Read god of stickman 3'a=0 reviews, rating & opinions:

Check all god of stickman 3'a=0 reviews below or publish your opinion.

100 Reviews Found

Sort by: Most Accurate (default) | Newest | Top Rated

  • 0

    Useful review?

    clash of clans []  2020-5-11 22:47

    recommend amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    guns of glory []  2020-5-21 22:34
    [email protected]

    Just played Guns of Glory on a phone application via mistplay reviews. Played this one with amazing interest as on the mobile you got the impression of controlling your characters on the ground level, helping catch pick pockets etc etc. Like all mobile ads this was misleading. Don't obtain me wrong the android game itself was addictive and you can spend hours playing (If you play via mistplay you can earn a fair few Amazon vouchers), but yeah false advertising? Really? Unfortunately this is a huge pitfall a lot of android games like these fall into. For example you can expect a nice create your kitchen safe android game but instead you obtain something quite various (garden scapes see add for application and play game)

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    add the fresh characters and fresh boss fresh fusion, rise up lot of cp point (it isn't 1300, it is 150,000) modernize hurry up please fresh characters : frieza cooler bardok caulifla kale zamasu fresh fusion : fused zamasu, kefla (frieza, cooler) add the costume goku turtle hermit gi, yardrad clothes, saiyan armor vegeta saiyan armor with scouter, buu saga training suit, cell saga war suit trunks without jacket gohan amazing saiyanman clothes without helmet and cloak blackgoku zamasu clothes broly old suit

    0  


    Add your opinion on god of stickman 3'a=0 or scroll down to read more reviews ↓

     

  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    fix your android game the ads doesn't even work when im trying to obtain coins in the android game

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    it is asome the same Day installation of the year and I will be in the future of our android games are based upon its contents or take any action in reliance on the phone with me and I will be in the future of our android games are based on the phone with me and I will be in the future of our android games are based on the phone with me to send a copy for you read this and other info of your time in my head around and have the time and for this week so that you can do that I am looking to this product on a

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    it really fun and hard at the same time but what i dont like about it is that its takes forever to make batter someone

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    this android game is so coo

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    it a cool android game I really like it

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    hay qoa

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    kw

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    Godly Amazing

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    Amazing modernize guys. I really loved the android game but the only issue is that what would i do if I change my device? how would i transfer my progress to the other. pls do something guys.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    it's a amazing android game thanks to the modernize but when I so watch ad it hold quiting out randomly and can't obtain a reward please fix this

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    When I play it feels like an console android game

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    u ruined it now with the fresh motion

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    ITS SO MUCH FUUNNNN!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    thanks Guys just waiting for news Skills hold up the amazing work

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    i love the fresh update! thx its much better!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    awsome do more

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    This android game is kinda ruined now, there's no tutorial, so I had no idea what I was doing, since there were a lot of buttons to push, ya can't just expect us to know what every button does. The android game keeps freezing, which is annoying seeing how I was about to beat a opponent and it froze, and I had to restart. The opponent liked to that teleport attack a lot, I was a full health, about to beat an enemy, and then it teleported 3 [email protected]#$%!&?ing me each time and I lost. This may need some nerfing is all.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    it is great! but confused me when I saw all the buttons on the screen

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    add do not work for me please fix

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    when you're super saying you're like unbeatable and that's the best part about this android game

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    i love the affects and video test the android game really changed and its really fun to play now

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    please add more charecters and create it easier to obtain a lot of

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    DOPE !

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    wow

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    i love this android game i was always a fab of dbz😁😅 but theres a issue with the ads they dont work when i test to watch ads it eemovws me from the ad and i dont obtain pls fix it and my android game froze when i transformed

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    the fresh modernize created it 1000x better bros thx

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    hey I like this android game sooo much I hope you hold updating the android game thx

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    itis so coolllll

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    best modernize ever now 5 starts 😸😸😸😸😚

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    looks cool

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    AS AMAZING AS SHREK I have had this android game for ages and I have been waiting for the excellent modernize to come and here it is! If you like 2d fighting android games this is for you! PS. You kinda broke the ad - > balls but it is OK pleas fix

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    I think you should when you blow up planets and transform you hold the transformation Ssj1 ssj2 and other

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    this android game has become stupid it was amazing before there was a balance we play we watch an add we obtain the and you obtain your true from us watching the ads taking away the ability to create in the android game in faster ways so the hole android game isnt just going backwards and repeating the same levels over and over again till there is no point in playing the android game to the end cuz you lose your interest in the first page of fighting I loved this android game but you really need to fix the ads for feature

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    can you add child trunks and goten like little stick children

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    its amazing but better if some charaters are and thnks for making it fly now

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    This is a quality Dragonball game. I highly have fun it!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    its the best dragon ball android game there is

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    ysa

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of Stickman 3 [App]  2019-6-13 13:44

    awesome fun

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Ultra God Stickman [App]  2019-9-29 13:36

    Super cool, kamekamehaaa!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of War Origins Collection - Playstation 3 []  2020-1-31 19:9

    God of Battle is a series I love to follow. I have played the previous three since they first came out for the PS2 then the PS3 for the recent one. If you are looking for the fill-in-the-gaps story, this collection will do it for ains of Olympus will take you through the happenings that happen right before God of Battle part one. For a port-over, the android game doesn't look too bad. If you have played the first HD remake, you will message it is about par with that one, graphics wise. It may be a touch lower. That would probably be expected since it was originally for a small hand-held PSP. The sound quality is ok. The android game play is what you would expect from the series: Amazing old cheat and slash. The story is probably the least desirable of the two. It is kind of bland. There are points here and there where it may grab your attention though. Overall, I would give Chains of Olympus an ost of Sparta will probably interest you the most if you watched any of the extras they had from God of Battle part one. They have the two main story lines that really grabbed my attention while watching the extras: Kratos' mother and brother. It's like a family reunion. The story for Ghost may be one of the best out of the five console games. The graphics definitely look better than Chains. The sound is about the same as Chains though. The android game play is beautiful much the same as well. However, the one thing I did like was the change in weapon types. Overall, I would give Ghost of Sparta a solid h android games are beautiful short. Chains of Olympus was definitely the shorter of the two. I was not only able to beat Chains in two days but I think I got the Platinum trophy in two days as well. If you have a huge time frame where you are free, you may be able to beat this android game in one sitting. Ghost of Sparta was a small harder and longer (heehee). It may take you more time to obtain through.I would rate the collection, as a whole, a solid 8.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of War Origins Collection - Playstation 3 []  2020-1-31 19:9

    God of Battle Chains of Olympus, and God of Battle Ghost of Sparta were both for the PSP. Now it comes out for the PS3 in HD, in oneBlu-Ray disc title called God of War: Origins Collection. Chains of Olympus you play as Kratos before the happenings of the first God of War. So Kratos will be still serving the gods. He's sent in to support stop a Persian invasion. The Persians are using a giant basilisk to help. Like God of Battle fashion, you war it throughout parts of the level. Related to the Hydra in GOW1. After your war you learn that the gods are in trouble, and the globe has turned dark. You go through the Sun God's temple, to Hades, and Tartarus as some of the locations. The story is not the best of the GOW's, but it's ok. You also learn a lot about the titans imprisonment in me of the opponents are hard to dodge unlike in the previous games. Namely the panther type creature, and theundead with the twin swords. There seems to be a slight delay for the dodge can parry in this game. Ever since GOW2 gave you the golden fleece, it's the standard for the rest of the GOW's.Zeus's gauntlet, that you collect in you weaponry, is a close range weapon that dozens of damage. You don't obtain thisearly on unfortunatly, and it's too bad.God of Battle Ghost of Sparta has improved much more than Chains of Olympus. You are on a find for your brother who was also mentioned in GOW1.He was taken away, and you search out why on your journey to search him. The gods do not wish Kratos to go, but of course he refuses them. You travel a lot more here than in Chains of Olympus locations. You might remember the ship level in GOW1. You begin the android game sailing again. A giant sea monster chases you from the ocean to even on land. Yes, another giant creature in the beginning. This one will present up a amazing number of times. There are a lot of various levels here ranging from the town of Atlantis, a lava mountain, snowy areas, and even Kratos's town of Sparta.If you've played the previous GOW's, you'll realize quickly in the android game why he's so desparate to save his brother. There are a lot of reasons. There are flash back happenings in the android game that give you a small more insight each time. The story is my second favorite to GOW2 as e combat is improved here as well from Chains of Olympus. The dodge button responds amazing again. The twins sword opponents are back, and still have lightning quick attacks. So it's best to just hold them at a range and attack. In here Kratos will be able to arm himself with the Spartan spear and shield. You can throw spears here without selecting in a menu to do so. The melee range is not as amazing as your double blades, but it can finish opponents faster. The combos are somewhat slow as well. But if you place together various throwing attacks with a combination for close combat, it's a amazing e developers have learned from the mistakes of Chains of Olympus, and it shows with Ghost of Sparta. The Blu-Ray disc is a for Ghost of Sparta alone. Chains would just be a bonus. It's still a decent game. It's really a plus going from the little PSP screen to a bigger HD screen to play these games.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    guideclips for god of war 3 [App]  2018-1-30 21:10

    Goff

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of War Origins Collection - Playstation 3 []  2020-1-31 19:9

    God of Battle Origins collection is a fun edition to the ever-expanding roster of God of Battle android games on the PS3. These android games (chains of Olympus and Ghost of Sparta ) were first released on the PSP and despite a few minor complaints have created a smooth transition to the huge screen. Lets look at Chains of Olympus (CoO) first as it is definitely the weaker of the 2 entries. The story line here is the usual God of Battle tale of revenge and redemption, though it purports to be an origin story it is unsuccessful in further developing the hero of Kratos and fails to add anything of true value or interest to the God of Battle Lore. There are some technical issues too, the fixed camera here is too tight- making the android game feel claustrophobic and combat can become problematic- I must have died on a dozen occasions when an unseen opponent came charging in from somewhere off stage. When the camera does zoom out, usually for dramatic effect, it achieves small but to highlight the android games shortcomings- the flat textures and plain graphics create this the least beautiful god of battle android game I have e God of Battle android games are formulaic at the best of times but CoO is linear to a fault, as you progress through a level you would be magically sealed in an zone and released only when the requisite amount of enemies had been dispatched- nothing fresh as far as God of Battle goes but here it is not buffeted by the amazing set pieces, light issue solving and epic visual effects common to the series. For everything it does wrong, it does other things very well- the video test is addictive and the combat is surprisingly nuanced- on some occasions it takes some tactic to dispatch even the lowliest of minions. CoO gets a 3/5On to Ghost of Sparta (GoS) firstly it looks much, much better- the hero models, environments and visual effects are perfect and maybe it is just because I was coming of the lowly CoO but I would hazard to suggest these are the second strongest visuals in the series (only superseded by the awesome God of Battle 3). The storyline is the usual failed attempt to right the wrongs of the past, honestly I've played and completed 5 God Of Battle android games in 2 years and can barely hold the stories straight in my memory they are just all so related and have become this congealed mass of homogenous memory. As for the gameplay- there is much better variety, they have tightened up the controls and camera is far better. There are some awesome set pieces and the story is stronger (even though it opens on the tired cliché of a dream/vision). The larger opponents are more formidable and will require additional effort to vanquish, while the boss wars are fun. There is a small bit of issue solving and the android game has a much more epic feeling than CoO, it feels like the God of Battle you play and love on your console. There are some minor nitpicky problems, like the inescapable and unskippable cutscenes (most annoying when they precede a tough section and you die and have to rewatch half a min of nonsense before you can kick [email protected]#$%) Other than that it is probably one of the strongest titles in the series 5/5.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of War Origins Collection - Playstation 3 []  2020-1-31 19:9

    I played all three GOW android games and loved them but I didn't own a PSP, so i missed the two handheld adventures. But no longer! The android game plays great, just like the PS2 and PS3 versions basically. Obviously it doesn't have the PS3 graphics, but it has been created HD so they are beautiful crisp. Both android games take put during Kratos' earlier time, in Chains of Olympus it's during the time when Krato's was the chapion of the Gods before the first game. Ghost of Sparta takes put between GOW 2 and GOW3 and with the mystery of Kratos' brother Deimos. Like the three console android games theres action, gore, and twists galore. These will tie up your collection perfectly and if you are a fan of the series these are not to be missed!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of War Origins Collection - Playstation 3 []  2020-1-31 19:9

    I have that bigger collection that includes all the GoW android games but that specific collection does not have physical discs for these 2 games. I solved that problem by wasting more buying this collection that includes discs of the 2 PSP games.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of War Origins Collection - Playstation 3 []  2020-1-31 19:9

    I don't own a PSP, so this was my possibility to finally see these two titles. I played them on my 65" Sharp Aquos LCD HDTV, and both android games look like they were created for PS3. In fact both look superior to the God of Battle Collection despite those having been PS2 games. The sound is also nearly as amazing as GOW3.I have now played every android game in the series, and these titles stack up well. They are lacking in truly epic boss battles, which is understandable since the main story was saved for the console releases. Still, what's here is solid, and also very familiar. You have the obligatory moment of Kratos on a ship, treasure chests hidden in the foreground, an occasional death via some trap that only seems to exist to aggravate you, unwelcome beam walking (thankfully held to a minimum), and of course the absence of all your previously earned weapons and life/magic meter extensions to begin every game. In the case of Ghost of Sparta, they don't even contrive a method to power you down. You are a god, yet weak enough to be killed by standard enemies. I just search it absurd that in the entire series I never felt like I wielded the power of the god of war. Remember when Ares wiped out an entire barbarian troops at will? Why can't Kratos do that? At least Ghost of Sparta the option to use the Arms of Sparta, a spear and shield that I enjoyed using as Kratos' main weapons to break up the monotony of his chain blades, which have never felt strong to conclusion, this series has gotten quite stale over the course of five games, but this release is well worth your time if you enjoyed the others. When you play GOW you know what you're going to get, and in that sense this delivers completely.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of War Origins Collection - Playstation 3 []  2020-1-31 19:9

    If you haven't played a God of Battle android game yet, you're really missing out. Regardless of the system you're using, GOW titles are simply the best android games available. I bought the first GOW soon after it's release on the P2, and it changed my gaming life forever. I've since bought every fresh title as soon as it's released (usually on pre-order) and have never been disappointed.Unfortunately, I don't own a PSP. I've dabbled in the portable gaming zone before (Gameboy, DS, Lynx) and I've never really liked gaming on portable consoles. I search them too limiting, like a lite ver of home consoles. With that said, I've really debated back and forth on buying a PSP strictly for Chains of Olympus. When Ghost of Sparta came out, I was in a true quandry. I still couldn't validate buying a whole fresh system I knew I wouldn't use just for 2 games, not when I could just replay GOW 3 (which is simply the best android game every made, period - and never loses replayability, I've completed it 5 times so far and hold going back for more).Then something magical happened. CoO and GoS were released for the P3. Oh satisfied day! Not only were they remastered for HD output (which, they did a fantasic job of by the way), but they were combined into a single blu-ray disc at the bargain of $40. There is a God, afterall.I just finished CoO. I'll jump into GoS e only complain I have - it's too short. Obviously something has to give, being it's release on a portable system. And don't obtain me wrong, I'm glad they sacrificed length over graphics or gameplay. But, it did leave me wanting more. But don't they all?If you like any of the other GOW titles, this is a must-have.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of War Origins Collection - Playstation 3 []  2020-1-31 19:9

    Well I bought this android game because I wasn't gonna go a PSP just for 2 games. So I was glad this came out for PS3 when it did. I did have to wait for it to go down in a bit before was nice they remastered the android games trying to touch them up in spots however you could tell it was of lower quality (graphically) then the other PS3 games. It was about the same as the first God of Battle android game maybe but maybe slightly worse (graphically again).The stories were interesting ones that seemed to just add to the God Of Battle saga without having to mess with anything in the storyline of the other games. The one android game helped bridge the gap to something you search in one of the other android games similar to the god e video test mechanics were beautiful much the same as previous android games without being as difficult as say the third God of War. And the boss wars weren't to difficult. There were times here and there where trying to jump onto something else could require 3-4 or more tries because the android game for some reason didn't think you created it or something. Which were the only the true downsides to it.Overall if you have played the god of battle android games and haven't checked out these, this would be a amazing possibility to while they are still low in price. You basically obtain 2 android games for the of one and they are better then the PSP versions.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of War Origins Collection - Playstation 3 []  2020-1-31 19:9

    First of all, in case you still have doubts about it: This android game contains both Chains of Olympus and Ghost of Sparta in a single Blu-Ray, no need to install anything.I've bought this collection a long time ago, but I tried (and got) both Platinum trophies first, before making a review of the gamesThat said, let's begin with the key points for this collection:*The android games definitely won't latest long (they're PSP games, so don't expect them to latest as much as GOW III, please)*To obtain the platinum (any of the 2 available) you might need to clear the android game at least twice*It is remastered in HD, but I've played in a 480i SD screen, no huge at , let's go through the games.*God of War: Chains of terms of story line, it happens BEFORE GOW I, so if you wish to play like it's meant to be played, hold that in so, as in ALL and EVERY GOW game, you'll be Athena's puppet AND you'll visit the tartarus (Kratos has some problems with Hades and death, you know.)In the beginning of the game, as in every GOW, you'll learn about the controls, which, of course are slightly various then the original PS2/3 GOW android games due to the lack of some buttons in the PSP layout (no huge too), then you'll go through the levels, collect boxes for souls, health/magic upgrades... You may not take more than 6 hours to clear the android game if you're hardcore in the 1st playthrough (from the 2nd playthrough on, you'll be able to use some perks, such as unique skins that grant you abilities, that is, if you play in the same difficulty setting or a lower one that you've cleared the android game (e.g. if you clear it in Normal mode, then you can play Normal and Simple like a god, but if you go for Hard, gotta begin from scratch again)As for the trophies, well, since it's a remaster, they couldn't obtain creative enough to create the trophy set more challenging so there aren't any painful trophy to get, really. As for the story of the game, well, Helios was kidnapped and the sun wouldn't come up, and Morpheus was taking everything into his domains (everybody was sleeping and the usual horde of opponents was taking place), in the end, Kratos must face a tough choice: Stay with the ones he most loved and f* the world, or, leave them behind, obtain true angry for what he was forced to do and save the globe while taking a bath of blood, like always, while slicing the wife of a god and a titan.*God of War: Ghost of e android game story happens BEFORE GOW II, however, you'll obtain stripped off all your weapons ("like it never happened before...", if you're familiar with the GOW series...)but yeah, we can't expect to war like the God of War, it'd be too easy... From the 2 games, this one is my favorite because we obtain more things to do, and a bigger android game with lots of challenges, and also, we obtain to visit SPARTA! (and, since it's a default in the GOW series, we obtain to visit some ladies there too... and when you do that, create sure you "visit" them 3 times and do it RIGHT, before leaving Sparta *hint hint*) Then, straight to the game's story: After you've become (spoiler-free) a... MIGHTY fighter in GOW I, Kratos will hear rumors about his brother, Deimos, then Kratos will, once again, run through Greece (and sink Atlantis and create Poseidon angry in the process, and even go to Thanatos' domains, which even the gods are afraid to cross...) to search out the truth, which will be shocking, revealing and pleasing to search out... Well, to prevent any more spoilers, I'll stop telling the story from here (well, it involves Athena as well, but... when it doesn't? ) and give you the background of the game: Ghost of Sparta was named after Kratos nick name (he was called Ghost of Sparta after what he did to the ones he loved the most, and that's why he's gray-ish). In the android game you'll face cool bosses, search nice weapons, and you'll collect relics (YES!, relics!) that will give you powers/perks after you clear the android game (after that you'll be able to use skins as well)AS for the trophies, same as Chains of Olympus... they aren't hard to obtain as long as you're a amazing player of GOW...Bottom line: Both android games are true amazing and fun to play, and if you search this collection for like I did ($20) and if you like God of War, then just it for your PS3... I've played both android games on the PSP but I wanted even more, so I bought the PS3 edition and I am very satisfied with it. Like I said, the only downside of this collection is that the android games won't latest long and you won't have much challenges to obtain the Platinums

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    God of War Origins Collection - Playstation 3 []  2020-1-31 19:9

    I am using my phone to write this so please bear with the poor punctuation. If you wish to experince GOW, I would the android games separately (GOW collection, this, and GOW 3) because the GOW saga has problems with the origins android games not being on a disc and the voucher. In the end you might end up paying a bit more for the games, but I honestly think it is worth it if you wish all of the android games on disc. Overall, these android games are fun. You have to give them some slack for the graphics as these were originally psp games.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The God of Small Things: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    Sometimes it was hard to hold the characters names straight. There seemed to be 2 names for each character, thus, created it hard to be sure who I was reading about. That aside, this book has awesome content and message. A clasic

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The God of Small Things: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    Read this for class, and was surprisingly intrigued. Very amazing read. I reccomned it to those who wish to gain a fresh perspective on life, love, and family.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The God of Small Things: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    Nice and just like new!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Not God: A History of Alcoholics Anonymous []  2019-12-23 19:41

    Do not the title fool you....."It is imperative that the alcoholic understand he is not God." This is an wonderful book and for anyone serious about the greatest mutual aid society, AA, this book is must!! Not a fast read but well written and well thought out

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Not God: A History of Alcoholics Anonymous []  2019-12-23 19:41

    I bought this book as a replacement for one I had read and given away several years ago. It is a must read for anyone wanting to know how AA came to be and what it's deepest core philosophy is about. This book was written as a research project by a man (who is not an alcoholic or addict) that received authorization from AA to research their archives in preparing the book. The actual reading is split into two parts. The first is the most detailed explanation of the origin and development of AA that exists. It describes what is written in the AA approved literature but goes into so much more detail, particularly about the decisions created by individual groups during the formative years of AA which lead to the development of the "steps" and "traditions" and overall group harmony. The second half of the book describes in painstaking detail the notion of "not God" and how it applies to the AA view of surrender to win. I first bought this book after my AA sponsor requested I read it after I had been sober about 10 years. It is clearly written and concise but 456 pages of microprint. Around the time I read this I became a licensed counselor working in drug treatment facilities and used much of what I gained from this book to pass on to newly recovering addicts trying to understand community based recovery through the different 12 Step programs. I believe the material in this book (along with the approved 12 Step material) allowed me to convey a deeper understanding to people of why to consider 12 step programs after treatment than I could have with only the institutional training I got in graduate school. I reread the first half of the book about 5 years ago after 20 years of sobriety and found it just as interesting and refreshing as the first reading years before. As I say, it is must reading for persons serious about 12 Step recovery. Don't pick it up for light reading because that it is not.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Pursuit of God: A Christian Classic []  2020-1-16 19:51

    I love this book but this is a CRAPPY printing - the quality is poor & I'm not sure if it's a "bootleg" but that's my guess! Don't obtain this copy - it's not official.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Pursuit of God: A Christian Classic []  2020-1-16 19:51

    Tozer writes this classic booklet primarily to two groups of people. First, he writes to those familiar with the church, who have respect for the Bible, but are on the sidelines and not really committed. Second, he writes to those who are steeped in doctrine but short on relational experience with the Christian God. He explains to each how the relational experience can fill a person’s zer wrote this in 1948. Thus, he quotes from an older translation of the Bible, one filled with Thee and Thou. Other than these quotations, Tozer is simple to follow. It takes about one-and-a-half hours to read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Desiring God: Meditations of A Christian Hedonist []  2020-1-19 22:29

    This book is a life changer and will present you what belief and worshiping God as a Christian is supposed Donne about. Wish to know your life's purpose? Read this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Desiring God: Meditations of A Christian Hedonist []  2020-1-19 22:29

    As a college student, this slightly hard-headed reviewer found what he took to be the `C.S. Lewis cult' to be trendy and off-putting, an observation that--for whatever historical accuracy it might have achieved--delayed his introduction into one of the amazing masters by three years or cently I became aware that I was avoiding reading John Piper for a similarly faulty motive: the glare in the eye of the so-called `Piper Cubs'--one that from time to time takes on a fanatic bearing--served as a too convenient pretext for sidestepping whatever value might lie in the ruminations of their master. And so, in a spasm of self-denial, I laid aside my shallow reluctance, found a recently re-minted copy of Piper's first famous work Desiring God, Meditation of a Christian Hedonist, and undertook to `take up and read'.Three things about John Piper come clear in the early innings. First, he loves the church. I do not mean chiefly that he's enamored with the idea or the notion of the Church, but that he has a spiny conviction that God does his best work among the local gatherings of imperfect and occasionally poor human beings who claim to belong to him by virtue of faith in Jesus Christ. Whatever Piper writes, it seems, is likely to have passed the try of survivability among knots of true people who burp, scratch themselves, and occasionally the mortgage cond, Piper wants us to be happy. Really, truly happy. The label that he applies, recurrently and persistently, to that view of things which he unabashedly urges on the rest of us is `Christian hedonism'. Being a intelligent man, Piper taken due stock of the liabilities that can be associated with this phrase, then hung on to it for the merits of its shock value or, at the least, its useful ird, Piper finds in the Puritan writers and in the manner of life and thought that flows out of John Calvin's Geneva an exceedingly useful tutorial to life in our very various times and, it must be added, a rather straight-line trajectory from the biblical materials themselves, not least, from the Apostle Paul. Although the author or his editors have realized the downside of unselfconscious use of Calvinistic vocabulary, he and they are quite content to claim a rather precise theological identity and then let the chips to fall--presumably because they have been foreordained to do so--where they e author does not hesitate to go autobiographical in this passionate and deeply private work. Although this integration of testimony and teaching flows throughout the book, the introductory `How I Became a Christian Hedonist' serves warning of what is coming. Piper introduces us here to his rephrasing--he would see it as a faithful rendering--of the Westminster Catechism's first declaration: `The chief end of man', Reformed Christians are accustomed to reciting `is to glory God and have fun Him forever'. Piper does not see a dual teleology for human existence but rather a single one:The chief end of man is to glorify God by enjoying Him is possible that Piper's discernment is right here and that his rephrasing shocks contemporary piety precisely because we have forgotten just how central `the religious affections' are to life lived out before our e college-era experience of the author in discovering release from bare duty to joyful service--and then to search this articulated by the likes of Blaise Pascal and C.S. Lewis--marks the genesis of Piper's life-long mission to convert us into satisfied people because we search our joy in God's ong the autobiographical way, Piper pauses to provide a rather systematic definition of Christian Hedonism that maps out the path ahead when testimony has given method in considerable degree to didactic:Christian Hedonism is a philosophy of life built on the following five convictions:1. The longing to be satisfied is a universal human experience, and it is good, not sinful.2. We should never test to deny or resist our longing to be happy, as though it were a poor impulse. Instead we should seek to intensify this longing and [email protected]#$%! with whatever will provide the deepest and most enduring satisfaction.3. The deepest and most enduring happiness is found only in God. Not from God, but in God.4. The happiness we search in God reaches its consummation when it is shared with others in the manifold ways of love.5. To the extent that we test to abandon the pursuit of our own pleasure, we fail to honor God and love people. Or, to place it positively: The pursuit of pleasure is a important part of all worship and ere may not be enough dour-minded custodians of gravity about any more to justify the lampooning of them. But even if there are only one or two, one imagines their righteous knees trembling as Piper oils his musket.Having done so, the author turns earnestly to the matter of happiness. God's happiness, in fact (Chapter 1, `The Happiness of God. Foundation for Christian Hedonism', pp. 30-50). This chapter establishes Piper's way as he will sustain it throughout Desiring God in at least two rst, the page before the beginning of each chapter proper is attractively set with a series of quotes. These give some indication of the reservoir from which Piper draws his concept and his prose. Characteristically, chapter one is introduced by quotations from the Bible and the American theologian Jonathan Edwards, two of the author's cond, Piper begins his consideration of happiness by addressing the happiness of God. Although Christians outside of Piper's Reformed tradition might object that the observation is hardly special to that particular strain of faith and practice, it is probably fair to to Piper's Calvinism the insistence upon beginning most conversation with God this vein, Piper allows himself yet another relecture of the Westminster Shorter Catechism's first principle: The chief end of God is to glorify God and have fun Himself doing so, Piper is explicit about his intention: to shift the conversation from duty to design. Since God is the first Designer and--in Piper's pastoral survey of the landscape--Christians urgently need to be freed to desire both God and happiness, it makes sense to start by contemplating the stage of a God who is immensely satisfied with himself.I have deliberately chosen language that conjures a rather icky picture of the deity. How can a God who is `happy with himself' be worthy of our worship and service? Even in a review I search it fair to do so precisely because the work under inspection is eager to deconstruct the off-putting nature of famous response to such a God.Piper's first chapter is at pains to show a sovereign, majestic, joyful and joy-giving God who is worthy of us finding our happiness in him precisely because he is so utterly satisfied in himself. Piper asks--appropriately in this reviewer's estimation--whether a sour-minded deity who faced frustration on every side would be the kind of God whom we would want--whom we would be happy?--to worship.Obviously, such a God would not inspire, at the least, our confidence. So Piper plants as a first principle of Christian Hedonism a God who is supremely satisfied because his purposes are in fact not topic to frustration, abortion, or--to allude to a biblical author's turn of phrase--shadow of turning.God delights, Piper tells us, in the assured results of `redemption history'. He is not bashful about the massive sledding needed in to arrive at a destination where God's absolute sovereignty is freely confessed, for his macro-argument fairly requires this kind of confidence in the inevitability of God's final win as in his control of the info of his war.His first chapter draws this conclusion:All the works of God culminate in the praises of his Redeemed people. The climax of His happiness is the delight He takes in the echoes of His excellence in the praises of the saints. This praise is the consummation of our own joy in God. Therefore, God's pursuit of praise from us and our pursuit of pleasure in Him are the same pursuit. This is the amazing gospel! This is the foundation of Christian e exclamation point after the penultimate sentence and the bare full stop after the final one suggest that Piper aims at something short of a full identification of `great gospel' with `Christian Hedonism'. But only just.Piper next turns to the matter of conversion (chapter two, `Conversion', pp. 52-74), turning to time-honored Christian vocabulary commonly employed to describe this existential change of direction and finding it wanting. Because conversion talk has become conventional it has become powerless. It allows people to believe they are Christians when in fact they are e lexicon of Christian hedonism supplies language that meets the resulting need:Could it be that today the most straightforward biblical command for conversion is not, `Believe in the Lord,' but, `Delight yourself in the Lord'? And might not a lot of slumbering hearts be stabbed broad awake by the words `Unless a man be born again into a Christian hedonist he cannot see the kingdom of God'?The author then proceeds to restate classic Christian doctrine regarding sin and salvation in the `new' terms of Christian hedonism. Matters of joy, desire, passion, and longing are now seen as indicators of the deepest value of the human heart. Conversion becomes less a description of changed states in the abstract than of the dynamic movements of the human heart. Jonathan Edwards' religious affections lurk at every ing is method down the list of central Christian attitudes and activities, Piper asserts that worship has to do with true life (Chapter 3, `Worship', pp. 76-109). The importance of it, he derives from Jesus' unconventional chat with a Samaritan prostitute, resides not in the where, but rather in the how and the whom. Piper is working his method towards a systematization of the--pardon the redundancy--systemic nature of engagement with God. By this I mean--because I believe that Piper intends--the reconquest of the totalist nature of Christian worship and service with regard to the human person. Speaking from a tradition that not infrequently pursues logic into the ditch of scholastic rationality, Piper wants to create sure that the human experience we abbreviate with words like `passion' and `emotion' are not inadvertently left out of the mix. Worship `in spirit and truth' doubtless means subtly distinct things at once, some of them signaled in English by whether or not one capitalizes the `S-word'. But for author it must contain the summons to worship God with, as they say, passion:The fuel of worship is a real vision of the greatness of God; the fire that makes the fuel burn white hot is the quickening of the Holy Spirit; the furnace created alive and warm by the flame of truth is our renewed spirit; and the resulting heat of our affections is strong worship, pushing its method out in confessions, longings, acclamations, tears, songs, shouts, bowed heads, lifted hands, and obedient a paragraph like the one just cited, Piper brushes up versus one of his principal contributions to modern piety: a dynamic, thrusting, engaged view of worship and service by Christians whose understanding of the God whom they worship is shaped at the outside by--perilously abstract--notions like majesty and sovereignty.If American evangelicals over thirty possess an unwritten but almost Talmudic-ally authoritative oral law, it is the one that decrees that emotion follows fact. One acts upon the facts, not expecting emotion to present itself as a constituent element of obedient experience. `Rubbish!', Piper seems to wish to say to such well-intentioned parceling out of human nature. The frequency with which words like `affections' and `passion' punctuate his dismantling of this time-honored bit of pastoral counsel is indicative of how unfortunately misleading he considers it to can almost hear the small pamphlets burning ...In his fourth chapter, Piper develops his reputation as a master of the productively jarring phrase (`Love. The labor of Christian Hedonism', pp. 110-141). He makes the claim that disinterested benevolence--service to God motivated by duty rather than a beggar's desperate hunger for God's company--is evil. Not `inappropriate', `unhelpful', or even `misguided', mind you. be precise, he has already floated this notion in his chapter on worship. But as he returns from the Christian's vertical relationship with God to the horizontal matter of loving interaction with his human peers, the logic of virtuous questing for the reward of fellowship becomes the more clear.Piper realizes he has his work chop out for him at this point, finding it important to urge his readers not to fixate on the isolated biblical passage that may appear to run contrary to the argument of Christian hedonism but rather to find for what linguists and philosophers call the `deep structure'.That fundamental moral architecture, Piper believes, insists upon the goodness of delighting in what is good, of loving it, of seeking the reward that comes to those who pursue it. It is not difficult for him to heap passage upon passage that employs this language and logic, for the biblical anthology of thick with such expressions. Piper's contribution is momentarily to pry us out from under a half-century or more of dutiful exhortation to an begin zone where we can hear the sound of a music whose dominant chords are not the deep thud of responsibility but rather the brassy summons of joyful reward.I suppose on no particular scientific basis that this chapter is where Piper loses the lion's share of his would-be fellow hedonists. The language is so severely unconventional that it takes an almost heroic commitment to hearing the man out to continue pressing through t I create this observation with sadness rather than endorsement, for Piper is clearly mining the biblical materials with a manner of expertise. Given enough of a reader's time and sufficient explanatory paragraphs, he makes a respectable case for that pursuit of pleasureful reward that is capable of embracing suffering, that knows the salt of tears, and that rejoices--indeed finds itself doubled--in the joy of others. Piper views the Bible as the principal means God has provided to hold the Christian walking in paths that bring the desired joy and the joy of desiring Him (Chapter five, `Scripture. Kindling for Christian hedonism', pp. 142-157). As it is place in one of Scripture's more memorable turns of phrase, Scripture `restores the soul.'In saying so, Piper wants to be clear about the reality that the Christian's lived experience is not best described as uninterrupted happiness. He is in a war, a context in which Piper appears to sense the deep appropriateness of the biblical claim that God's written truth is a `sword'.Pace that street-level prejudice the supposes that Calvinists do not pray because they believe everything is predestined to happen just as it will sans messy consultation with human beings, Piper is all for prayer. He does not mean the pious, public enunciation of pedantries but the knee-born cry like that of an adultress who possesses nothing and knows it (chapter six, `Prayer', pp. 158-183). Such kneeling pursuit of both glory and happiness look to the Christian Hedonist to be entirely like what God invites sinners--redeemed and wanting to be so--to engage. For Piper, it is only poor theology that has forced God's glory and our happiness apart. In his view, they are joined at the hip and so the noisy, kneeling pray-er finds himself in his Maker's presence. Piper concludes this chapter with a summons to plan for prayer the method we plan for all other things that matter to us.With regard to the this-worldly--or so it might appear--matter of money, Piper's approach has some down-home counsel: `(Biblical passages) teach us to use our in a method that will being us the greatest and longest gain. That is, they advocate Christian Hedonism' (Chapter seven, `Money', pp. 184-203).This is something other than crass consumerism precisely because that kind of artless binging settles for too little, too soon. Christian hedonism seeks to maximize its utilities, so to speak, by setting its sights on an eternal horizon. With too short a view, `(t)he amazing danger of riches is that our affections will be carried awwy from God to His gifts.'Piper speaks vigorously about the need for simplicity, not least in sections entitled `What should the rich do?' and `What about the lake home?'Turning to another crucible in which happiness and distress are often mingled, Piper describes marriage as the put where misery too often reigns because the married do not seek their own pleasure in the happiness of their spouse (chapter 8, `Marriage. A matrix for Christian Hedonism', pp. 204-221). Marriage is a mystery precisely because it conceals a secret that is grander than those on the outside can glimpse.Even as he dismantles the egalitarian argument that Paul employs the Greek word '''''' to mean `source' rather than the more pedestrian `head', Piper urges wives to `take their cue' from the Church where as men are to do so from Christ. His use of the ambiguous and nuanced term `take their cue' allows him to argue for a hierarchy of sorts but without sounding rigid or ill-tempered. It seems to this reviewer that he succeeds. A related willingness to `take one's clues'--so to speak--from context and circumstance produces the chapter's penultimate section, entitled `Forms of Submission'. One size most emphatically does not fit all.Piper's pulse clearly quickens as he arrives at his ninth chapter (hapter 9, `Missions. The war cry of Christian Hedonism', pp. 222-251. The piece requires a considerable effort at sympathetic reading these two decades hence, for our language has left behind a view of Christian mission that has been abbreviated as `from the West to the rest' in favor of an alternative that takes into acc a global church and resonates with the vocabulary of `mission from everywhere to every one'. Still, the author's passion for a kind of happiness that takes into acc the determination of the biblical God to harvest every nation for his worship is a welcome antidote to shelves of self-help literature that rarely lifts one's gaze beyond the next suburb. This reviewer, having spent the biggest chunk of his life under `missionary' status, heartily endorses Piper's exploration of the oft-heard testimony that `I never created a sacrifice'.In the final chapter of the book's body, Piper turns to a matter that might seem the most incongruous entry in a book on hedonism of any kind: suffering (chapter 10, `Suffering: The sacrifice of Christian Hedonism', pp. 252-288). He argues that suffering subsumes human experience on both sides of the somewhat arbitrary distinction Christians create between persecution and sickness or accident. These gradations of human pain `have this in common: They all threaten our faith in the goodness of God and tempt us to leave the path of obedience. Therefore, every triumph of faith and all perseverance in obedience are testimonies to the goodness of God and the preciousness of Christ--whether the opponent is sickness, Satan, sin, or sabotage.'That is not all that such a fate holds in common. The suffering that results from sickness and that which is brought upon the believer by persecution `are both intended by Satan for the destruction of our faith and governed by God for the purifying of our faith'.Suffering emerges, in Piper's treatment, as a particularly intense arena in which joy is to be pursued most hotly.An epilogue (`Why I Have Written this Book: seven reasons', pp. 289-307) is pleasingly autobiographical and makes one wish to know the man with the exuberant soul and the majestic God who required to say all that he has said here.A handy appendix entitled `The Goal of God in Redemptive History' (pp. 308-321) reminds the reader that redemption is but is not in the first instance about us. The piece concludes with another twist on the now popular first article of the Westminster Shorter Catechism:What may we conclude from this survey of redemption history? We may conclude that the chief end of God is to glorify God and have fun Himself forever. He stands supreme at the center of His own affections. For that very reason, He is a self-sufficient and inexhaustible fountain of Grace.A second appendix manages to articulate an apology for Christian faith that is both disarming and acute (`Is the Bible a Reliable Tutorial to Lasting Joy?', pp. 322-334). For some readers these thirteen pages, rather inorganically connected to the book's main argument but a preamble for its coherence, may be worth the volume's price.If most Christians could agree to the argument of Piper's second appendix and a lot of sincere onlookers recognize its plausibility, matters are quite various in the author's third appendix (`Is God Less Glorious Because He Ordained That Evil Be? Jonathan Edwards on the divine decrees', pp. 335-351). Here Piper bores down into the philosophical (I use the term advisedly, for a Calvinist/Edwardsian system inevitably requires employment of at least a dialect that moves categorically beyond the biblical vocabulary.) plumbing that supplies his pastoral work and writing. He asks two questions that animated as well the uncommon mind of his intellectual mentor, Jonathan Edwards:* Is God the author of sin?* Why does God ordain that there be evil?Piper supplies something other than a bald `no' to the first question by endorsing Edwards' distinction of the `will of decree' from the `will of command'. God may hate sin but see in its chance a more universal amazing which he pursues and achieves for this e respond to the second is more easily abbreviated: `... so that amazing may come of it.'The section's final paragraphs are worth quoting for the method they detect a failure of nerve in most evangelical theodicy and then push Calvinist/Edwardsian thought toward pastoral ends:So the respond to the question in the title of this appendix, `Is God less glorious because He ordained that evil be?' is no, just the opposite. God is more glorious for having conceived and made and governed a globe like this with all its evil. The effort to absolve Him by denying His foreknowledge of sin or by denying His control of sin is a fatal error and a amazing dishonor to His Word and His wisdom. Evangelicals who are seeking the glory of God, look well to the teaching of your churches and your schools. But most of all, look well to your souls.If you would see God's glory ad savor His glory and magnify His glory in this world, do not remain wavering before the sovereignty of God in the face of amazing evil. Take His Book in your hand, please for His Spirit of illumination and humility and trust, and settle this matter so that you might be unshakable in the day of your own amazing calamity. My prayer is that what I have written will sharpen and deepen your God-entranced worldview and that in the day of your loss you will be like Job, who, when he lost all his children, fell down and worshiped and said `The LORD gave, and the LORD has taken away, blessed be the name of the LORD.'Two final appendices treat how to war for joy--since developed by the author in book-length form and the reasons Piper continues to use the provocative term `Hedonism'.What are we to create of John Piper's Christian Hedonism and its programmatic role within a resurgent North American Calvinism? A handful of observations is the most, at first reading, that I feel capable of rst, there is enough coherence in this business that I am sure I will search myself reading through Piper's works, seeking in particular that bonus for nuance that comes with having been critiqued, beaten up, and endorsed (with qualifications and without) in the public cond, Piper's efforts at recovering a put for the religious affections that nourishes and is nourished by a life of the mind strikes me as particularly timely. The Christian capacity to swing like a badly balanced pendulum from the extreme of doctrinal scholasticism to vacuous `praise and worship' whose principal conviction seems to be that reality outside the emotional experience of corporate worship is the thing we no longer do scarcely requires development here. Out of careful doctrinal conviction rather than infatuation with the middle ground, Piper articulates a compelling both/and ird, I am not sure that the phrase `Christian Hedonism' has worn well. Perhaps, like a worn-out pair of running shoes that carried one a lot of miles while accruing all manner of associations and affections, it should be urth, Piper's pastorally-directed biblical theology bears both the virtues and the liabilities of any attempt to identify a `core' around which the diverse biblical materials search their proper orbit. All competent efforts, it seems to me, serve their time as required correctives to badly focused or incoherent alternative biblical theologies. Yet all, in time, are seen to practice the sin of reductionism even in as they exercise their saintly pilgrimage. Piper's fresh core corrects, to be sure. As a doctor of the ecclesia reformata, semper reformanda, the author is not doubt the first to recognize the historically conditioned nature of his work and to want for worthy successors.Whoever they be, they will need grace and courage if they are to do justice to an essentially daring body of work. I am not as satisfied as I want nor as content to seek my happiness in the glory of God and the joy of my compeers as I could t I am a bit happier and a small more purposeful about my happiness and God's for having turned these pages. Now, if you'll excuse me, I have a book to read (John Piper, When I Don't Desire God: how to war for joy).

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The God of Small Things: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    I read this book in 2 days. Such a well written book. I really enjoyed how the story was told bit by bit and it really created me curious. I did watch Ms Roy's YouTube clips on Untouchables. It really gives the context for this book and makes one appreciate the problems of inequality that are being raised.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The God of Small Things: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    I liked being surprised as I read. Familiar words sounded fresh to me. I was captivated by the writing style, and the story.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Not God: A History of Alcoholics Anonymous []  2019-12-23 19:41

    I have read widely about AA. This is the best history I have read. Not only does the author organize a lot of historical details, but strings them into a cogent storyline, Kurtz explains the underlying theme of developments, using the idea of Powerless-ness brings Power, and how it is a Spiritual concept. I can see how a lot of detractors don't really understand the primary ideas of ere is so much in the book and footnotes; that I plan to re-read much of it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Not God: A History of Alcoholics Anonymous []  2019-12-23 19:41

    Amazing book on the history of AA- should and share with others

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Pursuit of God: A Christian Classic []  2020-1-16 19:51

    Haven't read the whole book, because I have some a lot of bible studies I'm doing plus reading & study God's word takes a few hours, then adding this book. I've read about half of the book, I have to say it's a very amazing book. zer was one God called preacher. He was so dictated, he was like those men in the Bible that Jesus called, what we all need to be more like. Jesus driven. Have the love of Christ in our hearts. I'm so family oriented that my heart damage for his wife and children, but I have to say If I had a husband staying away from home or working from home I DEFINITELY WOULD WANT HIM DOING IT FOR THE LORD AND NOT FOR THE DRIVE FOR MORE MONEY OR HIGHER POSITION. I'm looking forward to finishing this book., seeing how his life turned out and seeing all he did for our Lord. I don't think it hurts to have Amazing books in your library.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Desiring God: Meditations of A Christian Hedonist []  2020-1-19 22:29

    This is one of the most enlightening books I have ever read. Period.When "Desiring God" was first recommended to me almost ten years ago I started reading it but didn't create it past the first couple of chapters. But after reading some of Piper's other writings in more latest years I decided to give "Desiring God" another try, and am so glad I e first several chapters are dense with historical and philosophical references, that were unfamiliar to me, which created for challenging reading. (And is why I didn't obtain too far the first time I read it.) But these chapters lay a foundation for later chapters and explain terminology such as "Christian hedonism" which recurs throughout the book.Piper makes no claims of innovation with the contents of "Desiring God". In it's pages he takes readers back to C.S. Lewis, Jonathan Edwards and most importantly Biblical texts to support readers explore the glorious truth that man's happiness and God's glory need not be mutually exclusive. Rather, says Piper, "God is most glorified in us when we are most happy in Him."Perseverance rewards with some of the most enlightening, thought provoking chapters I have ever read. Piper writes in such a method that appeals to both the mind and the t, for an easier introduction to the ideas presented in "Desiring God" I would recommend starting with Piper's more latest book Don't Waste Your Life. "Desiring God" is the magnum opus of Piper's writings, but for a lot of it isn't the best put to start.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Desiring God: Meditations of A Christian Hedonist []  2020-1-19 22:29

    This is my first read for Piper. Although I have not been a massive reader in the past, this is the best book on Christian living/theology I have read. I believe Piper does a fine job of defending his usage of the term Hedonism and his phrases "God is most glorified in us when we are most happy in Him" and "the chief end of man is to glorify God BY enjoying him forever." Although some readers may be turned off by his staunch Calvinistic beliefs or his deterministic view of man's will, I would not allow this be a point of difference that would turn you away from the book. Read this book!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The God of Small Things: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    I read this book years ago-and lost it in a move. Had to reorder, it's that's good!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The God of Small Things: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    This story will touch you soul. Powerful, rich in descriptions and a profound visit on human selfishness. It hurts, deep inside and leaves you vibrating.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Desiring God: Meditations of A Christian Hedonist []  2020-1-19 22:29

    It took me a year to obtain through this book. I am not a fan of his style and it was not that interesting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Desiring God: Meditations of A Christian Hedonist []  2020-1-19 22:29

    The book makes me think seriously about my opinion and relationship with the heavenly Father. A lot of aspects were brought to my mind.Hedonism had always been negative but now I see it in a various light. I am glad to be/have the title.I am glad I had only the globe view of hedonists. Now I have learned again, not to be so dogmatic

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Not God: A History of Alcoholics Anonymous []  2019-12-23 19:41

    a Book Report by Ron HousleyErnest Kurtz holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University in the History of American Civilization; is a respected researcher; was the only person ever granted unlimited access to the Alcoholic Anonymous archives; and has given us a 400 page authoritative history detailing the birth and early growth of the basic organization to search a method for millions of hopeless alcoholics to obtain their lives is a fascinating story dating back to the mid 1930’s.AA’s founding is a struggle by Bill Wilson (and others) to explore a formula to let hopeless alcoholics to set their lives on a purposeful and meaningful path — a struggle which previously had always ended in failure. Like with the founding of America itself, there was no guaranty that the early trials and tribulations of Bill Wilson, et. al., would effect in eventual e early years of AA’s founding are so steeped in religious overture that one of the basic misconceptions today is that AA is some kind of religious movement, with a powerful background in a “conversion experience” – reminiscent of America’s early religious “Revivals.” At the early Revivals, sinners would march down front, in Billy Graham fashion, to be saved after a motivational sermon. The counterpart in AA was that the alcoholic would admit the reality of his fall from grace, owing to the fact that he could not stop drinking; and that he would, metaphorically, march down front and keep the bonuses of serenity, gratitude, a “new method of life,” and a kind of welcome to “adult life.”To be sure, millions of otherwise condemned alcoholics have been “saved” through Alcoholics Anonymous, after decades of failure by the medical community. I search the entire history fascinating; but at the same time I search it mired in confusing language which obfuscates some necessary questions: for instance, what is the meaning of the term, “spiritual;” what exactly differentiates “spiritual” from “religious;” and, how does AA’s recovery formula work for the non-religious alcoholic?Perhaps the most striking sentence, to me, comes in the middle of the book in the chapter, “The Context of Religious Ideas,” where Kurtz observes while discussing what the alcoholic must do to recover: “…the human activity most fundamentally essential to the attainment of ‘salvation’ is ACCEPTING REALITY.” [the author’s emphasis] (p.184)So there you have it: the alcoholic must “accept reality;” and how does one accept reality? One grasps it conceptually, using reason. Therein lies the conflict discussed throughout this entire book --- how does the alcoholic adhere to reality and reason in the face of an organization continually talking about the need to have “faith?” It is an age old dilemma.AA up a range of “character building” suggestions, by the adoption of which the struggling alcoholic can supposedly rid himself of the lure of alcohol. Foremost among the suggestions is the imperative to adopt “Honesty,” which the author summarizes as: “The Respond to Addiction is devotion to truth” and “…the restoration of the sanity of appropriate contact with reality and truth.” (p.185)I can see that sanity and cognitive contact with reality are two states that always go together; and I can easily understand how the drinking alcoholic is almost always chop off from cognitive contact with reality, because his cognitive faculty (i.e., his reasoning mind) is no longer functioning properly. Hence the alcoholic’s need for a “return to sanity” — a theme thoroughly integrated into AA’s e evolution of AA in the years following Globe Battle II saw the coming-together of an actual organization; and that organization saw the dominance of several principles supposedly essential for the sick and suffering alcoholic to recover:(a) there was near total agreement among the early membership that “getting the program” (i.e., getting recovery for oneself) was dependent upon an honest identification of the hopelessness experienced by the alcoholic who couldn’t stop drinking and who [email protected]#$%!&ing the end of his street (his “bottom,” as they say in AA);(b) further, the AA membership consolidated around the idea that recovery from alcoholism needed the cultivation of what became known as the “AA method of life,” which was essentially a life driven by the principles which were woven into what was known as The Twelve Steps — which first and foremost specified honesty with self and justice with respect to AA’s early years (in the 1950s), critiques began to appear in major media of the time (such as The Saturday Evening Post and Harper’s), seeming to smear AA as a “fanatical religious cult;” (p.144) as a “dogmatic cult” intent on cultivating dependence on AA itself. Charges of “cultism” continue into the show day, from some riously, the very title of this book, “Not-God,” focuses attention on one of AA’s most explicit themes: that recovery from alcoholism requires the alcoholic to give up the grandiosity of “playing God” — or, to quote Bill Wilson again: “Most alcoholics…like ink that they have grown up. The problem is that they do not know that they still have a lot to learn.” (p.140)Ernest Kurtz spends the entire second half of his book attempting to untangle some of the confusions seemingly intrinsic to “the program” of Alcoholics Anonymous. He addresses questions of faith vs. reason in the alcoholic’s quest for sobriety; he looks for the “essentials” of AA’s formula for recovery; and he tries to deconstruct the implied collectivism of AA’s “We” approach, and to sort out where individual responsibility plays a pivotal role. He quotes Bill Wilson: “Highly satisfactory as it is to live one’s life for others, it cannot be anything but disastrous to live one’s life for others as those other think it should be lived. One has, for better or worse, to choose his [sic] own life.” (p. 214)Kurtz’s book turned out to be an interesting acc of how an organization was born; how it struggled in its early years; how it overcame serious obstacles and criticisms; how its religious language transformed into embracing non-religious alcoholics seeking help; and, how it has advanced some of the major themes which were born during the formative years.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Not God: A History of Alcoholics Anonymous []  2019-12-23 19:41

    This is a must read for any student of the history of Alcoholics Anonymous. It is a rewrite of the author's PhD dissertation, and that shows a bit, it is a small dense at times, but quite worth it. If you wish to know something of the context in which the movement arose, the sources of it's ideas and how it got started and became established this is necessary reading. Amazing factual, objective info and insights. An excellent, outside addition to the "conference approved" official histories.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Pursuit of God: A Christian Classic []  2020-1-16 19:51

    Horrible quality of text. Difficult to read because the font is so bad.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Pursuit of God: A Christian Classic []  2020-1-16 19:51

    The book is great, however, the print type in this ver is ridiculously tiny. My eyes are fine and it's hard to read. It's so little that the book itself is thinner than most catalogs. Each letter is about 1/8th of an inch tall.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The God of Small Things: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    This review is posted on my blog: [...] my writing seminar here at school, we had to read The God of Little Things by Arundhati Roy. This novel takes put in southern India and follows the life of the twins Esthappen and Rahel. It is 1969 and the Marxist Uprising is very prominent in the state of Kerala. Through a series of flashbacks and show day scenes, Roy creatively illustrates the unbecoming of their family through secrecy, loss of innocence, and is was one of the best books I have had to read for a class. It throws the twins into a situation they never dreamed of being in and shows how one person’s mistakes can affect an entire family. While reading, you slowly start to see the kids lose their innocence and trust in the amazing things that their globe has to offer, which ultimately hardens their e conclusion of this novel was very tragic and created me cry. When you learn who the “God of Little Things” is it makes you so satisfied but you also know what is going to happen and it is so upsetting. But once the twins are reunited as adults, they realize that there was always that unique connection between them, even if it isn’t the connection you y’s work successfully shows the corruption of India’s current Love Laws and Caste System. She breaks down borders and builds her characters around these strict laws but allows them to step out of bounds. Through her social commentary, Roy thoroughly describes to the reader what needs to be changed in India. Roy is a new and powerful voice that stands up versus the laws of her land, showing others that change is necessary.4.3 Stars

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The God of Small Things: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    A life changing book that is so beautifully written I read it every other year to obtain a possibility to savor inspired literature.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Pursuit of God: A Christian Classic []  2020-1-16 19:51

    I loved this book so much, I read it twice in one ing a believer is one thing, but having a real hunger for God is another. Matthew 7:14 says "but little is the gate and narrow the street that leads to life, and only a few search it." The life of a Christian is not easy. God doesn't suggest to be first above everything, he demands it. Thankfully, we have the Holy Spirit and the Bible to tutorial us so that we may inherently possess reverential fear for the Lord.I highly recommend this book for all believers.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Pursuit of God: A Christian Classic []  2020-1-16 19:51

    This has been my first read of AW Tozer, but i have a general lean toward 'antique' writings. My number one hang up is the language in which most are written. The Pursuit of God, however, was a breeze to read as far as the language goes. It's content is timeless and encouraging. This book would be a fitting everyday devotional for someone who wants to dig a bit deeper daily. It would also be a amazing encouragement to the Christ follower who is in need of a rekindling of their flame.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Desiring God: Meditations of A Christian Hedonist []  2020-1-19 22:29

    Piper sums life in a sentence: God is most glorified in us when we are most happy in Him. "Desiring God: Meditations of a Christian Hedonist" (a subtitle to die for!) is one of the most profound and provocative books of the latest 100 years. In fact, not since Jonathan Edwards' "Religious Affections" has anyone so brilliantly and convincingly united head and heart, rationality and relationality, cognition and affection.Piper, because of his stature as a Reformation thinker and conservative pastor, very akin to Edwards, can reach conservatives with the notice of desire and affections, like few others. In other, less-respected and less-able hands (or pens), the notice might be dismissed or missed. In Piper's hands, we search that the grand theme of all of history, Yahweh Elohim's Opus, is relationship. It shouldn't be surprising, given that all of history has been shepherded by the Trinitarian God who has always and forever similar within the Divine really is true, God's glory and humanity's amazing are not mutually exclusive. To explore how they coexist and cohere read "Desiring God."Reviewer: Dr. Robert W. Kellemen is the author of "Soul Physicians: A Theology of Soul Care and Spiritual Direction," "Spiritual Friends: A Methodology of Soul Care and Spiritual Direction," and the forthcoming "Sacred Companions: A History of Soul Care and Spiritual Direction."

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Desiring God: Meditations of A Christian Hedonist []  2020-1-19 22:29

    This book challenged me, encouraged me, and most importantly guided me to have a deeper love for and satisfaction in God. Our desire for worldly pleasures are not too powerful but too weak, I am now convinced more than ever that Knowing God and experiencing His glory is the highest pleasure in the universe. I am very thankful for this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Not God: A History of Alcoholics Anonymous []  2019-12-23 19:41

    Lots of history about Alcoholics Anonymous but also a very thoughtful dissertation on addiction, it's treatment and the psychology/sociology of a "spiritual" solution to the frailties of the human condition. This is really the definitive history of Alcoholics Anonymous. It is not a short book because of that. In his "thesis" section he does a amazing job of deciphering why and how that program works. Very thoughtful and discerning. Anyone with a true interest in addiction should read this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Not God: A History of Alcoholics Anonymous []  2019-12-23 19:41

    The definitive work on how & why 12 step recovery works. In understanding the history we start to gain confidence that 12 step work is not a mystery but is actually based in science. There is repeatable data which those suffering from addiction can use. Based in the idea that "this is what worked for me". So there is no preaching when applied as designed. An eye opening reference meant to be used as a tool for anyone interested in using an anonymous program to change the direction of one's life.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The God of Small Things: A Novel [Book]  2017-12-25 18:0

    Once, every now and then, I read a book that feels so strong that I wonder how could I have lived before -- without knowing this story -- and not be aware of the void within? The God of Little Things is one such book. Extraordinary language carried me through. A masterful narration permitted horrible happenings to unfold in such a method that I was eager to see them through. What makes this novel great, greater than most, is that it is not only a story about India in the 1960s, about her caste system, or about Western colonialism. This story is about us, human beings with follies, and a lot of cruelties. And it is also about our love, our need for love that more often than not is out of synchrony with our lives. It shows us the difference between a globe seen through children's eyes and that of adults. How we corrupt ourselves as we grow into maturity, although sometimes it happens as abruptly as in the twin's lives in Ms. Roy's novel.I can't add anything else here that more than 400 reviewers have not said; I would have to dissect this book, and I don't feel comfortable doing it because I don't wish to break its ffice it to say, it is an extraordinary novel.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Pursuit of God: A Christian Classic []  2020-1-16 19:51

    This may be the most convicting book I've ever read. I do not contain the Bible in the books I've read. It is the inspired Word of God and therefore in a class of it's own. A. W. Tozer impresses me as a theologian for the masses. His insights are deep but his style is straightforward and simple to understand. I will not attempt to do a point by point review. I'll just say that if we, professing Christians, will honestly consider the points he makes we will come to a better understanding of what prevents us from having the intimate relationship with our Creator that He clearly desires. The point Tozer makes about the veil that separates us from God is enough in itself to explain our problem. I intend to read it again taking notes and writing down his a lot of statements that create for perfect quotes. The prayers he contains at the end of each chapter are worth writing down and including in ones regular prayer time.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Pursuit of God: A Christian Classic []  2020-1-16 19:51

    Preface: Tozer starts off dark with this statement, “In this hour of all-but-universal darkness one cheering gleam appears: within the fold of conservative Christianity there are to be found increasing numbers of persons whose religious lives are marked by a growing hunger after god himself.” So, Tozer thinks the globe is in a state of universal darkness? That is a very unrealistic view on life and is setting up a “Life Sucks without Christianity” mentality. He then states that more people have a growing hunger for a belief in a god. What is this hunger? It seems to me it is a desire for emotional comfort. Can Tozer demonstrate that his god exists? He then states, “They are eager for spiritual realities and will not be place off with words, nor will they be content with correct ‘interpretations’ of truth.” What is a spiritual reality? Can Tozer demonstrate these spiritual realities exist in our shared reality? As for his comment about correct interpretations of truth; truth is fact and there are no interpretations of facts. He goes on to say, “There may be a right opinion of god without either love or one right temper toward him. Satan is a proof of this.” I’m glad he mentions that people have opinions of a god, but can they demonstrate this god exists? He claims Satan is the proof of this, yet can he prove that Satan exists? He speaks of people holding the “right” opinions of god but doesn’t explain what these are (most likely people who agree with his options). He states that the bible can bring knowledge of god, but can it? The bible was written by men and cannot be demonstrated to be a reliable pathway to truth.C1: Following Hard After God: Tozer makes this statement, “…before a man can seek god, god must first have sought the man.” Really? So, god is the one who seeks the relationship with humans? How so? There have been a lot of gods in human history in which Christians do not believe. People believed in these gods as Christians believe in their god. How can we demonstrate that the Christian god exists and that he is perusing a relationship with anyone? Tozer goes on, “Before a sinful man can think a right thought of god, there must have been a work of enlightenment done within him.” First, per the bible aren’t we all sinful? Second, what is this work of enlightenment? How can we demonstrate it has occurred? Tozer then states [for god] “He has first place an urge within us that spurs us to the pursuit.” Does he? I do not have this urge, does that mean god doesn’t wish me to pursue him? Will I go to hell because god didn’t give me this urge? Tozer states, “God is a person, and in the deep of his mighty nature he thinks, wills, enjoys, feels, loves, desires and suffers as any other person may.” How does Tozer know this to be true? He is simply asserting he knows something instead of demonstrating the truth of his statement. Tozer goes on, “He communicates with us through the avenues of our minds, our wills and our emotions.” Does a god communicate with us? Before Judaism and Christianity a lot of people thought that other gods were communicating with them, where they right? People “feel” like something is communicating with them but that doesn’t mean there is an external smart entity actually communicating directly to those people’s brains. If a god was communicating, what is he saying? Is he providing info which could not be known by humans by any other means (like the cure for cancer)? No, it is not. It is how people feel about their beliefs. It is emotions people are feeling about the concept of a god in their minds. It is a relationship with themselves. Tozer states, “Now as always god discovers himself to ‘babes’ and hides himself in thick darkness from the wise and the prudent.” So, god only reveals himself with people who have a kid like mind? People who, like children, are easily fooled? People, who are willing to believe things without demonstrable, verifiable, and objective evidence? And, god will intentionally hide himself from people who are seeking actual evidence for his existence? What do we call an adult to has the mind of a child? A fool (a person who acts unwisely, or imprudently). So, is Tozer saying that god is only interested in communicating with and saving fools? Telling people to not use their logic and critical thinking skills is risky and self-serving.C2: The Blessedness of Possessing Nothing: Tozer covers the evil of physical possessions. Tozer states, “They were created for man’s uses, but they were meant always to be external to man and subservient to him.” Humans use physical things to better our lives. If someone takes owning physical positions to an unhealthy level then I can see where it may be an issue. However, few people I know do this. Tozer states, “But sin has introduced complications and has created those very bonuses of god a potential source of rune to the soul.” Really? Physical things can lead to the ruin of the soul? First, can Tozer demonstrate souls exist? Again, anything taken to an unhealthy level (including religion) can cause problems in people’s lives. If Tozer believes it will impact an afterlife he must demonstrate this afterlife and his god exist. He refers to the story of Abraham and Isaac. This is not a amazing comparison. I don’t believe this story actually happened in reality, it is just a story about following god not matter what. Another human being is not a possession. It was Abraham’s duty, as a father, to protect Isaac from harm. Yet, he hears a voice and decides to follow those instruction to murder his son. Is god really so jealous that he can’t stand a father loving his son?C3: Removing the Veil: Tozer states, “God angry us for himself: that is the only explanation that satisfies the ear of a thinking man, whatever his wild reason may say. Should faulty education and perverse reasoning lead a man to conclude otherwise, there is small that any Christen can do for him.” Again, Tozer is speaking of belief in something based on emotion and he denounces reason and education. This is ridiculous. He goes on, “I speak to thirsty hearts whose longing have been wakened by the tough of god within them, and such as they need no reasoned proof. Their restless hears furnish all the proof they need.” Again, he is telling people that how they “feel” about the concept of a god is the reason they should believe this god exists in reality. Reason and education are far more necessary than how you feel about any topic. How you feel about something has no bearing on weather or not that something is true or true. He goes on to talk about how sin is always based on “self”, “Self is the opaque veil that hides the face of god from us. It can be removed only in spiritual experience, never by mere instruction.” Yes, being a selfish jerk is not good. But, there are true globe consequences for being a selfish jerk. He goes on to give a list of traits he believes his god has: Immutable (unchanging over time, unable to be changed). Really? It is obvious that the god of the old testament who sanctioned slavery and genocide is very various then the god of the fresh testament who told us to love our enemies. Omniscient (knowing everything) How can anyone know that this god is omniscient? Righteous (morally right or virtuous) Is it morally right to murder homosexuals, unruly children, or huge groups of people because they are on the land that you think a god promised to you? Spirit (a supernatural being) How can we determine & demonstrate if anything claimed to be supernatural actually exists? Tozer states, “God must do everything for us. Our part is to yield and trust.” Can anyone demonstrate that god is doing anything for anyone?C4: Apprehending God: Tozer states, “To most people god is an inference, not a reality.” No, believing in a god is not an inference (a conclusion reached on the basis of evidence and reasoning); but I agree it is not a reality. He goes on to state, “Others do not go even go so far as this; they know him only by hearsay.” YES! This the only method people know anything about whatever god in which they believe. The Bible is hearsay. All preachers are only repeating hearsay from the bible. Anything else would be private experience (which cannot be demonstrated to be factually accurate) or people simply lying. Tozer goes on, “The bible assumes as a self-evident fact that men can know god with at least the same degree of immediacy as they know any other person or thing…” Yet, this is not true. How can you know anything about a god? What mechanism or way can you use to explore anything about a supernatural entity? Then Tozer states, “Faith enables our spiritual sense to function.” So, you can only detect and learn anything about a god by using faith (strong belief in God or in the doctrines of a religion, based on spiritual apprehension rather than proof). So, you have to believe, with no evidence, in something then you can believe more things about that something? Can anyone see how small sense this makes? Tozer give his definition of reality: “I mean that which has existence apart from any idea any mind may have of it, and which would exist if there were no mind anywhere to entertain a thought of it. That which is true has being in itself. It does not depend upon the observer for its validity.” Yet, Tozer is too blinded by his faith to realize that his god (just like every other god claimed to exist by humans) belief doesn’t fit his own definition. He continues on, “Faith creates nothing: it simply reckons upon that which is already there.” So, faith allows people to detect the undetectable? Tozer continues, “God and the spiritual globe are real. We can reckon upon them with as much assurance as we reckon upon the familiar globe around us.” Sorry, but NO! You can reckon upon your concept of a god and your concept of a spiritual world; but these things only exist in your mind. You can NOT demonstrate these things exist in our shared reality in a verifiable and objective way. This is how we determine what actually exists in reality.C5: The Universal Presence: Tozer starts, “In all Christian teaching certain primary truths are found…” Really, what truths? Tozer goes on, “God dwells in his creation and is everywhere indivisibly show in all his work.” Can Tozer demonstrate this claim to be true? He continues, “It means simply that god is here. Wherever we are, god is here. There is no place, there can be no place, where he is not.” Again, Tozer must demonstrate the truth of this claim in a demonstrable, verifiable, and objective way. Now, if he is speaking of the concept of a god in the minds of humans; then you carry around your own private concept of the god in which you believe. However, that does not create this god true external to your own mind. Tozer speaks of the beginning of our observable universe, “In the beginning god. Not matter, for matter is not self-causing. It requires an antecedent cause, and god is that cause.” No human being alive, or who has ever lived, knows how our observable universe began; this contains every Christian. This is just another claim by Tozer. He goes on, “In the beginning god, the uncaused cause of matter, mind and law.” These are just more unverified claims. Tozer goes on to claim that his god exists absolutely everywhere but yet again, he is just asserting a claim which he cannot demonstrate to be true. Tozer states, “On our part there must be surrender to the spirt of god, for his work it is to present us the father and the son. If we co-operate with him in loving obedience god will manifest himself to us and that manifestation will be the difference between a nominal Christian life and a life radiant with the light of his face.” So, just believe in this god, follow what the bible tells you unquestioningly, and you will believe you see him in your life, and you will feel like your life is better. Isn’t this what happens in most religions. Can’t this happen with Zeus, Odin, Brahma, or Allah?C6: The Speaking Voice: Tozer states, “The why of natural law is the living voice of god immanent in his creation. And this word of god which brought all worlds into being cannot be understood to mean the bible, for it is not written or printed word at all, but the expression of the will of god spoken into the structure of all things. This word of god is the breath of god filling the globe with living potentiality. The voice of god is the most strong force in nature, indeed the only force in nature, for all energy is here only because the power-filled word is being spoken.” This is one heavy claim which must be demonstrated to be true. I’m surprised that Tozer states that the bible is not necessarily the word of god. Does this mean we can disregard the bible? Yet, can Tozer demonstrate this voice of god? Can he present it actually exists anywhere other than people’s minds? Later Tozer states, “The bible is the inevitable outcome of god’s continuous speech. It is the infallible declaration of his mind for us place into our familiar human words.” So now Tozer states that the bible is infallible word of god. Yet the bible cannot be demonstrated to be a reliable pathway to truth.C7: The gaze of the Soul: Tozer states, “They are the spiritual principles behind the record of god’s dealings with men and woven into the writings of holy men as they ‘were moved by the holy ghost.’” How can anyone demonstrate that the men who wrote the bible were “moved” by this supernatural force? Nothing in the bible indicates the info came from anything but humans. There is nothing in the bible that somehow exceeds human knowledge. Much of what is written in the bible is considered to be immoral today: slavery, murdering homosexuals, genocide, murdering unruly children, and the concept of hell to name a few. Tozer then speaks of the importance of faith, “Faith is all-important in the life of the soul. Without faith it is impossible to please god. Faith will obtain me anything, take me anywhere in the kingdom of god, but without faith there can be no approach to god, no forgiveness, no deliverance, no salvation, no communion, no spiritual life at all.” This is wrong. Without belief (faith) in things which cannot be demonstrated to be factually accurate you may FEEL that you can’t please a god. If you have it you may FEEL you can be close to a god and will be save in some imaginary afterlife; but this does not create any of these beliefs real in reality. This is just wishful thinking. Tozer goes on to test to define faith, but ultimately it is just believing something for which you do not have amazing reason. Faith is belief because you wish something to be true, not because it is (in fact) true.C8: Restoring the creator-creature relation: Tozer starts, “A satisfactory spiritual life will start with complete change in relation between god and the sinner; not a judicial change merely, but a conscious and experienced change affecting the sinner’s whole nature. The atonement in Jesus’ blood makes such a change judicially possible and the working of the holy spirit makes it emotionally satisfying.” This change is belief that your relationship with the concept of a god has changed. You believe things will become emotionally better and then your attitude changes for the better. This can be achieved by non-supernatural methods and I would argue there is nothing supernatural event at all. Tozer goes on, “…So we obtain our moral bearings by looking at god. We must start with god. We are right when and only when we stand in the right position relative to god, and we are wrong so far and so long as we stand in any other position.” This is demonstrably wrong. Our morals do not come from a god. Morals are not a dictate. Our morals come from a goal shared by humans, and that gold is overall human wellbeing. Tozer states, “Much of our difficulty as seeking Christians stems from our unwillingness to take god as he is and adjust our lives accordingly. We insist upon trying to modify him and bring him nearer to our own image.” YES! Because god only exists as a concept in human minds we do test to create him in the photo that best suits us. This is why there are so a lot of varying opinions about the Christian god. There are thousands of denominations of Christianity that do not agree on a lot of aspects of the religion. Who and what god is, is an opinion because the existence of this god is not a demonstrable fact. He continues, “I speak of a voluntary exalting of god to his proper station over us and willing surrender of our whole being to the put of worshipful submission which the creator-creature circumstance makes proper.” You are placing this concept of a god in this position only in your mind. Then Tozer speaks of people putting things like & ambition above god. Well, can we humans avoid this? We require for ourselves and our family to survive and thrive in this world. Ambition can bring us this money. As I’ve stated earlier, anything taken to an unhealthy level is not god. But pursuit of doing what is in the best interest of yourself and the people around you is a amazing thing.C9: Meekness and Rest: Tozer speaks of sin; “All our heartaches and a amazing a lot of of our physical ills spring directly out of sins. Pride, arrogance, resentfulness, evil imaginings, malice, greed: these are the sources of more human pain than all the diseases that ever-afflicted moral flesh.” No. Tozer is demonstrably wrong. Once again, anything taken to an unhealthy level can cause issues in our lives. However, you only have to look around you to search that the vast majority of people do not suffer as Tozer describes because they understand the negative impacts of these negative behaviors. Tozer states, “To all the victims of the gnawing disease Jesus says, “Ye must become as small children.” For small kids do not compare; they keep direct enjoyment from what they have without relating it to something else or someone else.” Has Tozer ever observed children’s behaviors? Kids are extremely selfish and do not hesitate to take things away from other kids or hit other kids out of frustration. They scream, cry, kick, and hit if they don’t obtain what they want. They learn from the adults around them that these behaviors are not acceptable. As I have stated earlier, kids are fools because they haven’t experienced enough to develop reason and wisdom.C10: The Sacrament of Living: Tozer begins, “Our problem springs from the fact that we who follow Christ inhabit at once two worlds, the spiritual and natural world.” The existence of a spiritual globe is not a fact; Tozer must demonstrate this put exists. Tozer goes on to speak negatively of the Catholic church, “…the Roman Catholic church represents today the sacred-secular heresy carried to its logical conclusion.” Here is the issue, how can any denomination determine if what they teach and preach is right or wrong? Everything is determined based on interpretation of the bible, and anyone can interpret it however he or she chooses. This makes the bible an unreliable pathway to truth.I understand that this book was written for a specific group of Christians who believe what Tozer believes. However, I hope people recognize that everything Tozer wrote was his opinion about things for which he can NOT know or confirm are factually accurate. He believes because he wants to believe. He believes because his beliefs provide him with emotional comfort. I am not interested in believing anything for these reasons. I am interested in understanding as a lot of Real (Factually Accurate) things as possible and as few False (Factually Inaccurate) things as possible.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Pursuit of God: A Christian Classic []  2020-1-16 19:51

    Tozer's books to me are more like reference material than just simply a book...you always wish to hold them handy to review as your life's seasons change. This is because his writings seem timeless...his words always seem to apply to the season you are in. This book is no different. I only want there were more in the church today like Tozer. He does not mince words. He is focused on the Lord Jesus Christ and he does not allow anything take his focus off of Him. It is very refreshing to hear truth, clear, unvarnished, convicting and as applicable today as it was in Tozer's time. In fact, much of what Tozer writes about - the church, seekers, church programs, etc. - is even more active today than it was in his time. If you truly wish to know Father better...if you wish to see Jesus more clearly and understand better what he spoke out while here - read A.W. Tozer. But if your religeous doctrine means more to you than truth; if your religeous spirit is stronger than your desire to seek a private relationship with Father and His Son, then wait until your spirit is right and ready for truth. A.W. Tozer had a passion for the Lord that needs to be renewed in today's church. I wish to know and have that passion in my life. If you do, too, this is a book for you.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Not God: A History of Alcoholics Anonymous []  2019-12-23 19:41

    " God , I'm Not-God , You Are-God " became my " mantra " during the second year of my recovery in the program of Alcoholics Anonymous. I still repeat it often. I had never heard the phrase " Not-God " . Yet, a lot of people around me and a lot of of my readings suggested I had to stop playing God , especially if I wanted relief from the continuous stream of thoughts that would enter my mind. Not until I admitted , believed and accepted that I was " Not-God " , was I given the relief I is book provides a historical foundation for an understanding of Alcoholics Anonymous. In addition, it fills the blanks needed for a more thorough understanding of the huge book of Alcoholics is an absolute must read for those interested in Alcoholics Anonymous . In addition , I suggest alcoholics read the book if they are fortunate to reach a point in their recovery where they develop a curiosity as to the history of AA . Tim H.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Not God: A History of Alcoholics Anonymous []  2019-12-23 19:41

    The most detailed informed history of AA I’ve ever come across!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Desiring God: Meditations of A Christian Hedonist []  2020-1-19 22:29

    This book is simply a lot. It's lengthy, with lots and lots of detail and explanation. It was a bit too much for me (Ie, what the author said in 100 pages could have been just as well said in 50 pages). Others may like the level of detail given by Piper tho. The historical research that went into the book i found very interesting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Desiring God: Meditations of A Christian Hedonist []  2020-1-19 22:29

    This book had a amazing message. It was very inspiring. I probably need to re-read it. The key notice is that joy is found in your relationship with God, rather than in God's blessings. I recommend it for anyone who wants a spiritual connection with God or anyone who likes to read faith development books.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Stickman Revenge 3: League of Heroes [App]  2019-7-21 13:38

    DO NOT SPEND MONEY or GET TOO INVOLVED IN THIS GAME. I love the game, but even after spending money, and unlocking most the game, now that i am switching phones, i obtain to lose all my true spent, progress, and loot. Again, do not waste or time.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Stickman Revenge 3: League of Heroes [App]  2019-7-21 13:38

    This android game has become ridiculus. Too a lot of ads. Now you cannot even play more than 5 times till the enery ends

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Stickman Revenge 3: League of Heroes [App]  2019-7-21 13:38

    Don't download, nothing worth here, I got bored soon enough,repetitive theeme

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Stickman Revenge 3: League of Heroes [App]  2019-7-21 13:38

    best android game ever. just want that all characters costed gems but best android game ever

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Stickman Revenge 3: League of Heroes [App]  2019-7-21 13:38

    Not good game. Absolutely horrible!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Stickman Revenge 3: League of Heroes [App]  2019-7-21 13:38

    It can't but it is installing now really long time

    0  



    Search Cloud

    About us

    Use our product reviews finder and generate tons of ratings & opinions on any item, shop product or service. Search, read and publish reviews for brands, TV shows, ebooks, gadgets, video games, meals, music, household items or movies. Would you like to rate recently purchased thing? Go ahead! Express satisfaction or sadness, describe own experience & identify strengths and weaknesses of the product. Write short or detailed review with a few clicks.

    Community

    Publish review of any item you find here, registration is not required
    Share own experience, point out the pros and cons, warn or recommend
    Search for opinions on any item, product or service, read tons of reviews

    Contact

    www.add-reviews.com

    Use contact form to reach us or write a message via email:

    [email protected]

    Describe your problem, share ideas or report a bug on the site.

    https://add-reviews.com/
    0856-458-386