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    Tudors: The History of England Volume II []  2020-1-27 20:1

    More readable and consistent in style than the first volume of the history, the Tudors for some reason then goes on to depart from the attempt to show a holistic history in favor of a much more narrowly focused interest on the reformation and Elizabethan settlement. Ackroyd wades into debates of faith with enthusiasm, and enough though far from total accuracy. What’s really a shame is that on doing so he abandons the more interesting “this is what the lives of the people were like” sections which often redeemed his jaundiced and frequently flawed political history in Foundation. It’s clear this is closer to his era, but it falls short in fresh and various ways than the previous volume.

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    Tudors: The History of England Volume II []  2020-1-27 20:1

    I bought this book on the tip of "The Weekly Standard" on whom I lean heavily for book reviews. They lauded the author and I agree that his book is very reader-friendly and a pleasure to read. It increased my knowledge of the reformation and how amazing a part the Tudors played in it, it's too poor there were so a lot of burnings and head loppings that went along with it, the Christians of that era have a lot to respond for. Reading this book will give you a concise understanding of what the Tudors were all about, you'll have fun it.

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    Tudors: The History of England Volume II []  2020-1-27 20:1

    Yes, I watched the TV series. Yes, I've read all five of C.J. Sansom's Matthew Shardlake mysteries covering the Tudor era. (Highly recommended if you're a Tudor fan.) Yes, I've read countless other treatments - both fiction and non-fiction - about the Tudors. So why tackle another one? I guess it's like Globe Battle II. I can't seem to obtain enough, and once I'm on a roll, can hardly include myself in the desire to aculate more facts, interpretations, special insights. It's almost like living through the period, and when I do read another treatment, I often think, "Oh, yes, I remember that," as if I'd almost (even though not quite) been kroyd adds considerably to the reader's shop of knowledge on this period, no matter how much background that reader already has on the Tudors. He piles facts on facts, examples on examples - as in the religious turmoil of the entire era. In fact, there are so a lot of aspects to the religious turmoil, over the entire 94-year reign (from Henry VIII through Elizabeth I), that the period takes on a feeling that controversies will never be settled (somewhat like the Arab-Israeli conflict today?). From previous readings, I had a notion that Henry VIII settled most of the religious hash when he broke with the Pope, confiscated the monasteries, and proclaimed himself head of the church. But that was just a start. Even Henry experienced an endless slog through the religious thicket, and the war continued well beyond his time. Ackroyd gives a complex, intriguing picture (nothing could be "clear" about this matter) of the convoluted interaction not just of the Catholics vs. the Protestants, but of the different Protestant denominations as well.Another striking insight was how cheap life was in that time - not just for the not good commoners, but for the ruling class as well. Seems as though most of the courtiers, even at the highest level, lived from day to day wondering when their heads would be chopped off. Our political wars today are beautiful nasty, but at least for the most part, we don't murder out political opponents.I've always been fascinated by Henry's parade through six wives, and knew he was haunted with the idea of producing a male heir. But Ackroyd points out that Henry's goal was not simply to insure a continuation of the male line, but more importantly to validate Tudor legitimacy to the throne. The Tudors were undoubtedly legitimate contenders for the throne, but by no means the only ones with related kroyd, then, adds significantly to an understanding of the Tudor era, and his book is certainly worth the read. 4-1/2 stars.

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    Tudors: The History of England Volume II []  2020-1-27 20:1

    I was captivated from the beginning. This is an acc that can be clearly understood by persons with even a rudimentary understanding of England's history.I thought the author stated his opinions, as well as opposing opinions, clearly and concisely and offered a reasonable explanation as to why he leaned one method or another. He allowed the reader to arrive at their own conclusions based on his evidence without demeaning the reader if you chose do not need to be a scholar to have fun this book. I would highly recommend and am looking forward to the nextinstallment. gbash

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    Tudors: The History of England Volume II []  2020-1-27 20:1

    The Tudor kings and queens were arguably the dynasty that shaped the future of English history more than any other. Peter Akroyd recreates the story of the Tudor kings and queens with awesome detail. Even in 432 pages, Akroyd can only scratch the surface of these colourful and larger than life 's all here. The triumphs and tragedies of one of the bloodiest dynasties in English history. Betrayals and conspiracies were the words of the day during the reign of the Tutors. History fans will be enthralled by all of the details. No doubt Henry VIII and Elizabeth I are the main characters in this book as they ultimately shaped the religious outlook in England.Akroyd does spend huge parts of the book describing the religious fervor in England. It's fascinating to read how Catholic England became a Protestant country in stages and in varying extremes. Catholic, then Protestant, then Catholic again and finally Protestant. Probably no other European country saw such religious doubt, Akroyd could have made a book 5 times longer with all the intrigue and espionage in spite all the detail, the reader can be left with so a lot of questions. Lady Jane Grey and her 9 days of Queen in England is not explored as fully as possible. Even Mary Queen of Scots deserved more ere is no question that TUDORS: THE HISTORY OF ENGLAND FROM HENRY VIII TO ELIZABETH I is an incredibly fascinating read for any history fan. I'm not sure why HENRY VII does not feature in the title since he founded the Tudor Dynasty. I guess that's for another book.

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    Tudors: The History of England Volume II []  2020-1-27 20:1

    This is the second volume of Peter Ackroyd's history of England. So far there are three, but more volumes are expected--and anticipated. This book can easily stand on its own. THE TUDORS covers the ninety-four year period from the ascension of Henry VIII in 1509 to the death of his daughter, Elizabeth I in 1603. Two of his other children, Edward VI and Mary I (Bloody Mary) also rule during this e Tutors are fascinating, if brutal, rulers, and Ackroyd brings them all to life, along with their supporting cast, which contains the six queens of Henry VIII and councillors such as Thomas More and Robert Cecil, among a lot of others. As always, Ackroyd's prose is lively and accessible, and his insights are spot kroyd focuses quite closely on the Protestant Reformation that was taking put throughout the period. It is certainly important to do so, but Ackroyd delves so deep on specific matters that it can grow tedious.But create no mistake. This is an entertaining and enjoyable book on that popular family who ruled England for nearly a century.

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    Tudors: The History of England Volume II []  2020-1-27 20:1

    This is a very amazing history of the Tudors. I bought his Rebellion: The History of England from James I to the Glorious Revolution before this book, so I have things out of order as it were, but it doesn't matter; whatever he writes can stand on its own. I was impressed with Rebellion and decided to buy this book, and I feel like it is even better, so now I have Foundation: The History of England from Its Earliest Beginnings to the Tudors on the shelf waiting next.He writes so well. You never feel like you are bogging down into irrelevant info but what info that are provided support you understand the period, but this book takes you method beyond an English king that was known to cut a head off, even if that head was his wife's, and explains the significance in a broader picture of why his period is so necessary in the history of our civilization.Henry VIII was consumed with having a male heir. When he married his deceased brother's wife, Katherine of Aragon just before his eighteenth birthday, the plan was that she would provide him a son. She failed. She gave birth to a daughter, Mary, Henry began to have thoughts of ditching her as he already had his eyes on Anne Boleyn, and so began his quest to get from the pope an annulment of the marriage. To hold it short, he was able to marry Anne and she gave him a daughter, Elizabeth, but not a son. So he had her head chopped off because of reports of adultery and went on to marry again. Jayne Seymour did give him a son, Edward VI. She died just a few days after l of this is somewhat tabloid stuff. The true interest of the book is the almost one hundred years of reformation that England went through, from being a Catholic nation to becoming a nation under the Anglican (Protestant) church, whose head was the king or queen. It was not an simple or pleasant transformation. That nation had changed its faith four times in twenty years, and a time had come for an end to innovation. But during those years there were changes in the throne as well. When Henry VIII died, Edward became king, but being of not good health he died at the age of sixteen. During his reign, the nation remained Protestant. An attempt was created to sidestep Mary and install Lady Jane Grey as queen. Her reign lasted a small over a week and Mary took over. Mary was a devout Catholic, and while she ruled there were about 300 "heretics" burned alive, earning her the moniker of Bloody Mary. While she did marry, she produced no children, and upon her death Elizabeth began her long ere are so a lot of characters involved in this book, whether bi, archbi, noblemen or secretaries. Ackroyd does a amazing job of presenting each of them, and while a lot of expired without their head, he does introduce us to William Cecil and his son Robert. William was with Elizabeth throughout her reign and was, in fact, her basic minister. He helped to tutorial her although no man could control her. She was very powerful willed, wanted peace in her kingdom, was wisely wary of political ties to other nations, and held England together when a amazing majority of Europe was Catholic, and a lot of wished to see her head in a e matter of Mary Queen of Scots is discussed adequately in the book. The author is not judgmental of Mary but does rightly point out that she created some very foolish decisions during her lifetime. Running away with the basic suspect of her husband's murder was not a brilliant move and she lived in custody in England for about eighteen years until Cecil and Walsingham got enough on her to cut off her the latter part of Elizabeth's rule, the nation was saved by the English navy and poor luck weather for the Spanish navy. She ruled until 1603 and the son of Mary Queen of Scots, James I of England, took the throne. You will learn more about him in Rebellion.I thoroughly enjoyed the book and Peter Ackroyd is one of my favorite authors. I strongly recommend his works.

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    Tudors: The History of England Volume II []  2020-1-27 20:1

    Ackroyd's principle focus is on the religious conflicts , smouldering in the background since Wycoff's day and the growing tension between Church and State Authority. Which became critical with Henry VIII's desperate need for a male heir and the Pope's unwillingness to grant him an annulment from Catherine. Other questions about military, fiscal and sociological developments take a back seat to the basic focus on the strife began by Henry VIII schism, Edward's relatively passive acceptance of the status quo; Mary's reversion to Orthodox Catholicism; and Elizabeth's relatively benign reversion to Henry's Anglo Catholicism and then, gradually the movement to a uniquely English form of Episcopal kroyd writes well and clearly aims his text towards a more famous and easily digestible format. (As opposed to a more academic and forensic treatment of the material.)He is more focused and, therefore, more substantive in moving his main theme along, than in his previous more broadly comprehensive survey of the entire history of England before the Tudors.An simple read and a clear exposition of the main features of what really created the Tudor dynasty so celebrated for its effects on the development of a singular English history.

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    Tudors: The History of England Volume II []  2020-1-27 20:1

    If you wonder why freedom of religion and the separation of church and state became the very first amendment to the United States Constitution, this book will support you understand.While the personalities, infighting and politics surrounding the reigns of Henry VIII, Queen Mary and Elizabeth I are a huge part of this fascinating book, the religious turmoil of the period is a strong, almost dominant undercurrent.If you are squeamish, allow this book be. This was an era where a easy beheading was considered humane execution. Disputes over religious niceties like whether a priest should elevate the host during communion were enough to obtain someone sent to the stake. If they were lucky the wood for the fire would be body gets off easy. All parties are guilty of horrendous crimes.Having just a tip of the horror that entangling government with religion caused in that era, one can well understand why those who first amended the US Constitution thought preventing such entanglement in their fresh republic to be of supreme e Protestant motives behind all that religious strife were both high -- freeing the people from the "superstitions", papal dominance, and costly exploitation of the Catholic Church -- and venal -- seizing the wealth of the Catholic churches, monasteries and convents. The Catholic motives were equally compromised. All combatants claimed they were fighting to save souls. All practiced the bloodiest and cruelest means to do so.When God is your captain, and your opponents are the Devil's, there is no humanity to stay your hand.

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    Tudors: The History of England Volume II []  2020-1-27 20:1

    Nobody like Peter Ackroyd to tell the story of England. I have the set. I feel lucky to have been introduced to the books, and have learned a lot from reading them. Ackroyd is an interesting author who can weave a lot of facts into a story about true people. One has to know English history to be able to understand American history, or Hawaiian history for that matter. The Tudors was a amazing read, and I discovered much that I never really understood. Have a small patience and you will be greatly rewarded. Read the entire set of histories and you will never think of England in the same way.

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    Bank of England Mortgage FastApp [App]  2020-4-12 13:11

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    A Child's History of England []  2020-1-25 4:36

    No one can write about old England as Charles ens. His own background of poverty and his ownlife in a not good house in England. Stayed with him and showed its good, bad, sadness, and winningin the only method a man of his hero can say. I was in England about two years ago and I went toto visit the house he grew up in. I am so glad I had this unbelievable opportunity. I cant really describe it, exceptto say it was surreal. Mary

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    A Child's History of England []  2020-1-25 4:36

    When I grew up our household had a set of books by Charles ens. I progressed from filling the endpapers with infantile scribbles to actually reading some. My two favorites were A Christmas Carol and a Child's History of England. I read and reread this book a lot of times. What drew me in was the sweep of history from King Arthur to just before Victorian times told in incredibly colourful prose. Of course, the book's title tells it all. This is the exact opposite of academic history. Here, there are no pages long footnotes giving dry scholarly arguments pro and con. Nor is it like modern textbooks pushing anachronistic agendas in a massive handed , this is history told by a amazing novelist for the purpose of helping young people appreciate the history of their civilization. This is precisely the result it had on me. The book captures history through the telling of tales, legends, and people. The prose is, often quite vivid. I always remember this phrase: "and he was tied to a horse, taken to the Isle of Ely where his eyes were pulled out of his head..." No kid, raised on slam, bang, pow films and comic books could miss the point here. History is not for the faint-hearted. One of ens' strengths as a writer has been to present that we live in a globe of cause of this book, I learned to love history. Not history as memorization of dates, but history as the actions and reactions of living, breathing people. Rereading this story today is just as exciting a trip as it was 6o years ago, when I was in 5th grade. And...you can't beat the price on Kindle.

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    A Child's History of England []  2020-1-25 4:36

    A Child's History of England is a nice summary, although a bit biased, of English history seen through the lens of Mr. ens. I enjoyed it. Most readers of English history will have fun it, I believe, and also fans of Charles ens.

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    A Child's History of England []  2020-1-25 4:36

    It is simply written for children, but ens is the greatest. However, this is the first book I have tried to read on a screen. It is not the same, I miss the feel and smell of paper.

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    A Child's History of England []  2020-1-25 4:36

    Very disappointed. I bought seven copies of this book to give as a bonus to budding historians in a children's class I was teaching about the Tudors. The children were so excited, but the book lacked all illustrations, was full of typos, and would have Mr. ens rolling in his grave. My nine year old pulled out a sharpie and started circling all of the grammatical errors in her copy.

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    A Child's History of England []  2020-1-25 4:36

    No illustrations

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    A Child's History of England []  2020-1-25 4:36

    I never tire of reading this book. It's not just for children.

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    A Child's History of England []  2020-1-25 4:36

    I've never read much ens, but I can't place down this book. What a compelling read! A couple of logical fallacies here and there, but it really doesn't take away from the overall presentation. I want I had discovered this in high school. I bought another copy for my daughter who is a sophomore in high en't there free text versions available you can cram on to your Kindle? You bet. But you are going to spend a lot of time formatting it to create it readable. I tried, but it wasn't a lot of fun and the results weren't that of this writing this ver is selling for $0.99 -- at this price it's not worth trying to format it yourself.

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    A Child's History of England []  2020-1-25 4:36

    Written for kids but a fun readread for the older crowd

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    A Child's History of England []  2020-1-25 4:36

    Perfect book on the early history of British Kings.

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    A History of England from the Tudors to the Stuarts []  2020-1-22 0:54

    Absolutely fantastic, edge of my seat the entire time!!!!

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    The Pats: An Illustrated History of the New England Patriots []  2020-8-5 18:48

    AS a long time fan--at the first android game in 1960, is the most comprehensive and thorough book, I have read about the Patriots. The authors are very well informed and share stories that have happened over decades. This should be a must read for all Patrios fans.

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    The Pats: An Illustrated History of the New England Patriots []  2020-8-5 18:48

    Place out by the Boston World hoes through the whole season

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    A History of England from the Tudors to the Stuarts []  2020-1-22 0:54

    Unbelievable lecturer! Extremely fascinating history with a presenter that is knowledgeable, entertaining, insightful and intelligent. Extremely engaging.

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    The Pats: An Illustrated History of the New England Patriots []  2020-8-5 18:48

    Bought the book for my husband for Christmas. He has been a Patriots fl of his life. HE LOVES IT! It is various from everything he owns, and believeme, he owns A LOT of memorabilia!

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    The Pats: An Illustrated History of the New England Patriots []  2020-8-5 18:48

    very nice book amazing to have if you are a patriots fan or just a fan of the nfl

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    A History of England from the Tudors to the Stuarts []  2020-1-22 0:54

    History can be very confusing because of all the names and places. But professor Bucholz keeps the story line clear and doesn't allow you obtain too lost from all the details. He also helpfully goes back and forth between the line/history of kings and queens to talk about the regular people in England at the time of the events. Very illuminating.I have to mention one little thing that seemed odd, though. On at least two occasions so far he has allow us know that he's not going to be PC by getting overcorrect with some of his terms, because we all know what he's talking about. But then he says "B.C.E." rather than "B.C." Probably just habit.

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    A History of England from the Tudors to the Stuarts []  2020-1-22 0:54

    I have listened to a lot of amazing courses. I have taken a lot of college level history courses. This is one of if not the best lecture series on history I have experienced. Prof. Bucholz does an awesome job of bringing the topic matter alive. By far and away the best amazing courses I have listened to.

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    The Pats: An Illustrated History of the New England Patriots []  2020-8-5 18:48

    I LIKED THAT THE BOOK TOOK YOU BACK TO THE BEGINING OF THE PATS HISTORY. READING ABOUT ALL THE OLD NAMES BROUGHT ME BACK TO WHEN THEY STARTED RIGHT UP TO TODAYS TEAM. STILL READING AND LOOKING BACK AND BRINGING UP OLD MEMORIES FOR ME AS I HAVE BEEN A FAN FOR MANY YEARS. NOW 83 YEARS OLD AND LOVE THIS BOOK. GREAT FOR ANY PATS FAN.

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    The Pats: An Illustrated History of the New England Patriots []  2020-8-5 18:48

    Sixty years of the rollicking history of football’s most fascinating squad and all for half the price of a android game parking space.

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    A History of England from the Tudors to the Stuarts []  2020-1-22 0:54

    This is the battle between the Stuarts and Tudors in England. Nicely broken down into 30 min 'lectures' that sound great. Little bits of very interesting history with cultural tastes.

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    The Pats: An Illustrated History of the New England Patriots []  2020-8-5 18:48

    A must have for any past fan. It goes from the begin of the franchise back in 1960 when they were known as the Boston Patriots to the current championship run the pats are on. One side note it goes up till 2017 so super bowl liii will not be in there.

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    The Pats: An Illustrated History of the New England Patriots []  2020-8-5 18:48

    The recipients of the book were elated.

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    A History of England from the Tudors to the Stuarts []  2020-1-22 0:54

    Just finished listening to this series. Really well done. I love this era of history and Bucholz did a amazing job of reminding me of things I had forgotten. He had a lot of history to obtain through, I'm looking forward to reading his other books where he has the zone to go more into detail. this series might be overwhelming for someone just starting out on learning about this topic. Unless they take notes and pay very amazing attention. This isn't the fault of Bucholz but of the content. These Tutors and Stuarts all seem to have the same first names, and the titled people hold changing their names as they require fresh titles. It is very confusing.

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    A History of England from the Tudors to the Stuarts []  2020-1-22 0:54

    Robert Bucholz does a marvelous job in both entertaining and informing his listeners in the epic story of Tudor and Stuart England. As a lecturer in American Politics I have the utmost admiration for the lectures and their content and his skillful presentation, 48 thirty min lectures are well organized and highly recommended The gentle self deprecating humor and enthusiasm for the material makes this course a joy. .

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    The Pats: An Illustrated History of the New England Patriots []  2020-8-5 18:48

    I happened to hear an interview with one of the authors on Vermont Public Radio and immediately ordered the book. Right from the obtain go where the authors talked about how Fresh England was Fresh York Giants location pre AFL I knew this was going to be amazing because I can remember watching the Giants as a anyone who can remember sitting in Nickerson Field or Fenway Park or on the metal benches in Schaefer Stadium freezing you butt off watching or following the trials and tribulations of the "Patsies", you will have fun reliving the history, as painful as it was to be a fan at the time. For anyone under the age of 25 who has only known the Patriots as the dynasty they have been since 2001, this will be a amazing history lesson for you and support you to understand the pain and suffering afflicted on long time fans by this squad which has created the past 18 years so special.Lot's of amazing stories, anecdotes, memorabilia and insights place together in chronological order. Not a piece of literature but a concise, well written and assembled history of the franchise which any Pat's fan should have fun and support you savor what has been so unique about the 21st century Patriots. For the haters out there, sorry but it sucks to be you! I only hope that the revised edition of 2028 will present how the Pats dynasty continued...While I am a Kindle aficionado, I strongly suggest buying the hard cover ver of this book.

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    The Pats: An Illustrated History of the New England Patriots []  2020-8-5 18:48

    Bought as a Christmas bonus for my dad who is a die-hard Patriots fan + loves football in general and loves to read.

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    Civil War: The History of England Volume III []  2020-1-27 20:1

    The time of the doomed Stuart dynasty (in England) has always been one of those periods where I felt I knew the basics but didn't really understand the ins-and-outs of it all. Peter Ackroyd's history takes us from the accession of James I (VI of Scotland) to the throne of England on the death of Elizabeth in 1603, through to the flight of James II (VII) to France and the arrival of William of Orange and Mary in 1688. Since this is the third book in what I understand is to be a six-book series, Ackroyd doesn't delve much into the pre-Stuart era, nor does he say much about what happened after the happenings he is describing, but that doesn't show issues because he thoroughly explains the main players and factions as he goes along.And what a bunch they were! I don't think I've ever read about a battle where I so emphatically felt that I didn't wish to help either side. While the Stuarts seem to have been a particularly inept, corrupt and often depraved crowd of absolutist monarchs, the Parliamentarians come across as a bunch of deeply unpleasant, power-hungry, money-grubbing, squabbling incompetents (clearly real precursors of today's lot). When Cromwell's military dictatorship begins to look like the amazing times, then it gives an indication of the awfulness of the alternatives. What a pity M. Guillotin hadn't been born yet...Ackroyd's style is very accessible and he incorporates quotes from a lot of contemporaneous sources - not just the people in power, but a lot of fairly ordinary onlookers who give a flavour of the despair that must have been felt by the pawns in this bloody chess-game. Of course, we still can't hear the voices of the illiterate poor, but Ackroyd shows the impact on them of the different machinations of both sides, and the manipulation of them, usually via the different religious factions. Ackroyd also looks at the plays and writings that were produced at the time, showing how they were influenced by events, and how they would have been understood by the audiences of the day. And he discusses the impact of plague and fire, both as physical happenings and as how they would have been perceived well as this clear picture of happenings in England, Ackroyd sets the story well into the international context. He manages to hold the reader on top of all the shifting treaties and loyalties, showing how dependant international affairs were on private relationships at that time. We obtain a feel for the beginnings of the different European empires and how necessary that was becoming in determining alliances and enmities. And he reminds the reader that both Scotland and Ireland, now linked to England by a shared monarchy, played necessary roles in providing help or distraction to the English factions.Overall, this is a very readable and interesting acc of the period, written in a method that makes it simple for the non-academic reader to follow. It's certainly left me feeling much clearer about the reasons behind the happenings and about the personalities of the people involved. I appreciated that he didn't romanticise either side - his treatment felt very even-handed to me. But I'm afraid the question of whether I'd have wanted to be a Roundhead or a Cavalier remains unresolved - Cavalier probably, but only on the grounds that their hairdos were more fun... 4½ stars for me, so rounded up.NB This book was provided for review by the publisher, St Martin's Press.

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    Civil War: The History of England Volume III []  2020-1-27 20:1

    The low number of stars I have awarded to this book reflects more on my expectations than on the skills of the author. That said I feel that the author must share some responsibility for my confusion when selecting his book from the book shelf. I think that the title ‘Civil War’, combined with a picture of both Oliver Cromwell and King Charles, might lead any careless reader to believe that the topic of the work was the English Civil Wars. That was my expectation and so I was sorely disappointed in the contents of what I now know should perhaps be better entitled an Almanac of the Stuart period.I realise that this book is one part of a wider history of England, I believe that this larger work is intended to rival Churchill’s History of the English Speaking People and may well succeed. Although I doubt that the author will be awarded a Nobel Prize for his efforts. Like Churchill’s masterpiece Ackroyd’s History of England can be praised or criticised for being meandering: taking side streets whenever the author has a fancy for a particular path. Unlike Churchill, Ackroyd has small or no interest in wars or politics; Ackroyd’s interest is art and culture. No poor thing in general, but perhaps not the best focus of attention if the reader wants to know about the political turmoil and savage warfare that accompanied the terminal breakdown of Charles’ relationship with his kroyd dedicates more pages to Leviathan and Pilgrim’s Progress than the entire second civil war. That said, the discussion of Hobbes’ views is woefully brief if the reader is looking for a book on 17th century philosophers. Ackroyd manages to show his discussion of Leviathan completely divorced from the views of contemporary thinkers (for example Locke is not mentioned at all).This is a book for a generalist who wants to wander through English history taking fast glances at amusing anecdotes as they pass from Hengest to Hesseltine. It could also serve to whet the appetite of someone looking for something more substantial; an appetite best happy by more focused works. In this latest respect I suppose it is fair to say that I owe some thanks to Mr Ackroyd. As a effect of my selection of his poorly entitled ‘Civil War’ I went looking for something more fitting to my original interest. I found Trevor Royle’s The Civil War: The Battle of the Three Kingdoms 1638-1660, an perfect and thought provoking telling of the story that puts the English conflicts in the wider British conclusion, I am not saying this is a poor book, far from it. I am just saying that I much prefer Royle’s approach to history, which could hardly be more various than Ackroyd’s: both I am sure equally valid. If a reader came to Royle’s book expecting a history magazine to while away the time on a long flight they might well be disappointed and would probably have been better off with Ackroyd’s version.

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    A History of the Protestant Reformation in England and Ireland []  2020-2-4 3:59

    Honesty in the telling of English History in the media, films (Cate Blanchett had to admit the history portrayed in her Q.E. 1ST film was bunkum) and school room is a rare animal these this book we are presented with facts that create sense of the need of the British establishment to later hire Whig historians to whitewash the criminal barbarity of the English reformation in the learning institutes of e facts of the demonic degree of Protestant barbarity are such that the Anti-Catholic propaganda that was concocted after the fact sound so made-up and ludicrously exaggerated to our ears today.I guess their own crimes where such that even bigger monstrosities were needed to cover them up. I note the few people who have negated this book can't but fail to address the historical facts and research contained in this book regarding the real motivational forces behind an happening that has brought misery to the 4 corners of the at this book was written by a Protestant makes it all the more remarkable and valuable.If a sister book was to be recommended I would say "The Facts about Luther" is the ideal companion is book also quotes mostly Protestant historians in damning that foolish man who admitted in his own writings that his "doctrines" came from the devil.Go figure...

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    A History of the Protestant Reformation in England and Ireland []  2020-2-4 3:59

    as promised thanks

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    Civil War: The History of England Volume III []  2020-1-27 20:1

    very amazing read

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    Civil War: The History of England Volume III []  2020-1-27 20:1

    The low number of stars I have awarded to this book reflects more on my expectations than on the skills of the author. That said I feel that the author must share some responsibility for my confusion when selecting his book from the book shelf. I feel that the title ‘Civil War’, combined with a picture of both Oliver Cromwell and King Charles, might lead any careless reader to believe that the topic of the work was the English Civil Wars. That was my expectation and so I was sorely disappointed in the contents of what I now know should perhaps be better entitled an Almanac of the Stuart period.I realise that this book is one part of a wider history of England, I believe that this larger work is intended to rival Churchill’s History of the English Speaking People and may well succeed. Although I doubt that the author will be awarded a Nobel Prize for his efforts. Like Churchill’s masterpiece Ackroyd’s History of England can be praised or criticised for being meandering: taking side streets whenever the author has a fancy for a particular path. Unlike Churchill, Ackroyd has small or no interest in wars or politics; Ackroyd’s interest is art and culture. No poor thing in general, but perhaps not the best focus of attention if the reader wants to know about the political turmoil and savage warfare that accompanied the terminal breakdown of Charles’ relationship with his kroyd dedicates more pages to Leviathan and Pilgrim’s Progress than the entire second civil war. That said, the discussion of Hobbes’ views is woefully brief if the reader is looking for a book on 17th century philosophers. Ackroyd manages to show his discussion of Leviathan completely divorced from the views of contemporary thinkers (for example Locke is not mentioned at all).This is a book for a generalist who wants to wander through English history taking fast glances at amusing anecdotes as they pass from Hengest to Hesseltine. It could also serve to whet the appetite of someone looking for something more substantial; an appetite best happy by more focused works. In this latest respect I suppose it is fair to say that I owe some thanks to Mr Ackroyd. As a effect of my selection of his poorly entitled ‘Civil War’ I went looking for something more fitting to my original interest. I found Trevor Royle’s The Civil War: The Battle of the Three Kingdoms 1638-1660, an perfect and thought provoking telling of the story that puts the English conflicts in the wider British conclusion, I am not saying this is a poor book, far from it. I am just saying that I much prefer Royle’s approach to history, which could hardly be more various than Ackroyd’s: both I am sure equally valid. If a reader came to Royle’s book expecting a history magazine to while away the time on a long flight they might well be disappointed and would probably have been better off with Ackroyd’s version.

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    A History of the Protestant Reformation in England and Ireland []  2020-2-4 3:59

    An excellent, amusing and sarcastic defence of the Catholic Church in England before the Reformation amd a refutation of the lies peddled by protestants since them to justify their plunder of the monasteries. We are suffering the consequences of the Protestant revolution today. As a effect of the Reformation the establishment of central banks, the debt cash system and income tax was created possible and we all became slaves to usury.

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    Civil War: The History of England Volume III []  2020-1-27 20:1

    I'm confused. This book is titled " . . Volume III: The History of England" but some reviewers refer to "Rebelion" as the third volume. Also, Amazon refers to "Foundation" as the first book in a series of six. What titles are #4, 5, and 6 in the series?

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    A History of the Protestant Reformation in England and Ireland []  2020-2-4 3:59

    I have given away more copies of this book than any other. The reason why this nearly 200-year-old book has gone through so a lot of printings is because of the truths about the Protestant Reformation in England contained therein. One won't search them in any secular history books. It is interesting that author William Cobbett was himself a Protestant, but that is no guarantee of accuracy as to this subject. Rather, the truths about the [email protected]#$%!&h century Church property confiscations is in the details. Cobbett fills his book with jaw-dropping evidence of what happened in the days when Henry VIII, Cromwell and "Good Queen Bess" were in charge. An example of why one needs to read Cobbett's history: The perfect book by Kerry Bolton entitled The Banking Swindle begins with a discussion of the origins of the modern Bank of England dating back to Henry VIII and his need for cash. Author Bolton never explains how Henry and Cromwell obtained the seed cash for what is now the Bank of England. Author Cobbett does, in chapters V and VI. As one example, by 1540 over 800 monasteries had been dissolved and their properties and wealth confiscated. Indeed, the reader soon discovers why the Elizabethan Not good Law was required in 1601. Those who think government welfare programs are a substitute for Church charities, need to read this book.

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    A History of the Protestant Reformation in England and Ireland []  2020-2-4 3:59

    William Cobbett couldn't write anything bad, but this one must surely appeal mostly to historians. There are the letters (300 or so of them if I've counted correctly) and also a huge appendix listing all the properties seized from the Catholic Church during the English reformation. This by itself represents a large amount of research effort and I think I'm going to search out what actual experts - not me - think of its background and and have fun Cottage Economy, Rural Rides and so bbett is a master of invective, of hypocrisy, and of Englishness.Long may he be read.

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    Civil War: The History of England Volume III []  2020-1-27 20:1

    Quick Service. Product as described.

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    Civil War: The History of England Volume III []  2020-1-27 20:1

    The low number of stars I have awarded to this book reflects more on my expectations than on the skills of the author. That said I feel that the author must share some responsibility for my confusion when selecting his book from the book shelf. I feel that the title ‘Civil War’, combined with a picture of both Oliver Cromwell and King Charles, might lead any careless reader to believe that the topic of the work was the English Civil Wars. That was my expectation and so I was sorely disappointed in the contents of what I now know should perhaps be better entitled an Almanac of the Stuart period.I realise that this book is one part of a wider history of England, I believe that this larger work is intended to rival Churchill’s History of the English Speaking People and may well succeed. Although I doubt that the author will be awarded a Nobel Prize for his efforts. Like Churchill’s masterpiece Ackroyd’s History of England can be praised or criticised for being meandering: taking side streets whenever the author has a fancy for a particular path. Unlike Churchill, Ackroyd has small or no interest in wars or politics; Ackroyd’s interest is art and culture. No poor thing in general, but perhaps not the best focus of attention if the reader wants to know about the political turmoil and savage warfare that accompanied the terminal breakdown of Charles’ relationship with his kroyd dedicates more pages to Leviathan and Pilgrim’s Progress than the entire second civil war. That said, the discussion of Hobbes’ views is woefully brief if the reader is looking for a book on 17th century philosophers. Ackroyd manages to show his discussion of Leviathan completely divorced from the views of contemporary thinkers (for example Locke is not mentioned at all).This is a book for a generalist who wants to wander through English history taking fast glances at amusing anecdotes as they pass from Hengest to Hesseltine. It could also serve to whet the appetite of someone looking for something more substantial; an appetite best happy by more focused works. In this latest respect I suppose it is fair to say that I owe some thanks to Mr Ackroyd. As a effect of my selection of his poorly entitled ‘Civil War’ I went looking for something more fitting to my original interest. I found Trevor Royle’s The Civil War: The Battle of the Three Kingdoms 1638-1660, an perfect and thought provoking telling of the story that puts the English conflicts in the wider British conclusion, I am not saying this is a poor book, far from it. I am just saying that I much prefer Royle’s approach to history, which could hardly be more various than Ackroyd’s: both I am sure equally valid. If a reader came to Royle’s book expecting a history magazine to while away the time on a long flight they might well be disappointed and would probably have been better off with Ackroyd’s version.

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    A History of the Protestant Reformation in England and Ireland []  2020-2-4 3:59

    This is the worst book read in over six decades. No footnotes. Over-statements. Repeats himself. Uses 20 words when 2 would work. Total misunderstanding of the medieval and post-medieval period. Zero understanding of theology. The guy's a moron. Virulent. Hate-filled and hate-controlled. But, place into the 250-page bibliography for the 16th century. We obtain no bibliography from this moron. I want Amazon had "zero stars" or "negative integers." He'll work for the gullible types who aren't well-read in the period.

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    A History of the Protestant Reformation in England and Ireland []  2020-2-4 3:59

    The title of this book is A History of the Protestant Reformation in England and Ireland. Unfortunately, only about 4 pages concern Ireland. A better title might have been A Polemic About Protestant Reformers in London. While a few individuals are named in the text as sources, there are no citations as to sources. The writing style is 19th Century British so a lot of readers may search this a very awkward read.

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    A History of the Protestant Reformation in England and Ireland []  2020-2-4 3:59

    Cobbett wrote this energetic and vitriolic history of the Reformation in the early 1800's. It turned conventional wisdom on its head and influenced a lot of high-powered pro-Catholic intellectuals, including Hilaire Belloc and GK Chesterton. Cobbett's primary premise is that the Reformation destroyed the social fabric of England, which had been sewn together so elegantly under nine centuries of Catholic influence and rule. His detailed acc of Henry VIII's profligacy, the rapacious deeds of his political heirs and allies, and the havoc they wrought upon the citizenry, especially the not good citizenry, create a supremely convincing argument. Although Cobbett wields a venomous pen, he researched his topic well and appears to have most of his facts straight. And although he interprets the facts in the worst possible light, there is no getting around the one easy fact that greed, lust and hatred motivated a lot of of England's "reformers". Cobbett's style is conversational--as if he were writing you a letter, almost--and is remarkably readable for a work of that period. I think any investigation of the Reformation should contain this book!

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    A History of the Protestant Reformation in England and Ireland []  2020-2-4 3:59

    John Henry Newman wrote in An Essay on the Development of Christian Doctrine that "to be deep in history is to cease to be a Protestant." Newman was referring to the Church Fathers but his observation could also apply to more latest - say, perhaps Reformation era - history, and one could not search a more colourful and entertaining explanation of that period than William Cobbett's "A History of the Protestant Reformation in England and Ireland."Cobbett was a Protestant member of that church "by law established", and a conservative in the real sense of the word. Chesterton wrote of him that "what he saw was not an Eden that cannot exist but rather an Inferno that can"; and like all conservatives who take mind to look into the matter, Cobbett developed a profound respect for the Catholic Church and its cultural traditions. "When Cobbett found that what he conceived to be a truth had been concealed by a trick," continues Chesterton, "his reaction was a towering passion."This "towering passion" of Cobbett's turned into his History of the Reformation, and reading this work is essential to understanding the virulent anti-"popish" sentiment that arose and persists in our Protestant dominated culture. More importantly, it explains exactly what was lost in that strong-arm, government-led riot of thieves versus the Catholic religion in England that literally crushed, murdered, and intimidated so much of its citizenry. The unintended consequences have thundered down the centuries, as what was formerly known as Christendom sinks deeper and deeper under the waves of lunacy. The men who had given us Magna Carte, habeas corpus and a thousand years of culture where wiped away, and in their put were exchanged standing armies, skyrocketing taxes, central banking, and public bbett, arguing with all the subtlety of a bulldog, uses a framework in which there is not one single Reformation playing out, but really a series of five Reformations:1. The first or the "godly" Reformation of Henry, Edward and Elizabeth.2. The second or the "thorough godly" Reformation of Cromwell and his Roundheads3. The third or "glorious" Reformation of William and Mary.4. The fourth Reformation or the American Revolution when America rebelled from being treated by the Crown like - well, like Catholics.5. The fifth Reformation or the French Revolution where France followed the English template to destroy the Church, and ended up nearly destroying the whole of Europe.What is particularly notable in this book is how some of Cobbett's passages could be pulled from today's headlines. In describing the @#$%!&?ization of England's economy in the 5th year of William and Mary, he writes:"Thus arose loans, funds, banks, bankers, banknotes, and a national debt ; things that England had never heard or dreamed of before this battle [against "popery"] for preserving the Protestant religion as by law established ; things without which she had had a long and glorious career of a lot of centuries, and had been the greatest and happiest country in the world.... the ancient philosophers, the Fathers of the Church, both Testaments, the Canons of the Church, and the decisions of Pope and Councils, all agree, all declare that to take cash for the use of cash is sinful. Indeed, no such thing was ever attempted to be justified until the savage Henry VIII had cast off the supremacy of the Pope.... It is certain that before the 'Reformation' there was no such thing known amongst Christians as receiving cash or profit in any shape, merely for the use of money. It would be simple to present that mischiefs enormous are inseparable from such a practice, but we shall see enough of those mischiefs in the end. Suffice it for the present, that this national usury, which was now invented for the first time, arose out of the Reformation."As I write this in 2012, it is worth pausing to look at the abuses of banking, debt and usury, and the misery it has made in the midst of e book is organized around the following chapters:1. Introduction2. Henry VIII - The Divorce.3. Henry VIII - The Royal Supremacy.4. Henry VIII - Tyranny of Henry VIII5. Henry VIII - The Dissolution of the Monasteries6. Henry VIII - Confiscation of the monasteries7. Edward VI8. Mary9. Mary and Elizabeth10. Elizabeth - The Massacre of Saint Bartholomew11. Elizabeth - Hypocrisy of Elizabeth on the death of Mary Stuart12. The Stuarts13. The Charges versus James II and Their Refutation14. Results of the Reformation - Triumph of William III in England and Ireland15. Results of the Reformation - The American Revolution the First Cause of Catholic Relief16. Impoverishment and Degradation of the People by the ReformationI highly recommend "A History of the Protestant Reformation in England and Ireland" - it reads very quickly, and Cobbett's witty, sardonic style is very entertaining. Bi Francis Aidan Gasquet's preface and notes are helpful in doenting (and correcting in a few places) Cobbett's sources - which by the method is mostly from Dr. John Lingard's "The History Of England, From the First Invasion by the Romans to the Accession of Henry VIII."

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    A History of the Protestant Reformation in England and Ireland []  2020-2-4 3:59

    Because Cobbett proves that the Reformation is actually the Deformation.And the writing is superb. Read any of the five hundred or so letters that form the book, any, for proof of that. For example, read the latest sentence of #245 -- about 130 words but extraordinarily clear. Even better, the latest sentence of #258, nearing 200 words of emphasis and subordination and resulting in a strong clarity. Cobbett is the antithesis of the young Hemingway, the strong American writer of my youth, and he is able to achieve so much ame that I spent my development in this Protestantized land where I never even heard of this masterpiece, and all because Cobbett shows the bankruptcy, the profound bankruptcy, of that heresy.

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    Civil War: The History of England Volume III []  2020-1-27 20:1

    Peter Ackroyd's Civil War: The History of England Volume III is the best, most literate and comprehensive work in existence on thecomplex state of England, politically, intellectually, and socially in the 17th century. This is not some obscure subject, as it concernsthe very hinge upon which the door closed on the Renaissance and opened to our modern period. The entire spectrum of this erahas been the close study of mine since before college and until now that I am an octogenarian I read this book with delight. I would have expected nothing less from Peter Ackroyd. And if you are unfamiliar with his nonfiction, fiction, and arts criticism,a globe of amazing reading awaits you. In our advanced state of dumbed down or pedantic drivel, Ackroyd's golden pen and laser mindearns him the title of man of letters, the best since Aldous Huxley.Lee Hopkins

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    The Heart of England []  2020-1-23 0:54

    I just bought this book and rate it above "Our hearts are in England". It's well written, informative and the photography was sharper and more beautiful.

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    The Heart of England []  2020-1-23 0:54

    Amazing info on England.

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    The Heart of England []  2020-1-23 0:54

    As a fan of Victoria - and most especially of the first 16 years under Nancy Lindemeyer's editorial reign - I was delighted with this book, recapping some of my favorite "armchair vacations" to that unbelievable country. Allow others dream of exotic adventures into deserts and steaming jungles. England is the destination for a lot of of my fantasy itineraries and this book helped me appreciate the both the dozens and "essence" of England. I heartily recommend it for those who have fun "all things English", or even just a pleasant overview. It's going into my private library - instead of being donated to our public library (which is my usual practice once I've read and enjoyed a book)

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    The Heart of England []  2020-1-23 0:54

    I got this book because I have been in constant disappointment ever since VICTORIA Magazine ceased production. I found this book not quite as amazing as their "Heart of France" book as this one features a lot of images out of the magazine and could have been a small more interesting. Having said this, if you loved VICTORIA you will wish to have this keepsake.

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    The Heart of England []  2020-1-23 0:54

    I purchased this for my anglophile 16 year old daughter. She devoured this accompanied by a pot of tea from her fresh English tea service and afterward with glowing eyes said, Mom you MUST read this! I message that she has it displayed in the sitting zone of her bedroom.When I decided to buy her a book on England, my first choice was to search something by Victoria Magazine. They always do these types of books so nicely, with much visual delight and meaningful content. (And yes, selfishly, I was buying it for me too.)

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    The Heart of England []  2020-1-23 0:54

    A lovely book as all Victoria books are, but I was hoping for more decor and this was more of a guidebook. Excellent for someone planning a visit to England!

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    The Heart of England []  2020-1-23 0:54

    Very enjoyable experience, nice photos, amazing introductory information. The author obviously loves the topic, which makes for an enjoyable journey!

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    The Heart of England []  2020-1-23 0:54

    I love this book... The info and everything so beautifully written, the pictures are amazing... It's a treasure!

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    The Heart of England []  2020-1-23 0:54

    Book arrived in perfect condition both from seller & shipping. Very nice read for anyone who loves all things British!

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    The Heart of England []  2020-1-23 0:54

    brilliant d description of english life in general and perfect recipes. amazing book about england,well worth getting.

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    English History: A Captivating Guide to the History of England and the Victorian Era []  2020-1-30 18:50

    History of EnglandThis book covers British history from the Roman invasion to WWII in a brief but informative fashion!The Victorian EraThis book is an in depth look at the scientific innovations and socio-economic changes that took put in the lifetime of Queen Victoria!If your a fan of British history, or just a run-of-the-mill amateur historian you'll definitely wish to add this book to your library😊

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    English History: A Captivating Guide to the History of England and the Victorian Era []  2020-1-30 18:50

    I really enjoyed reading this book bundle. I learned quite a bit of info and these two books go really well together. There was info about the beginning of Briton that I hadn't heard of before. I had heard of Hadrian's Wall but didn't really understand the context of how it was built. Another amazing book bundle from Captivating History that I highly recommend.

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    English History: A Captivating Guide to the History of England and the Victorian Era []  2020-1-30 18:50

    This is an interesting and comprehensive look at the history of England (and Britain).It covers from method back in Neolithic times to just after WWII.Odd how the irrationality of religion has shaped history.Odd also how European powers felt that they had the right to just move into another country and just take it is is a broad look at 'England', interesting to see what is included and what is e Victorian Era - was reviewed separately.

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    English History: A Captivating Guide to the History of England and the Victorian Era []  2020-1-30 18:50

    This deals with the history of England and during the Victorian Era. The reads are informative and they give quite a few details.

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    English History: A Captivating Guide to the History of England and the Victorian Era []  2020-1-30 18:50

    Previous Review of The History of EnglandThis is a condensed overview of English history. It's not meant to be scholarly of all English history, but if read as overview summary, and that's likely why I kind a like it as an overview. Major historical happenings are not, explored in depth and there are some historical omissions, but this overview of all the historical events can serve as a springboard for more in depth topic reading of your own private locations of interest from Captivating History other books on each topic of Amazing Britain’s cond Book - The Victorian EraA look at Victorian England and the 19th century and the world, this book begins with early emphasis on the private life of Queen Victoria of England, including her childhood, leading up to her reign as Queen during which time the Empire becomes will read about Queen Victoria’s private losses and death, along with extra insightful chapters. An interesting chapter that's not normally taught in history class, will give you insights into the health issues of the cities and the living conditions suffered by the poor. Like poverty, homelessness, rats and other pests, a cholera epidemic. Then there's chapters on anatomy and the study of medicine, but was only performed by the use of snatched bodies.And there's chapter’s on the later 19th and early 20th century, and England’s focus on South Africa pulling in Australia and Canada, known as the Second Boer War, that affected the whole world.

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    English History: A Captivating Guide to the History of England and the Victorian Era []  2020-1-30 18:50

    This is the best & most detailed study on English history I’ve seen . This could be textbook material for British schools . Also , even in the United States would be an perfect survey course in college !Another outstanding job by Captivating History!!!

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    English History: A Captivating Guide to the History of England and the Victorian Era []  2020-1-30 18:50

    I was very impressed by what I read. As always with every book from Captivating History I explore something new.

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    English History: A Captivating Guide to the History of England and the Victorian Era []  2020-1-30 18:50

    :Book Review Written January 26, 2020English History: A Captivating Tutorial to the History of England and the Victorian Era, By Captivating HistoryKindle Edition (222 Pages)This is a concise history of t England presented in two e first volume, " The History of England ", is a fascinating acc of the key happenings in England's history. Beginning with prehistory the author describes the different groups that migrated from the European Contentment and were established in the British Isles when Julius Caesar invaded the island in the middle of the First Millennium B.C.E. From these fearsome Celtic fighters to the clever inventors and statesmen of the modern era, England's story is alive with magnificent castles, complex kings and queens, rebellious peasants, the magnificent Navy, and horrifying plagues. England became a unified state in the 10th century, and since the Age of Discovery, which began during the 15th century, has had a significant cultural and legal impact on the wider e English language, the Anglican Church, and English law – the basis for the common law legal systems of a lot of other countries around the globe – developed in England, and the country's parliamentary system of government has been widely adopted by other nations. The Industrial Revolution began in 18th-century England, transforming its society into the world's first industrialized nation .During the 19th Century the small island nation transformed into the British Empire, holding dominion over roughly one -fourth of the Earth's landmass and 458 million people, (one-fifth of the world's population). The exceptional narrative describes the happenings that included England's rise to the British Empire and its subsequent decline following Globe Battle e second volume, The Victorian Era, is a concise biography of Queen Victoria and a chronicle of the era Victoria's e reign and 19th Century Amazing Britain. When she stepped onto the throne of Amazing Britain and Ireland in 1837, gone were the days when the monarch was the supreme authority over the kingdom. Victoria ruled at the head of a government with which she was meant to converse, debate, and ultimately tutorial (not direct), and it was a job she sometimes struggled to perform. Victoria described herself as an emotional monster and blamed her gender for what she believed were her shortcomings as a monarch. The queen suffered emotionally during her childhood and also in the early part of her rule, but despite her private difficulties, Victoria came to be loved and respected by the majority of her topics across the vast British Empire. An unprecedented number of necessary social and economic changes occurred during Victoria’s 63-year reign, and that span of time has come to signify Britain’s coming of age into modern history. One of the most significant changes was that the British Empire burst onto the globe scene , extending from Scotland and England to Canada, India, Africa Southeast Asia, Hong Kong, , and Australia, accepting no boundaries and no higher authority than itself. It was not only the World's first real Superpower, but also the biggest empire in history. Concurrent with becoming an Empire, England and Scotland experienced a amazing population explosion. When Victoria was crowned in 1837, here were about 13.9 million Britons; by the time she died in 1901, there were an estimated 32.5 million. Historians attribute this sharp increase to modernized methods of medical treatment, sanitation, and social welfare, but each of those industries was far from perfection during the 19th century. The story of this fascinating period in the history of Amazing Britain comes to life in the pages of th is h volumes of this work are presented in an excellent, straight forward manner that is engaging and readily comprehensible. It's obviously well researched, and presented in a clear, informative, and well written manner with extensive footnotes. The biographical discussion regarding Victoria is supplemented by excerpts from a journal she maintained throughout her life and the author provides a number of keen insights into the personality of the reclusive Queen. Further, the author brings London and the people of Victoriaa's realm to life while providing s a wealth of info regarding social , economic, political, religious, and other cultural developments that emerged during the period. The chapters regarding the revolutionary changes in public health and sanitation, the Victorian's interests in Spiritualism, Egyptology and the emergence of the Science Fiction genre in literature were particularly fascinating, as well as revealing. This book provides the reader with a front row seat into Britian's emergence into the modern world. I strongly recommend this book to any one that is at least a small curious about history or whom enjoys a good, nonfiction story, well told.. I really enjoyed this book!!!

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    English History: A Captivating Guide to the History of England and the Victorian Era []  2020-1-30 18:50

    This book explains the Neolithic Revolution in England; the change from hunters and gatherers to more settled agricultural pursuits.  As Britons made urban centers and burial chambers for necessary dead citizens, they became more autonomous and wealthy (they were rich in resources).  That brought jealous Europeans, hoping to steal their goods.  Before long, the Romans noticed Britain; Julius Caesar tried to defeat the island but was unsuccessful.  However, in 43 CE, Claudius sent the Roman troops to overtake the Britons because he required an exciting project to create himself more popular.  The fascinating story of Boudica is included at this point in the story.  She was the latest major obstruction to total Roman domination and after she fell, Britannia became a Roman province until the Dark Ages (when Rome removed their units to protect their capital from the Visigoths).As a way of preserving Roman culture, the Britons may have become Christians en mass.  After generations of Danes, Celts, and Germanic tribes immigrated to England, in 876, Alfred of Wes sought to unify the peoples under one ruler -- himself.  He was wonderfully successful and led to a royal lineage for generations to is book explains the complicated machinations of multiple rulers trying to take over England that ended with the Norman Conquest.  After Richard (the Lion-Heart) died, England was unhappy with the rule of his younger brother, John.  Finally, the Archbi of Canterbury interceded to formalize a contract between the king and his people.  The effect was the Magna e rest of this book mentions the necessary points of English life:  Black Death, the Tudor Dynasty, Henry VIII, Elizabeth I.  While Elizabeth tried her hand at British colonies in the Fresh World, she hedged her bets by giving a charter to English trade to establish the East India Company. Eventually, this would lead to unparalleled wealth in is no wonder why there are so a lot of Americans with Scottish blood in their veins after reading about the Seven Ill Years in Scotland.  It caused a lot of to immigrate to the Fresh World.  This book also does a amazing job of explaining Sinn Fein; I'd heard of it a lot of times but not how it got started.  The division of Ireland is also explained. THE VICTORIAN ERA-- Victoria's 63-year-reign would oversee an wonderful amount of social and economic changes in Amazing Britain.  This sentence encapsulates the Victorian Era:  "... the underlying theme of the Victorian era was the find for a balance between tradition and modernity, Christianity and spirituality, and wealth and poverty." (p. 112)Anyone who wonders about Victoria's straight-laced views of life need look no further than to the strict upbringing she had. It was a surprise to read that the crown of Hanover was to be passed on to male heirs.  So it was not Victoria who inherited the crown but her father's younger brother, Ernest Augustus.  He was the heir presumptive until Victoria married and had of the fun things about Captivating History is their ability to add fascinating snippets of history, to create the story more interesting.  Here are a few examples:  Buckingham Palace first began as a silkworm plantation under King James I.  Victorian Britain was overwhelmed with refuse and rats; they were totally at the mercy of the rat-catcher. Middle-class men of Victoria's era lived on the average 45 years; while laboring men averaged a life one-half of that time.  The Ouija Board came straight out of the obsession with spiritualism during Victoria's time.  When Victoria died, Prince Albert's dressing gown and a lock of John Brown's hair was added to her casket (after the kids had turned away).  Included in this book are a dozens of social problems that affected British citizens.  There are chapters on the rats, fleas, and attending illnesses (including cholera), municipal sanitation, medical improvements, and body snatchers, seances, spiritualism, Jack the Ripper, Christmas fashions made by the Queen and Albert, science fiction, and even Egyptology.  This book seems to mention everything that was necessary in the Victorian Era.I'm glad to see that Joseph Bazalgette got his due in this book.  I've read his life and he was an awesome man who did much to change life in noxious London.

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    English History: A Captivating Guide to the History of England and the Victorian Era []  2020-1-30 18:50

    Very well written. I personally have fun English History and always look for additions to my knowledge/experience. This was jus what I have fun most. New perspective with info fresh to me - and I read a lot of history. Well done and worth the price - definitely worth the read time. Don’t miss this addition to your library. I am glad I found it.

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    A Building History of Northern New England []  2020-1-16 5:40

    Unbelievable book for anyone interested in old buildings.

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    A Building History of Northern New England []  2020-1-16 5:40

    Very helpful in dating my house. Writing is clear and well organized and illustrations are good. I used this book along with deed research and family history to search an accurate date.

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    A Building History of Northern New England []  2020-1-16 5:40

    Scholarly and comprehensively researched! The most impressive overview of the cultural landscape of Fresh England yet published. It integrates research from a wide dozens of sources and academic fields. A must read for anyone interested in the cultural landscape and material culture of this region.

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    A Building History of Northern New England []  2020-1-16 5:40

    This book is an invaluable resource for understanding and dating early buildings in all of Fresh England.

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    A Building History of Northern New England []  2020-1-16 5:40

    Finally, a book that focuses on Fresh England building history. This book should be read cover to cover for a complete understanding of the evolution of construction and to understand the necessary info often overlooked. I thought I had a beautiful amazing knowledge of old house construction, but I learned something on every page. Perfect images demonstrating the point discussed in the text. Should be on the bookshelf of every old house ester, Vermont

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    A Building History of Northern New England []  2020-1-16 5:40

    Very informative and well researched.

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    A Building History of Northern New England []  2020-1-16 5:40

    This book is well illustrated and provides a wealth of valuable info on the evolution of building technology in Fresh England. The level of detail is very helpful to architects and owners of historic structures. The author has brought a lifetime of experience as an architectural historian to this book.

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    A Building History of Northern New England []  2020-1-16 5:40

    Just what I needed!!

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    A Building History of Northern New England []  2020-1-16 5:40

    Tremendous amount of scholarly work by Mr Garvin detailing construction of buildings in an necessary zone of Fresh England history and culture. Highly recommended.

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    A Building History of Northern New England []  2020-1-16 5:40

    had to return it; a bonus to one who has everything

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    Saxons vs. Vikings: Alfred the Great and England in the Dark Ages (A Very, Very Short History of England) []  2020-1-17 20:56

    This book bears the same relationship to history that reality TV does to reality. It's all about proving to you that the author is clever and witty, and there are some actual facts thrown into the mix. I bought the book, and tossed it after 1 1/2 chapters. If you have to hold discarding snarky commentary to discern what is actually truthful, you've invested far more effort than the book is worth. "An Idiot's Tutorial to King Alfred" would be more educational.

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    Saxons vs. Vikings: Alfred the Great and England in the Dark Ages (A Very, Very Short History of England) []  2020-1-17 20:56

    I really enjoyed the author's sense of humor! Medieval history can be quite dry, even for those of us who study it, but as I read this book, I stopped several times to read passages aloud to my husband. Very entertaining! I just bought the next book in the series.

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    Saxons vs. Vikings: Alfred the Great and England in the Dark Ages (A Very, Very Short History of England) []  2020-1-17 20:56

    This book is an simple read on the ancient history of England when the country was ruled by kings in a lot of various locations of the island. It also covered the first king that united the country, King Alfred. The book was well researched and is not boring.

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    Saxons vs. Vikings: Alfred the Great and England in the Dark Ages (A Very, Very Short History of England) []  2020-1-17 20:56

    This was a fun, fast read, written in a jocular tone. An entertaining fast history of early England, the author does a amazing job of going over things that I hadn't read about since high school (over 30 years ago), and mostly making them interesting. A lot of historical ground is covered, and keeping the names straight can be a small difficult, but this the only caveat. Note: the author is from the UK, and I am from the USA; I still found it to be perfectly accessible, even though I was not familiar with the period.

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    Saxons vs. Vikings: Alfred the Great and England in the Dark Ages (A Very, Very Short History of England) []  2020-1-17 20:56

    Well, one of the most interesting facts I learned is that Sir Francis Drake landed in California. This small tidbit of history wasn't taught in American schools when I was a student. Granted, that was a long time ago so this may have been discovered after I left school.

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    Saxons vs. Vikings: Alfred the Great and England in the Dark Ages (A Very, Very Short History of England) []  2020-1-17 20:56

    Very readable book with a lot of history about the period from about the year 500 to year 1000 in England. There is a lot of detail that would be boring but the author has a unbelievable ability to turn a phrase making the book humorous but helping the reader to remember. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and had a lot of moments of laughing out loud. If only all history books for this much fun.

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    Saxons vs. Vikings: Alfred the Great and England in the Dark Ages (A Very, Very Short History of England) []  2020-1-17 20:56

    A previous reviewer criticized the brevity of this book, but that seems partly a function of the paucity of basic sources during the period it describes (the Dark Ages). This is an entertaining explanation of the early origins of England, by an author well-versed in the history and anthropology of the period.

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    Saxons vs. Vikings: Alfred the Great and England in the Dark Ages (A Very, Very Short History of England) []  2020-1-17 20:56

    This is not a serious work of scholarship, but it isn't meant to be. Ed West surveys the history of England from the Roman to Athelstan, grandson of Alfred the Great, in a quippy, jocular style. The sources he cites are generally secondary sources, and he doesn't spare the effort to contain a couple of humorous observations in every paragraph. Nonetheless, for all that, this book is a amazing survey of the topic and the humor provides a method of remembering the different interesting factoids that create up this book.I am a kind of word nerd, so I search things like this captivating:"The Britons called the invaders the Saesneg, as the English are today called by their neighbors to the west (in Scottish Gaelic it is Sassenach and in Cornish Sowsnek). They in turn referred to the natives as Welsh, which has a dozens of meanings but none of them particularly positive, either “slave,” “foreigner” or “dark stranger” (likewise the French-speaking Belgians are called Walloons and Wallachia in Romania has the same etymology, while Cornwall, Walsall, and Walthamstow in London probably all come from Wal). The Welsh, or Cymraeg, referred to the neighboring country as “Lloegyr,” literally “the lost lands.”"Wales, Walloons, Wallachia....I never suspected there was a connection.Another one:"Some hangovers from pagan times still exist today: The “Boar’s Head Carol,” sung every year at Queen’s College, Oxford by a procession carrying a boar’s head, almost certainly dates back to an early Anglo-Saxon offering to Freyja." And another one that gives a taste of the author's writing style:"And yet not only is his amazing war forgotten but the first king of England is largely unknown; his anniversary was barely noted in 1939, although in fairness we had other things to worry about, and if you asked the average person today what they thought of Athelstan, they’d probably guess it was some godforsaken put in central Asia. This “roof tree of honour of the western world” was popular in the medieval period and was even mentioned in Shakespeare, and it was only from the sixteenth century that Athelstan became increasingly forgotten, as his grandfather became more famous. Perhaps it was because Alfred’s narrative of having our backs versus the wall is more beautiful than Athelstan’s story of cementing the legacy, or that Alfred had commissioned a biographer to record his amazing achievements, and that a series of beautiful stories about him fired the imagination. There was, according to some sources, a biography of Athelstan written during his lifetime but it was lost."All in all, this makes a satisfying and fun read for the history buff.

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    Saxons vs. Vikings: Alfred the Great and England in the Dark Ages (A Very, Very Short History of England) []  2020-1-17 20:56

    This is the first time I've ever read a book about history that created me laugh out loud! All historians should write this way, they'd have a lot more readers if they did. The reason I only gave it four stars is because it was badly edited, with numerous grammatical and spelling errors, but overall I would highly recommend it to anyone wanting a brief overview of early English history.

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    Saxons vs. Vikings: Alfred the Great and England in the Dark Ages (A Very, Very Short History of England) []  2020-1-17 20:56

    When you're just curious and grab a book on a subject, you can be horribly disappointed. With this book by Ed West I was not disappointed I was both entertained and informed.

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    The Queen of England: Ascension []  2020-11-8 18:51

    Perfect story and writing in all three books of the series. However, the lack of attention to proofreading and editing left far too a lot of glaring and obvious grammatical and typographical errors in each of the three books, diminishing the enjoyment of them.

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    The Queen of England: Ascension []  2020-11-8 18:51

    Sometimes you can tell a book from its cover. That’s certainly the case with Courtney Brandt’s The Queen of England, Book 3: Ascension. I loved it’s attractive cover - but the book I totally adore. It’s been a long wait since the first two books in this series (each separately reviewed), but the wait was worth it. Juliette’s story is a wonderful, magical, thrilling tale that’s superbly told - and very simple to highly recommend.

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    The Queen of England: Ascension []  2020-11-8 18:51

    Meticulously crafted and taking the magical atmosphere to a whole fresh level, this much awaited third book in the series delivers on its promise of a suspenseful and fully captivating read. I highly recommend the whole series, and can assure you it only gets more interesting as the story progresses! Hoping the author will write more books about some of these characters and their adventures.

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    The Tudors: A Captivating Guide to the History of England from Henry VII to Elizabeth I []  2019-12-18 20:38

    Simple to read thumbnail sketch of the Tudor family and the monarchs it produced in English history. Not definitive as history but a amazing overdue and stepping stone to further study by those that fine the period interesting.

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