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    Go Ahead and Backup and Other Railroad Stories []  2021-4-7 20:34

    Amazing true globe stories.

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories: Revised Edition (True Railroad Stories Book 1) []  2019-12-24 20:12

    I knew a Penn Central/Conrail guy from Toledo and learned lots from him as an engineer on the WCL. Time goes by too quickly and the railroad is not what it used to be.

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories: Revised Edition (True Railroad Stories Book 1) []  2019-12-24 20:12

    An interesting collection of railroad stories and why all real railroaders must be rail fans as who else would place up with the job

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories (True Railroad Stories) (Volume 1) []  2020-1-30 22:58

    A career in railroading, from the rail to the engineer's seat

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories (True Railroad Stories) (Volume 1) []  2020-1-30 22:58

    To anyone who loves some amazing stories this is a amazing book. To someone that understands theoperations of daily railroad life, this is an awesome book. I was able to relate to all of theexperiences and found myself laughing aloud several times. Very nicely compliments to the author.

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories (True Railroad Stories) (Volume 1) []  2020-1-30 22:58

    An interesting collection of railroad stories and why all real railroaders must be rail fans as who else would place up with the job

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories: Revised Edition (True Railroad Stories Book 1) []  2019-12-24 20:12

    A career in railroading, from the rail to the engineer's seat

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories: Revised Edition (True Railroad Stories Book 1) []  2019-12-24 20:12

    Interesting railroading book

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories (True Railroad Stories) (Volume 1) []  2020-1-30 22:58

    I had previously read Chuck's stories in Classic Trains Magazine. So this compilation of stories was nice to see. He is a real railroader and I hope he continues to share his career with readers like me who never got to go railroading.

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories (True Railroad Stories) (Volume 1) []  2020-1-30 22:58

    Really amazing stories. Recommended for train buffs everywhere!

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories: Revised Edition (True Railroad Stories Book 1) []  2019-12-24 20:12

    I had previously read Chuck's stories in Classic Trains Magazine. So this compilation of stories was nice to see. He is a real railroader and I hope he continues to share his career with readers like me who never got to go railroading.

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories: Revised Edition (True Railroad Stories Book 1) []  2019-12-24 20:12

    You obtain the crazy thimgs that pass asModern railroading, GREAT read, never a dull moment on the railroad ,love this book

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories (True Railroad Stories) (Volume 1) []  2020-1-30 22:58

    I knew a Penn Central/Conrail guy from Toledo and learned lots from him as an engineer on the WCL. Time goes by too quickly and the railroad is not what it used to be.

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories (True Railroad Stories) (Volume 1) []  2020-1-30 22:58

    Interesting railroading book

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories: Revised Edition (True Railroad Stories Book 1) []  2019-12-24 20:12

    A amazing collection of experiences, from working in the , to being called as a baggage handler on a passenger train, to being the Engineer, from early 1970's to 2011, in the greater Detroit area. Gives a real insight in one's life, working in the Railroad industry.

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories: Revised Edition (True Railroad Stories Book 1) []  2019-12-24 20:12

    Really amazing stories. Recommended for train buffs everywhere!

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories (True Railroad Stories) (Volume 1) []  2020-1-30 22:58

    A amazing collection of experiences, from working in the , to being called as a baggage handler on a passenger train, to being the Engineer, from early 1970's to 2011, in the greater Detroit area. Gives a real insight in one's life, working in the Railroad industry.

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories (True Railroad Stories) (Volume 1) []  2020-1-30 22:58

    This book arrived within days of placing order. I would begin it at random, begin reading and not be able to place it down. Read it cover to cover within a week and will hold it handy so I can return to it . Amazing read for a foamer. Five stars.

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories (True Railroad Stories) (Volume 1) []  2020-1-30 22:58

    You obtain the crazy thimgs that pass asModern railroading, GREAT read, never a dull moment on the railroad ,love this book

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories: Revised Edition (True Railroad Stories Book 1) []  2019-12-24 20:12

    To anyone who loves some amazing stories this is a amazing book. To someone that understands theoperations of daily railroad life, this is an awesome book. I was able to relate to all of theexperiences and found myself laughing aloud several times. Very nicely compliments to the author.

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    When Deadhead Counted As Rest and Other Railroad Stories: Revised Edition (True Railroad Stories Book 1) []  2019-12-24 20:12

    This book arrived within days of placing order. I would begin it at random, begin reading and not be able to place it down. Read it cover to cover within a week and will hold it handy so I can return to it . Amazing read for a foamer. Five stars.

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    Don't Flush in the Station and Other Railroad Stories []  2020-7-5 18:37

    Unbelievable book with perfect stories. Really gives insight into the daily lives of railroad men and women. Doents an era that has changed dramatically.

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    Don't Flush in the Station and Other Railroad Stories []  2020-7-5 18:37

    This book captures the heart and soul of “real railroading” featuring short stories from lifelong RR’er Chuck Geletzke Jr and other railroaders who contributed to his book. It is an insider’s look at an industry that had a heritage and language all of its own, and has sadly disappeared within the latest 10 years or so. Reading this book is the closest thing to climbing aboard a caboose and riding along to the past days when RR’ers worked in all sorts of weather and got their trains over the street with blood, sweat and tears, but also shared a camaraderie and sense of humor that resonates in its stories— a amazing read!

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    Don't Flush in the Station and Other Railroad Stories []  2020-7-5 18:37

    amazing hero portrayals, a few more maps would be ry related to his other books, also enjoyable. please do some more

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    Don't Flush in the Station and Other Railroad Stories []  2020-7-5 18:37

    This is a collection of really not good short stories, written or edited in a formulaic fashion. Virtually none of the stories would be of interest even to rail-fans. A lot of of the stories are two pages long that really amount to one liners in most people's everyday conversation. The pages are in reasonably huge type for those of us that need it, and almost double spaced. This combination results in a book that is physically bigger than is important for a normal paperback. I would not recommend this book even to the most ardent rail-fan. The only caveat I might add, is that a rail-history buff might search an odd instance in these stories that might help some project or other, but not because the book makes amazing reading.

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    Railroad Stories From The EJ&E Railroad and a few others []  2021-1-19 20:22

    It brings back a nostalgic memory.... Reading the stories, I look back and I can almost smell the summer breezes as it whips through an EJ&E rusted engine. A must have

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    Railroad Stories From The EJ&E Railroad and a few others []  2021-1-19 20:22

    The stories are real to the railroaders life. Actually felt the comradery oozing from the pages. A must have for any J, or any railroad enthusiast.

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    Railroad Stories From The EJ&E Railroad and a few others []  2021-1-19 20:22

    I purchased this book for my husband who worked for the EJ&E Railway. It was delivered today and he has been reading it all day. Very simple to read!

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    Railroad Stories From The EJ&E Railroad and a few others []  2021-1-19 20:22

    I really enjoyed this book. The author provides 155 short stories about various situations on the Elgin Joliet & Eastern Railway. Most of us non-railroaders don't really know what its like to work on the railroad. William O'Neal Stringer pulls back the curtain and shares the silly, the stupid, the satisfying and the struggles of being being a amazing employee and competent railroader.

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    Railroad Stories From The EJ&E Railroad and a few others []  2021-1-19 20:22

    Well written and to the point. You can visualize it . Thanks brother 🚂

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    Bloodchild: And Other Stories []  2020-2-5 0:55

    I feel it is a not good sin of omission on my part that until now I have never read any works by Octavia Butler.I mean, sure, everyone has their gaps in their reading history, where there's an author here or there who you've always meant to obtain round to reading but just haven't. But Butler has been a glaring hole in my reading - until e freely admits in her introduction to this short story collection that novels are where her heart truly belongs, but this is a amazing method to delve into her writing, a gentle starter with the main course ready and waiting to follow, if you ere are seven stories and two essays in this collection, kicking off with the award-winning title story. Bloodchild is a complex story of interdependent relationships, with humans being used as hosts to nurse the infants of an alien species, but at a cost. There are questions of what one is willing to exchange in order to survive, problems of abusive relationships and private sacrifice, all heady subjects swirling within the confines of a short ard-winner that it is, though, personally I prefer another story in the collection, The Evening and the Morning and the Night. It's a story of a society where a made to cure ailments such as cancer has after-effects, with the descendants of those who took the affected by a condition which can cause them to "drift", losing touch with the society around them and slipping into risky psychosis. Told from the perspective of the kids affected by this disorder, as they face a future which seems inevitably to slip towards madness and death, it's a deeply poignant tale of how society deals with those it cannot cope with, and what happens to those individuals themselves - whether they can carve out their own future in a globe that offers them ese two stories stand out above the others, but there's still plenty of amazing reading to be had in the collection. There's no binding theme - though a recurring focus is on problems of biology and illness. One nice feature is that each story has notes after it with the author detailing her thoughts on the tale. For example, she addresses the fact that a lot of think Bloodchild is about slavery - it isn't, though talk in the story of selling people tips that way. It's more complex than that, though, and very much worth discovering if, like me, you've been lagging behind on exploring Butler's work.

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    Bloodchild: And Other Stories []  2020-2-5 0:55

    After reading a portion of "Bloodchild" in a Hugo Award "snippet" book earlier this year, I picked up Octavia E. Butler's "Bloodchild: And Other Stories." For an author who claimed to hate writing short stories, her talent at sharing glimpses into a possible future shine through in this om stories about a post-alien landing on Earth to humans who have traveled to other universes themselves, we see the desperation and drive that is ever-present in history and will continue into the future. This collection of short stories really drives home the fact that humans will always BE human and will always shine through no matter how difficult or dark the cirtances are. Our compassion may be hidden in some, but there will always be someone caring. One of my favorites stories is "Speech Sounds," where we see a woman struggling to hide a secret while protecting herself from the globe surrounding her. "The Book of Martha" is the latest tale told, highlighting how impossible it is to create a Utopia that everyone will be satisfied with... and a special solution discovered along that way.About halfway through the collection, we take a look into the past as we see a young Octavia struggling to create her method as an author... not only a science-fiction author, but a black female science-fiction author. As a young girl born black, in the south, poor, and in the 1940s, we see the determination of a woman who wouldn't take NO for an answer. She should be an inspiration to all aspiring authors.Overall, I was very satisfied with this collection. It was amazing to view the globe through Octavia E. Butler's eyes, and I can see why she won both Hugo and Nebula Awards. When she passed away in 2006, the science-fiction community lost a unbelievable and talented storyteller, though her dreams will follow us into the future.

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    Bloodchild and Other Stories []  2020-1-16 10:59

    I feel it is a not good sin of omission on my part that until now I have never read any works by Octavia Butler.I mean, sure, everyone has their gaps in their reading history, where there's an author here or there who you've always meant to obtain round to reading but just haven't. But Butler has been a glaring hole in my reading - until e freely admits in her introduction to this short story collection that novels are where her heart truly belongs, but this is a amazing method to delve into her writing, a gentle starter with the main course ready and waiting to follow, if you ere are seven stories and two essays in this collection, kicking off with the award-winning title story. Bloodchild is a complex story of interdependent relationships, with humans being used as hosts to nurse the infants of an alien species, but at a cost. There are questions of what one is willing to exchange in order to survive, problems of abusive relationships and private sacrifice, all heady subjects swirling within the confines of a short ard-winner that it is, though, personally I prefer another story in the collection, The Evening and the Morning and the Night. It's a story of a society where a made to cure ailments such as cancer has after-effects, with the descendants of those who took the affected by a condition which can cause them to "drift", losing touch with the society around them and slipping into risky psychosis. Told from the perspective of the kids affected by this disorder, as they face a future which seems inevitably to slip towards madness and death, it's a deeply poignant tale of how society deals with those it cannot cope with, and what happens to those individuals themselves - whether they can carve out their own future in a globe that offers them ese two stories stand out above the others, but there's still plenty of amazing reading to be had in the collection. There's no binding theme - though a recurring focus is on problems of biology and illness. One nice feature is that each story has notes after it with the author detailing her thoughts on the tale. For example, she addresses the fact that a lot of think Bloodchild is about slavery - it isn't, though talk in the story of selling people tips that way. It's more complex than that, though, and very much worth discovering if, like me, you've been lagging behind on exploring Butler's work.

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    Bloodchild and Other Stories []  2020-1-16 10:59

    After reading a portion of "Bloodchild" in a Hugo Award "snippet" book earlier this year, I picked up Octavia E. Butler's "Bloodchild: And Other Stories." For an author who claimed to hate writing short stories, her talent at sharing glimpses into a possible future shine through in this om stories about a post-alien landing on Earth to humans who have traveled to other universes themselves, we see the desperation and drive that is ever-present in history and will continue into the future. This collection of short stories really drives home the fact that humans will always BE human and will always shine through no matter how difficult or dark the cirtances are. Our compassion may be hidden in some, but there will always be someone caring. One of my favorites stories is "Speech Sounds," where we see a woman struggling to hide a secret while protecting herself from the globe surrounding her. "The Book of Martha" is the latest tale told, highlighting how impossible it is to create a Utopia that everyone will be satisfied with... and a special solution discovered along that way.About halfway through the collection, we take a look into the past as we see a young Octavia struggling to create her method as an author... not only a science-fiction author, but a black female science-fiction author. As a young girl born black, in the south, poor, and in the 1940s, we see the determination of a woman who wouldn't take NO for an answer. She should be an inspiration to all aspiring authors.Overall, I was very satisfied with this collection. It was amazing to view the globe through Octavia E. Butler's eyes, and I can see why she won both Hugo and Nebula Awards. When she passed away in 2006, the science-fiction community lost a unbelievable and talented storyteller, though her dreams will follow us into the future.

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    Homeland and Other Stories []  2021-4-6 23:13

    Some of the stories were hard to dicipher. But others I really liked.

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    Bloodchild and Other Stories []  2020-1-16 10:59

    I’ve been on such a lengthy and satisfying short story kick, I was delighted when a lovely mate told me that Octavia Butler had published her own collection of short stories. I picked up a copy straight away and enjoyed it from cover to cover – and not just the stories, but how Butler took a moment at the end of each of them to reflect on them with brief afterwards. There is some seriously visionary content event in these stories – even more so when you realize most were written in the late 70s and 80s and are reminded how small today is actually original. Apologies to Ms Butler if this offends the ghost of a brilliant novelist, but I would happily watch TV series based on “Bloodchild,” “The Evening and the Morning and the Night,” “Speechsounds,” or “Amnesty.” Actually, I just wish more of “The Evening and the Morning and the Night” and “Amnesty” in any form. I also particularly appreciated “Positive Obsession” and “Furor Scribendi,” one an autobiographical essay about Butler determination to become a professional writer, the other an essay about the challenges of writing and six rules for fresh or struggling writers, which boil down to one radiant piece of guidance for so a lot of dreams: Persist.

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    Bloodchild and Other Stories []  2020-1-16 10:59

    The 2005 expanded edition of Butler's only collection of short fiction includes the original five stories and two essays, plus two extra stories published in 2003. Each story is remarkable for its succinct, raw power, and the collection, while slight, is impressive for its variety. There's more going on here in seven stories than a lot of more prolific writers offer in a lifetime. Two of the earlier stories are not science fiction; one is a "sympathetic [that is, non-judgmental] story of incest" inspired by different biblical examples; the other is a story about a working woman "turning to alcohol." And Butler wrote an afterword for each selection, explaining its inspiration, meaning, and put in her oeuvre. In one of the two essays, she recalls how an exasperated writing teacher asked her, "Can't you write anything normal?" The answer, happily, is though the most popular piece is "Bloodchild" (Butler's "pregnant man story"), for my cash the gem of the book is "Speech Sounds," about a woman who has mysteriously retained her functions of speech after a deadly disease has robbed nearly all the surviving population of the ability to communicate. (The primary set-up reminds me a small of Saramago's "Blindness," which was of course written much later.) The mute survivors attack the healthy for their "superiority" and so even those who can speak are forced to be silent and armed. The woman struggles to survive in the anarchic violence of a globe "where the only likely common language was body language."The final selection, "The Book of Martha" (one of the stories written in 2003), also shows why, five years after her death, Butler continues to be regarded as one of the best of science fiction writers. An extended dialogue between a woman and God, it is Butler's "utopia story," but her take on the excellent globe explains much about why the ironies in her fiction still resonate: "I don't like most utopia stories because I don't believe them for a moment. It seems inevitable that my utopia would be someone else's hell." There is some ver of heaven or hell for every reader in each one of these stories, but all of them are immaculately rendered.

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    Bloodchild: And Other Stories []  2020-2-5 0:55

    I’ve been on such a lengthy and satisfying short story kick, I was delighted when a lovely mate told me that Octavia Butler had published her own collection of short stories. I picked up a copy straight away and enjoyed it from cover to cover – and not just the stories, but how Butler took a moment at the end of each of them to reflect on them with brief afterwards. There is some seriously visionary content event in these stories – even more so when you realize most were written in the late 70s and 80s and are reminded how small today is actually original. Apologies to Ms Butler if this offends the ghost of a brilliant novelist, but I would happily watch TV series based on “Bloodchild,” “The Evening and the Morning and the Night,” “Speechsounds,” or “Amnesty.” Actually, I just wish more of “The Evening and the Morning and the Night” and “Amnesty” in any form. I also particularly appreciated “Positive Obsession” and “Furor Scribendi,” one an autobiographical essay about Butler determination to become a professional writer, the other an essay about the challenges of writing and six rules for fresh or struggling writers, which boil down to one radiant piece of guidance for so a lot of dreams: Persist.

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    Bloodchild: And Other Stories []  2020-2-5 0:55

    I had a "Bloodchild" nightmare the other night, so that bumped this work up in my TBR queue, hoping to search perhaps a satisfied t really, but then there weren't really UNhappy endings, either. Butler's stories challenge the mind - what price would humans pay to have a colony on another globe where giant insectoids were the dominant species (Bloodchild)? What if a that cured cancer led to unexpected side effects in the offspring of the descendants, a really horrific disease that led to self-mutilation and murder? How about a worldwide virus that robbed humankind either of the ability to speak, or the ability to read, or both (but not the memory of being able to do so)?Brilliantly written, the stories totally drew me in, and a unbelievable gift in this edition is that there is a short afterword by the author to each story: here's what I was thinking, here's what I based X on, here's where this train of thought led me. It's almost as if we obtain to discuss the stories with the author herself, which is amazing since Ms. Butler has since passed and we CAN'T ask her in ere are also two autobiographical sketches about the author and her private writing journey. Sci-fi and fantasy were long the domain of white men, and here's this writer who was not only a woman, but a BLACK woman, leaping into the field and winning Hugos and Nebulas. (She also experienced the usual writer drought of a lot of rejection slips and LONG gaps between sales.)Brilliant, haunting stories, this book is a classic that everyone should read.

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    Bloodchild: And Other Stories []  2020-2-5 0:55

    Bloodchild is a mixed bag of fiction and non-fiction that is an perfect introduction to both the private and the creative sides of Butler. She is able to make believable near-future imaginings that are highly detailed and yet vague, but also powerfully different. She invents some of the most creatively thought out aliens, yet does so with gorgeous prose. I also loved her essays on the role of race in her development as a person and as a writer. Highly recommend.

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    Homeland and Other Stories []  2021-4-6 23:13

    The BEST story is Homeland. Poetic. Attractive writing that BK is known for, unbelievable story and characters that stay with you long after. The stories that followed I could not hear her voice; they were common. I love this author, this is early work yes, but obtain this just for the first story. Its perfect.

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    Bloodchild and Other Stories []  2020-1-16 10:59

    I had a "Bloodchild" nightmare the other night, so that bumped this work up in my TBR queue, hoping to search perhaps a satisfied t really, but then there weren't really UNhappy endings, either. Butler's stories challenge the mind - what price would humans pay to have a colony on another globe where giant insectoids were the dominant species (Bloodchild)? What if a that cured cancer led to unexpected side effects in the offspring of the descendants, a really horrific disease that led to self-mutilation and murder? How about a worldwide virus that robbed humankind either of the ability to speak, or the ability to read, or both (but not the memory of being able to do so)?Brilliantly written, the stories totally drew me in, and a unbelievable gift in this edition is that there is a short afterword by the author to each story: here's what I was thinking, here's what I based X on, here's where this train of thought led me. It's almost as if we obtain to discuss the stories with the author herself, which is amazing since Ms. Butler has since passed and we CAN'T ask her in ere are also two autobiographical sketches about the author and her private writing journey. Sci-fi and fantasy were long the domain of white men, and here's this writer who was not only a woman, but a BLACK woman, leaping into the field and winning Hugos and Nebulas. (She also experienced the usual writer drought of a lot of rejection slips and LONG gaps between sales.)Brilliant, haunting stories, this book is a classic that everyone should read.

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    Bloodchild: And Other Stories []  2020-2-5 0:55

    The 2005 expanded edition of Butler's only collection of short fiction includes the original five stories and two essays, plus two extra stories published in 2003. Each story is remarkable for its succinct, raw power, and the collection, while slight, is impressive for its variety. There's more going on here in seven stories than a lot of more prolific writers offer in a lifetime. Two of the earlier stories are not science fiction; one is a "sympathetic [that is, non-judgmental] story of incest" inspired by different biblical examples; the other is a story about a working woman "turning to alcohol." And Butler wrote an afterword for each selection, explaining its inspiration, meaning, and put in her oeuvre. In one of the two essays, she recalls how an exasperated writing teacher asked her, "Can't you write anything normal?" The answer, happily, is though the most popular piece is "Bloodchild" (Butler's "pregnant man story"), for my cash the gem of the book is "Speech Sounds," about a woman who has mysteriously retained her functions of speech after a deadly disease has robbed nearly all the surviving population of the ability to communicate. (The primary set-up reminds me a small of Saramago's "Blindness," which was of course written much later.) The mute survivors attack the healthy for their "superiority" and so even those who can speak are forced to be silent and armed. The woman struggles to survive in the anarchic violence of a globe "where the only likely common language was body language."The final selection, "The Book of Martha" (one of the stories written in 2003), also shows why, five years after her death, Butler continues to be regarded as one of the best of science fiction writers. An extended dialogue between a woman and God, it is Butler's "utopia story," but her take on the excellent globe explains much about why the ironies in her fiction still resonate: "I don't like most utopia stories because I don't believe them for a moment. It seems inevitable that my utopia would be someone else's hell." There is some ver of heaven or hell for every reader in each one of these stories, but all of them are immaculately rendered.

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    Homeland and Other Stories []  2021-4-6 23:13

    Got as a bonus for my parents who loved Poisonwood Bible. They did not like this one...said it's about hippie .

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    Homeland and Other Stories []  2021-4-6 23:13

    These are unbelievable stories of people that we may recognize or at least feel that we may know them. Barbara Kingsolver delivers again.

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    Bloodchild and Other Stories []  2020-1-16 10:59

    Bloodchild and Other Stories was my introduction to Butler’s writing, and it reflects a masterful (and masterfully-thoughtful) writer. This collection features every short story — and two essays — that Octavia Butler wrote between 1971 and 2003. At just over 200 pages, that’s not many, and she herself admits to not being a writer or fan of short stories in her comments.### ‘Bloodchild’ (1984)I should search the title story, ‘Bloodchild,’ cheesy, with its insect-like aliens and technological magic: It’s steeped in old-fashioned sci-fi cheese without ever getting drowned in the magic and wonder writers like Bradbury relied on.[N.B. This review features photos and formatting specific to my book site, dendrobibliography: Check it out here.]‘Bloodchild’ is about a future where humanity has come under the control and protection of a space-faring species most akin to preying mantises and spiders. They’re benevolent, but still very clearly in charge. Humanity is, coincidentally, an ideal host species for the Tilc’s larva; human families live on vast preserves, and are free to live as long as they supply one kid per family as an N’Tilc — a host of Tilc is is an uncomfortable story, and infinitely imaginative. Humanity is conflicted about this — it is a sort of slavery, after all. The hosts form close bonds with their Tilc partners, but the host process is violent, painful, gory, and can easily lead to the host’s death if they’re not careful.‘Bloodchild’ never quite focuses on that, however. This story is all about the bond of human boy and his Tilc partner; in forming a loving relationship despite the requisite pain and suffering.### ‘The Evening and the Morning and the Night’ (1987)‘The Evening and the Morning and the Night’ continues the first story’s excellence, introducing a genetic disorder that causes unpredictably violent and suicidal behavior in those affected by it. Society, being how it is, punishes those born with this genetic disorder, pushing them to the outskirts of society much as our culture silently does with unique needs individuals (which, of course, exacerbates their condition, turning the violence into a cycle). Like ‘Bloodchild,’ this story is needed reading.### ‘Near of Kin’ (1979), ‘Speech Sounds’ (1983), and ‘Crossover’ (1971)The original edition of Bloodchild and Other Stories only had three more stories, all shorter and less consistent. ‘Near of Kin’ and ‘Crossover’ aren’t sci-fi, and are brief moments in the lives of fragmenting families: In ‘Near of Kin,’ a young woman goes through her mother’s belongings after she passes away. She reflects on her not good relationship with her mom, and of her better, if timid, relationship with her living uncle — who, it’s suggested, is her dad. ‘Crossover,’ Butler’s first-published story (1971), follows a young, miserable woman struggling with an abusive boyfriend, a miserable job, and thoughts of suicide. These two aren’t bad, but didn’t leave much of an impression.‘Speech Sounds’ is a fairly standard mid-’80s post-apocalyptic story. The world’s social order has broken down after a virus causes every living person to either lose their ability to speak or read/write. Each group — speakers and readers — is led by jealousy and problem communicating, leading to a plot straight out of the Street Warrior. This story, about a young woman who makes a fleeting acquaintance with someone not awful, is exciting, yes, but the apocalypse was never believable, and, like the page-count, the characters are in and out of the story too quickly to be ’s rare that I can obtain into short stories as it is, and these three, while good, remind me more of every other short story writer I’ve had problem getting into despite accolades (Ray Bradbury, Amy Hempel).### ‘Positive Obsession’ (1989) and ‘Furor Scribendi’ (1993)The two essays that closed the original ’95 publication of Bloodchild, ‘Positive Obsession’ and ‘Furor Scribendi,’ contain stories from Butler’s life as well as tip to aspiring writers. Her writing background is fascinating, publishing sci-fi at a time when Samuel Delany was the only accepted black sci-fi writer. Octavia didn’t have much in the method of role models or family encouragement: Black women shouldn’t write, especially genre fiction.Her writing tip that accompanies her flash-biography is simple: Hold writing, hold trying — become obsessed. Butler intentionally shuns the garbage of the self-help industry to obtain her notice across: There’s no talent — nothing innate in respected writers — there’s only their obsessions that drive them to test and test ese two short essays may be far more valuable than any self-help book or tutorial for writers.### ‘Amnesty’ (2003)Butler’s return to short stories is stunning, with both ‘Amnesty’ and ‘the Book of Martha’ being some of the most intellectually- and emotionally-demanding work in the collection. ‘Amnesty’ is a marriage of classic sci-fi tropes, careful characterization, and damning social commentary.An alien civilization has landed. Like in Ted Chiang’s ‘Story of Your Life,’ the Communities landed quietly in the world’s deserts, barely interacting with us as we’re studied from a distance. People have been abducted — never with any nefarious intent, though some have suffered simply due to communication problems — and slab cities have been erected around the Communities. The Communities are peaceful, each individual actually a population in itself of plant-like entities, minds working as e story revolves around a former abductee interviewing candidates from outside the Communities to work for the Communities. As the interviewer, she gets a number of questions about why she is working for the species, and her reasoning is the meat of this story, relevant particularly to political happenings in 2017:After her abduction, Noah was kidnapped by her own government and tortured for years. They didn’t understand the Communities — rather feared them — and wouldn’t believe that she wasn’t an agent working on the aliens’ behalf to hurt mankind. Mankind, embroiled in heated tournament with itself, is hardly prepared to handle an alien species which, they assume, must be after the same thing. It’s a cycle of fear and hatred, and Noah felt no choice in escaping persecution. What the Communities offer her is a home: She’s no longer welcome among mankind, tainted by this alien experience.Octavia Butler’s gleamed more truths about humanity than most of us ever could.### ‘The Book of Martha’ (2005)The final story Butler ever wrote, ‘the Book of Martha’ is another bombshell on the reader’s feelings. The idea is easy (and even cliche): God meets with Martha in her dreams. Martha’s an everywoman figure, rising from nothing to moderate success. S/he asks for her support in shaping humanity’s future, in helping dilute anger and hatred and religious persecution in favor of a e rest of this story is their conversation, their debates on how her varying ideas would support or hurt the vision of an earthly paradise: Who would benefit, who would suffer. The only method to benefit everyone — hopefully — they realize, is through that individual’s dreams.‘The Book of Martha’ offers an interesting thought experiment, and it’s surprising that a philosophical conversation with the self makes for as entertaining a story as this is.---Short stories rarely appeal to me the method novels do, but Bloodchild and Other Stories is an perfect introduction to Butler’s writing. Her ideas are brilliantly creative, her social commentary sharp, the empathy of her characters deep — I can’t wait to move on to her other work.

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    Bloodchild and Other Stories []  2020-1-16 10:59

    Okay, here's a book, and it's a collection of short stories, and they're extraordinary short stories, and what more can I really say without spoilage? After all, there isn't that much plot to a short story...Well, first of all, I can say that the title story is one of the most disturbing things I have ever read. It isn't a horror story, but it has the power to horrify.I can say that one of the major foci of these stories is biological speculation - human and alien - and that Butler's ideas are inevitably original. But the stories are always about _people_. The ideas are more than backdrop, they propel the people into revealing cirtances - revealing not so much about the individual as about the species.I can say that Butler was (she died in 2006) one of the most skilled crafters of sentences and paragraphs SF has ever witnessed, that she deserves to stand with Delany and Wolfe, Le Guin and Sturgeon and Russ.And I can say that there are two essays about writing in here. One is about how Butler came to be a writer; the other is about how you might do so if you are so at's all I can really say except: *read this book*!

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    Bloodchild: And Other Stories []  2020-2-5 0:55

    Bloodchild and Other Stories was my introduction to Butler’s writing, and it reflects a masterful (and masterfully-thoughtful) writer. This collection features every short story — and two essays — that Octavia Butler wrote between 1971 and 2003. At just over 200 pages, that’s not many, and she herself admits to not being a writer or fan of short stories in her comments.### ‘Bloodchild’ (1984)I should search the title story, ‘Bloodchild,’ cheesy, with its insect-like aliens and technological magic: It’s steeped in old-fashioned sci-fi cheese without ever getting drowned in the magic and wonder writers like Bradbury relied on.[N.B. This review features photos and formatting specific to my book site, dendrobibliography: Check it out here.]‘Bloodchild’ is about a future where humanity has come under the control and protection of a space-faring species most akin to preying mantises and spiders. They’re benevolent, but still very clearly in charge. Humanity is, coincidentally, an ideal host species for the Tilc’s larva; human families live on vast preserves, and are free to live as long as they supply one kid per family as an N’Tilc — a host of Tilc is is an uncomfortable story, and infinitely imaginative. Humanity is conflicted about this — it is a sort of slavery, after all. The hosts form close bonds with their Tilc partners, but the host process is violent, painful, gory, and can easily lead to the host’s death if they’re not careful.‘Bloodchild’ never quite focuses on that, however. This story is all about the bond of human boy and his Tilc partner; in forming a loving relationship despite the requisite pain and suffering.### ‘The Evening and the Morning and the Night’ (1987)‘The Evening and the Morning and the Night’ continues the first story’s excellence, introducing a genetic disorder that causes unpredictably violent and suicidal behavior in those affected by it. Society, being how it is, punishes those born with this genetic disorder, pushing them to the outskirts of society much as our culture silently does with unique needs individuals (which, of course, exacerbates their condition, turning the violence into a cycle). Like ‘Bloodchild,’ this story is needed reading.### ‘Near of Kin’ (1979), ‘Speech Sounds’ (1983), and ‘Crossover’ (1971)The original edition of Bloodchild and Other Stories only had three more stories, all shorter and less consistent. ‘Near of Kin’ and ‘Crossover’ aren’t sci-fi, and are brief moments in the lives of fragmenting families: In ‘Near of Kin,’ a young woman goes through her mother’s belongings after she passes away. She reflects on her not good relationship with her mom, and of her better, if timid, relationship with her living uncle — who, it’s suggested, is her dad. ‘Crossover,’ Butler’s first-published story (1971), follows a young, miserable woman struggling with an abusive boyfriend, a miserable job, and thoughts of suicide. These two aren’t bad, but didn’t leave much of an impression.‘Speech Sounds’ is a fairly standard mid-’80s post-apocalyptic story. The world’s social order has broken down after a virus causes every living person to either lose their ability to speak or read/write. Each group — speakers and readers — is led by jealousy and problem communicating, leading to a plot straight out of the Street Warrior. This story, about a young woman who makes a fleeting acquaintance with someone not awful, is exciting, yes, but the apocalypse was never believable, and, like the page-count, the characters are in and out of the story too quickly to be ’s rare that I can obtain into short stories as it is, and these three, while good, remind me more of every other short story writer I’ve had problem getting into despite accolades (Ray Bradbury, Amy Hempel).### ‘Positive Obsession’ (1989) and ‘Furor Scribendi’ (1993)The two essays that closed the original ’95 publication of Bloodchild, ‘Positive Obsession’ and ‘Furor Scribendi,’ contain stories from Butler’s life as well as tip to aspiring writers. Her writing background is fascinating, publishing sci-fi at a time when Samuel Delany was the only accepted black sci-fi writer. Octavia didn’t have much in the method of role models or family encouragement: Black women shouldn’t write, especially genre fiction.Her writing tip that accompanies her flash-biography is simple: Hold writing, hold trying — become obsessed. Butler intentionally shuns the garbage of the self-help industry to obtain her notice across: There’s no talent — nothing innate in respected writers — there’s only their obsessions that drive them to test and test ese two short essays may be far more valuable than any self-help book or tutorial for writers.### ‘Amnesty’ (2003)Butler’s return to short stories is stunning, with both ‘Amnesty’ and ‘the Book of Martha’ being some of the most intellectually- and emotionally-demanding work in the collection. ‘Amnesty’ is a marriage of classic sci-fi tropes, careful characterization, and damning social commentary.An alien civilization has landed. Like in Ted Chiang’s ‘Story of Your Life,’ the Communities landed quietly in the world’s deserts, barely interacting with us as we’re studied from a distance. People have been abducted — never with any nefarious intent, though some have suffered simply due to communication problems — and slab cities have been erected around the Communities. The Communities are peaceful, each individual actually a population in itself of plant-like entities, minds working as e story revolves around a former abductee interviewing candidates from outside the Communities to work for the Communities. As the interviewer, she gets a number of questions about why she is working for the species, and her reasoning is the meat of this story, relevant particularly to political happenings in 2017:After her abduction, Noah was kidnapped by her own government and tortured for years. They didn’t understand the Communities — rather feared them — and wouldn’t believe that she wasn’t an agent working on the aliens’ behalf to hurt mankind. Mankind, embroiled in heated tournament with itself, is hardly prepared to handle an alien species which, they assume, must be after the same thing. It’s a cycle of fear and hatred, and Noah felt no choice in escaping persecution. What the Communities offer her is a home: She’s no longer welcome among mankind, tainted by this alien experience.Octavia Butler’s gleamed more truths about humanity than most of us ever could.### ‘The Book of Martha’ (2005)The final story Butler ever wrote, ‘the Book of Martha’ is another bombshell on the reader’s feelings. The idea is easy (and even cliche): God meets with Martha in her dreams. Martha’s an everywoman figure, rising from nothing to moderate success. S/he asks for her support in shaping humanity’s future, in helping dilute anger and hatred and religious persecution in favor of a e rest of this story is their conversation, their debates on how her varying ideas would support or hurt the vision of an earthly paradise: Who would benefit, who would suffer. The only method to benefit everyone — hopefully — they realize, is through that individual’s dreams.‘The Book of Martha’ offers an interesting thought experiment, and it’s surprising that a philosophical conversation with the self makes for as entertaining a story as this is.---Short stories rarely appeal to me the method novels do, but Bloodchild and Other Stories is an perfect introduction to Butler’s writing. Her ideas are brilliantly creative, her social commentary sharp, the empathy of her characters deep — I can’t wait to move on to her other work.

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    Bloodchild: And Other Stories []  2020-2-5 0:55

    This was my first introduction to the work of Ocatavia Butler, an author I had heard a lot of amazing things about before seeing this Kindle eBook ver of her collection of short stories, 'Bloodchild', featured on sale at Amazon for a deep discount. The collection was a amazing representation of her work and included a number of extremely intriguing stories that I have been left thinking about after I finished reading it. I would highly recommend it especially to fans of science fiction or dystopia, and the short biography included in the text seems like a amazing read for any aspiring author, but particularly to female or African-American ones.

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    Homeland and Other Stories []  2021-4-6 23:13

    I have always loved Ms Kingsolver’s novels and this book of short stories stands up to her reputation of perfect stories. And such a dozens !

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    Homeland and Other Stories []  2021-4-6 23:13

    I am not a fan of short stories. It's not that I don't think they're not well-written, because I do think they are. It is just that they're not always so satisfying and leaves one wanting t this time. I enjoyed every single one of Kingsolver's short stories. I have read a few of her novels and think her latest book, "Animal, Food, Miracle" is the best book yet so far. Obviously, this collection of short stories are her earlier works ... and still just as good. These short stories told stories of people's lives, such as a young lifter moving into an old house wanting to change her ways. She ends up helping her elderly neighbor and yet witness a crime that led to the neighbor's downfall. Then there is the story of Rose-Johnny, a sad reflection of the life of prejudice and racism. Then there's the latest story of an union worker who was arrested to break up the union. All of these stories in this collection are realistic and shares the ideals that we humans have ... as well as the imperfections. One cannot support but relate to each of the characters in this is is another recommendation for short stories fans out there and I am glad that I discovered this gem!10/19/09

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    Homeland and Other Stories []  2021-4-6 23:13

    I love everything -- from short stories to nonfiction to especially her novels -- that Barbara Kingsolver has written. These short stories are excellent!

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    Bloodchild: And Other Stories []  2020-2-5 0:55

    Bloodchild is a collection of short stories by the popular science-fiction writer Octavia Butler. The issue with short story collections is that they are usually a mixed bag, populated with mostly mediocre stories speckled with a few stinkers and a few gems. Well, I am satisfied to report to you that Bloodchild is not like that at all. Every single story in this collection is captivating, intelligent, and written in a style that is clear and accessible without losing any of its sophistication.What really struck me about Bloodchild was the sheer emotional impact of each story. Because each story is such a excellent small world, and because the characters are so well realized, every story really packs a punch. I place down the book between each story, incapable of doing any true thinking because I was so blown away by what I had just read. I think the effectiveness of the stories comes from a mix of perfect writing and characterization and the method Butler uses those characters to discover complex ideas. One of Butler's strengths is in never letting her work become preachy or one-sided. Butler's ideas are as complex as her characters, and that makes her stories resonate in a very true and strong ually, this would be the part of the review where I would tell you which stories were my favorite and which ones to skip, but I can't really do that with this collection, because they are all absolutely worth reading. I believe that Butler's most popular stories are Bloodchild and Speech Sounds, both of which are in this collection and both of which are absolutely mind-blowing. Bloodchild actually left me speechless and shaking by the time I finished it. Her other stories are more subtle, but are still incredibly well-written. There are also two essays included in the book, my favorite of which was Positive Obsession. Since I bought the updated ver of the book, I got an additional two stories on top of the original five stories and two essays. If you are going to obtain it, I recommend getting the updated version, because the two added stories are both very good, especially Amnesty. In all of the stories Butler's characters are absolutely convincing, and her story-telling is so smooth that you never need time to obtain adjusted to the story, even when you are dropped right in the middle of the action. That is, to me, a sign of a amazing writer.I know this review is vague, but that is only because Butler's stories are so good. I don't feel like I need to speak for them, and I'm not sure that I could even if I wanted to. If you wish smart stories with concise yet vivid writing and realistic characters, then Octavia Butler is absolutely the writer for you.Rating: 5 starsVivid writing, engaging plot, convincing characters, and smart globe building. Highly recommended.

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    Bloodchild: And Other Stories []  2020-2-5 0:55

    Okay, here's a book, and it's a collection of short stories, and they're extraordinary short stories, and what more can I really say without spoilage? After all, there isn't that much plot to a short story...Well, first of all, I can say that the title story is one of the most disturbing things I have ever read. It isn't a horror story, but it has the power to horrify.I can say that one of the major foci of these stories is biological speculation - human and alien - and that Butler's ideas are inevitably original. But the stories are always about _people_. The ideas are more than backdrop, they propel the people into revealing cirtances - revealing not so much about the individual as about the species.I can say that Butler was (she died in 2006) one of the most skilled crafters of sentences and paragraphs SF has ever witnessed, that she deserves to stand with Delany and Wolfe, Le Guin and Sturgeon and Russ.And I can say that there are two essays about writing in here. One is about how Butler came to be a writer; the other is about how you might do so if you are so at's all I can really say except: *read this book*!

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    Bloodchild and Other Stories []  2020-1-16 10:59

    Bloodchild is a collection of short stories by the popular science-fiction writer Octavia Butler. The issue with short story collections is that they are usually a mixed bag, populated with mostly mediocre stories speckled with a few stinkers and a few gems. Well, I am satisfied to report to you that Bloodchild is not like that at all. Every single story in this collection is captivating, intelligent, and written in a style that is clear and accessible without losing any of its sophistication.What really struck me about Bloodchild was the sheer emotional impact of each story. Because each story is such a excellent small world, and because the characters are so well realized, every story really packs a punch. I place down the book between each story, incapable of doing any true thinking because I was so blown away by what I had just read. I think the effectiveness of the stories comes from a mix of perfect writing and characterization and the method Butler uses those characters to discover complex ideas. One of Butler's strengths is in never letting her work become preachy or one-sided. Butler's ideas are as complex as her characters, and that makes her stories resonate in a very true and strong ually, this would be the part of the review where I would tell you which stories were my favorite and which ones to skip, but I can't really do that with this collection, because they are all absolutely worth reading. I believe that Butler's most popular stories are Bloodchild and Speech Sounds, both of which are in this collection and both of which are absolutely mind-blowing. Bloodchild actually left me speechless and shaking by the time I finished it. Her other stories are more subtle, but are still incredibly well-written. There are also two essays included in the book, my favorite of which was Positive Obsession. Since I bought the updated ver of the book, I got an additional two stories on top of the original five stories and two essays. If you are going to obtain it, I recommend getting the updated version, because the two added stories are both very good, especially Amnesty. In all of the stories Butler's characters are absolutely convincing, and her story-telling is so smooth that you never need time to obtain adjusted to the story, even when you are dropped right in the middle of the action. That is, to me, a sign of a amazing writer.I know this review is vague, but that is only because Butler's stories are so good. I don't feel like I need to speak for them, and I'm not sure that I could even if I wanted to. If you wish smart stories with concise yet vivid writing and realistic characters, then Octavia Butler is absolutely the writer for you.Rating: 5 starsVivid writing, engaging plot, convincing characters, and smart globe building. Highly recommended.

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    Bloodchild and Other Stories []  2020-1-16 10:59

    This was my first introduction to the work of Ocatavia Butler, an author I had heard a lot of amazing things about before seeing this Kindle eBook ver of her collection of short stories, 'Bloodchild', featured on sale at Amazon for a deep discount. The collection was a amazing representation of her work and included a number of extremely intriguing stories that I have been left thinking about after I finished reading it. I would highly recommend it especially to fans of science fiction or dystopia, and the short biography included in the text seems like a amazing read for any aspiring author, but particularly to female or African-American ones.

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    Bloodchild and Other Stories []  2020-1-16 10:59

    Bloodchild is a mixed bag of fiction and non-fiction that is an perfect introduction to both the private and the creative sides of Butler. She is able to make believable near-future imaginings that are highly detailed and yet vague, but also powerfully different. She invents some of the most creatively thought out aliens, yet does so with gorgeous prose. I also loved her essays on the role of race in her development as a person and as a writer. Highly recommend.

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    Homeland and Other Stories []  2021-4-6 23:13

    I didn’t like these stories. Perhaps it is just me, but I found then to seem incomplete.

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    Homeland and Other Stories []  2021-4-6 23:13

    Amazing collection of stories from this author. Simple read. Did not wish to stop reading!

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    Homeland and Other Stories []  2021-4-6 23:13

    First, I must admit that I Am a Kingsolver fan. And she definitely did not disappoint with this lovely collection. Her characters are so human I feel that I already know them. Each story transports you to another put for a while. Simple reading, yet interesting and challenging themes.

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    Family Happiness and Other Stories []  2020-1-28 22:25

    Short but uplifting story well told.

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    Family Happiness and Other Stories []  2020-1-28 22:25

    Tolstoy's Family Happiness is passe' and boring. I read a lot of books each year, and this is not one I would recommend. I would highly recommend "Into the wild", "The woman who walked to Russia", "Garden Spell", "Desert Queen", I could go on, with a lot of other subjects, but that will have to wait. nch

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    Growing Things and Other Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    I should note that there’s some mention of animal hurt in a couple of the e title story, Growing Things, is an apocalyptic story in which two girls wait for their father to come home from a supply run as plants take over the world. His stories are rarely just one thing, however, and there are other things going on in that family. Where We All Will Be has people flocking to the ocean like moths to a flame–except for Zane, who isn’t feeling the mysterious pull at all. He goes, however, in an attempt to stay with his father and search his mother. It’s Versus the Law to Feed the Ducks is an apocalyptic from the point of view of a young child. Swim Wants to Know If It’s as Poor as Swim Thinks is another apocalyptic, in which a mother tracks down her daughter (whom she is legally needed to stay away from) as giant creatures attack the world. Once again we search that Tremblay’s tales tend to work on multiple levels, as this woman has some… mething About Birds is utterly surreal and bizarre; not really my kind of story, but it was still oddly fascinating. The Teacher is also rather surreal–eight children are place into a unique class, and it seems to send them all ’round the twist as they’re created to watch some rather disturbing films. Notes for “The Barn in the Wild” is an interesting small found-journal story. A Haunted House Is a Wheel upon Which Some Are Broken is a choose-your-own-adventure story–this works amazing in ebook format, where you can just click on the links. I didn’t really grok The Thirteenth Temple, but I gather it refers back to one of Tremblay’s other books, so perhaps it would create more sense if I had read that e Getaway is about four men fleeing a robbery-gone-wrong. Only, it seems to have gone more wrong than they think. The ending in particular really gripped me. Nineteen Snapshots of Dennisport is also another crime/horror story, told as descriptions of nineteen photographs. It’s an interesting conceit, and it really works in this case.___________ is a very odd story. It starts with a woman approaching a man on a beach and pretending to be his wife, and it just gets stranger from there! Very creepy! Our Town’s Creature is a weird small story about a swamp creature and its relationship with the nearby town. The Society of the Monsterhood is a very bizarre story about four teens and the creature they sort-of befriend. Again, a very odd tale, with an even stranger Won’t Go Away is one of a couple of author-main-character stories. It involves a writer who goes to a reading and does something… unexpected. And how that affects other people who were there. Another story with an author as a main hero is Notes from the Dog Walkers. It’s hard to imagine telling a story as notes left for a person by their dog walkers, but it works! One of the dog walkers starts getting a small too familiar. They poke around the house a lot more than they should, and begin advising the author on their e Ice Turret sees a bunch of ice climbers trying to scale a mysterious ice turret in Antarctica. This is the most Lovecraftian story in here. Her Red Right Hand is a Hellboy story! It’s a bit melancholy and sad, but very interesting. It introduces us to a small girl, Gemma, whose mother recently died and whose father seems to be going off the deep end.I absolutely loved this collection. While there were some stories that didn’t hit me quite as hard as others, they’re all interesting and fascinating to read.

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    Growing Things and Other Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    I didn’t like these stories at all. They created no sense & certainly were not scary. I don’t think people know how to write really scary books anymore or create scary movies. It’s all just gore now. Sorry I bought this book.

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    Always Chloe and Other Stories []  2020-1-24 22:30

    What can I say about Chloe. She's an interesting hero as all of Hyde's characters. If you wish to learn about sea animals, birds, or just plain people, this is the book for you. At times I found myself confused following Chloe's thoughts, but in the end Catherine Ryan Hyde puts it in black and white and brings it all together.I'm not sure I liked the other stories as much. Interesting character's for sure. With this author you're in for a ride you probably have never taken, you think. Then search your own self in the stories, if you look honestly. I guess everyone is 'not' so different. We just wish to be happy.

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    Pump Six and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 7:7

    The future portrayed in these short stories includes elements that are simple to imagine- war, religious differences, tournament for meal and water, and of course true estate. These are all here. But there is so much more. Genetic engineering of just about everything including people, animals, and plants grown for meal and fuel is the norm. Mutations are rampant and most of them aren't for the is is the first time I've read this author's work and I am very impressed. This is a person who has obviously given the end of civilization as we know it a lot of thought. The globe after any type of apocalypse is bound to be dark and dangerous, and that runs through every story in this collection, but it is the deeply weird items that was especially fascinating. With enough wealth, people in these stories can obtain away with just about anything, and they use that power without hesitation or ese tales aren't for the faint of heart- but if you have fun well written imaginative stories that create you think, then I would whole heartedly recommend this book.

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    The Sneetches and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 15:27

    One of my favorite books from my childhood. Now, as I read it to my 6 year old, I realize how impactful the lessons are from each of the stories. The Sneetches learn the value of living in a more accepting society and that you should not judge someone based on appearances but rather love them for who they are on the inside. (It also shows how simple it is for someone to take advantage of those that search their value only in their e north and south going zax present us that being stubborn and inflexible will not allow us grow and will hold us stuck as the globe continues without e green pants with no legs has a lesson about fear and e mom with all the Dave’s.... well, that is beautiful straightforward. It’s does present the value of stepping outside your box and being unique. Though really it just reminds us to not name all of our children Dave because it will cause so much problem in the long run. The random alternate name suggestions are still funny.Overall, it’s still a fun read and a amazing opportunity to begin up necessary conversations with your kids.

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    The Sneetches and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 15:27

    This was one of my favorite books when I was a child. I ordered it a couple months ago, since I remembered how much I had loved it. I laughed so hard I cried, through almost the whole book! It's awesome to me that this man could have come up with the necessary lessons that he did, and obtain them across in such funny ways and while making the unbelievable rhymes that he did! The book amazed me as I was laughing and crying! The story of the Sneetches that thought they were better than everyone else getting their comeuppance had me in stitches. The northgoing and southgoing zax with their lesson on stubbornness and "I won't budge" created me think that everyone in my whole family (up,down and sideways) must have read this story and instead of learning NOT to be stubborn, used the zaxes as their heros in learning TO be stubborn (don't budge EVEN if they build the highway over you)!!!! And the guy being scared of the pants with nobody in them, and it turns out the pants were depressed and scared too!!! It shows that others have the same feelings you do (even if the "others" are strange personless pants)!!! These lessons are SO amazing and useful for everyone . . . (Okay! So I didn't understand the lesson in the 23 Daves!) This book, to me, is pure genius. It is as timely today as when it was written in 1961.

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    Cowboy Kate and Other Stories []  2020-1-16 6:18

    Cowboy Kate is a unbelievable book. I wanted to buy a copy for a friend, and I wasn't careful enough reading the description here, so was disappointed to search out that this is a little size ver of the original.

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    Barrel Fever and Other Stories []  2020-1-20 21:5

    I'm a huge fan of David Sedaris. So why the 3 stars? I'll explain...I read "Me Talk Beautiful One Day" first and was blown away by it's clever, concise style. I laughed out loud many, a lot of times. Then I read "Naked," another unbelievable book. Both of these are written in a memoir style, snapshots of his hilarious and often painful life."Barrel Fever" on the other hand has a lot of satire, not a lot of his effective memoir style. It seems like he's searching for his voice in this book. However, he does strike gold with "The Santaland Diaries," the hysterical description of his job as an elf for a mall Santa. This story is also printed in "Holidays on Ice." I would recommend that book in put of "Barrel Fever.""Naked," "Me Talk...," and "Dress Your Family..." are all amazing books. Order them and laugh yourself sick.

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    Barrel Fever and Other Stories []  2020-1-20 21:5

    I first discovered David Sedaris when a mate left me a copy of "The Latest You'll Hear from Me" - still to this day one of my favorite short stories. It's just one of the a lot of stories and essays included in this clever, insightful and funny-as-hell collection. I'll end with a Sedaris quote to give those unfamiliar with his work a taste of his tone: I haven't got the slightest idea how to change people, but still I hold a long list of prospective candidates just in case I should ever figure it out.

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    Orange World and Other Stories []  2020-6-26 18:36

    I generally love Karen Russell’s quirky and innovative speculative fiction and looked forward to this collection for months. However, I found the stories generally disjointed, confusing, and tedious. The book felt rushed and unpolished like a sophomore effort by a mediocre author. I’m disappointed that someone (her editor/publisher???) didn’t caution versus diluting her otherwise stellar storytelling brand with a collection of lackluster stories.

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    After Abel: And Other Stories []  2020-9-14 18:18

    A number of years ago, after a lot of trips to Israel, my wife and I travelled to Jordan for a very short visit. Under a moonlit sky, we drove swiftly past the Dead Sea—a put we had seen countless times before from the Israel side. As familiar a stage as the Dead Sea was, however, this fresh view was surreal. The water and the hills rising above it were all there, seemingly just as we always remembered them. But the perspective was flipped, the angles uncomfortable and skewed, and what once seemed utterly predictable was now a landscape littered with the unknown, peppered with surprise. It was familiar, yet at the same time fascinating and new. We couldn’t obtain over what an unforgettable experience that was.I felt that same exhilaration reading Michal Lemberger’s brilliant fresh compilation, After Abel. Few characters in literature are as familiar as Eve, Lot’s wife, Pharoah‘s daughter, Hagar, and others. We know their stories; they have fixed orbits in the Bible stories we have all known since childhood. Lemberger, however, has taken what small we know of their stories—the skeletal outlines of their narratives—and woven them into a fabric bringing fresh life and vitality to their characters. Each story is essentially midrash, a Hebrew term that implies a commentary, or storytelling that lends layer and meaning to a more established narrative. Women who once served as mere window-dressing to the moral male heroes of the Bible are now magnificent, heroic, flawed, complex characters themselves. They are breathtaking.I read these stories in just a few sittings—they were impossible to place down. I hope that this is the first of a lot of opportunities to access Michal Lemberger’s special perspective on life and literature—finding nuance in the mundane, and hidden worlds hidden to all but her own fertile imagination.

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    After Abel: And Other Stories []  2020-9-14 18:18

    The Bible isn't known for its first-person stories narrated by women - that's why this book is so important. This retelling of familiar tales like the destruction of Sodom and the Book of Esther do so from the perspectives and reactions of those whose voices - until now - could only have been imagined. How did Eve feel about what happened in the garden? How did the wife of Lot feel as - to pacify villagers who wanted to rape their guests - her husband offered up her daughters? These are questions that students of Bible are seldom encouraged to ask - not only does Lemberger ask the questions, but she does so creatively, stepping into the shoes of these characters and vocalizes their perspectives, passions and struggles.

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    After Abel: And Other Stories []  2020-9-14 18:18

    This is a unbelievable book that I thoroughly enjoyed and can wholeheartedly recommend. It is creative without going beyond Biblical possibility. I felt like I was show in the time and in the story, understanding the stories from a fresh perspective. I love that I heard voices that I had hardly or squeamishly considered in the past. The stories were so appropriate that it feels like the truth and there can be no better compliment than that.

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    After Abel: And Other Stories []  2020-9-14 18:18

    Michal captures the imagination in this thoughtful "twist" on biblical characters. As a religious person who considers herself to be fairly well-versed in the stories of the bible, this added a whole fresh dimension to my appreciation for these narratives. There was not one weak story in the collection. Each one evoked a various emotion and reaction. Anyone who is interested in stories from the Bible, women's narratives, or simply well-written pieces will have fun this.

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    Jackalope Wives And Other Stories []  2020-10-6 18:35

    This was quite a book! Each story created an impact on me. Sometimes I left the story with a smile. Other times I turned the page quietly, tip-toeing past the quiet sadness so as to not disturb it. All the time, I eagerly continued on to the next. Needless to say, I was disappointed when it ended, and am now reviewing my budget to see where I can squeeze out enough to buy (just) one more of her books...I think Starbucks will have to create do without my White Chocolate Mocha orders this week.

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    Jackalope Wives And Other Stories []  2020-10-6 18:35

    I consider beautiful much anything by Ursula Vernon/T Kingfisher to be a must-read. She has a special authorial voice and can create any topic laugh-out-loud funny while also making the reader think. The characters are quirky and memorable, and the stories veer off in strange, unexpected directions. Some of the stories are sad and spooky and include violence and gore, but I was still satisfied to have read them.I highly recommend this book for anyone who enjoys quirky fairy tales, folklore, weird west stories, and dark humor.

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    Roast Chicken and Other Stories []  2020-10-16 18:1

    I had read about this book when it came out, but never followed up. I saw it on Amazon on sale and bought it for me and one for my sister. It is amazing reading, even if you never create the recipes. Hopkinson has a definite viewpoint on food. He makes you look at ingredients differently. Test it, you'll like it or at least think about some foods in a fresh way.

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    Cowboy Kate and Other Stories []  2020-1-16 6:18

    I thought the price of this book was a bit steep for a paperback, but when it arrived I realized it is not just a paperback, but a very little paperback, which makes this the most expensive image book, per square inch, I have ever purchased. Be sure to check out the "dimensions" in the product info. I like the book and will not return it as it is a classic, but seriously, this should be priced $20 or less. Having said that, the content of the book is superb, and the printing is very nice.

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    Barrel Fever and Other Stories []  2020-1-20 21:5

    I admit that I first read Naked and Me Talk Beautiful before I picked up this collection of Sedaris' early stories and essays. Since Naked and Me Talk Beautiful were written in the first person like a warped memoir from Sedaris' life, and were at times more designed to make laughter than to savage human nature, it took a few chapters for me to adapt to Sedaris taking on the voice of different crackpots and losers rather than daris' items that is displayed in Barrel Fever takes a sharper aim at the shallowness, self-importance and bitterness contained in his characters than Naked and Me Talk Pretty, but the sidesplitting humor in his later works only rears its head from time to time in Barrel Fever, most notably during the near-legendary "SantaLand Diaries" daris is a talented writer who lets his characters grind an axe or two now and then.

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    Growing Things and Other Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    The stories were simply weird, not scary, and all tended to have an begin ending, never really concluding the story arc, but leaving the reader to wonder what happened. I couldn't create it through half of it before I deleted it.

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    Growing Things and Other Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    This was not my first serving of Mr. Tremblay. I have read "Cabin at the End of the World". That is some story!!!These stories were just as surprising and just as excellent.If you appreciate a subtle horror story or one that's in your face, test Mr. Tremblay's stories. I think you will search much to think on.

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    Growing Things and Other Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    I stuck with the book for the first three stories, thinking that surely one would be enticing -- and the third, Something About Birds, got off to an interesting begin -- but in the end all three were just odd and felt unfinished. Ever seen some odd bit of modern art and walked away thinking you must be missing the point? That's where these stories left me. Maybe they're brilliant in some artsy nouveau way, but I'd be begin to other me reviewers here seemed to have fun the book, so maybe you will, too. I'm not going to bother reading further, though; three was enough. It may just be as poor as SWIM thinks.

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    THE PILOT: AND OTHER STORIES []  2020-8-6 18:33

    Outstanding... just outstanding. It’s like reading Earnest Gann again. I loved every word.

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    After Abel: And Other Stories []  2020-9-14 18:18

    I’d been looking forward to this book of short stories for months, ever since I read the piece titled “Lot’s Wife” in Lilith magazine. Shortly thereafter, I enrolled in a Jewish-writing class myself that shared some parallels with Lemberger’s project in its what is Lemberger’s project? In a post for the Jewish Book Council’s blog, she explained:“We are all the heroes of the stories of our own lives, but the women of the Bible aren’t given the possibility to play those roles. (That’s even real of some of the women—like Yael or Hagar—who do obtain to play active roles; their stories often advance the interests of others.) The questions that my book, AFTER ABEL, attempts to respond are: what are their stories? How would they think? What would they say if we gave them a possibility to speak? What would be necessary to them—would it be the same as what the men value? Or would there be a shadow world, one that exists next to the officially sanctioned account, in which the info of inheritance or battle don’t preoccupy their minds, but would instead be filled with the smell of food, the feel of a newborn’s skin, and the close ties of family and friendship that keep communities together?”Some of the protagonists in this book—like Eve, or Hagar, or Miriam, or Lot’s Wife—are personages I’d at least thought about before, although I had certainly never thought about them in the contexts that Lemberger has created. But (and maybe this has something to do with the fact that I sense myself deficient in my Jewish education) I’m perhaps especially grateful for the stories that feature characters I don’t think I was even conscious of prior to picking up this book: Zeresh, “Saul’s Daughter,” Achsah.Enriched by Jonathan Kirsch’s foreword, Lemberger’s own afterword, and a writing style that seems exquisitely and perfectly attuned to the stories’ ancient settings, AFTER ABEL AND OTHER STORIES is a collection I've been recommending to others, enthusiastically.

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    After Abel: And Other Stories []  2020-9-14 18:18

    This collection of short stories expands on the stories of some of the women in the Bible, a lot of of whom are mentioned only by name in the original text. So we search out more about Lot's wife than that she turned into a ar of salt, or how Eve really felt about her family life, or what Miriam was thinking as she watched over the basket containing he brother. The characters come to life in these stories, and are more than just the accessories of their husbands or families. I am definitely going to recommend this book to my book club.

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    Jackalope Wives And Other Stories []  2020-10-6 18:35

    I love this book! My favorite is probably "The Dryad's Shoe" but "Godmother" and "That Time with Bob and the Unicorn" are right up there as well. All three about Grandma Harken as well. And "Editing" resonated really personally with me, broke through my writers block.I was somewhat disappointed because I bought the book fresh and it arrived with water damage, probably from shipping, but it didn't create anything illegible just a bunch of wiggly pages. I didn't factor that into my rating because when it comes to books what's in them is more important. And whats in this one is pure genius!

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    Roast Chicken and Other Stories []  2020-10-16 18:1

    Wasn't for me.

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    Orange World and Other Stories []  2020-6-26 18:36

    Karen Russell and Harvard Beets are both acquired day this book will be needed reading in a course entitled "The Modern American Short Story." The class will be taken by pre-med students who are thinking, "This will be an simple A and push my GPA high enough to obtain in to Harvard Medical School." They will be l in all they would have been better off to have gone on the Harvard Beet Diet.

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    Orange World and Other Stories []  2020-6-26 18:36

    Karen Russell is one of those gifted authors who can squeeze an entire globe into a short story. Every one of these is like a birthday surprise: First you follow along nodding, and then you turn a corner and think, “Wait, what?! I would read her grocery list; I’m sure it has something strange on it.

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    Always Chloe and Other Stories []  2020-1-24 22:30

    WOW. I am fresh to 'Chloe', but I understand that there is another novel out there, and this won't be my 's interested to see Chloe's perspective on life (as a young woman with a learning disability), and it really created me consider how people react to those with disabilities and how the disabled persons feel about those 's story is plain, simple, and heartbreakingly complex. The narration is in hero Jordy and his path in life lends a true air of authenticity to this story. There are different lesser characters, and they bring a lot to the table. Though there are few of them, they are expertly developed. The lack of characters is suggestive of the life Jordy and Chloe live (and from the conditions they came).I am from a community not far from the setting of Morro Bay, CA, and the inclusion of very local info really brings the story to life.

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    Always Chloe and Other Stories []  2020-1-24 22:30

    A very entertaining collection of stories. All interesting, some very sweet, with accurate info and connections with nature. The main characters, a woman and her dog. The woman tells the stories and they read as if a journal. Other characters re-appear from time to time, keeping a nice continuity while the ending seems radically various to all of the preceding stories. Amazing reading, although novels are not my cup of tea, so to speak I enjoyed it because as a refreshing change from my preferred non-fiction, philosophical serious topics and technology.

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    Pump Six and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 7:7

    I gave it 5 stars, although it would be more accurate to give 4.5 rating. These short stories are all set in the same world, ours but with no changes to arrest global warming & the climate changes that ensue, the affects of GMOs & relying on one crop farming ( there is a technical term but it escapes me now) think of the amazing Irish potato blight, and the over-reach of large corporations. The saddest part would be the fact that humanity would adjust so well. The most compelling of these stories are of course those in which the protagonist's eyes are opened to these changes. I would recommend this collection to any one who enjoys short stories of speculative science fiction. I am going to read more of Paolo Bacigalupi's work.

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    Pump Six and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 7:7

    I came to appreciate the near future tales by Paolo Bacgalupi just recently. I am a hard core SciFi reader from the early books by Philip K @#$% and Herbert's Dune series. I began searching for fresh writers since a lot of of the early writers were olo's near future dystopian stories magnify the trends that we see in today's world. The idea of globe drouth, gene manipulation, and artificial intelligence is expanded and magnified in his stories and books to provide a frightening view of existence of the future.A amazing fresh venue for SciFi fans looking for an escape from fantasy fare..

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    Pump Six and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 7:7

    Pump Six and Other Stories is definitely one of the best short stories book I've ever read. I've only discovered Paolo Bacigalupi a few months ago with The Windup Girl and he really caught my attention, since then I've read his four books and I must say I enjoyed this one even more than Ship Breaker and The Drowned st of the short stories tend to be between 20 and 30 pages but don't be fooled by that. Characters are compelling, the pacing is perfect and Bacigalupi's descriptions never leave you cold. The worlds Bacigalupi has envisioned are definitely dark and brooding, and most important, quite likely. The stories presented here cross seamlessly from ecology to economy to politics to social oppression in its most diverse and unimaginable ways. Some of the problems exposed here have been going on for some time while others are yet to come.Politicians, beggars, genetically bioengineered models, oppressors, water hunters, managers, psychos, teachers and a lot of more play their parts in a not so distant future and the fact two of these stories are placed in the same globe The Windup Girl takes put in is definitely a plus. A page-turner.

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    Pump Six and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 7:7

    Paolo Bacigalupi is an perfect science fiction writer, with a lot of awards and nominations to prove it, and this anthology (his first) is full of fine short stories. Nearly all of his stories are set in near-future dystopias, where the globe has been blighted by ovepopulation, environmental disaster, genetic engineering gone wrong, or all of the above. But I have to disagree with the reviewers who found this book depressing; in most of the tales, Bacigalupi's characters search the inner strength to war back versus their situation, and to aim for-- and sometimes even achieve-- redemption or amazing as the stories are, I had to dock this book a star because of flaws in the Kindle edition. If you are going to charge $10.49 for an e-book, at the very least you should contain a working table of contents so the reader can obtain to a particular story.

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    The Sneetches and Other Stories []  2020-1-25 15:27

    The Sneetches and Other Stories is unbelievable reading for your child. It's not just that perfect first story in the title, but also three others that range from fun to e Sneetches is about monsters who separate into two groups based on appearance. With the star-bellied Sneetches looking down on the non-star-bellied Sneetches, tension builds...until in walks an entrepreneur who can instantly erase the differences with a "star-on" machine. I've heard reviewers crank about this story being pro-welfare, or liberal propaganda, but the lesson is more about prejudice, and while I won't spoil the story for you, there is a very P.T. Barnum-styled ending that helps the Sneetches realize that snap judgements lead to blinding one to what e story "The Zax" is another blindered example where two monsters hate each other so much they allow life pass them by. The rest of the globe moves on, while they can't seem to obtain over their mutual dislike of each other. This story is very en we have "Too A lot of Daves". Hilarious and silly, this is practically a short two-page poem, all about a mother who created the mistake of naming all of her kids Dave. My daughter was always delighted when I read this story because of all the silly words in it.Which brings us to the unsung gem at the end of "The Sneetches and Other Stories": the tale "What Was I Afraid Of?" Dealing with a child's fear of the unknown, this spooky small tale resolves itself sweetly, and I really have fun the method Dr. Seuss shows a kid that perhaps with a bit of determination, one might search that one's fears and anxieties really aren't so poor after all. The fact that the main hero is afraid of a pair of green pants is silly enough that a kid can instantly grasp that there are reasonable fears...and then there are unreasonable ones.Whatever stories you choose to read, read to your child. You will see a large difference in their learning, because you took the time to be with them and encouraged them. I loved The Sneetches and Other Stories because its lessons to me are the sorts of things every kid should learn about dealing with others and with themselves.

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    Family Happiness and Other Stories []  2020-1-28 22:25

    You will obtain lulled into experiencing first hand what the author conveys through his skilled writing. Fantastic.

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    Family Happiness and Other Stories []  2020-1-28 22:25

    Excellent, quick delivery to Hawaii! Very happy with pristine condition of book as described!

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