanne Vega, Secret Garden congenial to their mind and soul as well. These are not of background music!!!Adam from Düsseldorf

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity []  2020-1-14 19:11

    A client recommended this book. I got it in hardcover and loved it. Had to have another copy in case I wish to share it with anyone. Norman Doidge is a marvel, a compassionate, creative, and brilliant doctor who is what I would call a medical explorer.He addresses the lay reader without pretension and with amazing enthusiasm for the people and treatments he describes.I fell in love with Feldenkrais again after reading about it in The Brain's Method of Healing, learning fresh things about a modality that I thought I was familiar with.I teach religion classes and love bringing ideas from the treatments in this book into the e Brain's Method of Healing deserves a better review than mine (it's late and I'm too tired to do this review justice) but I wish to post this before I forget. If you have an interest in medicine, healing, psychology, psychiatry, spirituality, sound, light, movement, physics, disabilities, TBI, or compelling private stories, obtain this book. It is impossible to place down.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity []  2020-1-14 19:11

    As a fellow scientist, neuroplasticity is an amazing and necessary validated concept. The issue with this book is that it negates the profound and proven literature on the effectiveness of physical therapy and instead presents the idea that you can think your method completely out of pain. Sure if you think it and believe it, your pain can reduce more rapidly than if you stress over it, but movement as therapy is the single most necessary thing to getting out of pain. Very disappointed in this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Plate Tectonics: An Insider's History Of The Modern Theory Of The Earth (Frontiers in Physics) []  2019-12-11 18:34

    This book is method too technical for the layman. I had an introductory class in geology in college which did not address plate tectonics and I had difficulty in keeping up with the terminology in this book. I was able to manage a rudimentary understanding of this book. Here is what I got out of this book. Plate tectonics on the oceanic mantle is basically the movement of basalt rock from the mantle to the surface at rifting valleys extruding molten rock that shoves upper rock aside in the process creates a bulge. As the oceanic rift builds up, gravity starts the process of moving the oceanic mantle on each side of the rift. Another force acting on the oceanic mantle are convection currents from the molten interior that acts on the bottom of the oceanic mantle pushing away from rifting valley in each direction. The friction between oceanic mantle and the molten mantle causes the oceanic mantle to move in the same direction that gravity is pushing the oceanic mantle. As the oceanic mantle travels further away from the rifting valley, it becomes level in which case, gravity is not contributing to the motion of the oceanic mantle. Now, I don’t clearly understood the extrusion of the molten rock at the rift produces any forces, if it did, it would probably be minor. Now as the oceanic mantle is being pushed by gravity near the rifting bulge and the convections currents, it finally reaches a continental plate in such case the oceanic mantle is sub ducted under the continental plate in which gravity now comes back into play pulling the oceanic mantle back into the interior of liquid mantle. With the forces of gravity and convection currents along with immense amount of time, continents drift, tectonic plates grind versus each other along with being sub ducted and Earth will change causing changes in environment along with the changes in life. We are the products of this continental drifting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Plate Tectonics: An Insider's History Of The Modern Theory Of The Earth (Frontiers in Physics) []  2019-12-11 18:34

    Exciting atmosphere in research labs are well reflected. Latest chapter describing current status of geology and similar field is very interesting with some author's concern in future.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Intelligence of the Cosmos: Why Are We Here? New Answers from the Frontiers of Science []  2020-4-17 18:29

    The next step once you learn the dimension of consciousness permeates the universe. A amazing follow up to What Is Reality! It spends less time laying out the science and more on the app of this understanding. It reminds me how much I have yet to learn and the need to expand my horizons. It provides fertile ground to grow meditations where they never traveled before.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Intelligence of the Cosmos: Why Are We Here? New Answers from the Frontiers of Science []  2020-4-17 18:29

    Really enjoyed the different commentators, but I think I missed Laszlo's words themselves... what did Laszlo write about the intelligence of the Cosmos...??

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science []  2020-7-27 20:2

    This is one of the best books that I have read! I really recommend this book to anyone dealing in chronic pain or any disability. This book will create you realize that anything is possible in this life. A man that had a stroke and only had 10% of his brain, was able to regain all of his movement, memory, and speech. Please, read this book. I have recommended this book even to my doctors.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The End of Life as We Know It: Ominous News From the Frontiers of Science []  2021-1-10 18:57

    This book provides insight to a LOT of aspects of modern society and provides some degree of perspective. If you're baffled by society Ig mentality, you might wish to read this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Plate Tectonics: An Insider's History Of The Modern Theory Of The Earth (Frontiers in Physics) []  2019-12-11 18:34

    Accounts written by the individuals directly involved in the generation of a fresh method of looking at the earth. The authors show a clear picture, when taken together, of the different measurements, evidence, and intellectual efforts that went into the discovery that the surface of the earth is continually changing, and how.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Plate Tectonics: An Insider's History Of The Modern Theory Of The Earth (Frontiers in Physics) []  2019-12-11 18:34

    Clear descriptions of the work of major players. Surprised not to see Harold Wellman's work on the Alpine Fault.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity []  2020-1-14 19:11

    I recently purchased both the book and the audio version. I am amazed at potentially how easy the ideas are. I have begun to apply them after reading the first chapter. I can feel perceptible changes. I am so looking forward to reading more about how to apply the ideas. I must say that I am an occupational therapist who has used hands on modalities with people for more than 25 years. With that said, the book really dives into brain functions and terms that the lay person might search overwhelming. I would recommend to that person to hang in there and not worry about understanding each word, but to apply the thinking that the author suggests.I would like to search practitioners locally who apply this type of thinking and understanding so that I could refer patients to them. To me this book is full of current new minded outside the box ideas and concepts that our society and culture desperately need. This info seems like a viable alternative to standard pharmaceutical medicine. This may not work for everyone, but for those it does, if sounds like a ere is one problem that I found regarding the audio CD's, there are two poor tracks, disc 4 track 2aa and disc 9 track 7g. How do I obtain them replaced? Or should I send them back to amazon?I plan on recommending this book to a lot of of my friends.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity []  2020-1-14 19:11

    This is one of the best books i ever read. Definitely a page turner. To help this claim i suggest you just read all the awesome reviews on it (pages of them in the front of the book). I thought it might be dry and uninteresting but i bought it for the knowledge in it, without concern for how it read. Since it is topic matter I have always wanted to know more about and read everything i can about it. Then i found it is indescribably well written but is more than that. The author went to such amazing lengths to obtain accurate and real info and actual and real individual stories on every subject he covers and then writes so eloquently about it all. I never sent my family a book that they read and liked so i almost gave up on getting books for them. Then after reading this one i just wanted them to have it to for the info in it and even if they just used it as a resource ...and within days both my brother and his wife told me and everyone else they talked to ..to read it and raved about how interesting and informative it is and how they too didn't wish to place it down. They are still telling people that and it's at least a year later. Check the inside of table of contents as this book covers everything that you can imagine about brain and body diseases and maladies and cures for all of them and with totally legitimate and well sourced information. Most of the treatments written about are covered in more detail and with better depth in understanding than other books i have read. It covers some of the newest technology and other approaches both fresh and old that most have never heard of..and yet are more effective than what we do know about and use. The chapters on melody and sound for ADHD , ADD, and other conditions were so profound and such heartfelt and enjoyable reading that i wish to reread them a lot of times over. Those chapters and the one about Feldenkrais himself and his work , along with the final chapters ...were my favorite..but i loved the entire book...I have recommended though that people begin with chapter 5 and then go forward and then come back to read 1 through 4. Only because it gets most exciting with 5 and all of them after...where as 1 though 4 might not be much less for some who are very well read already in what those chapters cover...but after you are so filled with awe from the ones i suggest reading first...you can have fun coming back to the less exciting ones later. I also suggest this because some who read slow actually did obtain bored and gave up on this book when they only read the first few chapters and didn't know how much more profound the rest are...Others tho were in awe from the beginning so it's an individual thing with that part of the book but NO ONE I KNOW didn't completely love from chapter 5 on to the end. I want all teachers and doctors would read this. Actually everyone should read it . It would hugely impact the health care and education system and families struggling with kids or older family members suffering with things that we do have ways to heal and/or change how we work , educate, adapt to them and support them...and these options are NOW available and applicable and more easily employed if more people just knew about them.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science []  2020-7-27 20:2

    I was born with Cerebral Palsy in 1949. In those days, Neurology was not a medicine. I saw my first neurologist when I was 27 due to seizures. I then had my first ever EEG. At my follow up appointment, this doctor questioned my occupation as a violinist. He said it was impossible for me to play the violin because the right side of my brain did not function properly. I then told him he could come to a symphony rehearsal that following week, he did and was so shocked that he said that I had done the same thing as climbing Mt. Everest. The truth of the matter, instrumental melody started in my school in the 4th grade. I really wanted to play and instrument. My grandfather had a violin and that was it. Small did I know that the orthopedist that I saw suggested that I start something like melody for physical therapy for my left arm and hand. I only knew that I could not walk without a brace until I was 16. I was very powerful willed and I thought that everyone who was right handed - the left hand did not work. I was very determine and went to college as a Melody Education Major with violin being my instrument. I always told people who ask what my walking issue was, that I had to create detours in my brain to my left leg and if I was tired, my brain didn't send the messages. I FELT LIKE THIS BOOK WAS WRITTEN ABOUT ME. Today they call what I accomplished as Neuroplasticity. I have been teaching violin for over 42 years and have had a lot of unbelievable students along with my Symphony work.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science []  2020-7-27 20:2

    As someone who is dealing with brain injuries, I am very facinated with the book and the findings. So much I think I have already learned from experience, so it is awesome to read actual science on the ADAPTABLE brain. I have recomended the book to several friends. I want the author would write a condensed ver with references so someone could look at the info that are most interesting to them. That said, it is a unbelievable read for someone dealing with PTBIS, or anyone who knows someone who is. I'd definately give a shorter ver 5 Stars.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Intelligence of the Cosmos: Why Are We Here? New Answers from the Frontiers of Science []  2020-4-17 18:29

    An necessary and highly recommended critique of Materialism, with brilliant quotes from Jane Goodall and others. As Lazlo correctly writes, Materialism is zlo need not take the credit for ideas on consciousness that are hundreds of years old. They were first purveyed in coherent philosophical form by Georg Hegel and particularly by Friedrich Schelling, and later by Alfred North Whitehead. None of these sages are mentioned in the text, nor in any other book by Lazlo et al. It's a large e my article "Mysticism: Truth or Falsity" for a clearer understanding of the principles of Mysticism as distinct from eastern Mystification, and my article "Light, Magic, Masonry" for more recommendations and references. No red flags flying there.*** *** ***

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Intelligence of the Cosmos: Why Are We Here? New Answers from the Frontiers of Science []  2020-4-17 18:29

    I found reference to "The Intelligence of the Cosmos" by Ervin Laslo in Joseph Selbies boo "The Physics of God". I highly recommend both books.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The End of Life as We Know It: Ominous News From the Frontiers of Science []  2021-1-10 18:57

    A book of wisdom and knowledge that a lot of will not care to understand what is controversial about our world. Myself being born in the post Industrial Age and a free thinker believed these things a lot of years ago . Whatever controls your thoughts owns us .Let mankind understand that these times are full of power hungry people who use technology to advance their agendas , Wake up and obtain wisdom above all things as it can tutorial us safely thru today’s globe . Amazing book .

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Intelligence of the Cosmos: Why Are We Here? New Answers from the Frontiers of Science []  2020-4-17 18:29

    Amazing book to support expand one's mind of possibilities of our species evolutionary possibilities and gives one amazing hope for today's DEPRessing globe ! Also Ervin is a real genius in my opinion...when one who is so brilliant as he ,can talk in terms for the average layman to understand !

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity []  2020-1-14 19:11

    In his fresh book, Norman Doidge describes the role of brain plasticity in healing. This paradigm is helping us recognize how improvement from symptoms of all kinds is not only possible, but explainable, as well as idge artfully draws us in with people's stories, including the experiences of Dr. Michael Moskowitz, a chronic pain spet who figured out a method to cure his own increasingly debilitating chronic pain after 13 years (chapter 1). He has also successfully taught the technique to some of his patients. In chapter 2, Doidge walks with John Pepper, a Globe Battle II survivor with Parkinson's disease who devised a program that enabled him to recover lost mobility and other functions. Pepper uses his approach not only to hold a lot of of his symptoms at bay decades after diagnosis, he has also taught it to others with Parkinson's, who have also improved. More awesome stories and treatment approaches follow in each chapter and the case studies highlight this fresh paradigm. The research starts to explain the ever-elusive, until now, "why."In easy-to-read connecting language Doidge gives us a framework for understanding what is event during these transformations. He, and the studies he cites throughout, take us beyond our current understanding of the e principles of brain plasticity presented by Doidge can be summarized as follows (chapter 3):Events such as strokes, infections, head injuries, radiation, toxins and degenerative processes cause brain injury and affect our neurons. While some neurons die following such events, the fresh science is showing us that some neurons begin to signal in irregular ways following injury, which can create the brain "noisy" and confused. Other neurons become dormant (referred to as "non-use"). Improvement is based on the extent to which these neurons can heal, rewire, and recover from changes in idge presents 4 stages of neuroplastic healing, which gives us fresh ways of understanding how recovery occurs. Neurostimulation (1) is commonly required and can occur through attention to internal processes (such as mindful attention to sensations and movement, and intentional focusing of the mind on specific tasks) as well as through external input (such as from sound, light, and vibration). The energy provided by neurostimulation enables the brain to repair communication pathways and regain its innate capacity to regulate or "modulate" itself. The modulated brain (2) regains its ability to cycle, alternating from periods of activity to periods of rest and repair. Modulation allows the brain to relax, rest and heal (3). A rested brain is able to learn and rewire (4). Learning fresh skills allows a person to restore old functions or develop fresh ones and is a process referred to as e process of healing, and the extent to which recovery is possible, differs for everyone. Each person, as well as the happenings leading to symptoms, is unique. Not everyone needs to address all 4 stages of neuroplastic healing for improvement or recovery to occur. Some people experience significant or even full recovery after strokes and brain injuries. Others, such as people described who have Parkinson's and Multiple Sclerosis, can use tools to regain function and manage their diseases even though they do not achieve a cure or reversal of the underlying disease process. Some people presented have recovered fully from autoimmune-induced blindness, dyslexia, sensory integration problems, and serious debilitating developmental delays (each detailed through case studies in later book chapters). With some symptoms and chronic diseases, people need to hold using their tools to maintain their gains but can also recover again after periods of discontinuation. With other symptoms, such as Dr. Moskowitz's work with chronic pain, the techniques can be discontinued once symptoms e amount of time and effort involved in using these techniques varies. Recovery from strokes, when fresh neuronal pathways need to be developed, can take months or years. At the other extreme, recovery from chronic symptoms of traumatic brain injury (TBI) began for two women within hours of initial treatment. In this setting, neurostimulation energized neurons to better modulate, allowing them to start to communicate more effectively almost immediately. In these two cases, functions that had been interrupted rather than destroyed were restored.We are at the frontier of a paradigm shift. The seemingly miraculous changes described here are beginning to reveal their secrets and Doidge does a masterful job of giving us the tools to start to discover these fresh dimensions to whatever extent we may want. (Doidge's www service has a FAQ with links to resources).

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity []  2020-1-14 19:11

    I feel like this really helped me after surgery. Learning about the strength of repeated nerve mapping helped me understand why it was so necessary to break my pain cycle early and make fresh associations. If you have fun medical literature, this is definitely a worthwhile read

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Plate Tectonics: An Insider's History Of The Modern Theory Of The Earth (Frontiers in Physics) []  2019-12-11 18:34

    A small disappointing in the writing, but a must-read if you're interested in the development of plate tectonic theory. Thank you Naomi Oreskes!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Plate Tectonics: An Insider's History Of The Modern Theory Of The Earth (Frontiers in Physics) []  2019-12-11 18:34

    I initially read this book from the public library and liked it so well, I decided to buy it for my technical library. It is an perfect history of how our understanding of plate tectonics developed and the tremendous contributions created by the scientists who worked on the different aspects of it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Brain That Changes Itself: Stories of Personal Triumph from the Frontiers of Brain Science []  2020-7-27 20:2

    I have been catching up on my rman Doidge’s book, The Brain that Changes Itself (Penguin, 427pp. ($18)), was published in 2007, now some twelve years ago. This publication occurred towards the beginning of the era of neuro-hype that now has us choking on everything from neuroaesthetics to neurohistory, from neuromarketing to neurozoology. So pardon my initial ever, this book is the true deal. To those suffering from a dozens of neurological disorders or issues, extending from major strokes to learning disabilities or emotional disorders, Doidge’s narratives offer hope that hard work pays off. If more authors and editors would have read (and understood!) it, today’s neuro-hype would be a lot less hyped.Let me explain. There is neural science aplenty in Doidge’s exposition and defense of the flexibility – key term: plasticity – of the brain. There are also plentiful high tech devices (prostheses) that create for near science fiction innovation, except that they are engineering interventions, not fictions. However, what distinguishes Norman Doidge’s contribution is that, in every case without exception, the neural science “breakthrough” on the part of the patient is preceded by substantial – in some cases a year or more – of hard work on the patient’s behalf to regain lost neural functionality. Yes, from the point of view of our daily expectations of what can be attained in six weeks of twice a week rehabilitation, the results are “miraculous”; but upon closer inspection the “miracle” turns out to be 99% perspiration and 1% inspiration.I hasten to add that the exact distribution of effort varies. But the point is that, while the “miraculous” is supposed to be uncaused, lots of hard work on the part of the patient, properly directed, is a key determining factor. This in no method detracts from the authentic innovations and corresponding effort on the part of the neural scientists and engineers engaging in the rehabilitation e woman who lost her sense of balance tells of a woman (Cheryl) whose ability to orient herself in zone is “taken out” by an allergic reaction to an antibiotic (gentamicin) administered to treat an unrelated condition. Balance is sometimes considered a sixth sense, for without it the person literally looses her balance and falls over. Thus, Cheryl became the woman perpetually falling.  She becomes a “Wobbler.”While such a condition does not cause a person to die, unless the fall proves fatal, but it destroys the ability to engage in the activities of everyday living. Enter  Paul Bach-y-Rita, MD, and Yuri Danilov (biophysicist) (p. 3), who design a helmet that transmits orientation data to Cheryl through an ingenious interface that she can keep on her tongue like a little tongue depressor. It transmits a tingling sensation towards the front of the stick if she is bending forward, towards the back of the stick if she is bending backwards, and so on. Who would have thought it? Turns out that the tongue is a strong brain-machine ter some primary training as Cheryl wore it, she was able to orient herself and not fall over. After awhile, she took the helmet off and found that the ability to orient herself lasted a few minutes. There was a residual effect. With more training, the persistence of the after result was extended. Finally, after a year of work, she was able to dispense with the helmet. She had “magically” regained her sense of balance. The neural circuits that had been damaged were in result by-passed and the functionality taken over by other neural locations in the brain based on the training. Cheryl was no longer a is is the prelude to the narrative of the dramatic recovery of Bach-y-Rita’s own father, the Catalan poet Pedro Bach-y-Rita, who has a heavy disabling stroke, leaving him paralyzed in half his body and unable to ter four weeks of rehabilitation based on pessimistic theories that the brain could not benefit from extended treatment, the father, Pedro, was literally a basket case. Enter brother George – Pedro’s other son. Now George did not know that rehab was supposed to be impossible, and took the father home to the house in Mexico. They got knee pads and taught him to crawl – because it is useful to crawl before one walks, which Pedro eventually did again after a year of effort. Speech and writing also returned after much effort copying and practicing dro returned to teaching full time at Town College in Fresh York (p. 22) until he retires years later. After Pedro’s death, a routine autopsy of his brain in 1965, showed “that my father [Pedro] had had a large lesion from his stroke and that it had never healed, even though he recovered all these functions” (p. 23).The take-away? What modern neural science means when it asserts that nerve cells do not heal is accurate. But “plasticity” means that the brain is able to produce alternative means of performing the same messaging and functional activity. “The bridge is out,” so plasticity invents a detour around the damaged area. Pedro walks and talks again and returns to nventional rehab usually lasts for an hour and sessions are three times a week for (say) six weeks. Edward Taub has patients drill six hours a day, for ten to fifteen days straight. Patients do ten to twelve tasks a day, repeating each task ten times apiece. 80 percent of stroke patients who have lost arm functionality improve substantially (p. 147). Research indicates the same results may be available with only three hours a day of dedicated work. In short, thanks to plasticity, recovery from debilitating strokes is possible but – how shall I place it delicately? – it is not for the faint of heart. Turn off the TV! Obtain out your knee pads?So when doctors or patients say that the hurt is permanent or cannot be reversed, what they are really saying is that they lack the resources to help the substantial but doable effort to retrain the brain to relearn the function in question – and are unwilling to do the work. The question for the patients is: How hard are you willing to work?The next case opens the diverse globe of learning disabilities. Barbara Arrowsmith looms large, who as a kid had a confusing set of learning disabilities in spatial relationships, speaking, writing, and symbolization. Still, she had a demonstrable talent for reading social clues. She was not autistic, but seemingly “retarded” – cognitively impaired. She had issues with symbolic relationships, including telling time.With the accepting and tolerant environment provided by her parents, who seemed really not to “get” what was going on, Barbara set about to cure herself. She (and her parents) invented a series of exercises for herself that look a lot like what “old style” school used to be: A lot of repetitive exercises, rote memorization, copying, and structure. Flash cards to learn how to tell time. There is nothing wrong with the Montessori-inspired way of letting the inner kid blossom at her or his own rapid rate of learning, except it does not work for some kids. Plasticity demonstrates that “one size fits all” definitely does notfit e result? The Arrowsmith School was born, featuring a return to a “classical” approach:“[…] [A] classical education often included rote memorization of long poems in foreign languages which strengthen the auditory memory […] and an almost fanatical attention to handwriting, which probably helped strengthen motor capacities […] add[ing] speed and fluency to reading and speaking” (pp. 41–42).This also provides the opportunity to take a swipe at “the omnipresent PowerPoint presentation – the ultimate compensation for a weak premotor cortex.” Well said.Without having anything wrong with their learning capabilities as such, some kids have auditory cortex neurons that are firing too slowly. They could not distinguish between two related sounds – e.g., “ba” and “da” – or which sound was first and which second if the sounds occurred close together (p. 69):“Normally neurons, after they have processed a sound, are ready to fire again after about a 30-millesecond rest. Eighty percent of language-impaired kids took at least three times that length, so that they lost huge amounts of language information” (p. 69).The solution? Exploit brain plasticity to promote the proliferation of aural dendrites that distinguish relevant sounds and sounds, in result speeding up processing by making the most efficient use of available resources. Actually, the “solution” looks like a computer android game with flying cows and brown bears making phonetically relevant noises. Seems to work. Paula Tallal, Bill Jenkins, and Michael Merzenich obtain honorable mentions, and their remarkable results were published in the journal Science(January 1996). ough not developed to treat autism spectrum disorders, such exercises have given a boost to kids whose sensory processing left them over-stimulated – and over-whelmed, resulting in withdrawal and isolation. Improved results with school work – the major “job” of most kids – leads, at least indirectly, to improved socialization, recognition by peers and family, and integration into the community (p.75). Once again, it seems to a psychoytically trained medical doctor, one of Doidge’s interests is in addiction in its diverse forms, including alcohol and Internet graphy. For example, Doidge approvingly quotes Eric Nestler, University of Texas, for showing “how addictions cause permanent changes in the brains of animals” (p. 107). This comes right after quoting Alcoholics Anonymous that there are “no former addicts” (p. 106). Of course, the latter might just be rhetoric – “don’t allow your guard down!” Since this is not a softball review, I note that “permanent changes in the dopamine system” are definitely notplasticity. A counter-example to Doidge’s?Doidge gets high marks for inspirational examples and solid, innovative neural science reporting. But consistency?A conversation for chance – that is, talk therapy – which evokes the problems most salient to being human – relationships, work, tastes, and loves – activate BNGF [brain-derived neural growth factor], leading to a proliferation or pruning back of neural connections. This is perhaps the point to quote another interesting factoid: “Rats given Prozac [the popular antidepressant fluoxatine] for three weeks had a 70 percent increase in the number of cells in their hippocampus” [the brain zone hypothesized to be responsible for memory translation in humans] (p. 241). This is all amazing news, especially for the rats (who unfortunately did not survive the experiment), but the devil, as usual, is in the details.On a positive note, Freud was a trained neurologist, though he always craved recognition from the psychiatric establishment [heavens knows why – perhaps to build his practice]. In a separate chapter including a psychoytic case (“On Turning Our Ghosts into Ancestors,” an unacknowledged sound byte from Hans Loewald, psychoyst), Doidge’s points out in a footnote that having a conversation with a therapist changes one’s neurons too. The evidence is provided by fMRI studies before and after therapy (p. 379). This is the true chance for – obtain ready, welcome to  – most addictions – alcohol, road , gambling, cutting – Internet is a semi-self-defeating method of regulating one’s [dis-regulated] emotions. The disregulated individual may usefully learn expanded ways of regulating his emotions, including how to use empathy with other people to do so. Meanwhile, the plasticity of addictive behavior turns out to be more sticky and less flexible than the optimistic neuro-plasticians (if I may coin a term) might have hoped. Doidge has an unconventional, but plausible, hypothesis that “we have two separate pleasure systems in our brains, one that has to do with exciting pleasure and one with satisfying pleasure” (p. 108). Dopamine vs endorphins? Quite possibly. Yet one doesn’t need neuropsychoysis to appreciate this. Plato’s dialogue Gorgias makes the same point quite well (my point, not Doidge’s). Satisfying one’s appetites puts one in the hamster’s wheel of endless spinning whereas attaining an emotional-cognitive balance through human relations, contemplation, meditation, or related stress reducing activities provide enduring satisfaction. The tyrant may be able to steal your items – your property, freedom, and even your life – but the tyrant is the most miserable of men. The cycle of scratching the itch, stimulating the need further to scratch the itch, is a trap – and a form of suffering. Suffering is sticky, and Freud’s economic issue of masochisms looms huge and still has not been idge interweaves an acc of a breakthrough psychoysis with a 50 plus year old gentleman with a narrative of Eric Kandel’s Nobel Prize winning research. Kandel and his squad published on protein synthesis and the growth of neural connections required to transform short- into long-term memory. While it is real that humans are vastly more complicated than the mollusks in Kandel’s study, the protein synthesis is us, another neural mechanism is identified by which Talk Therapy changes your brain. Tag Solms – founding neuropsychoyst – and Oliver Turnbull translate Freud’s celebrated statement “where id was ego shall be” into neural science: “The aim of the talking cure […] from the neurobiological point of view [is] to extend the functional sphere of the influence of the prefrontal loves” (p. 233).Even if we are skirting close to the edges of neuro-hype here, it is an indisputable factoid that Freud, the neurologist, draws a picture of a neuronal synapse in 1895 (p. 233). At the time, such a diagram was a completely imaginative and speculative hypothesis. Impressive. Freud also credibly anticipates Hebb’s law (“neurons that fire together wire together”), but then again, in this case, so did David Hume (in 1731) with his principle of anwhile, back to the psychoysis with the 50-something gentleman who has suffered from a smoldering, low order depression for much of his life. Due to age, this is not considered a promising case. But that was prior to the emerging understanding of is provides Doidge with the opportunity to do some riffing, if not free associating, of his own about trauma, Spitz’s hospitalism, and psychopharmacology. “Trauma in infancy appears to lead to a supersensitization – a plastic alteration – of the brain neurons that regulate glucocorticoids” (p. 241). “Depression, high stress, and childhood trauma all release glucocorticoids and slay cells in the hippocampus, leading to memory loss” (p. 241). The result? The depressed person cannot give a coherent acc of his e ground breadking work of Rene Spitz on hospitalism – of kids confined to minimum care hospitals (anticipating the tragic results in the Rumanian orphanages after the fall of the USSR) – is invoked as evidence of the hurt that can occur. When the early environment is sufficient to hold the baby alive biologically but lacks the human (empathic) responsiveness  needed to promote the emotional well-being of the whole person, the effect is related to acquired autism – an overwhelmed, emotionally stunted person, struggling to survive in what seems to the individual to be a strange and unfriendly milieu.I summarize the lengthy course of hard work needed to produce the effect of Doidge’s successful psychoysis. The uncovering of older, neural pathway gets activated and reorganized in the process of sustained free association, dream work, and the conversation for chance in the psychoytic “talking cure”. Through an elaborate and lengthy process of working through, the patient regains his humanity, his lifelong depression lifts, and he is able to have fun his far neural plasticity has been a positive phenomenon and a much required source of hope and inspiration to action. However, plasticity also has a dark side. For example, if one loses a limb due to an amputation, the brain takes over what amounts to the now available neuronal zone on the neural map. One’s physical anatomy has changed, but the brain seems plastically committed to reusing the neural map of the body for other e limb is no longer there, but it hurts, cramps, burns, itches, because the neural map has not been amputated. However, the patient suffers – sometimes substantially – because one cannot massage or scratch a limb that does not exist. Yet the pain LIVEs in the neural system – and that makes it in is the dark side of plasticity. Pain is highly useful and necessary for survival. It protects living monsters from dangers to life and limb such as fire or noxious substances. We have a painful experience and learn to avoid that which caused the t pain can take on a life of its own. Anticipating pain can itself be painful. Once pain is learned it is almost literally burned into the neurons and it takes considerable work (and ingenuity) to unlearn – to extinguish – the pain.  “Our pain maps obtain damaged and fire incessant false alarms” (p. 180). V. S. Ramachandran has performed remarkable work with understanding that most recalcitrant of phenomena, phantom limb pain. Ramachandran’s is deservedly popular for a lot of reasons. But his easy innovation of the mirror box really requires an illustration. It is literally done with a lustrating mirror box therapy with an intact limb being reflected so as to make the appearance that the amputated limb is present: the individual experiences the presence of his missing limbThe topic with the missing hand is presented with a reflected photo of the good, intact hand, which in reflection looks just like the missing hand. The topic experiences the limb as being a part of his body. (That in itself is a remarkable result – the neural “socket” is still there.) In effect, the individual gets the hand back as something he owns. He is able to experience closing his missing hand by closing the amazing hand. This relieves cramps and other experiments, the lights are turned off and different locations of the body are touched. The zone that was once the [now missing] hand is used to map sensations on another zone of the body, for example, one’s face. Scratching an itch on the phantom limb by scratching just the right spot on one’s face becomes possible because the neural map of the missing limb has been taken over and is now being used to map a various part of the anatomyDoidge ends with a flourish:“V. S. Ramachandra, the neurological illusionist, had become the first physician to perform a seemingly impossible operation: the successful amputation of a phantom limb” (p. 187). He did this by changing the brain – in result deconditioning (deleting) the representation of the phantom limb from the brain. Thus, the promise and paradox of plasticity.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The End of Life as We Know It: Ominous News From the Frontiers of Science []  2021-1-10 18:57

    This book is downright scary! But it needs to be read. In fact, if there is one book in America right now that should be needed reading -- as we press the pedal to the metal in this angry dash of technological insanity -- it is Guillen's. He is not a fear-monger. He simply presents facts and adds a few insights and opinions and he has the credentials to be listened to. It is a very readable book and it needs to be read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The End of Life as We Know It: Ominous News From the Frontiers of Science []  2021-1-10 18:57

    Eye opening, everyone should understand how quick the globe is changing, ask the questions that will impact your life! Believe in what Gods plan is for all .

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Plate Tectonics: An Insider's History Of The Modern Theory Of The Earth (Frontiers in Physics) []  2019-12-11 18:34

    Bought this book on the basis of rave reviews but found it in part disappointing. In early text an illustration is repeated three times but barely used in adjoining articles. The unbelievable results of the Eltanin-19 are cited several times, but there is no map. Some illustrations are presented, obviously from a previous article, at too little a scale to be readable, and some refer to another figure that isn't there. Mixed reviews as to the articles, though some are outstandingly clear and certainly the principal players are there. I'm a geologist and long-time map addict, hence my views may be biased! And I was introduced to drift in a college course by a unbelievable teacher in 1942 and have followed the development of PT ever since with amazing fascination - from the middle of the continent.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Plate Tectonics: An Insider's History Of The Modern Theory Of The Earth (Frontiers in Physics) []  2019-12-11 18:34

    I really enjoyed the book, it gives you the view the scientific articles dont give, I love the private notes, the views of the scientists that wrote the various chapters, and the insights on their personalities and hero which the scientific articles always are void of. You learn things about plate tectonics that are not in the books and makes you remember what is amazing science and how it is done.A must for any earth science student,but also for any science lecturer.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Intelligence of the Cosmos: Why Are We Here? New Answers from the Frontiers of Science []  2020-4-17 18:29

    If you are truly sincere about wanting to know, this book opens the door. The method to the truth is revealed here. It is up to you whether to proceed or shrink from the quest that lies before you. I encourage you, be powerful you are almost there.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity []  2020-1-14 19:11

    My review of "The Brain's Method of Healing" is that of someone who experienced one of the therapies he describes, the Tomatis Method, a lot of years before Norman Doidge's book was published. For me, this is a practical subject, and I hope to shed some light both on this book and to address the natural skepticism that one might has who has not experienced or known someone who has benefited from the type of therapies Dr. Doidge life is an example of neuroplasticity. I was 40 when I found out about the Tomatis Method, described in Chapter 8 of Dr. Doidge's book. I had never graduated college. I was born with a cleft palate, had speech therapy, and was developmentally slow. I was a traumatized kid based on my childhood experiences. In my early 20s, I had cancer and was treated with chemotherapy and radiation at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. In my mid-30s, I married a unbelievable woman from the Philippines whom I met in the States. She was a doctor, and she did not care that I was less accomplished career-wise. It was her sudden death via vehicle accident that plunged me into a phase that I could not pull out of. I was like an old fashioned record player where the needle got stuck in a groove. I traveled to the Listening Centre in Toronto, Canada in 2003. This is the same centre that Dr. Doidge talks about in his book. After doing Tomatis, the needle lifted, I wanted to live again, and I returned to college and finished a degree program within three years after completing my initial treatment. It's necessary that I share that none of this happened overnight, and mine was not a one-time, cure all treatment. I have received Tomatis sound boosts over the years. The point remains, I went from a phase where I was not functioning to one where I was renewed and not only got back on my feet, but accomplished a task - finishing a 4-year university program - that I had been unable to do at an earlier age.I'd recommend Dr. Doidge's book to anyone. It's well researched and well written, and I feel for those in pain who might think his tone is too positive and optimistic. In the beginning, we have to let a crack of optimism to break through. We are fortunate to live in an age where alternative therapies are already established and neuroplasticity is acknowledged. Mine is among the a lot of stories of people getting support where they previously felt helpless. We know what we know, and what's difficult to acknowlege is our ignorance. I'd hope that readers of Dr. Doidge's book consider if any of the therapies he describes so well might support themselves or others. Norman Doidge's book is a welcome sign of the times, a beacon of light and hope that gives these alternative therapies the respect and consideration that they deserve.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Brain's Way of Healing: Remarkable Discoveries and Recoveries from the Frontiers of Neuroplasticity []  2020-1-14 19:11

    I think I have a 'noisy brain'! I suffer from a horrible condition known as Vestibular Migraines, which causes dizziness, imbalance, brain fog etc. that has left me unable to drive or work. There are usually no typical headaches involved, in fact I rarely obtain headaches and have only had a migraine twice in my 56 years. Neurologists have told me they don't really understand the condition but after reading The Brain's Method of Healing, I have a better idea of what is happening. Anxiety disorders are closely similar to vestibular migraines and through reading this book, I came to the conclusion that some locations of my brain are 'noisy'. Now to search a solution! I'd love to use a brain port, or PoNs device as described in the book, but this seems impossible from Australia, unless I travel overseas. Anyway, I got a lot out of this book...there were explanations and insights about how the brain works that created my jaw drop. It's a groundbreaking book that deserves to become a best seller.

    0  



    Search Cloud

    About us

    Use our product reviews finder and generate tons of ratings & opinions on any item, shop product or service. Search, read and publish reviews for brands, TV shows, ebooks, gadgets, video games, meals, music, household items or movies. Would you like to rate recently purchased thing? Go ahead! Express satisfaction or sadness, describe own experience & identify strengths and weaknesses of the product. Write short or detailed review with a few clicks.

    Community

    Publish review of any item you find here, registration is not required
    Share own experience, point out the pros and cons, warn or recommend
    Search for opinions on any item, product or service, read tons of reviews

    Contact

    www.add-reviews.com

    Use contact form to reach us or write a message via email:

    [email protected]

    Describe your problem, share ideas or report a bug on the site.

    https://add-reviews.com/
    0856-458-386