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    Crisis Without End: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe []  2019-12-23 20:30

    Amazing book, everyone on the planet should read it.

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    Crisis Without End: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe []  2019-12-23 20:30

    THE MOST IMPORTANT BOOK OF THE 21ST CENTURY. BAR NONE.Dr. Caldicott's book provides essays to a lot of experts about what really happened, and is event at Fukishima. All these experts are continually being silenced about the greatest man created disaster in history by the GE's and elites who own most governments.Her introduction alone about the radiated toxicity and cancer causing deaths it will be causing for generations to come, is worth the price of the book ere were three core meltdowns in the reactors at the onset of the crisis in March 2011. There is no safe level of radiation and TEPCO has no idea where to shop all the toxic waste water except to dump in the ocean and shop in leaking temporary e amount of toxic radiation just in the mass spent nuclear fuel alone, that will be toxic for generations to come, that have no long term storage plans, that are leaking, that have no funds for decommissioning as alternative power sources come online is a death knell in itself for this planets ve the bonus of truth for this Christmas, buy this most necessary book with all you mand to shut them all done NOW or we have no nukes, never again.

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    Crisis Without End: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe []  2019-12-23 20:30

    Fukushima is a disaster. This book tells us why. I found it interesting.

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    Crisis Without End: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe []  2019-12-23 20:30

    For a brief period, it was possible for Bela Russ, Ukraine, and others to publish public health consequences that they had is is the summary. It's important. Like most of this genre, it is dry reading. To be expected.Ever wonder what happened to the thousands of "liquadors" who went in harms method to cap the reactor. It's here.

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    Crisis Without End: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe []  2019-12-23 20:30

    This book is a series of essays or speeches on the consequences of the Fukushima accident. The quality and amount of whitewash vary from essay. One essay I was particularly interested in discussed accidents at other plants. I hadn't been aware there had been so many. Although the book is on Chernobyl rather than Fukushima, I think the book Chernobyl: Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment by Yablokov, Nesterenko, and Nesterenko gives a much better feeling for the consequences of a nuclear accident. The book is available on Amazon and I was glad I bought it despite the expense. To round out your knowledge of nuclear accidents, look up Fukushima, Chernobyl, and Mayak on You Tube.

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    Crisis Without End: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe []  2019-12-23 20:30

    Fukushima is the true deal. Don't allow anyone tell you otherwise. Do your part as a citizen of the globe and read this book NOW!

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    Crisis Without End: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe []  2019-12-23 20:30

    I like her honest data and research. I search myself going back to her book several times becausethe data becomes more and more clear when I review various chapters.

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    Crisis Without End: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe []  2019-12-23 20:30

    the nuclear madness and mess that isn't given much attention by the corporate owned news media

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    Crisis Without End: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe []  2019-12-23 20:30

    Written by the Don Quiote of Nuclear Horrors. The most trusted name in the business of revealing the medical consequences of ionizing radiation. There is no one who should not have this info and no one who doesn't need it! The worst and ongoing nuclear catastrophe in history. They can Never Clean It Up!!

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    Crisis Without End: The Medical and Ecological Consequences of the Fukushima Nuclear Catastrophe []  2019-12-23 20:30

    read and learn something

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    Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster []  2019-12-17 20:55

    Well written factually. It's just that the authors spend too much time in the book talking about the U.S. Nuclear regulatory process. That should have been reduced otherwise re title the book. the book itself is simple to understand stripped of its editorial commentaries.

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    Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster []  2019-12-17 20:55

    For what this book is I would have to say it's not the best. The making of the Fukushima One disaster had a lot of facets some technical and a lot of political or cultural. This book Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster skims over too a lot of of the rough edges that do not fit into the books agenda. Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster tippie toes around problems like why did TEPCO remove earth to lower the Fukushima Plant making it more suspectible to being overrun by was also well known that the Tag 1 containment for GE boiling water reactors were just plain junk. Why weren't upgrades created to better reinforce the Tag 1 containment as was done here in the USA. It appears certain Tag 1 Containment upgrades were not applied because, it appeared the Japanese were so certain such an accident could not happen here. This book avoids too a lot of hard questions technically and politically and full exploration of these locations is vital to understanding the Fukushima One Disaster. Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster ommits the main story which is the arrogance of TEPCO and the fact that political people were making decisions that tied the hands of those trying to manage 4 dying reactors. The reactors were dying a slow death that had the experts been given a free hand to do what was right in a timely manner the Fukushima disaster may have just been a minor footnote in anks to inept politicians delaying critical reactor safety venting and other steps that would have likely lessened or prevented meltdown they gave our globe an utter disaster. In Chernobyl and Fukushima 1 the politics of fear and mindless servitude in each of the respective cultures invaded the nuclear reactors control room. In both Japan and the former Soviet Union when the culture of fear enters a nuclear reactors control room effect was disaster magnified on a scale unthinkable that did not have to be. Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster tells part of the story but not the whole story of the nightmare called Fukushima One which is why it earns only my three star rating. Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster is a amazing attempt but it misses half the story.

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    Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster []  2019-12-17 20:55

    I have read several books about nuclear accidents/disasters and they all had one thing in common. The designers, builders, operators and people who lived around the accident areas never thought this kind of thing could happen here. Fukushima was no different. No one believed a 9.0m earthquake would ever happen or a tsunami as huge as the one made by the earthquake could ever happen. You will be surprised how things that couldn't happen, did

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    Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster []  2019-12-17 20:55

    This is eminently readable, so don't be place off by reviewers who claim it is technical. The first third of the book attempts an acc of the happenings leading up to the disaster. The rest of the book describes the political/regulatory stage in Japan afterwards, and relates it to the same in the U.S.What it does of that, it does reasonably well. The happening summary suffers, a little, from not following key players and getting direct interviews with management and workers, before and after. I really didn't pick up anything fresh that I hadn't already gleaned from internet ere's also nothing fresh in the focus of the latest half of the book, the contention that design planning for nuclear reactors is geared not toward true globe events, but true globe happenings that are economically feasible for the industries to plan against. That's been real for fifty years. For example, when it was discovered it wasn't economically feasible to design a containment that could handle a telephone pole slammed versus a containment building by 150 MPH winds of a tornado, criteria were relaxed from the telephone pole to a 4" X 12" plank. The authors have created clear that even post Fukushima, while there was talk of better design, contingency plans, things soon settled back into business as usual. The contingencies plans nearly always, and still, assume a singular failure, rather than multiple failures, ignoring that when things go wrong, they go wrong in e fact is, nuclear power isn't safe. The proof that its own industry recognizes that , is that they seek protection from liability in the form of the Price-Anderson Nuclear indemnities act. The industry is only willing to cover a little fraction of the hurt from any accident, and after that, the home/business owner and the taxpayer is on the hook for their disasters. If nuclear disasters were as far fetched as the industry likes to claim, then you and I could obtain our homes fully insured for damage/radiation caused by a plant accident. Or the industry would band together and collectively offer their own insurance for a disaster in their ranks. As it is, no insurance company will touch it, the industries won't gamble on it, and congress had to bail the industry out with a legal indemnification or it would not be able to at's also where this book falls short. It info small of the citizenry displaced by this uninsured disaster, caused by not good planning, not good regulations and incompetent power company management. The people who suffer, what their stories were, and their future prospects are ciphers.Ditto for the cleanup efforts for the reactors and the fuel storage tanks. It moves from the immediate disaster to regulatory concerns. Very small of the aftermath is covered.While it mentions a little bit about fallout on the U.S., it doesn't really cover much - not how reporting stations in the U.S. stopped publishing reports of fallout, how standards for minimum risky fallout were silently raised post disaster. Government monitoring stations in Ca stopped publishing figures on the internet. The incidence of measurable radiation from Fukushima in rainwater - even in Pennsylvania - went under reported. This was perhaps outside the scope of the book, But I still found it interesting that even coverage of the disaster by the major U.S. news networks wasn't mentioned. I followed the news closely. I remember clearly how the news was dominated by plant operator experts claiming there was no danger of a meltdown, even after the containment buildings blew from hydrogen explosions, even when radiation reports indicated otherwise.. And then, when the fallout began to be measured without any misinterpretation, the 'experts' disappeared from the news and then all coverage suddenly shifted to the battle in Libya and Fukushima fell from the screen except in cryptic reports. Given a huge portion of this book dealt with collusion between government and the industry, it would have been appropriate, I felt, to have included the press seeming willingness to mislead and then, when the meltdown was obvious in the radiation readings, to stop posting accounts of the disaster except in the most perfunctory is was markedly various during the Chernobyl disaster. Being that was a Soviet plant, a cold battle opponent at the time, and of a design not promoted by American industries and used in the U.S., the press felt free, or were allowed, to post very critical and detailed accounts. But now, because Fukushima was a reactor related to a lot of operating in the U.S., with the same potential problems (I have Tag I reactors nearby me), once the meltdowns began, the major news networks virtually shut down the story. There's a story, if any investigative reporters with enough conscience to tell it or news sources with enough independence would take it on. Sadly most U.S. media is held by only a few huge there are short-comings in this account, and short-comings pertinent to Fukushima. It was disappointing that so much of the book doesn't deal with Fukushima and the disaster directly. Much of the content in this book could be placed in a book detailing the shortcomings of the nuclear industry in general, detailing problems with plants in the U.S. and Japan. It would be fine if that content was in addition to a thorough study of Fukushima. But as others have noted, the book ends its focus on Fukushima before the half method mark, and never returns to clean up, population displacement, detailed radiation fallout findings and other problems similar to the disaster. I was hoping for much of that, because this is a special opportunity to gather and show those in a readable fashion for the general public. There the book fell short.I do think it is worth reading regardless that it seems to have been an attempt to relate the story of regulatory collusion between industry and government, more than the acc of this specific incident. But perhaps the authors couldn't bear to pass up the opportunity to show their story on that, with the Fukushima lead- in. Still, I await a more definitive acc of the disaster that perhaps will cover those elements I found lacking.

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    Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster []  2019-12-17 20:55

    This book is very interesting and simple to read. I would think a number of audiences would appreciate this book whether from a nuclear energy perspective or a human interest perspective. After reading this book and others on nuclear disasters, the respond seems to be in preventing an accident. It seems that once an accident starts and backup systems fail, it is impossible to stop a core meltdown and radiation leaks into the environment.

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    Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster []  2019-12-17 20:55

    The book starts with an perfect description of the happenings as they unfolded and gets into amazing info about the American's thoughts on the disaster. It is also typical of the anti-nuclear scare lobby that sees no future for nuclear power. What is missing is a grand overview of nuclear power concepts: The book glosses over the heavy evidence versus the linear-no-threshold hypothesis for radiation damage, the failures of mob-led policy making in "democracies", the absolute need to locate nuclear facilities underground and the requirement to create reactors simpler, not more complicated. Much like in a lot of other locations like "chemicals", "genetic modification", etc. we are retreating into caves instead of learning and advancing.

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    Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster []  2019-12-17 20:55

    David Lochbaum and the Union of Concerned Scientists are long-time enemies of nuclear power. They do not disappoint in this book. Since I am a proponent of nuclear power, and have written a book about it (Why We Need Nuclear Power: The Environmental Case), I was expecting this to be a hatchet job. To my surprise, it wasn't. They give a detailed and accurate ysis of the happenings similar to the Fukushima disaster. Clearly in hindsight higher seawalls could have been built and the nuclear disaster would not have happened and other safety features such as hardened vents might have helped prevent the catastrophic explosions. The authors accurately describe the tsunami as causing nearly 19,000 deaths and recognize that the tsunami was the basic cause of the accident. They even give a relatively fair treatment of the health consequences of the accident (few if any deaths from radiation are expected).The weakness of the book is the extrapolation from Fukushima to US nuclear reactors. The book has extensive coverage of the discussions and policies of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission similar to both Fukushima and US reactor safety in general. They rehash Three Mile Island as if it were nearly the same as Fukushima, which it is not. At every turn, they take the most pessimistic view possible of nuclear power and assume the most unlikely happenings will happen. The Union of Concerned Scientists, and these authors, have been making these same statements for decades and they have consistently failed to come true. The singular failing is to fairly assess how safe nuclear power actually has been in the US and to compare its risks (which are true but small) with the known risks of depending on burning coal to generate electricity, which is what nuclear power supplants. The other major problem is production of CO2 and global warming. US coal to generate electricity generates nearly 2 billion dozens of CO2 yearly but nuclear power generates virtually none. I have calculated that since 1970 nuclear power in the US has avoided 24 billion dozens of CO2 that would have been produced if coal had been burned instead. If nuclear power is too risky, as the authors imply, then what is to replace it without generating CO2? This book would be much better if the authors dealt with these two issues. Still, it is a worthwhile read.

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    Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster []  2019-12-17 20:55

    Really engaging, well-researched acc of what initially happened at Fukushima. Would love to see this same squad tackle what's been going on (or not) in the four years since. To this day the plant continues to release unfathomable amounts of radioactive wastewater into the Pacific Ocean. Now we're having all sorts of unexplained sea life disease and die-off from California to Alaska. Connected, perhaps?

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    Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster []  2019-12-17 20:55

    Very interesting. Makes you wonder why design engineers don't do more research.

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    Fukushima: The Story of a Nuclear Disaster []  2019-12-17 20:55

    Online reviewer proponents of nuclear energy point out one-sided biasis of this book w/ Union of Concerned Scientists omitting from final draft the information re the more responsible plant in Japan created to better specs (w/ higher seawall) survived fine, and decry not using a known salt water way which could have produced a various outcome also.But that is really the point: a lot of things can be safe or dangerous, & administered by imperfect humans, we must look to the danger presented by the lowest not the highest denominators & standards, right?Hubby & others says gripping reading re such a preventable tragedy continuing to impact our world. I wonder if I'll read in it how the plant's safety inspections' & upgrades' focus & resources were diverted to Al Gore's man-made global-warming carbon witchhunt, whose scientific models are completely failing to eventuate as direly forecast (record PA winter from mini-Ice Age we're experiencing like in 1800s). Japan tsunamia shifting earth's axis a cause of global warming along w/ meteorological factors, but you'd hate to see our globe without the carbon upon which green depends.

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    Station Blackout: Inside the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster and Recovery []  2019-12-23 20:29

    Chuck had special qualifications and experience to support the Japanese people deal with 3/11. His book explains a lot of of the decisions that were created under extreme crisis. I enjoyed the read, even though it was technical, learning about management under pressure that can be used in a lot of fields of ll McClintock, , former CEO & Owner of Med-Dispense

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    Station Blackout: Inside the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster and Recovery []  2019-12-23 20:29

    The book info the successes and failures that were attributable to leadership, communications, societial differences, during unimaginable hardships. It describes the heroic efforts that were created by the operators at both of the Fukushima nuclear power plants. The challenges that Japan faced was compared to the simotaneous occurance of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake and fires, with the flooding of hurricane Katrina, concurrent with the Three Mile Island Nuclear accident. The writer Dr. Charles Casto uses the first person in the narration because he was in charge of the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commissions emergency assistance contingent sent to Japan immediately after the event.

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    Station Blackout: Inside the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster and Recovery []  2019-12-23 20:29

    Chuck did a amazing job of not only describing the Fukushima accident in a clear, concise method but provided an interesting, behind the scenes view of the political interactions.

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    Station Blackout: Inside the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster and Recovery []  2019-12-23 20:29

    I have a professional relationship with Chuck. We worked together in the US Nuclear industry, and I hired him to teach the Supervisors at Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station about the Fukushima Event. His Seminar was IMPACTFUL, to say the least. I also visited Fukushima Daini in 1984 time frame so I can relate to the zone and culture. I have finished reading this book and LOVED it! I think Chuck did an perfect job of capturing the Leadership Challenges that the Japanese people faced trying to mitigate the disaster. And that is exactly what Chuck described in the summary on the cover flaps. I cannot imagine how they were able to communicate and know plant status without power. AWESOME Job Chuck! And God Bless the people of Japan.

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    Station Blackout: Inside the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster and Recovery []  2019-12-23 20:29

    Fascinating first-hand insight into the minds and actions of leaders who faced the Fukushima crisis.

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    Station Blackout: Inside the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster and Recovery []  2019-12-23 20:29

    I fully enjoyed reading this book. Although I understood the enormous technical challenges then and now, Mr. Casto writes of the human suffering exclusive of the station blackout event. I very much enjoyed the extreme crisis leadership aspects detailed in the book. Prior to Fukushima there were two core-damaging happenings in about 12500 reactor years of operation. Then there were 3 in one week. Mr. Casto was in the middle of the chaos doing what his years of experience trained him to do. The NRC and the US industry were fortunate to have him thus engaged. In conclusion my favorite chapters were Small Texas and the Huge Takeaway. A book that is very well done!

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    Station Blackout: Inside the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster and Recovery []  2019-12-23 20:29

    Chuck Casto's well-written book gave me an understanding of aspects of the Fukushima disaster that I'd not gotten from reading other accounts. Some accounts detailed what worked, and didn't work, from a technical aspect. Some accounts chronicled the political aspects of this disaster. But Casto's book explains how science and political science were intertwined - sometimes to the amazing and sometimes not. The amazing added significantly to my understanding of what happened and why.

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    Station Blackout: Inside the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster and Recovery []  2019-12-23 20:29

    Very nice detailed, factual and realistic.

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    Station Blackout: Inside the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster and Recovery []  2019-12-23 20:29

    This book is more about the author blowing his own horn. I was hoping for a technical ysis of the disaster. And disaster it was. If you're looking for the same, don't buy this book.

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    Station Blackout: Inside the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster and Recovery []  2019-12-23 20:29

    Casto's perspective and background results in an perfect book that not only tells about this disaster, it contains the lessons that should be learned. This is truly a captivating study of crisis management. Found this a most interesting read.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters; From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2020-1-19 22:41

    I found this to be a amazing read! The author clearly knows what he is talking about. He takes us through the chronology of nuclear accidents, starting with an understanding of what radioactive elements are in the first put and then describing a whole series of nuclear accidents, from the relatively minor and early ones to the major ones (like Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima Daiichi). The author describes the nature of these accidents in language that is readily understandable by those of us without a Ph.D. in physics. He also enables the reader to understand how nuclear reactors work and what can (and did) go wrong with them. Some very interesting images are included with the book (I have the ebook version). When I was done reading it for the day, I was always eager to pick the book up again and continue. It was highly enjoyable, and I would heartily recommend it.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2019-12-23 20:29

    As an ex-Navy submariner and Engineering Watch Supervisor, I really enjoyed this book. I trained on the A1W prototype in Idaho (1972) and spent a amazing deal of time on the other 2 plants (S5G and S1W). SL1 was a scary rumor at the time and the only teachable moment I remember is that we required to always believe our instrumentation, especially with a reactor accident or potential contamination event. I think this came from the first responders at SL1 not believing their counters when they first rolled up. We had to live in Idaho Falls and commute by a bus just about every day. We drove right past where some of the stories in this book unfolded. Brought back a lot of e boat I was on had a few situations that I was disappointed were not mentioned in the book. She was a very old boat, since retired with her reactor compartment buried out at the Hanford site. We had a couple basic to secondary leaks in our steam generators, as well as unexplained shield tank overflows while at e basic leaks were first seen as iodine isotopes at the air ejectors on the main condensers. We had to isolate the engineering locations and lived in our EAB's for 3 weeks limping back to Pearl. At the time there were a number of incidents across the fleet, per the grapevine, leading to a squad on another boat refusing to go to sea. I was hoping to search where I could contact the author. Rickover's nuclear navy did not have as spotless of a record as book seemed to imply at some points. Anyway, very amazing book, especially if you lived some of it.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2019-12-23 20:29

    Mahaffey has the perspective to see how nuclear power works, and how the holders of nuclear power accidentally screw up. Very well doented and very well written. This is worth the lay public's attention.I found this much more valuable than The Three Mile Island Accident (Charles River Editors), which I thought was merely a easy accident "review."Cherynobyl 01:23:40 (Andrew Leatherbarrow) was very good. Mahaffey's book covers the Chernobyl disaster also, and because Mahaffey's work has a broader context, adds a lot to Leatherbarrow's of the best books on Fukushima Daiichi is: On the Bring: The inside story of Fukushima Daiich (Ryusho Kadota). (Mahaffey covers this, too, in amazing detail).Overall, the best summary book we could find. Despite the gravity of the subject, Mahaffey has a twinkle in his eye and a gentle wit about how things happen.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2019-12-23 20:29

    My background is in process engineering. While I have dealt with radiation sources for things like level detection, I have never worked with a nuclear Mahaffey's book was for me, a familiar experience. See in chemical processes, you sometimes have to sift through the debris to figure out just what the not good guy before you did to go "POP!"Sadly, often the root cause boils down to 1. The decision was created to "Try something new!" without thinking things through. 2. There was a situation that developed that something was done to work around that resulted in the "event". 3. No one really knew what they were doing.I had always assumed that the Nuke boys were somehow better than that. That they had thought ahead and had more than the usual valve turning [email protected]@S###Ds in the employ to hold things this book, you realize that no, people are people and you can't design around foolishness. And even though you are playing some of the most risky material known to man, complacency will obtain you every time. At some point, the incidents recorded begin to sound so familiar that I felt I was reading the recent OSHA message about what not to at isn't to say I disliked the book. Far from it! James Mahaffey has a amazing method of not only explaining the incident, but the background. As a effect I have some better understanding of the joys and sorrows of dealing with nuclear issues. If you have a process background there will be a lot of "AhHah!" moments!Still, i must say i have a various view of nuclear power than I used to. There are so a lot of things than can go wrong, and the margins are such, that building a robust fool resistant reactor may not be economically feasible.

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    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Disaster: Investigating the Myth and Reality []  2019-12-23 20:30

    Delivered as promised. Have not yet read it, but at initial look, seems exactly what I wanted.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2019-12-23 20:29

    It's interesting that so a lot of accidents - not just in nuclear but everything - have as a root cause, safety h shuttle accidents have been root caused back to EPA decisions about asbestos caulk and ozone damaging e Detroit accident was because a latest min safety pyramid (ironically to prevent a melt down) came ernobyl was due to a try of safety equipment.Even the safety of my toaster has been compromised by the safety requirement of a shorter cord which encourages me to use a cheap and method too long extension the shipping and receiving department the box knives now have complicated mechanisms on them to hold you from cutting yourself and which are so complicated and unwieldy that I end up cutting myself and finally hacking at the box with scissors. The safest knife is a sharp knife.And air bags. Don't obtain me started about air bags.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters; From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2020-1-19 22:41

    This is a true page turner. I had no idea so a lot of accidents had happened. For me the most fascinating, and scary incidents, are those that occurred in reprocessing labs, where just pouring material from one container to another with a various shape creates a critical mass. Parts of it are quite technical, and requires some background in physics, but overall its very e title of the book is a bit misleading, because in order to cover accidents the author presents a large amount of background material explaining how a broad range of nuclear facilities were designed and supposed to work, in order to explain how things went wrong. This created the book a amazing read for the technically curious. I've only read one other book that installed equal enthusiasm: The invention that changed the globe by Robert Buderi, a history of the development of microwave radar and the science that arose from it,

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters; From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2020-1-19 22:41

    My background is in process engineering. While I have dealt with radiation sources for things like level detection, I have never worked with a nuclear Mahaffey's book was for me, a familiar experience. See in chemical processes, you sometimes have to sift through the debris to figure out just what the not good guy before you did to go "POP!"Sadly, often the root cause boils down to 1. The decision was created to "Try something new!" without thinking things through. 2. There was a situation that developed that something was done to work around that resulted in the "event". 3. No one really knew what they were doing.I had always assumed that the Nuke boys were somehow better than that. That they had thought ahead and had more than the usual valve turning [email protected]@S###Ds in the employ to hold things this book, you realize that no, people are people and you can't design around foolishness. And even though you are playing some of the most risky material known to man, complacency will obtain you every time. At some point, the incidents recorded begin to sound so familiar that I felt I was reading the recent OSHA message about what not to at isn't to say I disliked the book. Far from it! James Mahaffey has a amazing method of not only explaining the incident, but the background. As a effect I have some better understanding of the joys and sorrows of dealing with nuclear issues. If you have a process background there will be a lot of "AhHah!" moments!Still, i must say i have a various view of nuclear power than I used to. There are so a lot of things than can go wrong, and the margins are such, that building a robust fool resistant reactor may not be economically feasible.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2019-12-23 20:29

    This is a true page turner. I had no idea so a lot of accidents had happened. For me the most fascinating, and scary incidents, are those that occurred in reprocessing labs, where just pouring material from one container to another with a various shape creates a critical mass. Parts of it are quite technical, and requires some background in physics, but overall its very e title of the book is a bit misleading, because in order to cover accidents the author presents a large amount of background material explaining how a broad range of nuclear facilities were designed and supposed to work, in order to explain how things went wrong. This created the book a amazing read for the technically curious. I've only read one other book that installed equal enthusiasm: The invention that changed the globe by Robert Buderi, a history of the development of microwave radar and the science that arose from it,

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2019-12-23 20:29

    This is a really interesting and chilling book. I think the author's intent, as someone who it seems has worked in the industry, was to reassure readers that nuclear power is relatively safe. After reading it, however, I wondered how we've all managed to stay alive. There are dozens of interesting anecdotes, some amusing, some sad and tragic but at the least very instructional. Human error and misreading of happenings have contributed to a lot of the worst accidents. The book was also somewhat of a wake up call to me. As troubled as the U.S. nuclear industry appears to be it sure sounds like you don't wish to live near reactors in some other countries, like India, and you obtain the distinct feeling that another disaster like the most latest one in Japan is probably a certainty. I don't have an engineering background but I was able to follow most of the technical explanations and as a lay person have a much better feel for how reactors work. The writing was beautiful accessible and I really couldn't place the book down at times.

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    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Disaster: Investigating the Myth and Reality []  2019-12-23 20:30

    First, the tsunami was unreal and method beyond normal. The close escape from MAJOR result to the whole country was a very close escape. But this book does an perfect job of showing what happened in those first hours and days AND also the history of nuclear energy in Japan. The collusion, the greed, the back door channels, the myths of safety, the paper pushing, the non communications, the chutzpah, MITI, METI, NISA and all the other groups, and the power of TEPCO. EIGHT years on and thousands are still very directly affected in their living spaces.We are a user of TEPCO in the suburbs of Tokyo and "could" search other supply (a hassle), but my wife (Japanese) would hate to see TEPCO go bankrupt and not have to pay for all its damages. (They will never properly pay)If you wish to know some FACTS, read this book

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters; From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2020-1-19 22:41

    As an ex-Navy submariner and Engineering Watch Supervisor, I really enjoyed this book. I trained on the A1W prototype in Idaho (1972) and spent a amazing deal of time on the other 2 plants (S5G and S1W). SL1 was a scary rumor at the time and the only teachable moment I remember is that we required to always believe our instrumentation, especially with a reactor accident or potential contamination event. I think this came from the first responders at SL1 not believing their counters when they first rolled up. We had to live in Idaho Falls and commute by a bus just about every day. We drove right past where some of the stories in this book unfolded. Brought back a lot of e boat I was on had a few situations that I was disappointed were not mentioned in the book. She was a very old boat, since retired with her reactor compartment buried out at the Hanford site. We had a couple basic to secondary leaks in our steam generators, as well as unexplained shield tank overflows while at e basic leaks were first seen as iodine isotopes at the air ejectors on the main condensers. We had to isolate the engineering locations and lived in our EAB's for 3 weeks limping back to Pearl. At the time there were a number of incidents across the fleet, per the grapevine, leading to a squad on another boat refusing to go to sea. I was hoping to search where I could contact the author. Rickover's nuclear navy did not have as spotless of a record as book seemed to imply at some points. Anyway, very amazing book, especially if you lived some of it.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters; From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2020-1-19 22:41

    This is one of best books I've read. It significantly increased my understanding of nuclear technology, and I thought I knew a fair amount about that prior to picking up the book. It created me smile and even laugh at times. Several times I place down the book to call or email others I knew just to share passages from it with them.On the face of it paradoxically (tho if you read it, you'll understand) this compendium of descriptions of atomic accidents... including some major disasters... ultimately serves to create (a rational person) understand how relatively safe this technology is, especially as compared to alterantive means of generating the electrical power our entire civilization depends on.What I especially liked was that the book primarily presents facts and knowledge and history, and for the most part meticulously leaves it to the reader to create judgments and come to conclusions of generalities.I would have liked there to have been a bit more on fresh emerging ("4th generation") nuclear technologies, tho they are mentioned briefly in an encouraging is is a truly fascinating and HIGHLY read-able book. I recommend highly you buy and read it.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters; From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2020-1-19 22:41

    Mahaffey has the perspective to see how nuclear power works, and how the holders of nuclear power accidentally screw up. Very well doented and very well written. This is worth the lay public's attention.I found this much more valuable than The Three Mile Island Accident (Charles River Editors), which I thought was merely a easy accident "review."Cherynobyl 01:23:40 (Andrew Leatherbarrow) was very good. Mahaffey's book covers the Chernobyl disaster also, and because Mahaffey's work has a broader context, adds a lot to Leatherbarrow's of the best books on Fukushima Daiichi is: On the Bring: The inside story of Fukushima Daiich (Ryusho Kadota). (Mahaffey covers this, too, in amazing detail).Overall, the best summary book we could find. Despite the gravity of the subject, Mahaffey has a twinkle in his eye and a gentle wit about how things happen.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters; From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2020-1-19 22:41

    I've found the bok quite informative in relation to acidents and reactor/weapons design in general, but it's far too centered in the US. While there is a chapter on the UK, and several on the huge ones outside the US (Chernobyl and Fukushima), there is almost nothing on other nuclear nations (France, Germany, India, China, Italy, South Korea...), apart from about a dozen lines on France, and a mention of Finland during Chernobyl. More suprisingly, on the extensive description of liquid-metal reactors and why the USN didn't use them, there's no mention whatsoever (there or in the whole book) of the Soviet Alfa-class submarines, who did use them. At the end of the book, the author mentions a fresh generation of compact, mobile reactors but, again, fails to mention the Russian floating nuclear power stations, whicgh started to be built 7 years before this book came out... considering the author's obvious knowledge of the industry and history, I can onkly assume these omissions are deliberate.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters; From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2020-1-19 22:41

    This is a really interesting and chilling book. I think the author's intent, as someone who it seems has worked in the industry, was to reassure readers that nuclear power is relatively safe. After reading it, however, I wondered how we've all managed to stay alive. There are dozens of interesting anecdotes, some amusing, some sad and tragic but at the least very instructional. Human error and misreading of happenings have contributed to a lot of the worst accidents. The book was also somewhat of a wake up call to me. As troubled as the U.S. nuclear industry appears to be it sure sounds like you don't wish to live near reactors in some other countries, like India, and you obtain the distinct feeling that another disaster like the most latest one in Japan is probably a certainty. I don't have an engineering background but I was able to follow most of the technical explanations and as a lay person have a much better feel for how reactors work. The writing was beautiful accessible and I really couldn't place the book down at times.

    0  


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    Useful review?

    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2019-12-23 20:29

    This was not the book I expected when I purchased it. I was expecting an authoritative, well researched, well doented treatise on the history of nuclear accidents. It was certainly that. But I was also expecting a dry, pedantic, academic, formal, and boring book that I was determined to slog thorough because I wanted to understand the a story that traces its plot from a wrecked 2-10-0 decapod steam engine in north Georgia in 1954 to a heavy hydrogen explosion at Fukushima Daiichi, Japan in 2011, the human story is always front and center. Don’t misunderstand, Mahaffey understands the technology intimately and he describes the technical info with an engineers precision, but he also understands that it is the interface between the human and the machine where the real story is told, and time-and-time again, where the culprit of tragedy is to be though the title makes it sound like an academic textbook, it reads more like a Sebastian Junger or Jon Krakauer adventure story. One where when you breathlessly complete it, you will be chagrined to realize you just may have read a ere are two threads of striking similarities running through these stories. The first is how incaution led to so a lot of of these accidents. At first, this seems surprising given the risky nature of the processes and materials being handled. But it reminds me of a conversation I had with a friend. We are both rock climbers and used to a certain element of risk. We were discussing a climber who was well known for incredibly difficult climbs without a rope and I suggested he was somehow fundamentally various from the rest of us. My mate disagreed and offered that each time we take a risk and have a positive outcome, our expectation of a positive outcome increases and conversely, our vigilance decreases. It is an interesting idea and one that highlights the imperativeness of following well designed safety procedures and how there can be small or no tolerance for mavericks e second striking thread was how a lot of accidents were due to operators failing to follow procedures or mistrusting measurements because they followed their “gut instincts”. This thread might also seem to highlight the imperativeness of following well designed safety procedures and how there can be small or no tolerance for mavericks, but it less clear as we really have no amazing data on whether and how a lot of accidents were averted by related is is a story of amazing tragedy and sometimes amazing catastrophe. It is a story that doesn't shy away from telling the, often painful, stories of the very true human beings at the center of the events. Whether the effect of ignorance, youthful exuberance, hubris, heroism, or luck, the pictures painted in these words are fitting testimonials to the tragic victims of these events.But this is ultimately an optimistic story. It tells the tale of a completely fresh technology from its earliest inception to the show day through the lens of adversity. But the ultimate sense one is left with is a sense of triumph. If there is any pessimism, it is from the nagging sensation that what should be one of humanities greatest triumphs may be abandoned out of misplaced fear.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2019-12-23 20:29

    I've found the bok quite informative in relation to acidents and reactor/weapons design in general, but it's far too centered in the US. While there is a chapter on the UK, and several on the huge ones outside the US (Chernobyl and Fukushima), there is almost nothing on other nuclear nations (France, Germany, India, China, Italy, South Korea...), apart from about a dozen lines on France, and a mention of Finland during Chernobyl. More suprisingly, on the extensive description of liquid-metal reactors and why the USN didn't use them, there's no mention whatsoever (there or in the whole book) of the Soviet Alfa-class submarines, who did use them. At the end of the book, the author mentions a fresh generation of compact, mobile reactors but, again, fails to mention the Russian floating nuclear power stations, whicgh started to be built 7 years before this book came out... considering the author's obvious knowledge of the industry and history, I can onkly assume these omissions are deliberate.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2019-12-23 20:29

    I found this to be a amazing read! The author clearly knows what he is talking about. He takes us through the chronology of nuclear accidents, starting with an understanding of what radioactive elements are in the first put and then describing a whole series of nuclear accidents, from the relatively minor and early ones to the major ones (like Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and Fukushima Daiichi). The author describes the nature of these accidents in language that is readily understandable by those of us without a Ph.D. in physics. He also enables the reader to understand how nuclear reactors work and what can (and did) go wrong with them. Some very interesting images are included with the book (I have the ebook version). When I was done reading it for the day, I was always eager to pick the book up again and continue. It was highly enjoyable, and I would heartily recommend it.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters: From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2019-12-23 20:29

    This is one of best books I've read. It significantly increased my understanding of nuclear technology, and I thought I knew a fair amount about that prior to picking up the book. It created me smile and even laugh at times. Several times I place down the book to call or email others I knew just to share passages from it with them.On the face of it paradoxically (tho if you read it, you'll understand) this compendium of descriptions of atomic accidents... including some major disasters... ultimately serves to create (a rational person) understand how relatively safe this technology is, especially as compared to alterantive means of generating the electrical power our entire civilization depends on.What I especially liked was that the book primarily presents facts and knowledge and history, and for the most part meticulously leaves it to the reader to create judgments and come to conclusions of generalities.I would have liked there to have been a bit more on fresh emerging ("4th generation") nuclear technologies, tho they are mentioned briefly in an encouraging is is a truly fascinating and HIGHLY read-able book. I recommend highly you buy and read it.

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    Useful review?

    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters; From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2020-1-19 22:41

    This was not the book I expected when I purchased it. I was expecting an authoritative, well researched, well doented treatise on the history of nuclear accidents. It was certainly that. But I was also expecting a dry, pedantic, academic, formal, and boring book that I was determined to slog thorough because I wanted to understand the a story that traces its plot from a wrecked 2-10-0 decapod steam engine in north Georgia in 1954 to a heavy hydrogen explosion at Fukushima Daiichi, Japan in 2011, the human story is always front and center. Don’t misunderstand, Mahaffey understands the technology intimately and he describes the technical info with an engineers precision, but he also understands that it is the interface between the human and the machine where the real story is told, and time-and-time again, where the culprit of tragedy is to be though the title makes it sound like an academic textbook, it reads more like a Sebastian Junger or Jon Krakauer adventure story. One where when you breathlessly complete it, you will be chagrined to realize you just may have read a ere are two threads of striking similarities running through these stories. The first is how incaution led to so a lot of of these accidents. At first, this seems surprising given the risky nature of the processes and materials being handled. But it reminds me of a conversation I had with a friend. We are both rock climbers and used to a certain element of risk. We were discussing a climber who was well known for incredibly difficult climbs without a rope and I suggested he was somehow fundamentally various from the rest of us. My mate disagreed and offered that each time we take a risk and have a positive outcome, our expectation of a positive outcome increases and conversely, our vigilance decreases. It is an interesting idea and one that highlights the imperativeness of following well designed safety procedures and how there can be small or no tolerance for mavericks e second striking thread was how a lot of accidents were due to operators failing to follow procedures or mistrusting measurements because they followed their “gut instincts”. This thread might also seem to highlight the imperativeness of following well designed safety procedures and how there can be small or no tolerance for mavericks, but it less clear as we really have no amazing data on whether and how a lot of accidents were averted by related is is a story of amazing tragedy and sometimes amazing catastrophe. It is a story that doesn't shy away from telling the, often painful, stories of the very true human beings at the center of the events. Whether the effect of ignorance, youthful exuberance, hubris, heroism, or luck, the pictures painted in these words are fitting testimonials to the tragic victims of these events.But this is ultimately an optimistic story. It tells the tale of a completely fresh technology from its earliest inception to the show day through the lens of adversity. But the ultimate sense one is left with is a sense of triumph. If there is any pessimism, it is from the nagging sensation that what should be one of humanities greatest triumphs may be abandoned out of misplaced fear.

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    Atomic Accidents: A History of Nuclear Meltdowns and Disasters; From the Ozark Mountains to Fukushima []  2020-1-19 22:41

    It's interesting that so a lot of accidents - not just in nuclear but everything - have as a root cause, safety h shuttle accidents have been root caused back to EPA decisions about asbestos caulk and ozone damaging e Detroit accident was because a latest min safety pyramid (ironically to prevent a melt down) came ernobyl was due to a try of safety equipment.Even the safety of my toaster has been compromised by the safety requirement of a shorter cord which encourages me to use a cheap and method too long extension the shipping and receiving department the box knives now have complicated mechanisms on them to hold you from cutting yourself and which are so complicated and unwieldy that I end up cutting myself and finally hacking at the box with scissors. The safest knife is a sharp knife.And air bags. Don't obtain me started about air bags.

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    FUKUSHIMA 3.11 []  2019-12-23 20:30

    You can obtain true truth of the FUKU-ICHI accident with this book, even government is hiding true facts. He can obtain the info mainly from government report, but he can estimate what is event inside, because he had long experience fighting to atomic village people in every power generation construction site, so he can extract true facts from fake story of them. On his so a lot of lectures in Japan, audience create a lot of questions and he answered one by one. This book summarizes these Q&A in one book. So this book is written in Q&A form. 50 questions are most famous questions of Japanese people, then you can understand questions of people where it is. But these Q&A are for Japanese people, so it is not so simple for people outside Japan, and latest chapter explains over view of atomic power plant with historical view e chapter 4 explains historical point of view why Japanese introduced the nuclear power plant, it suggests you to think how to escape next accident.

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    The Week the World Stood Still: Inside the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis: Stanford Nuclear Age Series []  2020-1-18 20:31

    Stern did an awesome job bringing history to life. History can be hard to read depending on the historian, but Stern did a amazing job making it come alive. Quick Reading and Enjoyable

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    The Week the World Stood Still: Inside the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis: Stanford Nuclear Age Series []  2020-1-18 20:31

    The reliance on real-time info makes this [email protected]#$%!&?st-rate study. To be able to relate history almost as if it were fiction is a real art.

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    The Week the World Stood Still: Inside the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis: Stanford Nuclear Age Series []  2020-1-18 20:31

    I was 15 when president Kennedy was assassinated, so I wasn't totally aware of exactly what was event at the time of the Cuban Missile Crisis. It was very interesting to me to read about it and understand what it was all about. I was fascinated with the book. It took me back to a time when I didn't quite understand what was event or realize the seriousness of what could have happened. Unbelievable book.

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    The Week the World Stood Still: Inside the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis: Stanford Nuclear Age Series []  2020-1-18 20:31

    Kennedy's tape recorder lets you listen as a fly on the wall during the most necessary meetings of the 20th century. Crisp writing gives enough narration to provide a background for the conversations and explains nuances that non-experts would miss. A various story from that of RFK's 13 days, and probably a more honest one.

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    The Week the World Stood Still: Inside the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis: Stanford Nuclear Age Series []  2020-1-18 20:31

    Very good! I created this purchase because I required it for one of my college classes and it is definitely helping me. I used standard shipping and it came in the mail in just a week.

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    The Week the World Stood Still: Inside the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis: Stanford Nuclear Age Series []  2020-1-18 20:31

    I think this book is a must for the understanding how the happenings evolved in those very difficult 13 days. The Author has created an perfect work in putting in a readable method hours of recordings that he himself heard over and over again. He did not fill any gaps but added the mood and the expresions of the word being said, and that greatly support to understand the situation. He also add parallel info of key happenings outside the recorded rooms and place all together in a very coherent r us having suffered the chaos of the '60 as a collateral damage, knowing first hand what was event in the Capital of the Globe is a revealing so you can recognise the importance that the leadership had in both sides of the equation. The pressures, the uncertainty, the evident so called truth that a Leader has to overcome to search the right path in spite of them all is encouraging.Hence I recommed this book to anyone who still wish to know a amazing deal of the truth on the Cuban Crisis and learn first hand some perfect example of political leadership.

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    The Week the World Stood Still: Inside the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis: Stanford Nuclear Age Series []  2020-1-18 20:31

    the Kennedy tape recordings of the meetings during the Cuban Missle Crisis, Hard to place down as Jfk and his advisors struggle with the concept of nuclear war.

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    The Week the World Stood Still: Inside the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis: Stanford Nuclear Age Series []  2020-1-18 20:31

    Perfect read, lots of detail in a smaller book, fresh info on this critical event, does a amazing job of helping you visualize every player in the meetings.

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    The Week the World Stood Still: Inside the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis: Stanford Nuclear Age Series []  2020-1-18 20:31

    Good, fast read. Narrative style keeps you entertained and info easily digested. Very pro-JFK point of view. Gross abuse of italics in nearly every sentence got annoying fast.

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    The Week the World Stood Still: Inside the Secret Cuban Missile Crisis: Stanford Nuclear Age Series []  2020-1-18 20:31

    I purchased this at the same time i purchased the cuban missile crisis in American ry well written..I like especially the parts they were able to salvage thru the tapes

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    Fukushima : the First Five Days []  2019-12-23 20:30

    This book goes through the happenings over the first five days, almost hour per hour and uses the records of the operators. The forward states that the author has 20 years experience in the nuclear industry and more as a public educator. They key point he makes is that the operators and plant managers were local and required and wanted to take specific actions, such as venting Reactor 1, and how they were delayed in doing this by needing to ask permission from the TEPCO bosses in Tokyo and finally the Prime Minister. He builds a case that the hydrogen explosion in reactor 1 could have been prevented by venting earlier and that the hydrogen explosion destroyed the efforts to bring power and cooling water to the other reactors. So the delay in venting reactor 1 caused the hydrogen explosion which then caused the other problems. There is a lot of detail and you search yourself excited for the operators that tried to prevent the problems.He also describes the conditions which allowed Fukushima to happen. The Japanese ignored a US NRC suggestion, which was a requirement for US reactors, to evaluate certain beyond design conditions, namely a prolonged period of power outage. He states that the Japanese felt their grid system could never have such a power outage. The power outage from backup power, since the reactors were down and the diesel engines flooded, was the true cause of the accident. He states that if the Japanese had implemented the requirements of the US NRC, the accident would probably have been avoided. All indications from the operating records present that the reactors shut down properly after the earthquake and that emergency cooling was working well until the tsunami hit.

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    Fukushima : the First Five Days []  2019-12-23 20:30

    This book provides a very amazing acc of the Reactor Operators' logs over the first 5 days of the accident. The level of detail is quite good, there are reasonable explanations of the terminology and some insights into the politics involved. It does not give an in depth technical ysis, and gives us no insights into the individuals involved, therefore the acc is factual but reads just a small sterile. (in comparison to eg. "Chernobyl Notebook"). You come away with a amazing understanding of the Fukashima incident and it's ramifications, but I would have preferred more ysis from the author rather than the majority of the work being a rendition of the Operators Station Logs. Nevertheless a very worthwhile read.

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    Tsunami: Japan’s Post-Fukushima Future []  2020-1-3 22:5

    The substance of this book is uneven, with some of it offering perfect insights about the experiences and concerns of people living in Japan, and much of the rest of it rather tilted to a more myopic and conventional gaijin (foreigner) point of view. Given the book's modest price -- and the fact that the proceeds will be donated to NPOs working on disaster relief in Tohoku (northeastern Japan) -- the amazing parts more than justify a purchase; but one should take some chapters with a grain of salt.I read the book as someone who lives in Tokyo and in Tohoku (Iwate Prefecture), who has been here continuously since the earthquake, and who has seen first-hand a lot of of the communities damaged by the tsunami. The title and subtitle of the book had led me to expect the worst. Roughly 25,000 people, by conservative estimates, perished in the March 11 tsunami, which affected six prefectures (Miyagi, Iwate, Fukushima, Aomori, Ibaraki and Chiba; there was even a roughly 1-meter tsunami in Tokyo) along a stretch of coast roughly as long as that from the San Francisco Peninsula to Los Angeles, or as Florida's Atlantic coast; no one has died from the incident at the Fukushima reactor. To focus on the "post-Fukushima future" and "the aftershocks of Japan's nuclear nightmare" is typical of the Western press, but is disrespectful to the memories of those who perished and to the suffering and grief of the survivors. Although the troubles at Fukushima Dai-Ichi have helped revive the anti-nuclear movement in Japan, for most Japanese "Fukushima" is not a metonym for what's now called 3/11. (Nor is Fukushima "the city that's home to the nuclear power plant damaged by the quake and the ensuing tsunami," contra the former Tokyo bureau chief of Newsweek (@90); the towns are Okuma and Futaba, Fukushima is the prefecture (like a US state or French département).) The composition of the book is consistent with the Western nuke fixation: one-fourth of the essays are about the nuclear industry, while far less zone is given to the challenges of re-building communities. It's also disappointing that out of 24 articles, only 6-1/2 of them were written by rtunately, the first two sections, consisting of eyewitness accounts of 3/11 and two historical articles about how the lessons of past tsunami have been ignored, will be very instructive for readers outside Japan. For me the standout in the book was Kaori Shoji's "Marry Me," which beautifully explores the emotional impact of the events. Mariko Nagai contributes a more third-person literary interpretation, intercut with excerpted historical accounts and messages from past tsunami. Steve Corbett provides a vivid acc of his experiences in Ishinomaki (Miyagi-ken) on the day of the tsunami; this city was largely destroyed, and was still heartbreaking to visit in May, nearly two months later. Kumiko Makihara talks about visiting Fukushima during the May Golden Week holidays. The well-known writer Robert Whiting describes how those of us who stayed in Tokyo place up with the radiation hysteria that seized the outside world. (He falls into some typical gaijin habits, though, when he singles out only Fukushima as "where life was truly miserable" (@41) and when he attributes Japanese trust in government pronouncements as deriving from "the country's long history of feudalism" (@43). At this writing, life still is miserable in much of Iwate, Miyagi and elsewhere. And the feudalism comment overlooks not only the past 60 years or so of largely competent Japanese bureaucracy, but the fact that Russia's even longer history of feudalism had rather various results).In the second section, articles by David McNeill and Gregory Smits describe how monuments to previous tsunami in 1896 and 1933 were ignored by a lot of communities, who re-built within the inundation locations -- and how the experience of 3/11 will probably be ignored again, given enough time. Smits contains a couple of images taken from atop the seawall in Taro (Iwaizumi, Iwate-ken), where I also stood several weeks later than he, on a gray day when crows were picking over the rubble and human remains were still being discovered. You should see e theme of the third section, called "Looking Out on the World", is not so simple to pin down; subjects contain the response to 3/11 in Fresh York and an overview of the role of NGOs in the disaster recovery, among other topics. Thumbs up to Jeff Kingston for mentioning Onagawa, the most hellish put I saw on the coast, which apparently struck an Afghanistan veteran and emergency relief expert the same way; news about the devastation of this city has been suppressed in Japan. (I discuss some reasons why in a May 23 Concurring Opinions blog post, which also contains some photos.) The highlight of this section, though, was Noriko Murai's piece on media coverage in Japan during the days after 3/11. As a bonus, it will allow those outside Japan in on one of the cynical political jokes inspired by the weeks of everyday briefings on the Fukushima ere are fewer bright spots in the second half of the book. A short section on the political impact of the happenings at least has the virtue of talking about Japanese domestic politics, a subject that most Western media seem to deem far less necessary than Hello Kitty. Most of the six articles in a section about "the nuclear future" are well-informed but may strike some readers outside Japan as mainly of local interest. Nonetheless, those by Andrew Horvat (about the politics of choosing American reactor designs) and Andrew DeWit & Masaru Koneko (about how Japan might exit from nukes) are especially informative. Robert Dujarric (who acknowledges having given a paid lecture for Arveda, France's leading nuke firm) offers an argument for why nukes really are the best thing for Japan; like much other French commentary on 3/11 from both right and left, Japan appears here as a morality tale to instruct French political battles. Although some of the authors in this section talk about the construction of Fukushima Dai-Ichi, curiously none of the authors in this book mentions that the utility company, TEPCO, deliberately lowered the elevation of the plant website from 35 meters (well above the level of the 3/11 tsunami) to 10 meters (well below it). As reported in Tokyo Shimbun and on TV Asahi on May 5, quoting the then-TEPCO VP of planning, now a retired octogenarian, earthquake risk had been considered during construction, but tsunami risk had not. 25 meters of soil were removed so that by being closer to the ocean the plant's operating expense would be reduced, enhancing profit. The ex-VP also mentioned a method in which the plant could have been built to deal with both types of risk. (For more info about this in English, see my post of May 9 on the Concurring Opinions blog.)Jun Honma makes some amazing points about the relevance of the political machinations after the 2004 Indonesian tsunami to today's situation. I was confused, though, by his disparaging references to "anti-reformists" and consumption tax increases. The book's epigram, from the widely detested current PM Naoto Kan, refers to Japan's "preceding crisis, [which] could be called Japan's structural crisis." (Several non-Japanese authors defend Kan's performance, though none mentions that on the morning of 3/11, the story broke that he had accepted illegal campaign contributions from foreigners; he was truly saved by the afternoon's calamity. A related allegation, relating to a much smaller amount (ca. US$3,000), had led the foreign minister, the highly capable Seiji Maehara, to resign immediately from the Cabinet just a few days earlier, his dignity more or less intact.) "Structural reform" was the buzzword for the neoliberal policies of the Jiminto (a/k/a Liberal Democratic Party) Koizumi administration. Although Kan belongs to the opposite political party, Minshuto (a/k/a Democratic Party of Japan), a lot of of his policies present a return to neoliberalism (much as do the Obama Administration's), contrary to the manifesto that gave Minshuto its mandate in 2009. Is this the sort of reform that Honma is anti-anti-? We're not told clearly.But it's certainly the sort of reform you'll search promoted in the economics section of the book, which is by far the weakest -- in a couple of respects. Let's begin with the literary: in an essay entitled "Look Past Old Habits," David ing, the Asia editor of Financial Times opens with "The characters that spell out kiki, the Japanese word for crisis, can be read as 'danger' and 'opportunity'" -- the oldest cliché in Western writing about Asia. Bill Emmott, formerly of Economist, titles his "Shake Out of Stagnation" -- showing the incredibly poor taste of going for a grade school pun notwithstanding the tragedy he's been asked to address. Emmott's article is a narrative focused on the concerns of bondholders, not the people of Japan, and talking of Japan's debt-to-GDP ratio as if it were in the same shoes as Greece, while ignoring its large holdings of foreign assets. ing offers a more balanced view of the bonds situation, though he parrots the conventional wisdom that Minshuto lost the latest upper house election because Kan backed an increase in the consumption tax (so did Jiminto, who gained seats). Including Brad Glosserman ("Break Free of the Familiar"), the three economics commentators offer tired old gaijin prescriptions for Japan: "liberalize," allow in foreign workers, allow corporations run farms, encourage "Schumpeterian innovation", reduce trade barriers and enter into fresh trade deals to encourage foreign investment. ALL of these solutions were, for example, propounded by gaijin "experts" in an NHK BS-1 Project Wisdom broadcast entitled "Dou nara nihon / Can Japan Obtain Back on its Feet ?" this past January, 6 weeks before the quake -- as they have been propounded by related pundits for more than a decade. These authors vindicate a point created by Honma, that disasters make fresh bottles for old policy wine; they would have done better to have heeded the tip in their respective titles. Five stars for the first half of the book, a bit less than 3 stars for the second half, averaging out to roughly 4 stars.

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    Tsunami: Japan’s Post-Fukushima Future []  2020-1-3 22:5

    Six months after the Amazing East Japan Earthquake almost 20,000 people are dead or missing, 80,000 evacuees can't go home, and fear blossoms regarding the radiation from the Fukushima nuclear plant. In order to grasp so vast a catastrophe, one must discover it from every angle, which is precisely what this book offers. Editor Jeff Kingston has gathered essays by twenty-four writers and scholars that cover the social, economic, political, and environmental implications of the disaster. As Brad Glosserman reminds Japan to "let no crisis go to waste," a lot of of the essays offer blueprints to support the resilient country rebuild, and at the same time caution it versus a return to status quo. One hopes that, in addition to finding a wide audience, this necessary book appears in Japanese and reaches the domestic policy makers and planners entrusted with the country's recovery.

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    Fukushima : the First Five Days []  2019-12-23 20:30

    In Chernobyl Soviet State policies have everyone too afraid to take the bold actions required to save the reactor and hold it from blowing sky high. For sure that is an over simplification but real non-the-less. In Fukushima the Japanese people are order and duty bound. The individual is downplayed the group is held in high esteem. In American society we are trained to be individualist in a lot of locations of our lives as such in any situation there will likely aways be a loud mouth maverick who knows just enough to save the day. Of course this is not always the case but very often this disaster if this bookFukushima : the First Five Days is to be believed had the guys vented and cooled reactor number one early after the Earthquake \ Tidal Wave twin disasters it could have been saved. Had they just released the pent up radioactive gases yes their would have been radiation release but on a much lesser scale much like the release during Three Mile Island. Howewver like in Soviet Russia, Japan's political element started intejecting its uninformed evacuation before venting directives into the mix which created keeping the stressed reactors stable. Once the first reactor was lost the others fell like a house of cards as a consequences. Japan is a amazing country but, the design of Fukashima 1 was founded on an arrogance of the worse conflagration of happenings could never happen here not to us, not with our technology. Hindsight shows Japan's unwavering faith it its technology was mistplaced with tragic consequences.Fukushima : the First Five Days lays bare the well meaning mistakes created by amazing people. There was also so much time wasted going through the ritual of returning to the muster website for a count after every aftershock. When the reactors started melting down it was an extraordinary time and it requires extraordinary measures. Japan is still at its cultural heart a feudal society and that undercurrent of ritualistic respect chop down the response time to the disaster and created technical experts too defferential to political whims that did not have saving the reactors from meltdown as top priority.Fukushima : the First Five Days reveals so much about the disaster in painful detail it just created me respect the people of Japan and feel the amazing pain they endured in this triple disaster. This was a amazing book for its little price. It was my pleasure to read it.

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    Fukushima : the First Five Days []  2019-12-23 20:30

    Isis this. Did this

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    Fukushima : the First Five Days []  2019-12-23 20:30

    Facts are clear Uncertainties are cited and evalUATED. Rather technicaLPROSE

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    Tsunami: Japan’s Post-Fukushima Future []  2020-1-3 22:5

    Perfect book...well written...and very informative. The long-term effects of the earthquake and tsunami are still being felt in Japan, as well as around the world. This book does an perfect work of putting a human face on the tragedy.

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    Fukushima : the First Five Days []  2019-12-23 20:30

    Excellent, highly informative report. Provides enough technical info to understand at least some of what happened at Fukushima. The greatest value of this report (based on log entries at the facility as the disaster unfolded) shows how unreliable a lot of of the media reports were. A lot of commentary in the international news was misleading or totally fabricated by individuals unqualified to assess the disaster at the time. I believe the workers at Fukushima handled an unprecedented combination of worst case happenings calmly and with all the resources that could be created available. The Fukushima squad deserve thanks and recognition for their heroic efforts. These were brave, dedicated men. The happenings at Fukushima posed a very risky and unpredictable situation, well beyond any scenarios that could have been imagined. There is much to be learned from the Fukushima tragedy. Nuclear power can and should continue to supply important energy for a lot of societies. Lessons from Fukushima can support future applications to be safer and reliable. Garrie

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    Fukushima : the First Five Days []  2019-12-23 20:30

    You need to have some understanding of nuclear power plant design to appreciate this book. I found this book well done. Enjoyed this book and would like to choke the crap out of Japanese culture for being so damn arrogant and ill advised.

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    Tsunami: Japan’s Post-Fukushima Future []  2020-1-3 22:5

    This book was published immediately after the triple disaster of the Tohoku earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear meltdown in Japan in March 2011. It provides broad coverage of the problems Japan was facing with regard to recovery, public policy, government response, and nuclear energy reliance. There is a lot of repetition between the articles, but it does give the reader a amazing sense of the time. Reading this 8 years after the disaster left me wondering which paths Japan chose to pursue. It was a book for a moment in time, and that moment has passed.

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    Fukushima : the First Five Days []  2019-12-23 20:30

    Have read other accounts,theories and time lines on this topic and believe this chronological chain of happenings with clear links to what's event simultaneously at other locations of the plant support one understand when and why critical decisions were made. This book really fills in the blanks. Clear, clean nonlinear thinking by author is evident . I like reading a book that doesn't jump the "logic train" track. Nice work. Interesting theories for undoented time line

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    Fukushima : the First Five Days []  2019-12-23 20:30

    I am not an engineer, so some of this was difficult for me to follow, esp. with the little diagrams. However, it is a useful chronicle of what went wrong and how necessary it is to have a clearly-defined process for establishing and enforcing safety standards, improving reactor design, and responding to emergencies. It also provides insights into the human factors, website selection, and reactor design features that created the accident as poor as it was.

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    Tsunami: Japan’s Post-Fukushima Future []  2020-1-3 22:5

    I found this book informative but in parts it nearly sent me to sleep. Other essays address the happenings at Fukushima Atomic Power: Important Evil or Virtually Uncontrollable Force that's Wrecking the Planet?.

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    Tsunami: Japan’s Post-Fukushima Future []  2020-1-3 22:5

    This is a tremendous collection of essays by 22 scholars, journalists, writers and experts who offer a lot of insights about the tsunami that can't be found anywhere else. One of the compelling strengths is the broad coverage from multiple perspectives, a lot of by Japanese, written in different styles usefully organized by themes. The authors disagree on critical problems while interrogating assumptions and stereotypes and that is the method it should be. Unlike the popular Quakebook, mostly a compilation of impressionistic Tweets from the early post-disaster days and brief celebrity essays offering encouragement and sympathy, this is the first compilation to gather together expert ysis of this multi-faceted disaster. This is first-rate items and delivers in an accessible style for non-spets. Anyone who wants to understand the implications of the 3/11 creature quake and the consequences of the tsunami it unleashed need look no further. The Sutter review quibbles misleadingly and obviously he has his own axes to grind. From the opening short story by Mariko Nagai on the tsunami stones to the final essay by Gavan McCormack on Japan's nuclear energy industry this is a superb book that informs while proceeds go to charities working in Tohoku.

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    Nuclear Physics []  2020-6-29 18:51

    Amazing introductory book

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    Nuclear Cowboy []  2020-7-25 20:14

    Sometimes an album has a poor reputation due to stupid critic's reviews. It happens a lot when an artist take his freedom to experiment and to test fresh things. People and critics are often very jealous of their old prejudices. "Nuclear Cowboy" is just one of those albums. Since the day it came out it had poor rumors. Now that thanks to Amazon and to the unbelievable Japaneses I own this cd, after 7 years of long researches through all the cd I know and cd festivals here in Italy, I can laugh at John Sykes's critics. This record, being his first arranged with electronic loops immediatly woke up the purists. They started to complain that John had sold his soul, that he went crazy, that he was not "heavy metal" anymore, and someone, I don't know who, started to say that Sykes was influenced by Eminem (maybe misinterpretating some words from the man himself who was joking maybe, or saying something various FOR SURE). I remember in 2000, having been UNable to search this record, I tought "Sykes wants to sound like Eminem? Really?! Did our guy went banana?" I couldn't believe it, one of my greatest musical heroes ever, after decades of some of the best metal ever written (Snakes' 1987!!!!!) and after some of the most legendary guitar solos and the wyldest riffs ever recorded now was going for massive gold jewellery and bijioux, impossible tattoos, ridicolous hip hop disco melody rhythmns and rivers of nonsense words? I couldn't believe it. And infact I was right. This album, which should be in critics words, "Sykes meets Eminem", simply (and luckly!!) it's not. It's a John Sykes PURE album and it is, in the most easy words I know, fantastic. FANTASTIC. It's Sykes that simply tried some various arrangements and toyed (very well by the way) with loops and with the possibilities the fresh instruments gave him to dress his music. But the melody remained 100% Sykes, with still the same best lead guitar sound in the world. By the way, there some songs that are traditionally arranged with a regular drummer (sorry can't remember who he is). The looped songs are so Sykes that if you imagine a true band behind him, they simply could be songs from Blue Murder or Nothing but Trouble, maybe a small more modern ... simply there are some programmed bases. So what? It's Sykes men, SYKES! Don't be intimidated by what people say, it's PURE SYKES AT HIS BEST. And if you don't believe me test to listen to the wonderful power ballad we have here the unbelievable "I [email protected]#$%! Would Rain", which in my opinion alone, it deserves the high Japanese ticket price for this album (I know it's a song arranged in the traditional way, but I wanted to say that John's talent is intact). I mean, who can write items of this caliber if not our man, John Sykes?!?!? And what about the creature massive riffs of "We will", "Nuclear Cowboys"? Oh gosh, if I love this man, his talents, his musicianship, his voice, his guitar playing, his composing abilities, his taste, his melody ... to me Sykes is simply untouchable, ... SYKES IS THE MAN.

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    Nuclear Cowboy []  2020-7-25 20:14

    Former guitar player for Whitesnake. He can really play the guitar.

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    Nuclear Physics []  2020-6-29 18:51

    I bought this for my son. He loves it!

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    Nuclear Cowboy []  2020-7-25 20:14

    Not quite sure what to think about this album.I recently saw Sykes with Thin Lizzy on scene and it remimded me that I loved Blue Murder(and Whitesnake and tygers of pan tang,...).It is the first time I listened to a Sykes SOLO album and to be honest I expected something more "classic", massive songs and amazing long guitar solos...Nuclear Cowboy sounds more "modern", lots of drum loops with true drums by Carmine Appice, not that a lot of guitar solos and amazing hard rock songs drowned in e sound is amazing but modern, the songs are amazing but the treatment is not what I expected...I don't quite understand the point of releasing a more"commercial" album when you built your reputation on your guitar skills...still a change is never a completely poor thing.With this album, Sykes follows the path Gary Moore chose for some of his albums (Different beat, dark days in paradise,...)and while I like them I also got sick of them beautiful is might happen with Nuclear Cowboy.If you're a Classic Hard rock kinda guy, pick Blue Murder instead or maybe one of his other solo albums...

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    Nuclear Cowboy []  2020-7-25 20:14

    You might say that this album is overproduced, that it smells too much to hip-hop, nu-metal, industrial and techno; that Sykes' voice sounds a tad dulled here and there... whatever! While it's real that the use of synthesized loops and computer overdubs are extensive in this release, they just serve to give some fresher colors to a picture that still remains as solid as a hard rock. Beyond genres and clichés, I think that this one is a brilliant effort by John Sykes. He managed to give a modern mood to the melody here without compromising his explosive style, and the final effect is no less than r those wondering who John Sykes is, it should be enough saying that he was the guitarist and co-songwriter of the Whitesnake's 1987 mega-successful album. For those knowing who Sykes actually is, well... don't expect another Blue Murder album in "Nuclear Cowboy". You will in fact hear very few from the previous Sykes albums you might know. There is almost nothing from Thin Lizzy, Whitesnake or Blue Murder, apart the flashy soloing, the amazing vocals and the massive riffing. Yes, the guy still showcases his wide-open, deep vibratos and his squealing harmonics; but excluding "We Will" (which does sound beautiful old-school in spite of the modern production) and the ballad "I [email protected]#$%! would rain", this is a fresh John Sykes that you are still to discover. However, if you are a guitar lover don't be worried at all: her majesty the Les Paul proudly screams loud all along this release!So... how the heck does this "Nuclear Cowboy" sound alike after all? Well... I would just say "heavy as hell!", but it wouldn't be enough, as I should also say that it sounds at the same time familiar and different, mainstream and revolutionary, contemporary and bold... Some people will need some time to digest this, as the modern atmosphere can be scary for purists; while some other people will immediately applaud the experiment. For me, this album is more heterogeneous and interesting than the mellow "Loveland", the massive (but slightly monotonous) "20th Century" and the somewhat forgettable "Out of my tree"."Nuclear Cowboy" shows a Sykes at the peak of his songwriting and playing skills, and it's a shame that a lot of people will misunderstand the purpose of this masterpiece. Few times stylistic moves are done without loosing the authenticity and the charm of the original style; but Sykes succeeds in "Nuclear Cowboy" where others fail. This stylistic change is for the good, and he created absolutely no compromise: the essence of the artist is still there! Thus (to conclude, that this is becoming too long ;-)), begin your ears to overcome your prejudices and take a listen to this criminally overlooked (and underpromoted!) work of art. Five freaking stars!

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    Nuclear Cowboy []  2020-7-25 20:14

    A bit strange and very special rock and roll. I equate this as a need to find out for fresh sounds and incorporate them into rock and roll related to how Kip Winger has done with his solo career without the vast layers of orchestration. John Sykes does things with a guitar you won't hear anyplace else.

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    Nuclear Physics []  2020-6-29 18:51

    Outdated but crystal clear

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    Nuclear Cowboy []  2020-7-25 20:14

    Nuclear Cowboy is another awesome release from Sykes containing massive riffs, interesting songs, amazing solos, and a bit of additional production. John Sykes is a real guitar God and an awesome songwriter that produces very creative albums. This album is a small various to what you're used to hearing from John Sykes as it includes alot of electronic production including drum loops and techno tinged percussion but it is still a amazing CD from an wonderful musician. You won't be dissapointed with anything that Sykes produces. Highlights contain the assassin riffs of "Arc Angel", the moody track "Talking 'bout Love", and check out the attractive power ballad on here called "I [email protected]#$%! Would Rain" - pure Sykes with a heavy solo with his signature vibrato! Nuclear Cowboy is highly recommended to all fans of John Sykes willing to follow him into a slightly weird style of rock music.

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    Nuclear Cowboy []  2020-7-25 20:14

    You might say that this album is overproduced, that it smells too much to hip-hop, nu-metal, industrial and techno; that Sykes' voice sounds a tad dulled here and there... whatever! While it's real that the use of synthesized loops and computer overdubs are extensive in this release, they just serve to give some fresher colors to a picture that still remains as solid as a hard rock. Beyond genres and clichés, I think that this one is a brilliant effort by John Sykes. He managed to give a modern mood to the melody here without compromising his explosive style, and the final effect is no less than r those wondering who John Sykes is, it should be enough saying that he was the guitarist and co-songwriter of the Whitesnake's 1987 mega-successful album. For those knowing who Sykes actually is, well... don't expect another Blue Murder album in "Nuclear Cowboy". You will in fact hear very few from the previous Sykes albums you might know. There is almost nothing from Thin Lizzy, Whitesnake or Blue Murder, apart the flashy soloing, the amazing vocals and the massive riffing. Yes, the guy still showcases his wide-open, deep vibratos and his squealing harmonics; but excluding "We Will" (which does sound beautiful old-school in spite of the modern production) and the ballad "I [email protected]#$%! would rain", this is a fresh John Sykes that you are still to discover. However, if you are a guitar lover don't be worried at all: her majesty the Les Paul proudly screams loud all along this release!So... how the heck does this "Nuclear Cowboy" sound alike after all? Well... I would just say "heavy as hell!", but it wouldn't be enough, as I should also say that it sounds at the same time familiar and different, mainstream and revolutionary, contemporary and bold... Some people will need some time to digest this, as the modern atmosphere can be scary for purists; while some other people will immediately applaud the experiment. For me, this album is more heterogeneous and interesting than the mellow "Loveland", the massive (but slightly monotonous) "20th Century" and the somewhat forgettable "Out of my tree"."Nuclear Cowboy" shows a Sykes at the peak of his songwriting and playing skills, and it's a shame that a lot of people will misunderstand the purpose of this masterpiece. Few times stylistic moves are done without loosing the authenticity and the charm of the original style; but Sykes succeeds in "Nuclear Cowboy" where others fail. This stylistic change is for the good, and he created absolutely no compromise: the essence of the artist is still there! Thus (to conclude, that this is becoming too long ;-)), begin your ears to overcome your prejudices and take a listen to this criminally overlooked (and underpromoted!) work of art. Five freaking stars!

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    Nuclear Cowboy []  2020-7-25 20:14

    I kind of lost track of John Sykes over the latest 6 or 7 years. Previously I had followed his career from the NWOBHM band Tygers of Pan Tang, through his triumphant stint at revitalizing Thin Lizzy during the Thunder and Lightning period, and then on to hair band greatness in Whitesnake. I think I was one of the first persons on Earth to buy the first Blue Murder CD. I was really surprised at that time to search out that John is a amazing rock and roll singer in addtion to his wonderful guitar talent.Unfortunately for John, Blue Murder was breaking out at the same time a little trio from Seattle was about to change the entire landscape of rock music. You may have heard of them . . . Nirvana. Consequently, Geffen only modestly promoted the first Blue Murder CD and place in almost nothing on their second effort Nothing But Trouble. After that the John Sykes releases seem to have been Japan only releases. It's not a cliche, the Japanese really do know amazing interest in John came back to the forefront after seeing him perform with the reformed Thin Lizzy in early 2001 (simply awesome). By browsing this website I discovered he had more in his catalog that I did not own. I decided to spend more than a few bucks and obtain up to date. Of the 4 CDs I purchased (Out Of My Tree, Loveland, 20th Century, and Nuclear Cowboy), Out Of My Tree and Nuclear Cowboy are my favorites. But Nuclear Cowboy is a very various CD for John. I'm here to tell you clear Cowboy is a hybrid of John Sykes blues based metal and industrial rock. It really works for me. It did however take a few spins through the disc for me to really obtain into it. It is not as melodic as his previous works, but it does have melodic hooks to it. The programming is not nearly as dominant as say a Filter or Nine Inch Nails CD, but adds a texture that is really new and cool. This is a very credible effort by John and not just a feeble attempt to stay relevant in the 21st century. John peforms all vocal and guitar chores as well as bass guitar on half the tracks. Carmine Appice handles most of the drumming chores. Carmine's pedigree is well established and he does his usual amazing job. Wisely, John tapped Marco Mendoza to play bass on the other half of the tracks. I really like Marco and apparently so does John since he has been with him since 1992. Marco is a really versatile musician and can play everything from bone crushing back beats to fretless bass melodies.Highlights for me contain We Will, and Nuclear Cowboy which are the most industrial influenced tracks, as well as Nothing Means Nothing and One Method System which are straight ahead rockers. The ballad I [email protected]#$%! Would Rain has one of the most attractive bass melodies I have ever heard. Nice job Marco! One of the first reviews of this title suggested that John's solos are unstructured and improvised. I'm not sure I completely agree with that assessment. For sure, a lot of of these are not traditional Sykes guitar solos, but they do fit the mood and overall texture of the songs. In my opinion, this is a really well thought out and executed effort. Too poor this is a self-produced CD that will not obtain the promotion and success it deserves. Hopefully web reviews like this can partially overcome this disadvantage. Otherwise, we can expect another 5 - 10 years of "boy bands" and "teen queens" being shoved down our throats by the recording industry. God support us all.

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    Nuclear Cowboy []  2020-7-25 20:14

    He has the chops, he has the looks, he certainly has paid his dues but...the songs just ain't there folks!Sure, this release thunders like the Mighty Thor, the players and production are sharpe, but in the end, the songs are just ere are nods to alot of influences throughout the tracks from Nine Inch Nails to Whitesnake, but overall this listener grew bored after only a few listens. Skyes could really use a writing partner and then maybe something truly amazing might happen. Alone, there is no one to tell him: that doesn't work, change this, test that...in other words he suffers from the solo artist syndrome that befalls so a lot of artists who have no one to bounce ideas off of - they place out mediocre items and think it's great!...I will still check this guy out in the future, but will be cautious about buying him again.

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    Nuclear Cowboy []  2020-7-25 20:14

    Sykes does a amazing job of using electronic rhythms to place his songs and riffs in a various light. Unlike contemporary albums from Jeff Beck, Joe Satriani, and others, Sykes uses more true drums with his loops so that the electronics remain a flavor rather than THE flavor. On the other hand, this combination limits how far out he can go, and the melody isn't as experimental as one might expect. I search the songwriting here better than on 20th Century as there are largely better lyrics and more variation in tempo. Sykes' guitar is unbelievable as always. "I [email protected]#$%! Would Rain" is one of his all-time best songs.

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    Crisis Response [App]  2020-4-1 13:49

    Very engaging. Interesting story.

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    Inner Crisis []  2020-8-24 19:57

    This review is for the cd I received not the melody as it’s timeless classic. The CD I received look like as it copy ! or not issued by the company of the artist ( sorry for my poor English ), I’m a cd collector and love all my cds original with the booklet, story and history of the album and nothing in there on this cd I received! I trust buying from amazon but this cd finishing not good. Again the review is for the cd not for the amazing artist and his classic music.

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    Global Crisis []  2020-8-8 18:45

    After a couple of scattershot chapters it gets into a country by country history and does a major service to the historical discourse by adding in the meal production and taxation effects as the happenings unfolded. It was also fascinating to look across cultures at the same time: the Chinese, Russian, Ottoman, and European, amongst others, to see that all faced severe weather similar problems, but often reacted differently. Recommended for those who are interested in how human society survived and progressed in a particularly trying century.

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    Global Crisis []  2020-8-8 18:45

    A heavy book that is clearly written and ties The 30 Years War, Plagues, Revolutions around the world, and population crises and crash together. Not a Grand Theory book so much as it is an impressive mining of a lot of sources of data to explain how and why the Western Globe changed so radically and the Enlightenment and technological developments exploded in the 18th Century.

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    Global Crisis []  2020-8-8 18:45

    This amazing book by Geoffrey Parker was for me, as a Dutchman, a true eye opener. We were always taught at school that the 17th century was called Holland’s Golden Century (Gouden Eeuw). But halfway through this century the Dutch Provinces lost their global influence in trade and their society slit into relative poverty. All this happened rather quickly and has been incomprehensible for many. Parker, in a very captivating way, place this global era in a completely fresh perspective. He not only describes the effects sudden climate change had on society. Like failing crops, there for no meal for the population, with the effect that 30% of society just starved. The bottom third of the global population was pushed over the cliff. But also describes, in a very fascinating way, how governments and policy makers muddled through this period. Because of their total lack: of understanding, info and communication. Today we know more and understand more and we have constant actual info we can communicate instantly. I sincerely hope that today’s governments and policy-makers read this book, so we will do better with the eminent climate change we have on our doorstep today.

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    Global Crisis []  2020-8-8 18:45

    The 17th century appears to be the most calamitous century ever recorded in history. The author does an perfect job of researching this century, its happenings and the impact and the ysis is also e author covers all the happenings of the 17th century, including the wars, the revolutions, the droughts, the major weather events, etc. Further, he lays out the impact of these happenings on the people who experienced it. Apparently, due to the happenings of this century, the population of the planet declined 33% with some locations experiencing even worse declines, e.g. China close to 50% and e reasons for this, the author claims, and provides an perfect rationale to help his conclusions, starts with the worst climate of recorded history. The 17th century experienced some of the coldest months and years on record, some of the driest months and years, some of the wetest months and years, etc. One of the main reasons, apparently, was due to the lack of sun spots. However, El Nino raised its ugly head also to impact the weather differently in various regions of the world.Further, instead of trying to support out their citizens, the 17th century had more battles and longer battles than another century in recorded history. There were only three years in Europe where a battle was not being fought. And, there was the 30 years battle that totally depopulated parts of Germany and which is still consider by a lot of Germans to be the most calamitous period of German history (even beyond WWII). And, then there was the overthrow of the Ming dynasty in China that resulted in a large depopulation of that country.And, these wars, droughts, etc., and the resulting hunger and crushing taxes, resulted in rebellions and revolts. The most recognized one is the English Civil Battle (and Cromwell) which resulted in the only time that the English executed their monarch, King James I. But there were a lot of others, including a lot of parts of the Spanish empire, including Barcelona, Portugal and Naples. These revolts appear to have caused the begin of the decline of me, much of the book was fresh and interesting. However, this is a long and can be challenging read. And, the author often takes direct quotes from first persons, especially English, and these comments are horribly misspelled making it even harder to read. Finally, the conclusions - linking the 17th century to today was a stretch. We don't have anywhere near the amount of battles and revolutions occurring and we have the United Nations as a forum to handle these issues. And, whether we are as unprepared for climate change is spite of some the challenges, I do recommend this book for anyone interested in history. To me, this was worth the investment in cash and time.

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    Global Crisis []  2020-8-8 18:45

    Purchased for college. Amazing price, came with no damage. Highly recommend.

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    Crisis Messenger [App]  2021-1-22 21:8

    No need for data roaming so very cost effective, and reliable around the world!

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    Global Crisis []  2020-8-8 18:45

    This is a large and fascinating book about the amazing crisis of the 17th century. The author is perhaps the greatest living historian of 16th-17th century Iberia, and here he expands his scope to the entire world. He draws connections to the disruptive climate (weather) of the time, one of the temperature troughs in the multi-century Small Ice Age, which is valid, and he avoids overstating his case as most climate fighters seem to do. There are plenty of lessons for today, both climate-related and otherwise (like, tax revolts in France, very current as I write in January 2019). I note that as for climate, all the historical yses I have seen, including this one, emphasize the poor effects of COOLING, not WARMING. To the extent we expect climate to change (and it is always doing something), we should expect there to be disruptions in human activity, pluses and minuses.

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