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    God and Nature in the Thought of Margaret Cavendish []  2021-4-7 0:25

    Perfect collection of scholarly essays on the philosophy of the fascinating Margaret Cavendish.

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    The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature of their Thought []  2020-1-28 21:2

    It may have been only an odd mistake that led Amazon to invite me to review my own book, which was published 26 years ago, in 1980. Because I am often critical of my books, I am somewhat surprised by how much I continue to take pleasure in this one. I value it as a still uniquely detailed, sober, and yet imaginative argument meant to persuade--really persuade--philosophers and lovers of philosophy that it is unreasonable to interpret philosopohical views without considering the lives and emotions of the philosophers who made them. Most philosophers have had a stubborn but understandable prejudice versus such an attempt, which they label, as if it were a fallacy, "psychologism." But a comparison of their lives and fortunes and misfortunes with their abstract thought shows how misled these philosophers have been. As I write toward the end of the book, "Neither art, philosophy, nor science alone is adequate to understand or express human experience. Life would be more intellectually rewarding if artists and scientists were were more effectively interested in philosophy, and philosophers more effectively in art and science."Although perfect biographies of individual philosophers were published later than The Philosophers, the work I did on it was thoroughgoing,so it has not aged. And since I followed no current intellectual fashion, it has not gone out of fashion. I believe that the pleasure I took in writing my book is still infectious, and the care with which I developed my themes is still yields illuminatiion. Not without pride, I award my book the five stars I am sure is its due.

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    The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature of their Thought []  2020-1-28 21:2

    Book in very amazing condition

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    The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature of their Thought []  2020-1-28 21:2

    I really enjoyed this book. The apologetic, defensive introduction was a bit long and a bit strained. But the idea that a philosopher's life has a direct relation to his philosophy should be a given. I am surprised that there are not several more works of this type. The author does a amazing job but even without his psychological ysis the facts exposed about the private lives is worth the price of the book alone. If you are looking for a fresh method to peek an old interest in philosophy and the philosophers this is a amazing one. I don't know how I found this book but I am glad that I ard Edward Noble:"Hobo-ing America: A Workingman's Tour of the U.S.A.."

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    The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature of their Thought []  2020-1-28 21:2

    In 1926 Alexander Herzberg published a book, later translated into English under the title of The Psychology of Philosophers (which I have reviewed on Amazon). He examined the personalities of thity philosophers. Thirteen of these also figure in Scharfstein’s 1980 examination of twenty-two philosophers. What emerges from the two studies of these two studies is that a striking number of these thirty-nine philosophers lost one or both parents before the age of seven; were ineffective in their social relationships; complained of social isolation and loneliness; were paranoid or hypochondriacal; suffered from more or less prolonged periods of clinical or even suicidal; depression; were unmarried; were notoriously aggressive in contact with others; were quarrelsome and fast to take offence; were usually ineffective in practical and financial matters; and were interested in the very things they were not amazing at (such as politics and ethics). There is a suggestion that philosophical activity is likely to be psychopathological – and indeed Herzberg, who was a psychotherapist as well as a philosopher, had provided Freudian perspectives in his l of this is certainly interesting, but I wonder what conclusions, if any, one might draw from this material. To begin with, twenty-two philosophers are a very little sample: there must be a lot of hundreds of philosophers who present no such psychological traits in their personal lives. Then there is no control group to compare with the group of philosophers. A random sample of humanity might very well produce a related breakdown in a lot of of the traits listed. For example, one wonders how a lot of political journalists (not to mention ordinary people who pontificate about politics) would themselves be competent politicians; or what proportion of a random sample of the population would be inhibited in some method or another, be socially ineffective, financially incompetent, depressed, aggressive or fast to take offence.But, above all, what is important, surely, is not whether the PERSONALITIES present signs of psychopathology, but whether these signs are show in their writings. Sometimes they obviously are: Nietzsche is an obvious case in point; but Rousseau’s undoubtedly pathological personality and his inability or unwillingness to bring up his kids do not in themselves create his theories on education pathological. And even when the philosophy itself shows signs of embodying some neurotic thinking, as perhaps in Schopenhauer, it will often have a kernel, and sometimes a amazing deal more than a kernel, of truth in it.

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    The Philosophers: Their Lives and the Nature of their Thought []  2020-1-28 21:2

    While psycho-yses of people is something I generally shy away from, Ben-Ami Sharfstein has completed a fascinating string of case-studies. What makes it interesting is that the "subjects" are the greatest philosophers who have ever arfstein begins with some general observations about the psychological welfare of philosophers in general. He then goes on to discuss some patterns that he finds in the various personas. He also discusses the nature of truth and methods of persuasion. This covers the first 123 ter this elongated introduction, the author goes into each of the major modern philosophers in-turn, starting with Rene Descartes. Some of his favorites (Kant, Nietzsche) obtain 20+ pages devoted to them, while most of the personages obtain around 10 pages on their etzsche once said that one can tell a lot about the philosophy by the life of the philosopher. Scharfstein takes this to heart and briefly examines aspects of each individual's philosophy via the lens of their lives. He examines various aspects such as their childhoods (and the relationship they had w/their parents), their relationships with women as well as major life / traumatic events. All factor in to influencing how a philosopher thinks.If you wish a amazing book that deals with the psychological factors of philsophers, this is a amazing put to start. Sharfstein does not over-play his hand and I found his commentary to be insightful and reasonable. This is a very well thought-out book.

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    god of pranks []  2021-1-17 19:25

    try

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    In the Great Green Room: The Brilliant and Bold Life of Margaret Wise Brown [Book]  2018-6-16 18:0

    We all remember the result that Margaret's books had on our childhoods. Now, as an adult, I feel the same method about this book. It's a unbelievable look at Margaret Wise Brown's life. The author really takes you inside her head and makes you feel as if you are right there as she is going through her life. The descriptions are vivid and it keeps you wanting to read more. The book has the info of a biography but is page turning like a novel, which is great.A legend like Margaret Wise Brown is really defined by some of her most famous works like goodnight moon, but In the Amazing Green Room really went beyond those and revealed fascinating info about her life and the often tragic love affairs she was involved in. The book is well worth reading as an interesting portrait of a fascinating person, even if you did not grow up reading her children's books.If you've created it this far in my review, quit thinking and just buy this book.

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    In the Great Green Room: The Brilliant and Bold Life of Margaret Wise Brown [Book]  2018-6-16 18:0

    Loved the method it was written. Felt like really knew and identified with Margaret Wise Brown. It was awesome what she accomplished as a writer and producer of childrens' books!

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    In the Great Green Room: The Brilliant and Bold Life of Margaret Wise Brown [Book]  2018-6-16 18:0

    I started this book as a curiosity- who was the woman who wrote Goodnight Moon? The author lays out her life in fine detail, providing a complete picture of her ups and downs -- heartaches and loves, explaining how her writing intermingled with her life. And what an interesting life she had!

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    In the Great Green Room: The Brilliant and Bold Life of Margaret Wise Brown [Book]  2018-6-16 18:0

    Amy has done a brilliant job of bringing Margaret Wise Browns life alive for contemporary readers. She has been able to enhance our understanding of this remarkable woman. This is a amazing addition to the knowledge and experience of Margaret and combined with Leonard Marcus's biography, we can fully experience and admire this talented, sensitive, eccentric and attractive person.

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    In the Great Green Room: The Brilliant and Bold Life of Margaret Wise Brown [Book]  2018-6-16 18:0

    This book was delightful and likeable. It was simple to read and introduced me to the author of a favorite bedtime story book - Goodnight rgaret’s spirit of adventure was impressive. As the subtitle states she was brilliant and bold! Her ability to see the globe through a childlike lens is something to be admired and it was the key to her success as a children’s author. This book brought home the importance of positive parent to kid relationships. I loved the fact that Margaret was loyal and selfless when it came to her illustrators. She ensured that the illustrators of her books could create a living wage for their craft. Read this book and be inspired to live life as your real te: The book contains several pages of photographs (not sure if they can be seen in the ebook version). These images are the icing on the cake of Margaret's story.

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    In the Great Green Room: The Brilliant and Bold Life of Margaret Wise Brown [Book]  2018-6-16 18:0

    The book captured Margaret Wise Brown s uniquePersonality and method of looking at the world. She was a free spirit who understood kids s perceptions so well. I was interested in her life because I loved her books as a kid as well as for my own children. HerInterest in nature was what gave her books their specialTouch. The writing was perfect and sensitive.

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    In the Great Green Room: The Brilliant and Bold Life of Margaret Wise Brown [Book]  2018-6-16 18:0

    What a lovely book. My favorite part was when the author wrote about how Brown had originally added a final witty line to "Goodnight Moon" -- and has the kid say goodnight to a cuber and a fly! Next time I search myself reading (reciting) the book to a child, I will definitely add those to the end. Such an interesting person Brown was. I had no idea! Really really enjoyed this book.

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    In the Great Green Room: The Brilliant and Bold Life of Margaret Wise Brown [Book]  2018-6-16 18:0

    We have had Goodnight Moon in the family for years. I knew nothing about Margaret Wise Brown. This book was fascinating. You had Rockefellers, Carnegies, Barrymores, a Governor, a Senator, and a lot of other interesting characters involved in her life. I look at Goodnight Moon with small more knowledge and understanding now.

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    In the Great Green Room: The Brilliant and Bold Life of Margaret Wise Brown [Book]  2018-6-16 18:0

    If you are an adult avid reader, it may be because someone read to you when you were very young. Do you remember your favorite author? Probably not. However, the book you loved may have been "Goodnight Moon", authored by Margaret Wise Brown the topic of this unbelievable biography by Amy Gary. Margaret never lost the ability to see the globe through a child's eyes. That's what created her books so successful and what created her life so interesting. She was "quirky" and usually followed her own instincts rather than be swayed by others. I want I could have known her!

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    In the Great Green Room: The Brilliant and Bold Life of Margaret Wise Brown [Book]  2018-6-16 18:0

    I am a reading spet and my passion is children's literature. Margaret Wise Brown is an all time, classic children's author. I was in awe of her life story. She was much more than I expected, living a very full and complicated life and, I believe spent her existence trying to determine who she really was. Despite all the twists and turns she was able to make a treasury of books that have captured the imagination of millions of youngsters over the ages.

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    The Science of Self: Man, God, and the Mathematical Language of Nature []  2020-9-23 19:37

    I love these kind of books. It took years to place all of this info together. And, they're not done. This is a amazing read for the intellect. There's not a dull page in the book. It talked about the evolution of , why we don't all look alike, the meaning of life, what is life, the conscious universe, the science of death, the mind vs. the brain, mathematics of the universe, living mathematics, universal laws, a lot of a lot of things you've always wondered about. It's not a quick read, a lot of the material will create you stop and think, that's how we grow. I loved this book. Thank You Supreme Understanding and C'BS ALIFE ALLAH for your efforts.

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    The Science of Self: Man, God, and the Mathematical Language of Nature []  2020-9-23 19:37

    As a newborn.. I am on a knowledge binge to become wise and understand my put in this universe. This book has opened my mind beyond expectation. I am in the process of reading Knowledge of Self a Collection of Wisdom on the Science of Everything in Life as well as my 120's. This is only the beginning.. Peace. #1+1=3

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    The Science of Self: Man, God, and the Mathematical Language of Nature []  2020-9-23 19:37

    First of all, congratulations this is perfect work. May this book reach our history classes. Do not think this book is all "black" this is empowering, detailed and covers history for all of us to understand and connect with. The book is so detailed, so well written and so much info packed in one that is worth more than it is priced. I ask the publisher of this book, to please create this book a bigger size so that the reader has zone to take notes, highlight etc and that it is printed a better quality. This is a book to have in your library. BRAVO on this work!!!

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    The Science of Self: Man, God, and the Mathematical Language of Nature []  2020-9-23 19:37

    Perfect study! Extremely informative... Amazing read for all groups.

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    The Science of Self: Man, God, and the Mathematical Language of Nature []  2020-9-23 19:37

    This book is the one I have been looking for, it respond the question I have being asking myself over several years. It brakes everything down a baby should be able to understand it. If he/she is seeking truth and proper knowledge of us. It’s enlightening and refreshing it allowed me to see through my third eye and begin planning accordingly. To accomplish the balance of my goals with clear thinking. I wish to share this book but have to search like minded people and that’s very hard to search especially among our people.

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    The Science of Self: Man, God, and the Mathematical Language of Nature []  2020-9-23 19:37

    This is definitely a book that goes deeper than a normal read and opens up the mind to actually look at the concept of self.

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    The Science of Self: Man, God, and the Mathematical Language of Nature []  2020-9-23 19:37

    Supreme understanding never disappoints with the powerful content in this book and others alike. This is no exclusion for a must have.

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    The Science of Self: Man, God, and the Mathematical Language of Nature []  2020-9-23 19:37

    The authors remove all fluff and exclusively rely on the scientific way along with detailed peer reviewed research (which also relies on scientific method) to bring the facts as they stand. If fresh knowledge (light) which is always coming, uncovers or disrupts current facts then so be it. This is refreshing as the Light (knowledge) needs no one to vouch for it as it exposes the underlying truth that it reveals.

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    The Science of Self: Man, God, and the Mathematical Language of Nature []  2020-9-23 19:37

    I am reading this book for the second time as we speak and I have advised it to all of my mates at some point of time. It is one of my favorite books i my total collection. I want I had this when I was in like Jr. High. I think I would have loved science and math more if I saw presented in this simple format. Well done Supreme.

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    The Science of Self: Man, God, and the Mathematical Language of Nature []  2020-9-23 19:37

    This is a book that really makes you think outside of the religious norms you have about life, creation, and the universe, The authors here do a amazing job of providing references for their info and you can easily verify most claims in the book, i want the authors would have went more into the Origins of religion in this book but I guess thats for another edition. Overall a amazing book to create you think, but its not dogmatic.

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    Sensing God: Experiencing the Divine in Nature, Food, Music, and Beauty []  2021-1-26 19:47

    Gave this book as a bonus to a Christian family member who is a home schooling mother. She follows the inspiration and writings of the author's mother. Only feedback re the book is "I cannot wait to obtain into it."

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    Sensing God: Experiencing the Divine in Nature, Food, Music, and Beauty []  2021-1-26 19:47

    It's hard to even search words to express how much this book blessed, refreshed, and encouraged me. God is so amazing to give us amazing gifts. Joel Clarkson takes us through our senses, music, feasting, and more to support us see how God reveals Himself to us, and how He has given us ways to present His love to others in 's an absolutely attractive book; I've underlined a lot of things and even shared passages with mates and family who now can't wait to read it. You may just weep, cheer, and everything in between to answer to the beauty in this book.- "When we align our hearts to God's heart, it's not that we obtain what we desire; it's that He recreates and redirects our desires toward that which truly satisfies. We allow go of the simplistic things we once wanted because we are given something far more magnificent. We are given the opportunity to see the globe as it is. The inner eyes of our hearts are opened to the only real reality, so that our hearts may desire the only thing which truly satisfies."- "Jesus isn't only the source and the sustenance of beauty. He is also the *end* of beauty, the final point toward which all our desires as Christians are aligned. ... [T]hrough Jesus' incarnation, life, and death on the cross, eternity stepped into time, declaring God's creation worth redeeming."- "We are created to create music, our bodies intricately designed to sing in praise. And yet, rather than merely praising the utility of our constructed selves, perhaps it is in the very limitations of our form that melody opens up the beauty of God’s infinite reality: our constant need to breathe in and out again and again, the challenge to stay in tune and on beat, the frailty of our voices, so easily susceptible to injury or illness. It is a bonus given precisely through the constraints of our bodies. As 2 Corinthians says of Christ in us, 'we have this treasure in earthen vessels, so that the surpassing greatness of the power will be of God and not from ourselves.' God uses the earthen vessels of our limited selves to express the limitlessness of the goodness awaiting us beyond the veil of our earthly lives. Somehow, paradoxically, the more our limitations come into view, the more God’s power is expressed."- "Finally, the realization came to me: This is what my heart had anticipated. This is what I was created for: community, and communion, for the joy of the feast. Each bite had reinstated me to the remembrance of those who loved me and to the goodwill of those gathered there, expressed to me in their shared fellowship. Each savoring of a fresh flavor returned me to that truth and grounded me in the comfort of that knowing. ... This is because the feast is at the heart of the whole of God’s story, and at the very middle of it is the invitation into communion."I really can't recommend this book enough for every believer. This attractive and refreshing reminder is just what I required this year (and every year).{Note: I was provided an advance copy of this book by NavPress Books in exchange for my honest review.}

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    Sensing God: Experiencing the Divine in Nature, Food, Music, and Beauty []  2021-1-26 19:47

    This book is intellectually stimulating, vivid, poetic, memorable, relevant and filled with inspiration. I found in my reading, my heart would obtain so full that sometimes I had to pause and breathe. Readers will be amazed at how author, Joel Clarkson, is able to articulate the ways we experience God, our Creator, through all of our senses in the made globe — nature, art, music, food, beauty.Whereas evangelism often times focuses on our sins and depravity and our need “to be saved and have eternal life”, this book shares a critical notice that in addition to this, we must focus on knowing Jesus and experiencing him and his glory more fully through all our senses, to live life more abundantly and very importantly, how to live as photo bearers in the Kingdom of God here and now as God is restoring all things to himself. God invites us to be “co-conspirators with him in the amazing work of manifesting beauty in our day to day lives.”So a lot of magnificent quotes, but I will leave you with this:“Jesus, the excellent man, more holistically human than we in our imperfect humanness can imagine, rose bodily into heaven, carrying His incarnated flesh into eternity, declaring that not only is creation good, it is destined for redemption. Our witness of beauty in the here and now is a foretaste of what is coming someday, and when we celebrate that beauty and give it back to our hurting world, not only do we honor Jesus, we make a touch point for the eternal, making it palpable in our show moment.”I highly recommend this book. Tag it up. Savor it. Have fun this earth and all of His creation and partake in His goodness every day.

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    Sensing God: Experiencing the Divine in Nature, Food, Music, and Beauty []  2021-1-26 19:47

    This timely book entered the globe yesterday. Simple, slim, yet deeply written, as is typical of anyone from the Clarkson family, it works to connect a Biblical worldview (in thought and mind) to the globe of the senses. It accomplishes its task with grace, brevity, and whole-hearted strength.I love one of the opening chapter's tricky task to tie the physical to the metaphysical: the use of the 5 senses to write Truth from fingertips to neural byways, its carriage the metaphor. I love the entrance of Nature to describe the senses put in a Christian ecosystem.I love the excursions into the church fathers throughout the chapters. Theologians through the centuries wrestled with the purpose of the body and noticed the value of the senses. Joel Clarkson's knowledge and background in melody instills the chapter on "Creation's Song" with a musician's rhetoric.Even the tongue-in-cheek titled "Common Sense" sections at the end of every chapter not only create my inner love of play on words smile, but these sections also immediately begin the attached chapter into a springboard for meaningful and delicious practices to exhibit a Biblical worldview richly through physical means.A book humble to suggest that it is but the handbook, and the true quest is its very topic, to lay it aside and humbly seek to know in a frail human capacity the richness, justice, grace, mercy, and glory the Divine through the carriage that God has given us: our physical bodies and only request? A desire for more. With such a rich life and knowledge bank, I crave a menu of resources written from this author's experiences and encounters to drape around the senses and support readers like myself practically and pragmatically experience the Divine. Perhaps a handbook will follow. 🙂

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    Sensing God: Experiencing the Divine in Nature, Food, Music, and Beauty []  2021-1-26 19:47

    This was a refreshing and joyful read. This book can support take you out of your head and see God and his goodness all around you and let you to grow spiritually and understand God more fully. Please add this to your reading list!

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    Sensing God: Experiencing the Divine in Nature, Food, Music, and Beauty []  2021-1-26 19:47

    If you are looking for an inspirational, encouraging, & beautifully written book to begin off your fresh year, I HIGHLY suggest this!!!“This is the journey of this book: to explore how Jesus is seeking us in the points of sensory contact embedded in every part of our lives. Jesus is calling us to obtain our hands messy with the work of faith rooted in the soil of the visible, the tangible, & the touchable - & to allow that engaged work form & inform our witness to a globe desperate for God’s restoration.”So refreshing to read & meditate on something life giving! 🥰

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    Sensing God: Experiencing the Divine in Nature, Food, Music, and Beauty []  2021-1-26 19:47

    In this book, author Joel Clarkson encourages his readers to join their intellectual knowledge of God with a deeply felt sense of His presence through attractive and amazing earthly things. In the first few chapters, Clarkson lays out his rationale for understanding the role that the senses play in the Christian faith, and even though he does not intend for this to be a comprehensive doctrinal work, he makes a powerful case for why Christians should pursue encountering God through their senses, which are amazing and designed by Him. Throughout the remainder of the book, Clarkson addresses various categories of sensory joys, such as experiencing nature, music, beauty, flavor, and human ing BeautyHe shares real-life examples from his own experiences, and concludes each chapter with reflection questions to support readers think about how they have experienced God's grandeur and love through the sense just addressed, and how they can cultivate this more. This book is amazing for private use or group discussion, and because Clarkson draws on writings and traditions from a dozens of various denominational backgrounds, Christians of various theological convictions and methods of practice can all search something helpful here. I found this book refreshing, and appreciated the lack of tribalism in it. Clarkson does not test to persuade his readers to come around to his exact method of viewing the world, but provides guidance for how everyone can see beauty where they are.I especially appreciated the chapters on touch and on fasting, because Clarkson handles both of these sensitive topics unusually well. He acknowledges how "perilous" touch can be, but provides examples from Scripture and Christian history to present how healing, self-giving, and full of dignity meaningful touch can be. Regarding fasting, instead of promoting it merely as asceticism or a way of exerting control over the body, he conceptualizes it as a method to wash the windows of our hearts, reorienting our senses through temporary denial to see things more clearly. Although Clarkson deliberately does not provide step-by-step programs for applying these ideas, he helps his readers refresh their views of the senses in holistic and meaningful nclusionThis is a amazing book for Christians to read, regardless of their denomination or current level of sensitivity to the globe around them. People who are already attuned to God's divine presence in earthly joys can search this book helpful as Clarkson articulates concepts that are difficult to place into words, and readers who tend to discount the significance of the senses, or who regularly feel distracted from them, can benefit from this book's refreshing and easy challenge to become more aware and invested in the beauty around us. This book provides an orthodox and heart-stirring view of how significant the senses are to a relationship with God, encouraging readers to embrace the full implications and richness of their God-given humanity.

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    Sensing God: Experiencing the Divine in Nature, Food, Music, and Beauty []  2021-1-26 19:47

    Full of peace and beauty. This is a must-read for anyone who struggles with seeing the Lord in the globe around them- nature, food, etc. I received an advanced reader's copy.

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    Sensing God: Experiencing the Divine in Nature, Food, Music, and Beauty []  2021-1-26 19:47

    The goodness of God is all around us waiting for us to see. He woos and draws us if we will take the time to stop and listen!!I loved this quote from this book:It was not that we made it through our actions; surely the hidden presence of Jesus was already at work in countless sunrises stretching back to the dawn of time. She simply opened my eyes to recognize it in zone and time and answer to it in worship.

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    Sensing God: Experiencing the Divine in Nature, Food, Music, and Beauty []  2021-1-26 19:47

    Most Christians understand the deep importance of Unique Revelation (God's written Word, the Bible) to our faith. In my experience, a lot of Christians fail to grasp the importance of General Revelation (knowledge about God discovered through natural means like nature, music, beauty, etc.) for the strengthening and deepening of their faith. This book explores the wonderful bonus that General Revelation is and how we can best have fun this bonus through things like enjoyment of nature, the spiritual aspect of music, the ability of art to communicate, the fellowship that grows through human touch, the heightened sensitivity that comes with a period of denying the senses for a time (fasting), and then the all encompassing joy and delight of feasting, first with others here on earth, but always pointing ahead to that feast day Christians long for at the end of time. As an artist and nature lover I can't recommend this book more highly!

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    Reforesting Faith: What Trees Teach Us About the Nature of God and His Love for Us []  2020-1-14 19:16

    I loved this book so much that I purchased four more for gifts. Every page was a joy to read. The author walks us through the Bible with a nature talk! After reading this refreshing and thoughtful book, you will regard trees, plants, leaves, flowers, bushes, as bonuses from a loving Creator God for us to have fun and care for. Take this journey through the Bible and be amazed!

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    Reforesting Faith: What Trees Teach Us About the Nature of God and His Love for Us []  2020-1-14 19:16

    An easy, conversational read that assumes an acceptance of our environmental threats and ecosystem failures as any Christian would acknowledge their own sinfulness.A must read for any secular environmentalist who wants to understand the emerging Christian call away from domination of nature to genuine stewardship.He offers hope for fresh life through the amazing work of literally re-foresting the earth and for Christians his equation of the Tree of Life with the saving grace of Jesus Christ is chocked full of scholarly tidbits sure to stimulate the spiritual appetite.

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    Reforesting Faith: What Trees Teach Us About the Nature of God and His Love for Us []  2020-1-14 19:16

    I loved the book, the content, the pace, and gained a completely fresh understanding of TREES! At first I was skeptical, trees are kind of boring and I'm not a "tree hugger", but once I started this book I couldn't was incredibly illuminating. I’ve read the Bible a lot of times, yet somehow missed all these awesome connections to trees. The author is humorous, engaging, and the story-line moves quickly, yet the book is packed full of locations that require we pause for deeper reflection.I would highly recommend this book for both the Christian and non-Christians alike.

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    Being Human: An Entheological Guide to God, Evolution, and the Fractal, Energetic Nature of Reality []  2020-3-30 19:32

    I can't read this any more. I could accept some of his ideas, like his way is completely real and ALL OTHERS are utterly false - IF he created some rational arguments or explained differences in a meaningful way. Instead it's just some variation on EVERYTHING ELSE IS WRONG. For just ONE example, he says meditation is entirely about controlling the mind and "nothing at all do with" his explanation. Granted there is some language in the vast globe of practices with "meditation" that implies that, but that's just a very narrow slice of the subject - just a cartoon-like interpretation of what meditation is or who the Buddha (for example) was. Every attempt to explain how non-duality works - including his own - is going to be ultimately incorrect (because language - and ultimately the Self - is by its nature 'dual'). But he just says EVERYTHING ELSE IS WRONG without looking into the mirror of his own language is book comes across as if he has no idea what meditation is, what shamanism is. I can't believe he doesn't know - my only thought is perhaps he just read something about them and now thinks he knows everything? Or it was convenient to not test to articulate the complexities there?Another - more general - peeve I have is how often people attempt to explain difficult concepts by using fancy ideas they don't understand. Usually it's quantum physics but here Bell uses Fractals as if that actually explains anything. IF he actually knew fractal math well enough to realistically relate it to his work it might be interesting - but here he's just waving a magical fancy word around and explaining nothing. OK his yoga is interesting - and I can relate to some of his ideas around it - but it has nothing to do with "fractal".I don't doubt that Bell has experienced non-dual states, and even has a amazing understanding/experience/stance on it - but like so a lot of other evangelists for something they experience as awesome and important, he falls into the trap of thinking only HIS explanation is valid and ALL OTHERS are false.A detail I agree with: when he criticizes Terrence McKenna's "machine elves" description - the argument that there is another dimension "out there" that we obtain to experience - I agree with him. I think he's correct that those are just photos from our own minds. But even there Bell completely dismisses that experience, not even considering that those "illusions" might be a useful path for growth and self-exploration, which in turn could be a helpful tool leading to non-dual awareness.

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    Being Human: An Entheological Guide to God, Evolution, and the Fractal, Energetic Nature of Reality []  2020-3-30 19:32

    Amazing read! Short and concise, this book reiterates the experience of hypertravel and spiritual oneness. It helps clarify the questions asked after diving into the huge think. Amazing for psychonauts who are needing to integrate reason into their travels!

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    Being Human: An Entheological Guide to God, Evolution, and the Fractal, Energetic Nature of Reality []  2020-3-30 19:32

    Ball is rather off-the-wall, but I don't wish to be mean, given that the entheogenic problem is traditionally a small hokey. At his most insightful, he comments that Terrence McKenna's "self-transforming machine elves" were his own private projection. At his worst, he believes the body is composed of "infinity loops," about as credible as orogone energy, not my thing.

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    Being Human: An Entheological Guide to God, Evolution, and the Fractal, Energetic Nature of Reality []  2020-3-30 19:32

    Some really cool explanations of fractal energy and how it works.A very deep and unusual level of how reality works and what is going on when using psychedelics. Martin Ball has something he calls the divine imagination that is a realm where all things originate. Reminds me of Plato. Very eye opening and grounding for anyone who wants to discover psychedelic realms and entheogens

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    Being Human: An Entheological Guide to God, Evolution, and the Fractal, Energetic Nature of Reality []  2020-3-30 19:32

    this book is special on the subject and really straightforward and simple to read. it is a small bit little i think this subject could be more complex eventually

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    Reforesting Faith: What Trees Teach Us About the Nature of God and His Love for Us []  2020-1-14 19:16

    I love this topic and my pastor had quoted from this book so I sent for it. It is interesting but beautiful primary for those of us who have seen the wonders of creation and especially trees over time. Is a bit too generally meditative as well. Got 1/3 through it and found I was less inspired as I was finding it a boring read; but then it is written by a layman physician so on that basis might appeal to those less biblically knowledgeable. Just not quite what I expected.

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    Reforesting Faith: What Trees Teach Us About the Nature of God and His Love for Us []  2020-1-14 19:16

    “For my thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways my ways”I love it when God brings something fresh into my life. Something I never considered. Something I never thought possible. Something I never it possible for God to bring a man to himself and his household, Jewish wife, self-made man, atheist, medical doctor, unchurched, in his mid forties? it possible for God to use a boyhood love of trees and forests as a deep connection between Himself and this man? , with that beginning, Matthew Sleeth, MD completely captures my attention. What can I learn from a man like this? What can I obtain from a experience and walk such as he has had?“There’s a tree on the first page of Genesis, in the first Psalm, on the first page of the Fresh Testament, and on the latest page of Revelation. The Bible’s wisdom is referred to as a tree of life. Every major biblical hero and every major theological happening has a tree marking the spot. A tree is the only thing that could slay Jesus—and the only thing Jesus ever harmed.”With words like these, Matthew Sleeth creates crossings between creature, creation and Creator. If transformation can only come through the mind, thinking a fresh thought, giving a second thought to what is commonly thought, then “Reforesting Faith” accomplishes just that.I have a tree in my front yard. It was an overgrown twig. Both my wife and the builder said it was dead. I disagreed. The builder offered to remove (not replace) it. I declined. 7 years later its full of deep green leaves and 3-4 times as tall as it had been. It has been home to a Texas Mockingbird family for a couple of years.I’ll never look at it again as “just a tree”. I’ll never again regard my affection to be in and around trees as just a boyhood remembrance wanting to be recreated. I’ll never again look at other living things as a “category" for which God has no true affection, love or concern. Especially trees.I commend “Reforesting Faith” as worthy of your time and attention. It transformed my mind. It impacted my soul. I will behave differently because I couldn’t prevent it if I wanted to. And I don’t wish eve Jepperson

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    Reforesting Faith: What Trees Teach Us About the Nature of God and His Love for Us []  2020-1-14 19:16

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book and the sound rationality that it provoked in me. I have always had a very powerful love connection with trees and nature and feel closest to God there. Now I understand why. I highly recommend this book for Christians and non Christians alike. Beautifully written.

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    Reforesting Faith: What Trees Teach Us About the Nature of God and His Love for Us []  2020-1-14 19:16

    I liked this book so much, I searched for other books by this author and bought them as well. Thoughtful and interesting book. A various perspective. Those searching for God should read it.

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    Being Human: An Entheological Guide to God, Evolution, and the Fractal, Energetic Nature of Reality []  2020-3-30 19:32

    Completely amateur writing. Spelling errors and grammatical errors left and right. The author is incredibly arrogant and insists that all other beliefs about what reality is are wrong and that only his ver is correct. He speaks like an all-knowing prophet and makes you feel foolish for believing anything other than what he is preaching. I have no idea where he came by the "absolutely real and accurate" info that he presents. He sums up most of his thoughts with phrases like "this is the real nature of reality" and "accept that you are god". He repeats himself constantly by just re-wording his thoughts in order to take up page space. Things like "infinity loops" and "liquid crystal" are used in the most ridiculous ways to explain physiological systems. The use of very complicated explanations for primary anatomy and consciousness are used in ways to create the ideas presented sound very sophisticated and scientific. I'm not saying however, that everything in this small book is nonsense or ridiculous, though. The author does show enlightening concepts about entheogens, which I agree are tools to experience higher consciousness and view non-physical reality. But at the same time he makes things like taking tryptamines and hallucinogens sound like the most necessary thing in life and refers to it as "doing medicine work", when really they are just chemicals that we ingest to give us experiences of non-physical reality. He makes sense of a lot of aspects of physical and metaphysical reality by simplifying them in layman's terms. But all in all, it is a very arrogant, narrow-minded and empty explanation of what life and reality is- claiming there is nothing like life after death, reincarnation, spirits, or enlightenment. It does not give you much to look forward to after this life and makes "being human" seem depressing.

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    Reforesting Faith: What Trees Teach Us About the Nature of God and His Love for Us []  2020-1-14 19:16

    Actually bought this for my wife, who loved it and read a lot of parts to me. Seems a amazing book to convict Christians that they should be proper tree-huggers...but in a amazing and Godly way!!! All about the importance of trees to the environment and some very interesting history and facts, especially from the Bible about trees. For example, the founder of the Sierra Club, John Muir, was a devout Christian who had memorized the entire Fresh Testament and a amazing story about his conversion to Godly tree-hugging.

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    Being Human: An Entheological Guide to God, Evolution, and the Fractal, Energetic Nature of Reality []  2020-3-30 19:32

    This succinct book blew off the doors of perception for me and finally provided the missing pieces to certain esoteric subjects.I originally started in on the sacred mushroom literature but laid it aside to read this book first which was the best thing I could have done as this book provides the ontological tutorial for the rest of the literature.I am now back on track and having finished Clark Heinrick's Magic Mushrooms in Religion and Alchemy and John Rush's Failed God. The whole globe of ethnobotany and culture has opened up.I have an MA in Religious Studies with concentration in Philosophy, Cosmology, and Consciousness from CIIS in San Francisco but we never discussed this material-possibly because most of it came about since I earned my degree (2001) and not much was available besides Terrence Mc Kenna and Stan Grof and the holdovers from the psychedelic hippie stage of the late 60'nce then there has been an explosion of updated serious literature on the field of mind-altering is small book puts it all in perspective. It also provides a (totally unintended and un-related) view-point on the principles of the ego in metaphysical systems like "A course in Miracles-" plus it puts a lot of metaphysical concepts like planes of consciousness, UFOs and concepts of immortality in logical e folks who gave this title a one star obviously missed the point. We are not talking crystal meth or cocaine addiction ere may be an ego issue but it does not come from the author but rather from those who may feel threatened bythe claims from this gem.

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    Being Human: An Entheological Guide to God, Evolution, and the Fractal, Energetic Nature of Reality []  2020-3-30 19:32

    Simply good. Exactly what I was looking fuss or useless fresh age items to fill pages. Moving on to his next book

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    god pranks []  2021-1-17 19:27

    test2

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    Being Human: An Entheological Guide to God, Evolution, and the Fractal, Energetic Nature of Reality []  2020-3-30 19:32

    Amazing book! It did support me to understand more about human nature. It goes deep. I only want the author would spend more time on evolution of human species and on how we became self-aware. How did that transition from an animal to human occur? I hope to see more books coming from this author in the future.

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    Being Human: An Entheological Guide to God, Evolution, and the Fractal, Energetic Nature of Reality []  2020-3-30 19:32

    The first section of this book sets forth a theory on the nature of the universe. (The second part, less of interest to me, tells us how we can see that truth for ourselves through the use of entheogenic . It is well done, just of less interest to me personally.) I happen to agree with most of the first section, and found it totally thought provoking. What can create this book difficult to deal with is the fact that the author states his views as facts. I think any first year philosophy student could kick the author's butt in a debate...not on the topic matter, (which no one could prove or disprove) but on how he presents it as fact. Had Ball just used a lot of "in my opinion," "I think," or "based on my private experience," the book would have been more readable. If you can take a bit of an egomaniac spouting his opinions as truths, and are interested in theories of the universe, this book is a gem.

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    Reforesting Faith: What Trees Teach Us About the Nature of God and His Love for Us []  2020-1-14 19:16

    Matthew’s book taught me a lot of things, the greatest of which was discovering God’s attention to detail and love for His followers, a lot of times meeting them by, of course, trees! This faith-boosting book is like a spiritual science lesson sprinkled with Matthew’s humor and love of God’s Word. HIs appreciation for the info of the Bible are contagious. This would be a amazing book for a non-believer as well, perhaps leading them to faith. Matthew’s background in carpentry and medicine are clearly God-ordained, ultimately leading him to the Creator of his beloved trees. His own experiences present us how God pursues us all. How cool would it be for science classes to use this book in the classroom? A must-read for all ages...

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    Reforesting Faith: What Trees Teach Us About the Nature of God and His Love for Us []  2020-1-14 19:16

    Matthew Sleeth at his best! I couldn’t wait to keep the book and it was even better than I imagined! Engaging, entertaining, and enlightening about the Bible! Even though I have read through the Bible a lot of times, most of the insights that Matthew writes about did not come to my mind during my own reading. I will be reading the Word of God with fresh and appreciated understanding of the fabulous role of trees in the Bible. Thank you, Matthew, for this well researched and written book!

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    Hymn of Nature (All Creatures of Our God and King) []  2021-2-11 20:14

    I love this song, such a talented composer. The method Jon Schmidt can make a peaceful and strong song at the same time is amazing.

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    The Grit in the Pearl: The Scandalous Life of Margaret, Duchess of Argyll []  2019-12-18 18:0

    Amazing story.

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    The Grit in the Pearl: The Scandalous Life of Margaret, Duchess of Argyll []  2019-12-18 18:0

    I couldn't place this book down because I couldn't relate to her lifestyle of men, money, and entitlement. Fascinating psychological study of a woman's reality in the upper class of who she thought she was and who she thought she should be. For sure there was grit in her pearl.

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    The Grit in the Pearl: The Scandalous Life of Margaret, Duchess of Argyll []  2019-12-18 18:0

    Interesting but not worth the cost. Typical of wealthy seeking attention. It is a repeat of so a lot of in the upper class. Sadly there seldom is any contentment or joy but a lot of cash cash spent carelessly

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    The Grit in the Pearl: The Scandalous Life of Margaret, Duchess of Argyll []  2019-12-18 18:0

    my kind of reading!!

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    The Grit in the Pearl: The Scandalous Life of Margaret, Duchess of Argyll []  2019-12-18 18:0

    Just an average bio with not much insight into the thoughts and motivations of the subject.

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    The Grit in the Pearl: The Scandalous Life of Margaret, Duchess of Argyll []  2019-12-18 18:0

    I knew nothing about the Duchess before reading this book. The book offers a factual and multi faceted look at her story. It reads very much like a novel and was enjoyable to read. I would definitely recommend it to anyone who enjoys biographies. I would also seek out other works by this author as this one is so well done.

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    The Grit in the Pearl: The Scandalous Life of Margaret, Duchess of Argyll []  2019-12-18 18:0

    Most books for this price are , well, book sized. This is over priced for a short book. Interesting but not great. She was an interesting lady. I read 2 books recently about Hugette Clark and found those both superior to this. I am not saying not to read it but it's mediocre compared to a lot of books I have read.

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    The Grit in the Pearl: The Scandalous Life of Margaret, Duchess of Argyll []  2019-12-18 18:0

    This book kept me wanting more. Well-written story about a very compelling woman. Bought it on a whim and glad I did!

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    The Grit in the Pearl: The Scandalous Life of Margaret, Duchess of Argyll []  2019-12-18 18:0

    All my life, I had heard about this “dreadful” woman. I was fascinated by her. I then forgot all about her. Whilst reading my method through Lady Colin Campbell’s books she pops up again. Another side to the ongoing e Campbell men, as Dukes of Argyll, are not the most pleasant of human beings. They are mercenary at best,from all accounts, exceedingly unpleasant at worst as husbands from their wives ey burst onto the historical scene at Glencoe and it is all downhill from there. Personally, as a Scot, I have small to do with Campbells. Just rgaret comes across as a product of her generation, a latest bright flame of a dying breed. None too bright, enormously wealthy, privileged and blessed with the right looks for the time, she shone incandescently. Dazzling men, she picked and used, used and dropped, flitted and married, was cushioned by wealth and connections until the very end. Self professedly highly ed, she loved being with men. Did she like or the process of romance? She was a contemporary of Wallis Simpson, and looked like e popular Headless Polaroid is here, not the image itself, but a discussion. We still don’t know the man, but we have a amazing stab at his rsonally, I would love to know how these women never got pregnant. Or perhaps they did, and had “ terminations”. How DID they cope with such active lives and hold their birth rates so low?If you like a amazing readable biography, test this. It skips and jumps. Misses chunks and I think this is due to lack of material? Just stay away from Campbell men!

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    The Grit in the Pearl: The Scandalous Life of Margaret, Duchess of Argyll []  2019-12-18 18:0

    boring

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    Lost in the Middle: MidLife and the Grace of God []  2020-1-22 20:9

    This is one of the most perfect books on the market. I have been a bible study teacher and mentor for decades and I read voraciously and I would place this book on my top ten reading list of all time. But I do wish to place out a mild warning. The first half of this book depressed me to no end because it underscored my life so clearly. All the choices I'd created up until 50 were playing out very differently than I had imagined and that was a very difficult to swallow. It IS hard to accept how we've lived; the consequences of choices; the amazing disappointments of life. Those things are real, and hard to face. But the second half of the book was tremendously helpful in accepting the former and giving a amazing map to where to go from here.I ended up leading a bible study with this book and all the women had the same experience I had - the first half was difficult, but worth the read.

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    Lost in the Middle: MidLife and the Grace of God []  2020-1-22 20:9

    Lost in the Middle is the only book I have read so far that gets to the heart of us who have traveled the street long and seemingly come up short. It also hits home for those whose journey is still in process, but huge cracks in the street have appeared and nearly swallowed ul David Tripp gets at the heart of the human dilemma: focus on self rather than on the Creator. Somehow we obtain it backwards and think that all things need to work out for us, but it's not about us. When we think we are in control of our lives, we create ourselves like God, and, that, we aren't. Through the exercise of repentance, seeking forgiveness, and acknowledging the Sovereignty of God, we can rekindle the reason for living and finish well. I strongly recommend this book to us who are in the 4th quarter, AND to those who have blown it and need a leg up. Thank you Paul, for leading the way.

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    Lost in the Middle: MidLife and the Grace of God []  2020-1-22 20:9

    I am making an exception by writing a negative review for a book. I usually search some nugget of positive influence in books but I could not recommend this one. I am an avid reader and learner. I am a small past “mid” life but have an elderly parent and grown kids so I feel like I’m in the “middle”. The description and positive reviews created me wish to read this one. However, it is so wordy you have to read some paragraphs over to obtain it. Some chapters could have said exactly what Tripp wanted to say in 1 page or less. I have to say that I did not obtain anything out of it for myself. I am not struggling with the things he talked about even though I feel like I am in a weird put and age. I have experienced so a lot of devastating things in the latest 7 years and felt as though I would have been inspired by this book. Instead, it’s depressing. I want I would have spent my precious book budget on something else. I am very disappointed to say the least. Please, Mr Tripp, at least have your book edited and republished because even the print is hard to read.

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    Lost in the Middle: MidLife and the Grace of God []  2020-1-22 20:9

    This is an perfect book on getting your bearings in mid-life. Tripp does a amazing job of empathizing with the diverse locations that people search themselves in and helps them see the trials, testings, and triumphs as God's design to woo us close to himself. I had never heard of this book, though it was published in 2004, till I went to a marriage conference a few weeks ago. I really want I had seen it back then; but perhaps it was better to read it on the 'latter' side of mid-life rather than the beginning.

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    Lost in the Middle: MidLife and the Grace of God []  2020-1-22 20:9

    Having passed the 50-year tag in 2013, I am well into what is called "middle age." For the first 20 years of my life, the focus was growth and education. In my twenties, I began settle down into marriage and family, and in my thirties all the method through to my forties there was never a dull moment raising three children and serving at church. So, now what? In a Christian culture that stresses the need to "focus on the family," what happens when the family is gone? We can feel useless and lose the joy of our salvation as we mourn the loss of what we had in the past. Lost in the Middle by Paul David Tripp is an simple to read, practical book that helps us see this is a season of life in which we can be more spiritually productive than ever before. I especially liked the chapter titled, "Golden Calves." God calls women in Proverbs 31:25 to "laugh at the time to come." This book will support those who feel lost to see the joy that awaits those who have a biblical perspective on any scene of life, but especially with respect to aging.

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    Lost in the Middle: MidLife and the Grace of God []  2020-1-22 20:9

    Paul David Tripp has an insightful, but humble grasp of theology, and can take the theology and distill it into practical applications and attitudes. His thesis here and in his other works is that if we as believers (this book is for believers) focus our attentions on God and His ways, then the "crisis" of middle age is no crisis, in point of fact, it's a blessing because it will reveal elements of who we are that are ungodly, and once identified, they may be addressed.

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    Lost in the Middle: MidLife and the Grace of God []  2020-1-22 20:9

    God has been, and continues, using Paul Tripp to teach and to counsel the church at huge through his books. If you are living in the middle years of life this is a must read. If you are a middle aged man in a crisis of faith or going through confusion about the next half of your life.....buy it now and read it ASAP! The teaching is based strongly on the Bible, thus it is truth that really applies to all people of all ages. It will be of benefit for anyone to read, regardless of their age. My favorite thought in the book, and I summarize....The middle years best equate with the season of autumn. Autumn is the season of harvest. Whatever seeds you sowed in the spring and summer of your life will be seen in the "harvest-time" of your life. How truly profound is such a thought.

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    Lost in the Middle: MidLife and the Grace of God []  2020-1-22 20:9

    Paul David Tripp's book starts by describing three main triggers of mid-life malaise - mortality, regret, and broken dreams - and then walks through practical and biblically-based tactics for understanding, healing, hope, and renewal. He shares some special insights, such as the purpose and misuse of our God-given abilities of imagination, and society's failure to define the different stages that constitute what we oversimplify as "adulthood". Although the book is long-winded, Tripp is a lively and eloquent writer, and uses thematic ogies and the stories of several individuals to illustrate his points and keep the reader's attention. I also appreciate his careful avoidance of overusing scriptual texts; when he does turn to scripture, the passage is directly appropriate and fully developed. On the whole, the book is well-suited to the person lost in their own mid-life situation, is chock-full of insights, inspiration, and practical recommendations, and is an perfect traveling companion for the journey to significance and meaning in the "second half" of life.

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    Lost in the Middle: MidLife and the Grace of God []  2020-1-22 20:9

    I wish to write out the outset that this book (along with "The Holiness of God" by R. C. Sproul; "Heaven" by Peter Kreeft; "Emotionally Healthy Spirituality" by Pete Scazzero and "Prodigal God" by Tim Keller) has been one of the top paradigm shifting books I have read to support me change my thinking - radically. I also, have to write that I do not have the skill or ability to describe or recommend this book with the superlatives it deserves. I can only write that if you are struggling with "mid-life crises" this book is absolute MUST reading and I'm confident that you will be much better off by reading l that written - on with the review. I have personally battled depression my whole life. I am a perfectionist and have had to learn to "chill out" over the years, because I have found that things break, plans don't work out the method you thought they would, and God is sovereign and I'm overwhelmingly NOT!In this book Paul Tripp brilliantly exegetes reality and brokenness in this fallen globe in which we live. He gives tons of illustrations from the Bible, and men and women in the 21st century to point out the different manifestations of why so a lot of people struggle with the mid-life years. I have read the book twice (and I'm certain - I will read it again) because so a lot of of the stories are about my own struggles. He brings out in the begin so a lot of thoughts, and questions that a lot of of us wrestle with and answers them with penetrating insight, theological depth, and practical life giving is book is not an simple read. I think the more you struggle with life (especially in your middle years) - the harder it will be to read. I found myself crying, and physically aching as I read some of the stories and ysis from Tripp's pen. However, in the final ysis the book leads you to a new fresh begin and brilliantly applies the gospel to your life. B with hope - Tripp shows very practically how God's purposes and plans for your life will be fulfilled, no matter what you have done, or how you feel at this scene of life.I have been immensely helped in so a lot of ways from reading this book. Allow me list just five:1) It was just flat out helpful to have so a lot of of the things I've thought and felt be identified and addressed so insightfully by the author - in other words - "I'm not crazy" - there are actually millions of people that have gone and are going through what I am during this scene of life - and they are still trucking!2) I learned to appreciate the realities of God's design for humanity and how His plans will culminate - my story is a part of the fulfillment of the Amazing Story of the Bible. Tripp helps you to see that nothing in your life is wasted, and that Christ's win on the cross is also your ultimate win as well. Your failure has been nullified by Christ's Person and Work on your behalf. We have fallen, but He has picked us up. We have failed, but He has succeeded, and ultimately everything will be created fresh and excellent again - forever!3) I was so encouraged over and over again. Sometimes I feel like a major failure in every zone of life: as a Christian, pastor, provider, husband, father, taking care of myself physically, and the list can go on and on. However, Tripp is able to bring out the positive realities that effect from recognizing our weaknesses and how that makes God's grace such a unbelievable reality for us.4) I felt like I got to sit down with Jesus as I read this book. Perhaps one of the most helpful things he did in the book is present how much we are like the people in the Bible (even though we think we are not). The author has such a amazing grasp of theology, the Bible, and what God and people are like - that almost everything he writes is penetrating the deepest recesses of your soul. I think Paul Tripp is very wise, because he has a very intimate relationship with Jesus and brings that relationship to the reader in the book. It created me wish to know God more intimately, the Bible more than I do, and to walk more closely with Jesus.5) It created me even more excited about Heaven and to live for that which will latest forever. It created me wish to live more simply, for others, and for those things that will please my Master - Jesus. Like a lot of of the Psalms - I started reading the book in a discouraged and depressed state, and by the end of the book I was able to praise my Lord with a smile on my face, and with joy in my soul.I feel like this review is rubbish compared to how GOOD this book actually is. I can only say that this book will support you to understand your sin, need of a Savior, and need for His grace more than you ever have before. Also, that His grace is MUCH greater than all your sin. One more thing - anyone at any life scene can benefit tremendously from this book - you don't have to be struggling through mid-life to benefit from this book. Obtain this book, obtain copies to give away, and grow in His awesome grace. Thanks, Paul Tripp - and I hope that a lot of more people will read and benefit from this book - I sure have!

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    Lost in the Middle: MidLife and the Grace of God []  2020-1-22 20:9

    When I read the title, I did not really obtain it, LOST IN THE MIDDLE: MIDLIFE AND THE GRACE OF GOD. Our church is reading and studying this book in the care groups. Before I read it, I said to my friends, "that's where I am," because I thought the title meant that this is addressing those who are caring for older parents, helping grown children, enjoying grandchildren. I am. I would soon understand that I was to be addressed in a various method than I thought I would , these are not the ones who are being addressed. Rather it is about those with broken dreams, disillusioned ideas and older and, possibly sick, bodies. Where do our dreams search their fulfillment? Where can we go to satisfy our deepest needs? This is what Paul Tripp addresses and more than adequately. Without a doubt, I recommend his book highly. Our church, Covenant Life Church, in Gaithersburg, MD, is hosting a seminar presented by Paul Tripp on September 10-11. My husband and I are looking forward to attending. At the least, buy the book. You will be helped by it.

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    Man, Nature, and the Nature of Man []  2020-1-22 22:41

    I want you could obtain this in DVD but they never did it yet... Amazing stuff

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    Man, Nature, and the Nature of Man []  2020-1-22 22:41

    cant go wrong with Alan Watts

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    Man, Nature, and the Nature of Man []  2020-1-22 22:41

    Short, but poignant. Strikes home deftly, and makes you think about your put here in reality. Helps you accept yourself and others and nature itself in a much more intelligent, meaningful, and non-violent way. I recommend anything by Watts. He was one of our intellectual shining is audiobook is little compared to the plethora of lectures you can search for free on the Tube of You. Still, it is worth every penny. Especially because you can load it into an iPod and have it on the Alan Watts' books and check out those online lectures. Your life will be changed. For the better. Not by dogma and guilt, but by common sense spirituality.

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    Man, Nature, and the Nature of Man []  2020-1-22 22:41

    This captures bits and pieces of a few of Alan Watts' lectures. I can't think of anyone more enjoyable to listen to than Watts, and there are only a handful of people with his level of wisdom. When Watts gave lectures he didn't test to persuade anyone to anything, he just seeks to entertain you... spiritually and philosophically. So you might not obtain the best of Watts' 'arguments', but it's Watts, anything and everything the man did is precious.

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    The Edges of the Earth in Ancient Thought: Geography, Exploration, and Fiction []  2020-10-3 18:14

    James S. Romm, professor of classics at Bard College, undertakes a decidedly sophisticated literary turn to yze the manner in which the ancients perceived the far reaches of the Earth. He finds that they approached geography as much as a form of narrative fiction as a description of terrains or peoples grounded in fact and ysis. That, in itself, is a fascinating conclusion and suggests that a lot of of the tales we are familiar with, such as Atlantis, the Hyperboreans, and the like should be taken more as creative writing than factual reporting.Ancient geographers--although that term is a bit of mischaracterization--elieved that their own country was the center of a disk-like world. A disk-like Earth, surrounded by an Ocean with islands full of wonders and monstrosities, explained the world. As one traveled farther and farther away from Mediterranean culture, those inculcated in that culture believed, the globe becomes stranger and in going to the farthest ended humans were reported to behave is belief evolved over time and while such writers as Herodotus enjoyed the outrageous story and his histories are filled with the, he took care to note that such and story was similar to him and sometimes discounted it in his discussion. In addition, he also criticized others for their uncritical recitation of wild stories for lands far away. Over time others did the same, and the move toward greater concern over the reporting on lands and peoples far away emerged. This was especially the case in the era of Alexander the Amazing and thereafter as geographical knowledge based on the ground truth provided by expeditions became more reliable; that coupled with the concerns of Alexander himself that hard data be collected to aid in his efforts at conquest. Even so, assigning barbarian (and sometimes magical) status to those at the "edges of the Earth" remained is is, of course, a thoroughly doented study that raises a lot of questions, a lot of more questions than it answers. It is illuminating at several levels, but I found several key points that struck me as especially e first of these is the deep philosophical belief in "Ocean" as the source of all that exists and that its boundlessness surrounds all the land and water that the ancient Greeks knew. This "primordial water," to use Jean Rudhardt's term, made a useful understanding of creation, order, universe, and humanity's put in it. "The entire nexus of associations outlined above--connecting Ocean's role as boundary of earth with its vast extent, impassibility, atavism, and monstrous disorder--is neatly embodied in a set of Greek epigrams...`It [Ocean] is greatest because of this: It is beyond all things, but beyond it is nothing'" (pp. 25-26). Floating in Ocean was the Globe and beyond the amazing unknown, perhaps an unknown that was impenetrable but certainly one that was risky and unknown. The power of Ocean in ancient thought gave rise to the ideas of sea creatures and falling off the Earth as seafaring was viewed as a treacherous exercise. Over the centuries as Mediterranean culture expanded outward and more and more areas came to be know the idea of Ocean did not abate but the unknown of it moved outward as well. So when the Romans incorporated much of Britain into its empire Ocean moved beyond the English Channel but it still existed in some e second fascinating notice was the gradual realization and spread of the idea of Earth as a sphere that was surprisingly like our understanding of it today. At some level the idea of Ocean and the idea of Earth as a sphere are inconsistent with each other but they were held in creative tension in ancient philosophy through a rather complex set of exercises. A sweeping acc of what the Earth might look like from above by imagining the cosmos from a fresh vantage point above the Earth served ancient Greek philosophers in considering this issue. As Romm describes it, one would perceive the Earth as "a brightly colourful spherical object adorned with gold, silver, and jewels." He quotes Eratosthenes in considering the whole Earth: "Five encircling zones were girt around it: two of them darker than grayish-blue enamel, another one sandy and red, as if from fire....Two others there were, standing opposite one another, between the heat and the showers of ice; both were temperate regions, growing with grain, the fruit of Eleusinian Demeter; in them dwelt men antipodal to each other" (pp. 127-28). This categorization of the planet as having zones of hot and cold and temperate climates moved beyond Ocean as an explanation of the world. Hellenistic and Roman writers took a fresh turn that profoundly affected Mediaeval thought about the Earth."The Edges of the Earth in Ancient Thought" is a superb investigation not only of the idea of the "edges of the Earth" but also the idea of the Earth writ large.

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    The Edges of the Earth in Ancient Thought: Geography, Exploration, and Fiction []  2020-10-3 18:14

    It's a very interesting book for geographers. We could understand very well about myths - places, people - and fantasies about other lands emerging from the Ancient writers. Read it !

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    The Dawn of the Reformation: Essays in Late Medieval and Early Reformation Thought []  2020-1-24 20:14

    Although this book is a collection of essays and they were written some years ago, it still brings a lot of reflections...

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    The Edges of the Earth in Ancient Thought: Geography, Exploration, and Fiction []  2020-10-3 18:14

    The most fascinating aspect of reading The Edges of the Earth in Ancient Thought by James S. Romm is to learn that for the ancients, geography was more of a literary device than a budding science. In a way, it was more complex than that as the lines between literature and science were often blurred. It is interesting to note that the idea of the edge of the earth was most often used to make a moral lesson and what a better well to draw a taste of moral water from than the zone where the least info is available. It was a blank slate of sorts for the ancient historians, geographers, philosophers and different other writers to make their own messages for their own purposes. And in that the dozens lies the pleasure in this short, readable look at the times of ancient Rome and Greece.

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    Logic: A God-Centered Approach to the Foundation of Western Thought []  2021-1-22 19:57

    excellent

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    Logic: A God-Centered Approach to the Foundation of Western Thought []  2021-1-22 19:57

    For Christians looking to improve critical thinking skills, here is an accessible introduction to the study of logic as well as an in-depth treatment of the discipline from a professor with six academic degrees and over 30 years experience teaching. Questions for further reflection are included at the end of each chapter as well as helpful diagrams and charts for use in college and graduate-level rn Poythress has undertaken a radical recasting of the study of logic in this revolutionary work from a Christian :Vern S. Poythress (PhD, Harvard University; ThD, University of Stellenbosch) is professor of Fresh Testament interpretation at Westminster Theological Seminary in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he has taught for nearly four decades. In addition to earning six academic degrees, he is the author of numerous books and articles on biblical interpretation, language, and science.Endorsements:“Most books on logic content themselves with trying to fix our issues in logic. But in this book, Vern Poythress takes a ‘God-centered’ approach to the subject, which addresses a more foundational issue we have—our issue about logic. What is it? Why is it authoritative? If logic is part of the creation, could God have created a globe that had round squares in it? And if logic is untouchable and mysteriously somehow ‘over’ God, then doesn’t that create logic God? In this book, Poythress does a masterful job of showing how our ability to think rationally is grounded in the very nature of God Himself. I heartily recommend this book to every student of the subject.”Douglas Wilson, Senior Fellow of Theology, Fresh St. Andrews College; Pastor, Christ Church, Moscow, Idaho

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    Logic: A God-Centered Approach to the Foundation of Western Thought []  2021-1-22 19:57

    love it

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    The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature [Book]  2018-5-16 18:0

    There were things I liked about "The Items of Thought" and things I didn't. I would have preferred the book to be shorter. I certainly could take away a lot of profound observations. However, I don't think Pinker had to go into so a lot of examples, although I am sure a lot of readers will like that. Anyway, here are some necessary things which I will remember from the book.1. We can learn a lot about people from the method they place together words. Pinker shows a lot of examples.2. What is an event? 9-11 was an event, however there were also a lot of happenings which went into effecting it.3. Words take on fresh meanings to reflect on how the globe works.4. Learning a language is really a remarkable process. Pinker discredits linguistic determination, that is the brain learning language to generate thinking. He asserts that thoughts result language. Meanings are stored, not the exact combination of words which reflect them. Personally, I think both can work in parallel, when learning a language, but Pinker makes a amazing argument.5. Metaphors are very important. They are an essential part of thought. "To think is to grasp a metaphor". He shows the use of metaphor in Leviticus, which makes one think even more that biblical scripture, at least the Torah, should not necessarily be taken literally, more like a living doent which encourages deeper thinking especially as times change.6. The chapter on profanity is certainly interesting. The amygdala, in the brain, is necessary in storing memories with emotion. Bilingual people react more to taboo words in their first language, rather than their second. Aphasia, loss of articulate language, victims retain the ability to swear. This shows more memories of thought formulas rather than rule combinations. Such swearing in Tourettes's Syndrome is called copolalia.7. The basal ganglia in the brain, when weakened, taboo thoughts are more easily released. There is a "Rage Circuit" which runs from the amygdala to the hypothalmus - limbic circuitry.8. Implicative language, like with sarcasm and politeness, vs direct. Hierarchical and "culture of honor" societies use politeness more.9. Pinker brings up UN Resolution 242, about the Israeli - Palestinian situation, showing how the wording was intentionally created ambiguous, so each side could more likely agree to it. Best to obtain some agreement, so at least there is somewhere from which to proceed in negotiations. There again, words reflect thoughts, to often encourage further , the book is certainly worthwhile, despite its perhaps unnecessary length.

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    The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature [Book]  2018-5-16 18:0

    One of the most engaging books I've ever read. A book that makes you think about thinking, and how thought processes are expressed in language, revealing both the limitations and immense potential of language. Already looking forward to re-reading.

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    Logic: A God-Centered Approach to the Foundation of Western Thought []  2021-1-22 19:57

    Logic is one of the latest things one would expect to hear about in a church. I have found that some Christians even have an aversion to logic - a statement which interestingly enough is not very logical! We should be thankful to men like Very Poythress who share their bonuses with the church as well as the academy. One such bonus is his recent book, Logic: A God-Centered Approach to the Foundation of Western e first thing readers will message about this work is volume. It weighs in at over 700 pages which contains a huge appendix that supplement the fine work that Poythress e author organizes his book into three parts, namely - Elementary Logic, Aspects of Propositional Logic, and Enriching Logic. Readers familiar with the discipline of logic will be very familiar with the terminology that is included in the table of contents. At first glance, the book seems to have much in common with a standard textbook on logic. But the true beauty of the book is found in the relationship of logic to God. Poythress rightly shows the logic comes directly from the hand of God. Indeed, he is "the source for logic." The other demonstrates the rationality of logic and the private nature of logic: "Logic in this sense is an aspect of the mind of God. All God's attributes will therefore be manifested in the true laws of logic, in distinction from our human approximations to them."Poythress captures the essence of preuppositional apologetics and appears to pick up where Van Til left off: "We can praise God for what he has given us in our logic and our ability to reason." Yet, sinners suppress the truth of God's existence. "Everywhere we are confronted with the reality of God - and everywhere we flee from this reality."Logic helps us discern between truth and error. Logic on its own can not tell us what is true. But it will serve as a strong aid in the discerning process. This work by Vern Poythress is a strong anti-venom in a toxic globe that is on a death-march away from logic. Sometimes people just don't create any sense!

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    Logic: A God-Centered Approach to the Foundation of Western Thought []  2021-1-22 19:57

    I teach philosophy at the college level, have masters' degrees in both theology and philosophy, and am working toward a PhD (I mention this all to just provide context).I'm sure that Poythress is sincere and intelligent, but of the eight-or-so texts on logic I've read, this is the worst I've ever seen. Poythress attempts to combine theology and logic into one text, and fails on both counts. You literally have to wade through about 200 pages of confused theological sophistry before the primary Aristotelian syllogism is presented in any useful detail.If you wish to learn theology, go search an perfect theology book. If you wish to learn logic, go search an perfect logic book. For a general overview of logic, the Hurley text is probably the best text available at the moment, though there are several other fine ones available. If you wish to focus on categorical logic, Socratic Logic by Kreeft is perfect and thorough.

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    Logic: A God-Centered Approach to the Foundation of Western Thought []  2021-1-22 19:57

    This is a well written study of logic from the perspective of the One who made it. Poythress does very well teaching the concepts of logic as a discipline and connecting his teaching to the logic inherent in the nature of our triune Creator. The approach employed by Poythress is how all topics should be taught. The first topic to learn is theology and everything else flows from that.

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    Logic: A God-Centered Approach to the Foundation of Western Thought []  2021-1-22 19:57

    Most writers of logic books seem to go out of their method to create their writing and explanations as difficult as possible. I have always wondered how most writers of logic are so ill-logical in their sentence structure and descriptions. Sheridan makes logic about as simple as one can be in writing logic. Because of the words "A God-Centered Approach" in the book's title, most non-religious universities are unlikely to widely adopt the book. That is a shame. Most of life is not difficult to understand; most people only create it sound that method for ill-logical reasons.

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    Logic: A God-Centered Approach to the Foundation of Western Thought []  2021-1-22 19:57

    So far so good. I received the book a few weeks ago and have found it to be a concise, simple to read, and refreshing book on logic. It will be one I plan to hold on the shelf for continual reference.

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    The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature [Book]  2018-5-16 18:0

    In The Items of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature, Steven Pinker examines samples of daily speech to validate modern theories of cognitive science. Pinker is currently a professor and experimental psychologist at Harvard University. He earned his doctorate at Harvard in 1979, then moved to MIT for a postdoctoral fellowship and has been back and forth between the two since then. He’s best known for his work on language and the mind; his early research focused on visual cognition, while his more latest work focused more on kid language acquisition (with a particular emphasis on verbs). The Items of Thought makes perfect use of verbal acquisition data to provide insight to cognitive function. While a primary knowledge in semantic formalism would be helpful for getting more out of the book, I feel that it is a well-balanced composition of famous culture and linguistic theory. Colourful metaphors bring to light linguistic principles essential for Pinker’s arguments on human nature. Pinker writes that through language, a lot of complex ideas and attitudes are communicated in varying detail. These concepts shine through language, but they stem from a deeper, and at the most primary level, innate, system. Conceptual semantics, the language of thought, is necessary to understand because it provides evidence that our utterances are not inane, but that they have meaningful, interpretable content. He presents the question: how do kids acquire language in the first place? It’s clear that they are not memorizing the info based on their affinity to regularize (ie runned is a regularized ver of the irregular past tense) – which is something that is not found in the input (adult speech). They are yzing the input to create generalizations using innate building blocks. There is much discussion on what exactly these building blocks are and their functions, all in an effort of fortifying the concept of the human mind. The machinery innate to our minds, that is, what we are born capable of, is a subject worthy of much philosophical discussion because the respond is still unknown. Pinker takes time to introduce Fodor’s Extreme Nativism (words are the smallest building blocks, and therefore the meaning is the word itself) and Radical Pragmatics (there is very small innate knowledge – all meanings are devised from the context in which the words are uttered). He argues in favor of conceptual semantics, which suggests spatial and eventive qualities of words are innate, while qualities specific to the words are learned. He uses metaphor and the attributes of different words with related meanings that belong in various syntaxes to help his claim. His ultimate statement on the mind is that it’s clear, through linguistic evidence, that our mind is shaped by the world, and the globe by our mind. That is, our perception of reality is a product of the method we think, which is derived from the globe around us. Pinker’s style is informative and memorable. His makes amazing use of daily language, like advertisements and common phrases, to communicate sophisticated linguistic theories, as when he describes the verb classes when discussing the difficulties of the acquisition of verbs. The frequent appearance of metaphors based on media and pop culture keeps the reader engaged by eliminating technical terminology and making the research accessible to a much wider audience. He initially draws on the happenings of 9/11 to explain the slight differentiations semantics makes, a subject well understood by the majority of Americans. I appreciate that he lets his private style present through and really gives the reader a sense of being included in the observations and linguistic inductions that he makes. While I would not consider his ysis neuroscience based, it finds a home in cognitive science, which is valuable for understanding neuroscience on the level of higher cognitive function. The Items of Thought provides an perfect introduction to the relationship between cognitive science and language, all while engaging the reader in a light-weight, cultured script. I give The Items of Thought five stars for its integrity to the field and appealing writing style. Anyone with an interest in cognitive science and a passion for linguistics and languages would be no less than thrilled with this book.

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    The Stuff of Thought: Language as a Window into Human Nature [Book]  2018-5-16 18:0

    I don't know enough about the topic outside of what I learned in this book to give a review on the topic matter. What I can say is that Pinker is a clear, precise, and often funny teacher about what can be a difficult topic for most people to wrap their heads around. I would recommend the book if you have ever thought about the interrelation of thought and language.

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    The Dawn of the Reformation: Essays in Late Medieval and Early Reformation Thought []  2020-1-24 20:14

    Exactly as advertised. Very satisfied!

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