Read history of western philosophy reviews, rating & opinions:

Check all history of western philosophy reviews below or publish your opinion.

100 Reviews Found

Sort by: Most Accurate (default) | Newest | Top Rated

  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy []  2021-4-7 0:18

    This was a truly spectacular book and I rate it a solid 5 stars. I liked it much more than Will Durant’s acclaimed The Story of Philosophy, and equally as much as Leonard Peikoff’s History of Philosophy lectures.I like to think of this book as “a history of Western thought.” Russell profiles and summarizes every philosopher and philosophical movement from Thales to John Dewey and his own school of logical ysis. Each chapter was clear and interesting. I found Kant, Hegel, and Bergson less clear than other chapters, but that may just be because those philosophers themselves are hard to ssel didn’t just report on how ideas changed and impacted society, he also explained the history and workings of society in each period. I found this especially helpful for the first book about ancient philosophy and the second about the medieval ages. I also really loved how detailed Russell was in his ysis and retelling of the history of the Church. All of that was completely fresh to me, and I didn’t know how much I was missing by not delving into Church history!Also, I gotta say, his chapters on Rousseau, Berkeley, and Byron were exceptional. I loved the letters exchanged between Rousseau and Voltaire (I literally laughed out loud reading them). Berkeley was clearer than he’s ever been before. And even though I was never interested in Byron previously, Russell intrigued me with his description of him. I’ve already added some of his poems to my Kindle to check out!Usually long books annoy me. This one didn’t. Every sentence felt absolutely necessary, and I was often left with wanting to know more about each figure, idea, and period!Russell occasionally injected his opinion or brought up inconsistencies within the philosophies he was describing, but not nearly enough for my tastes. It was always very obvious when he was commenting as himself and when he was describing or speaking for the philosopher he was writing about though, which was great.Overall, this was an perfect survey of Western philosophy. It was amazing as an introduction to the ideas of these thinkers, as well as a “history of Western thought” like I mentioned at the beginning of this review. If you wish something that goes deeper into the philosophies of some of these thinkers, check out Leonard Peikoff’s History of Philosophy. If you’re more interested in the history aspect, you can check out Will Durant’s  Story of Philosophy . (I think Russell’s book is complimentary yet slightly superior to Durant’s.)I highly recommend this book, and the Audible ver narrated by Jonathan Keeble.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy []  2021-4-7 0:18

    I had been seeking an overall history of philosophy and this one is fantastic! I almost didn't order it because not only is it more than 800 pages but it was also written in 1945 -- I thought it would be a slog to obtain through, since I'm not an academic and never went to college. Rest assured it is NOT a slog! This is a phenomenally simple book to read, the writing style is clear and smooth and modern. I'm only half method through and learning SO much; now I understand why sometimes when I was reading books on religion or science or even history, I would feel like I got dropped in the middle of an on-going conversation and I was left out in the cold. Brilliant book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy []  2021-4-7 0:18

    I'm almost 40 and I've been mildly curious about philosophy throughout my adult life. Unfortunately, I had yet to read anything meaningful about it, because all the previous attempts to educate myself were thwarted by the pretentiousness of all the authors I had tried to read on the topic; I suspect one can't be accepted in this field if they speak like human beings.History of Western Philosophy, however, is different: even non-experts can read this introductory book! How awesome is that? On top of that, Russell has a delicious whimsical side to him, which transpires in this book just enough for the occasional comic relief. Although an atheist himself, he does present the important formal reverence to religious matters as avoid offending anyone (in fact, he even uses the appropriate jargon regarding heathens, heretics and the such, although I believe most of it is tongue in cheek).Apart from all that (which was the critical part for me), the book is obviously well respected, and it's remarkably thorough (which means you shouldn't be concerned with the content's verity or its coverage of the topic). Speaking of thoroughness, I'm quite satisfied that I happened upon it in digital format, because I later realized how thick the paper ver must be, and that I would most likely have been intimidated by it to the point of not buying the book in the first e Kindle ver does have a few OCR issues (typically locations missing between words), but they're few and far apart enough not to become any meaningful hindrance to fluid reading.UPDATE: I finally finished reading the book, and I wanted to add a few things specifically for novices like myself. If you're a newcomer to philosophy AND you're just a casual reader, expect that you won't be able to understand everything, and that you will remember much less than what you understand. This is necessary in two ways. On one hand, knowing this, you shouldn't obtain discouraged when you don't understand something as well as you'd wish to: you'd probably forget it anyway, so just hold on reading -- the necessary thing is to obtain an overall idea, not to remember every small detail (which is anyway impossible). On the other hand, the fact that you'll unavoidably forget a lot of items is quite unfortunate, because after you finish with the Antics, the cross-references become increasingly more necessary and relevant. So I suggest that, if your reading habits let it, you might wish to jot down a few words about each philosopher IMMEDIATELY after finishing each chapter; you probably wouldn't need more that two or three phrases with what you found most distinctive about that person, so you can later remember more about each of them at a glance.Having said all that, expect that in the end you'll leave with maybe 10% of what you've been reading -- and that's if you're lucky. But that's ok: what matters is that you leave with an understanding of what philosophy is really all about, and that you will definitely get. Plus, you'll certainly be able to put almost any Western philosopher in roughly the right period, you'll develop likes and dislikes, and you'll end up with a much better understanding of what and why it is that Western philosophers have been doing what they've been doing for the past few thousand years. And let's be honest: what more can you hope for?

    0  


    Add your opinion on history of western philosophy or scroll down to read more reviews ↓

     

  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy []  2021-4-7 0:18

    We are in 1946, Russell is building the chain of ideas pushing civilization to the current state. His erudition is profound but he is biased. And that's what makes this book so good. The Russell historian is using at least three hats as mathematician, English citizen and philosopher himself. The former is by far the most entertaining and edifying. For example, the mathematician starts boldly picking Pythagoras as the most necessary thinker ever. Although nuts, Pythagoras wrote the first mathematical proof. "Q.E.D.". And then he goes over the centuries digging up inconsistencies within the thinking frameworks being discussed. This is particularly rewarding if we did our homework and read the books he is discussing. Seems that civilization needs much more of this "curiosity to understand the world" which is all over the put within this book. And Russell shows a consistent path towards progress.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy []  2021-4-7 0:18

    The complete title is:History of Western Philosophy and its Connection with Political & Social Cirtances from the Earliest Times to the Show DayThis is a amazing book that I'm enjoying a lot.Unfortunately the complete title is butchered so you might think, as I did, the book is "just" about the history of omitting the complete title the publishers are dismissing the main strength of this book which is Philosophy's connections with politics and society throughout history.Had I known the book is also a history of politics and society I would have read it a long time ago.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy []  2021-4-7 0:18

    I liked the full coverage of the ideas and social and political context of the most prominent philosophers in three parts: ancient philosophy, catholic philosophy and modern philosophy. I liked to learn that philosophy can’t prove or disprove religious dogma, although most philosophers produced “proofs” of immortality and the existence of God by falsifying logic, making mathematics mystical and presenting deep-seated prejudices as heaven-sent intuitions. And I liked to know twentieth-century logical ysis school, of which Nobel laureate Bertrand Russell is considered a founder, which searches elementary truths by means of successive logical and empirical approximations, as in science.I recommend this book to all those interested in comprehending the evolution of the most prominent philosophers of all time in the human pursuit to comprehend life and how to live a amazing life.I gave five stars to this book because it’s a thorough and grand opus that provides a life changing comprehension of what it means to comprehend life and how to live a amazing life.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy []  2021-4-7 0:18

    Bertrand Russell wrote A History of Philosophy with posterity in mind. Written during the exigencies of the Second Globe War, Russell gives preponderance to the history of philosophy in the West. From the pre-Socratics to John Dewey, Russell chronicles Western philosophy with inimitable ysis, wit and passion. It's not exhaustive by any means, but as a one volume treatment of philosophical culture in the West, it's beautiful much perfect. Russell, more than anything else, was a amazing reformer and thought education to be essential to our species. Russell abhorred the orthodoxy of higher education as a system reserved only for the arcane and the privileged; philosophy was something to be cherished and openly exchanged, free from impunity and social barriers. Russell's judicious balance of erudition and accessibility shows on every page. The only time it feels arrhythmic is when Russell conflates the political dynamism of his era with the days of antiquity. Reference to this can be found in his synthesis of Rousseau/Hitler or Locke/Churchill. Other than that, I have no qualms with Russell's illustration of philosophy in the West. Russell also has the potential to positively surprise you, as well. Those I expected to be cannon fodder (Hobbes, Rousseau, Hegel, Mill, Marx, etc.) are reviewed with considerable objectivity and restraint. Russell clearly prioritizes certain systems over others, logic and empiricism, for example, elicit greater intellectual stimulus than, say, metaphysics. This isn't to suggest that Russell's preferences suspend his ability to cogently and consistently define the changes in epistemology, just an observation that he's not detached in the same method that defines the body of academic writing. It also has to be said that the text is a very handy reference point for any student of philosophy. This is an perfect one volume treatment of Western philosophy written by a brilliant man, who clearly respected his readers enough not to cloak his work in impenetrable prose. Highly recommended.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy []  2021-4-7 0:18

    It took a while before I finally finished "The History of Western Philosophy." There is a lot of history and Bertrand Russell covers a lot of history very quickly and briefly and still the book is 900 pages thick. That said, it was well written and not too hard to read. The hardest for me was to hold track of all the relationships explained. To truly understand all of them, I'd need to read it a couple more mmarizing "The History of Western Philosophy" is not possible in a book review and I won't attempt it. One necessary subject in this book is that it is as much "history" as "Philosophy" Thus at the times where there was less necessary contributions to the field of philosophy, the author still summarizes the history that happened and how that influenced later philosophers. In fact, how the history influenced philosophy and how philosophy influenced history is a key theme throughout the book. Russell shows has they are intertwined and caused each e book has three huge parts (each about 300 pages). They are 1) Ancient (mostly Greek) Philosophy, 2) Catholic Philosophy, and 3) Modern Philosophy. The book is chronological with sometimes forward references and a lot of backward references. Of all the philosophies, most of the time is spend on the Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle philosophies as their influence is so huge. Even though Bertrand Russell is quite critical of them and considers them overvalued... I guess he contributes to that by focusing on it much again :) That said, it is also a central theme that Bertrand Russell is not shy whatsoever to give his own opinion about the philosophies, changing his book partly to the philosophies of Bertrand Russell. That also means that if you are looking for a neutral summary of philosophers, then this book is not it. The opinions of the author did probably created the book more readable and accessible as it is at times as if he joins the philosophical discussion... except that the other philosophers are not able to argue back to Bertrand Russell. Unfair...I thoroughly enjoyed the History of Western Philosophy. It was thorough in breath though sometimes shallow in depth. That caused me to learn a large amount about history and the role of philosophy. For anyone interested in that and not bothered by the lack of neutrality, this book is highly recommended. For people looking for a practical book, this is not it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy []  2021-4-7 0:18

    This is a beautiful awesome compendium of Western Philosophy. I have one negative critique. There are locations where Professor Russell uses a quote and then does not say from what book the quote originates, nor is there a footnote. Of course, the quote is from the current philosopher that Professor Russell is discussing. But, once quoted, say Hegel, then the quote is not footnoted. I like to know the exact book and page of the quote. Nevertheless, this is a beautiful awesome book. The first third of the book deals with the Greeks, of course. I liked the chapters on Nietzsche and Marx the best. I know these two thinkers well, yet still learned some fresh information about them. For me, the most interesting idea in this book is the link between the Romantics, specifically Rousseau and Byron, to Hegel, to (of course) Nietzsche and the Fascism that engulfed Europe just years before this book was published. Also, the Empiricist of England (Locke the most prominent) fractured into two groups, one which produced countries like the USA and another which produced a country like the now defunct USSR. It's very interesting. A lot of philosophy books are not accessible to the layman like myself because of the obscurantist writing style of the professional university philosopher. For example, I tried to read Hegel's "Logic" years ago but only understood maybe 30 percent of what I read. Here, I understood a amazing 85 percent. Russell writes in a colloquial style that the every-day-person can grasp. However, there are some passages that will create you feel like your brain is going to explode. But again, if you are "into" philosophy, this is a amazing book. I was disappointed that there was no chapter on Kierkegaard.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy []  2021-4-7 0:18

    Bertrand Russell has been a character of mine for as long as I can remember. My father and my best mate refused to believe his history with T. S. Elliot and his wife, but I feel this has no put in judging a man of Russell's quality. Unfortunately he only mentions A. N. Whitehead but as he states not everyone can be covered. Russell does a amazing job keeping his private prejudices from his history. My review is of the audio rendition but I have read the text before eyesight angry that impossible. I should say here how much I appreciate this and other works being presented in an audio form. There is a issue with this in our not having access to is book is well worth buying either in text or audio. It is amazing to remember this was written when Britain was under attack by Hitler.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of Western Philosophy []  2020-1-19 22:8

    Bertrand Russell wrote A History of Philosophy with posterity in mind. Written during the exigencies of the Second Globe War, Russell gives preponderance to the history of philosophy in the West. From the pre-Socratics to John Dewey, Russell chronicles Western philosophy with inimitable ysis, wit and passion. It's not exhaustive by any means, but as a one volume treatment of philosophical culture in the West, it's beautiful much perfect. Russell, more than anything else, was a amazing reformer and thought education to be essential to our species. Russell abhorred the orthodoxy of higher education as a system reserved only for the arcane and the privileged; philosophy was something to be cherished and openly exchanged, free from impunity and social barriers. Russell's judicious balance of erudition and accessibility shows on every page. The only time it feels arrhythmic is when Russell conflates the political dynamism of his era with the days of antiquity. Reference to this can be found in his synthesis of Rousseau/Hitler or Locke/Churchill. Other than that, I have no qualms with Russell's illustration of philosophy in the West. Russell also has the potential to positively surprise you, as well. Those I expected to be cannon fodder (Hobbes, Rousseau, Hegel, Mill, Marx, etc.) are reviewed with considerable objectivity and restraint. Russell clearly prioritizes certain systems over others, logic and empiricism, for example, elicit greater intellectual stimulus than, say, metaphysics. This isn't to suggest that Russell's preferences suspend his ability to cogently and consistently define the changes in epistemology, just an observation that he's not detached in the same method that defines the body of academic writing. It also has to be said that the text is a very handy reference point for any student of philosophy. This is an perfect one volume treatment of Western philosophy written by a brilliant man, who clearly respected his readers enough not to cloak his work in impenetrable prose. Highly recommended.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of Western Philosophy []  2020-1-19 22:8

    I had been seeking an overall history of philosophy and this one is fantastic! I almost didn't order it because not only is it more than 800 pages but it was also written in 1945 -- I thought it would be a slog to obtain through, since I'm not an academic and never went to college. Rest assured it is NOT a slog! This is a phenomenally simple book to read, the writing style is clear and smooth and modern. I'm only half method through and learning SO much; now I understand why sometimes when I was reading books on religion or science or even history, I would feel like I got dropped in the middle of an on-going conversation and I was left out in the cold. Brilliant book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of Western Philosophy []  2020-1-19 22:8

    The book is great; highly recommended. The kindle edition has typos, probably from an inaccurate OCR system, with quotes like "Kant says that if you are kind to your brother because you arc [sic] fond of him, you have no moral merit".The chapter metadata also wasn't loaded into the table of contents, only the division into a few multi-hundred-page main sections. That makes the Kindle edition harder to use as a reference, though the find functionality somewhat. Overall, I think the Kindle edition is still quite serviceable, but if these sorts of things bother you, maybe go for the hardcover.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of Western Philosophy []  2020-1-19 22:8

    This was a truly spectacular book and I rate it a solid 5 stars. I liked it much more than Will Durant’s acclaimed The Story of Philosophy, and equally as much as Leonard Peikoff’s History of Philosophy lectures.I like to think of this book as “a history of Western thought.” Russell profiles and summarizes every philosopher and philosophical movement from Thales to John Dewey and his own school of logical ysis. Each chapter was clear and interesting. I found Kant, Hegel, and Bergson less clear than other chapters, but that may just be because those philosophers themselves are hard to ssel didn’t just report on how ideas changed and impacted society, he also explained the history and workings of society in each period. I found this especially helpful for the first book about ancient philosophy and the second about the medieval ages. I also really loved how detailed Russell was in his ysis and retelling of the history of the Church. All of that was completely fresh to me, and I didn’t know how much I was missing by not delving into Church history!Also, I gotta say, his chapters on Rousseau, Berkeley, and Byron were exceptional. I loved the letters exchanged between Rousseau and Voltaire (I literally laughed out loud reading them). Berkeley was clearer than he’s ever been before. And even though I was never interested in Byron previously, Russell intrigued me with his description of him. I’ve already added some of his poems to my Kindle to check out!Usually long books annoy me. This one didn’t. Every sentence felt absolutely necessary, and I was often left with wanting to know more about each figure, idea, and period!Russell occasionally injected his opinion or brought up inconsistencies within the philosophies he was describing, but not nearly enough for my tastes. It was always very obvious when he was commenting as himself and when he was describing or speaking for the philosopher he was writing about though, which was great.Overall, this was an perfect survey of Western philosophy. It was amazing as an introduction to the ideas of these thinkers, as well as a “history of Western thought” like I mentioned at the beginning of this review. If you wish something that goes deeper into the philosophies of some of these thinkers, check out Leonard Peikoff’s History of Philosophy. If you’re more interested in the history aspect, you can check out Will Durant’s Story of Philosophy. (I think Russell’s book is complimentary yet slightly superior to Durant’s.)I highly recommend this book, and the Audible ver narrated by Jonathan Keeble.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of Western Philosophy []  2020-1-19 22:8

    I liked the full coverage of the ideas and social and political context of the most prominent philosophers in three parts: ancient philosophy, catholic philosophy and modern philosophy. I liked to learn that philosophy can’t prove or disprove religious dogma, although most philosophers produced “proofs” of immortality and the existence of God by falsifying logic, making mathematics mystical and presenting deep-seated prejudices as heaven-sent intuitions. And I liked to know twentieth-century logical ysis school, of which Nobel laureate Bertrand Russell is considered a founder, which searches elementary truths by means of successive logical and empirical approximations, as in science.I recommend this book to all those interested in comprehending the evolution of the most prominent philosophers of all time in the human pursuit to comprehend life and how to live a amazing life.I gave five stars to this book because it’s a thorough and grand opus that provides a life changing comprehension of what it means to comprehend life and how to live a amazing life.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of Western Philosophy []  2020-1-19 22:8

    This is a beautiful awesome compendium of Western Philosophy. I have one negative critique. There are locations where Professor Russell uses a quote and then does not say from what book the quote originates, nor is there a footnote. Of course, the quote is from the current philosopher that Professor Russell is discussing. But, once quoted, say Hegel, then the quote is not footnoted. I like to know the exact book and page of the quote. Nevertheless, this is a beautiful awesome book. The first third of the book deals with the Greeks, of course. I liked the chapters on Nietzsche and Marx the best. I know these two thinkers well, yet still learned some fresh information about them. For me, the most interesting idea in this book is the link between the Romantics, specifically Rousseau and Byron, to Hegel, to (of course) Nietzsche and the Fascism that engulfed Europe just years before this book was published. Also, the Empiricist of England (Locke the most prominent) fractured into two groups, one which produced countries like the USA and another which produced a country like the now defunct USSR. It's very interesting. A lot of philosophy books are not accessible to the layman like myself because of the obscurantist writing style of the professional university philosopher. For example, I tried to read Hegel's "Logic" years ago but only understood maybe 30 percent of what I read. Here, I understood a amazing 85 percent. Russell writes in a colloquial style that the every-day-person can grasp. However, there are some passages that will create you feel like your brain is going to explode. But again, if you are "into" philosophy, this is a amazing book. I was disappointed that there was no chapter on Kierkegaard.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of Western Philosophy []  2020-1-19 22:8

    We are in 1946, Russell is building the chain of ideas pushing civilization to the current state. His erudition is profound but he is biased. And that's what makes this book so good. The Russell historian is using at least three hats as mathematician, English citizen and philosopher himself. The former is by far the most entertaining and edifying. For example, the mathematician starts boldly picking Pythagoras as the most necessary thinker ever. Although nuts, Pythagoras wrote the first mathematical proof. "Q.E.D.". And then he goes over the centuries digging up inconsistencies within the thinking frameworks being discussed. This is particularly rewarding if we did our homework and read the books he is discussing. Seems that civilization needs much more of this "curiosity to understand the world" which is all over the put within this book. And Russell shows a consistent path towards progress.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of Western Philosophy []  2020-1-19 22:8

    The complete title is:History of Western Philosophy and its Connection with Political & Social Cirtances from the Earliest Times to the Show DayThis is a amazing book that I'm enjoying a lot.Unfortunately the complete title is butchered so you might think, as I did, the book is "just" about the history of omitting the complete title the publishers are dismissing the main strength of this book which is Philosophy's connections with politics and society throughout history.Had I known the book is also a history of politics and society I would have read it a long time ago.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of Western Philosophy []  2020-1-19 22:8

    It took a while before I finally finished "The History of Western Philosophy." There is a lot of history and Bertrand Russell covers a lot of history very quickly and briefly and still the book is 900 pages thick. That said, it was well written and not too hard to read. The hardest for me was to hold track of all the relationships explained. To truly understand all of them, I'd need to read it a couple more mmarizing "The History of Western Philosophy" is not possible in a book review and I won't attempt it. One necessary subject in this book is that it is as much "history" as "Philosophy" Thus at the times where there was less necessary contributions to the field of philosophy, the author still summarizes the history that happened and how that influenced later philosophers. In fact, how the history influenced philosophy and how philosophy influenced history is a key theme throughout the book. Russell shows has they are intertwined and caused each e book has three huge parts (each about 300 pages). They are 1) Ancient (mostly Greek) Philosophy, 2) Catholic Philosophy, and 3) Modern Philosophy. The book is chronological with sometimes forward references and a lot of backward references. Of all the philosophies, most of the time is spend on the Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle philosophies as their influence is so huge. Even though Bertrand Russell is quite critical of them and considers them overvalued... I guess he contributes to that by focusing on it much again :) That said, it is also a central theme that Bertrand Russell is not shy whatsoever to give his own opinion about the philosophies, changing his book partly to the philosophies of Bertrand Russell. That also means that if you are looking for a neutral summary of philosophers, then this book is not it. The opinions of the author did probably created the book more readable and accessible as it is at times as if he joins the philosophical discussion... except that the other philosophers are not able to argue back to Bertrand Russell. Unfair...I thoroughly enjoyed the History of Western Philosophy. It was thorough in breath though sometimes shallow in depth. That caused me to learn a large amount about history and the role of philosophy. For anyone interested in that and not bothered by the lack of neutrality, this book is highly recommended. For people looking for a practical book, this is not it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A History of Western Philosophy []  2020-1-19 22:8

    I'm almost 40 and I've been mildly curious about philosophy throughout my adult life. Unfortunately, I had yet to read anything meaningful about it, because all the previous attempts to educate myself were thwarted by the pretentiousness of all the authors I had tried to read on the topic; I suspect one can't be accepted in this field if they speak like human beings.History of Western Philosophy, however, is different: even non-experts can read this introductory book! How awesome is that? On top of that, Russell has a delicious whimsical side to him, which transpires in this book just enough for the occasional comic relief. Although an atheist himself, he does present the important formal reverence to religious matters as avoid offending anyone (in fact, he even uses the appropriate jargon regarding heathens, heretics and the such, although I believe most of it is tongue in cheek).Apart from all that (which was the critical part for me), the book is obviously well respected, and it's remarkably thorough (which means you shouldn't be concerned with the content's verity or its coverage of the topic). Speaking of thoroughness, I'm quite satisfied that I happened upon it in digital format, because I later realized how thick the paper ver must be, and that I would most likely have been intimidated by it to the point of not buying the book in the first e Kindle ver does have a few OCR issues (typically locations missing between words), but they're few and far apart enough not to become any meaningful hindrance to fluid reading.UPDATE: I finally finished reading the book, and I wanted to add a few things specifically for novices like myself. If you're a newcomer to philosophy AND you're just a casual reader, expect that you won't be able to understand everything, and that you will remember much less than what you understand. This is necessary in two ways. On one hand, knowing this, you shouldn't obtain discouraged when you don't understand something as well as you'd wish to: you'd probably forget it anyway, so just hold on reading -- the necessary thing is to obtain an overall idea, not to remember every small detail (which is anyway impossible). On the other hand, the fact that you'll unavoidably forget a lot of items is quite unfortunate, because after you finish with the Antics, the cross-references become increasingly more necessary and relevant. So I suggest that, if your reading habits let it, you might wish to jot down a few words about each philosopher IMMEDIATELY after finishing each chapter; you probably wouldn't need more that two or three phrases with what you found most distinctive about that person, so you can later remember more about each of them at a glance.Having said all that, expect that in the end you'll leave with maybe 10% of what you've been reading -- and that's if you're lucky. But that's ok: what matters is that you leave with an understanding of what philosophy is really all about, and that you will definitely get. Plus, you'll certainly be able to put almost any Western philosopher in roughly the right period, you'll develop likes and dislikes, and you'll end up with a much better understanding of what and why it is that Western philosophers have been doing what they've been doing for the past few thousand years. And let's be honest: what more can you hope for?

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy []  2019-12-20 18:29

    This is a brilliantly written book that successfully balances the historical and philosophical detail of western thought since the early Greeks. While I have not read Russell's acclaimed title, I can confidently say that this history is exactly what I required as an average reader of philosophy with a desire to expand my knowledge of the discipline and achieve a broader understanding of the contributions of its major figures and others have pointed out, this history is particularly special for its acknowledgement of thinkers that are traditionally excluded from histories of philosophy but which have influenced the development of philosophy in lasting and compelling ways. Additionally, and most surprisingly, Sir Kenny's history remains remarkably accessible and enjoyable throughout without sacrificing clarity and precision. Truly a special contribution and one that will likely grow in acclaim as years go on.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy []  2019-12-20 18:29

    I learned much from this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy (Routledge Classics) []  2020-11-8 18:12

    It took a while before I finally finished "The History of Western Philosophy." There is a lot of history and Bertrand Russell covers a lot of history very quickly and briefly and still the book is 900 pages thick. That said, it was well written and not too hard to read. The hardest for me was to hold track of all the relationships explained. To truly understand all of them, I'd need to read it a couple more mmarizing "The History of Western Philosophy" is not possible in a book review and I won't attempt it. One necessary subject in this book is that it is as much "history" as "Philosophy" Thus at the times where there was less necessary contributions to the field of philosophy, the author still summarizes the history that happened and how that influenced later philosophers. In fact, how the history influenced philosophy and how philosophy influenced history is a key theme throughout the book. Russell shows has they are intertwined and caused each e book has three huge parts (each about 300 pages). They are 1) Ancient (mostly Greek) Philosophy, 2) Catholic Philosophy, and 3) Modern Philosophy. The book is chronological with sometimes forward references and a lot of backward references. Of all the philosophies, most of the time is spend on the Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle philosophies as their influence is so huge. Even though Bertrand Russell is quite critical of them and considers them overvalued... I guess he contributes to that by focusing on it much again :) That said, it is also a central theme that Bertrand Russell is not shy whatsoever to give his own opinion about the philosophies, changing his book partly to the philosophies of Bertrand Russell. That also means that if you are looking for a neutral summary of philosophers, then this book is not it. The opinions of the author did probably created the book more readable and accessible as it is at times as if he joins the philosophical discussion... except that the other philosophers are not able to argue back to Bertrand Russell. Unfair...I thoroughly enjoyed the History of Western Philosophy. It was thorough in breath though sometimes shallow in depth. That caused me to learn a large amount about history and the role of philosophy. For anyone interested in that and not bothered by the lack of neutrality, this book is highly recommended. For people looking for a practical book, this is not it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy (Routledge Classics) []  2020-11-8 18:12

    This was a truly spectacular book and I rate it a solid 5 stars. I liked it much more than Will Durant’s acclaimed The Story of Philosophy, and equally as much as Leonard Peikoff’s History of Philosophy lectures.I like to think of this book as “a history of Western thought.” Russell profiles and summarizes every philosopher and philosophical movement from Thales to John Dewey and his own school of logical ysis. Each chapter was clear and interesting. I found Kant, Hegel, and Bergson less clear than other chapters, but that may just be because those philosophers themselves are hard to ssel didn’t just report on how ideas changed and impacted society, he also explained the history and workings of society in each period. I found this especially helpful for the first book about ancient philosophy and the second about the medieval ages. I also really loved how detailed Russell was in his ysis and retelling of the history of the Church. All of that was completely fresh to me, and I didn’t know how much I was missing by not delving into Church history!Also, I gotta say, his chapters on Rousseau, Berkeley, and Byron were exceptional. I loved the letters exchanged between Rousseau and Voltaire (I literally laughed out loud reading them). Berkeley was clearer than he’s ever been before. And even though I was never interested in Byron previously, Russell intrigued me with his description of him. I’ve already added some of his poems to my Kindle to check out!Usually long books annoy me. This one didn’t. Every sentence felt absolutely necessary, and I was often left with wanting to know more about each figure, idea, and period!Russell occasionally injected his opinion or brought up inconsistencies within the philosophies he was describing, but not nearly enough for my tastes. It was always very obvious when he was commenting as himself and when he was describing or speaking for the philosopher he was writing about though, which was great.Overall, this was an perfect survey of Western philosophy. It was amazing as an introduction to the ideas of these thinkers, as well as a “history of Western thought” like I mentioned at the beginning of this review. If you wish something that goes deeper into the philosophies of some of these thinkers, check out Leonard Peikoff’s History of Philosophy. If you’re more interested in the history aspect, you can check out Will Durant’s  Story of Philosophy . (I think Russell’s book is complimentary yet slightly superior to Durant’s.)I highly recommend this book, and the Audible ver narrated by Jonathan Keeble.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy (Routledge Classics) []  2020-11-8 18:12

    I'm almost 40 and I've been mildly curious about philosophy throughout my adult life. Unfortunately, I had yet to read anything meaningful about it, because all the previous attempts to educate myself were thwarted by the pretentiousness of all the authors I had tried to read on the topic; I suspect one can't be accepted in this field if they speak like human beings.History of Western Philosophy, however, is different: even non-experts can read this introductory book! How awesome is that? On top of that, Russell has a delicious whimsical side to him, which transpires in this book just enough for the occasional comic relief. Although an atheist himself, he does present the important formal reverence to religious matters as avoid offending anyone (in fact, he even uses the appropriate jargon regarding heathens, heretics and the such, although I believe most of it is tongue in cheek).Apart from all that (which was the critical part for me), the book is obviously well respected, and it's remarkably thorough (which means you shouldn't be concerned with the content's verity or its coverage of the topic). Speaking of thoroughness, I'm quite satisfied that I happened upon it in digital format, because I later realized how thick the paper ver must be, and that I would most likely have been intimidated by it to the point of not buying the book in the first e Kindle ver does have a few OCR issues (typically locations missing between words), but they're few and far apart enough not to become any meaningful hindrance to fluid reading.UPDATE: I finally finished reading the book, and I wanted to add a few things specifically for novices like myself. If you're a newcomer to philosophy AND you're just a casual reader, expect that you won't be able to understand everything, and that you will remember much less than what you understand. This is necessary in two ways. On one hand, knowing this, you shouldn't obtain discouraged when you don't understand something as well as you'd wish to: you'd probably forget it anyway, so just hold on reading -- the necessary thing is to obtain an overall idea, not to remember every small detail (which is anyway impossible). On the other hand, the fact that you'll unavoidably forget a lot of items is quite unfortunate, because after you finish with the Antics, the cross-references become increasingly more necessary and relevant. So I suggest that, if your reading habits let it, you might wish to jot down a few words about each philosopher IMMEDIATELY after finishing each chapter; you probably wouldn't need more that two or three phrases with what you found most distinctive about that person, so you can later remember more about each of them at a glance.Having said all that, expect that in the end you'll leave with maybe 10% of what you've been reading -- and that's if you're lucky. But that's ok: what matters is that you leave with an understanding of what philosophy is really all about, and that you will definitely get. Plus, you'll certainly be able to put almost any Western philosopher in roughly the right period, you'll develop likes and dislikes, and you'll end up with a much better understanding of what and why it is that Western philosophers have been doing what they've been doing for the past few thousand years. And let's be honest: what more can you hope for?

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy []  2019-12-20 18:29

    If any person is looking for just one book to give them an overview of every major western philosophical notion of the latest 2500 years this is it. It does not go into as much detail on some specifics as other amazing classics such as Russell's not so fresh ver of the same title, or Durant's attractive Story of Philosophy, but it does cover far more ground than any other work in the sense of understanding the huge picture of western reading this book one will gain the best initial understanding of how a certain philosopher connects to another, or how a certain school of thought leads to the next. This book, it is true, does not go into amazing detail on any particular philosopher. But that is not what scaping histories are for. If that is what is being sought after, buy individual books on individual philosophers or far as the authorship goes, it is highly readable. It is not quit as attractive as Will Durant's prose scholarship (though of course no one's is) but it was about as close as a page-turner comes to non-fiction. I found myself highly fascinated and growing deeper in my understanding of overall philosophy - often going through tons of pages without even noticing. Each chapter flows logically into the next and makes excellent sense. Kenny certainly mastered the art of high quality scholarship without being sically, if one is anything less than an expert on western philosophy this book holds value. If one has absolutely no, or at least very little, understanding of philosophy then this book will begin a whole fresh globe to their mind. Even if said reader is well educated in philosophy this book will increase one's overall understanding so that they may go on to, through other books, better learn of the amazing a lot of philosophical specifics. I will both gladly and hastily recommend this book as the first for anyone to gain knowledge in philosophy. Surely this will become the standard survey into western philosophy for the next half-century.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy []  2019-12-20 18:29

    Makes it a quick simple reference.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy (Routledge Classics) []  2020-11-8 18:12

    Bertrand Russell wrote A History of Philosophy with posterity in mind. Written during the exigencies of the Second Globe War, Russell gives preponderance to the history of philosophy in the West. From the pre-Socratics to John Dewey, Russell chronicles Western philosophy with inimitable ysis, wit and passion. It's not exhaustive by any means, but as a one volume treatment of philosophical culture in the West, it's beautiful much perfect. Russell, more than anything else, was a amazing reformer and thought education to be essential to our species. Russell abhorred the orthodoxy of higher education as a system reserved only for the arcane and the privileged; philosophy was something to be cherished and openly exchanged, free from impunity and social barriers. Russell's judicious balance of erudition and accessibility shows on every page. The only time it feels arrhythmic is when Russell conflates the political dynamism of his era with the days of antiquity. Reference to this can be found in his synthesis of Rousseau/Hitler or Locke/Churchill. Other than that, I have no qualms with Russell's illustration of philosophy in the West. Russell also has the potential to positively surprise you, as well. Those I expected to be cannon fodder (Hobbes, Rousseau, Hegel, Mill, Marx, etc.) are reviewed with considerable objectivity and restraint. Russell clearly prioritizes certain systems over others, logic and empiricism, for example, elicit greater intellectual stimulus than, say, metaphysics. This isn't to suggest that Russell's preferences suspend his ability to cogently and consistently define the changes in epistemology, just an observation that he's not detached in the same method that defines the body of academic writing. It also has to be said that the text is a very handy reference point for any student of philosophy. This is an perfect one volume treatment of Western philosophy written by a brilliant man, who clearly respected his readers enough not to cloak his work in impenetrable prose. Highly recommended.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy []  2019-12-20 18:29

    This is a unbelievable overview of the whole of Western Philosophy written by an perfect if somewhat unsung philosopher and historian, Anthony Kenny. Mr. Kenny’s approach of first giving the philosopher’s history and then an in-depth study of the philosophical work they covered, works very well for spot reference, though I couldn’t support reading it from cover to cover. The book really rounded out my understanding of this nebulous topic’s growth and specialization though the centuries. I highly recommend.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy []  2019-12-20 18:29

    I don't think it's at the same level as Russell's book. I

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy (Routledge Classics) []  2020-11-8 18:12

    We are in 1946, Russell is building the chain of ideas pushing civilization to the current state. His erudition is profound but he is biased. And that's what makes this book so good. The Russell historian is using at least three hats as mathematician, English citizen and philosopher himself. The former is by far the most entertaining and edifying. For example, the mathematician starts boldly picking Pythagoras as the most necessary thinker ever. Although nuts, Pythagoras wrote the first mathematical proof. "Q.E.D.". And then he goes over the centuries digging up inconsistencies within the thinking frameworks being discussed. This is particularly rewarding if we did our homework and read the books he is discussing. Seems that civilization needs much more of this "curiosity to understand the world" which is all over the put within this book. And Russell shows a consistent path towards progress.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy (Routledge Classics) []  2020-11-8 18:12

    I had been seeking an overall history of philosophy and this one is fantastic! I almost didn't order it because not only is it more than 800 pages but it was also written in 1945 -- I thought it would be a slog to obtain through, since I'm not an academic and never went to college. Rest assured it is NOT a slog! This is a phenomenally simple book to read, the writing style is clear and smooth and modern. I'm only half method through and learning SO much; now I understand why sometimes when I was reading books on religion or science or even history, I would feel like I got dropped in the middle of an on-going conversation and I was left out in the cold. Brilliant book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy (Routledge Classics) []  2020-11-8 18:12

    I liked the full coverage of the ideas and social and political context of the most prominent philosophers in three parts: ancient philosophy, catholic philosophy and modern philosophy. I liked to learn that philosophy can’t prove or disprove religious dogma, although most philosophers produced “proofs” of immortality and the existence of God by falsifying logic, making mathematics mystical and presenting deep-seated prejudices as heaven-sent intuitions. And I liked to know twentieth-century logical ysis school, of which Nobel laureate Bertrand Russell is considered a founder, which searches elementary truths by means of successive logical and empirical approximations, as in science.I recommend this book to all those interested in comprehending the evolution of the most prominent philosophers of all time in the human pursuit to comprehend life and how to live a amazing life.I gave five stars to this book because it’s a thorough and grand opus that provides a life changing comprehension of what it means to comprehend life and how to live a amazing life.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy []  2019-12-20 18:29

    I have the highest regard for this history, or I would not have both hardcover and Kindle versions of it. These notes concern the transition to the Kindle format, as experienced on the original vigation is mostly excellent, as it should be for a work which will be used as a work of reference as well as one of which substantial portions will be read from beginning to end: there is a table of contents with the major divisions of each of the Four Parts (originally published separately), and at the begin of each Part there is its own more detailed contents section. Cross-references and footnotes are hyperlinked. The only improvement to navigation would be if the page references in the Index were hyperlinked e smaller typeface used in my printed volumes for whole paragraphs of quotation is missing, except in Part Four. Thankfully, in the other Parts there is additional white zone before and (usually) after the quoted passage. This white space, plus the almost inevitable reference to the cited work, ensures that in practice one can work out where the quotation ends. However, the conventional layout is there for a reason, and we should not have to deduce where a quotation begins and me "tabular" textual layouts (which occur infrequently) are not really satisfactory. So two columns of text (e.g. parallel syllogisms, or the square showing "Intellect, Will, Sensation, Desire" at about zone 4670) obtain run together in a method that is frankly ere are some strange and arbitrary changes to the printed text: at one point the transliteration of the Greek for "the now" (an italicised "to nun") loses the italics for the article "to". At another, on motion, there are apostrophes representing the primes in p' and p", which is not beautiful but suffices. Then suddenly they disappear and what should read « p' to p" » now reads on the Kindle « p to p ». Again, for some reason on the Kindle a zone is introduced into the term "not-p" so that it becomes "not -p" and the reader stumbles briefly over whether the hyphen represents the ¬ sign for negation (location about 3138).There are no illustrations in the Kindle version. The map, as usual on my Paperwhite, is e page numbers are continuous, doubtless representing those of the one-volume edition of the work rather than of the separately published volumes. The frequent headings (hyperlinked as already mentioned), rather than the page numbers, let one quite easily to relate the Kindle text to one of the printed eek letters obtain very uneven treatment in the Kindle version: sometimes a proper, scalable Greek letter is used; sometimes a Roman letter equivalent based on the letter's appearance (e.g. Zeta and Zed/Zee); sometimes a Roman letter equivalent based on the letter's position the respective alphabets (e.g. Zeta and F); and sometimes a non-scalable graphic. (A lower-case Greek Phi given the latter treatment looks rather like a smudge on the screen.) Examples follow - all from Volume One, where there are frequent references to Aristotle's "Metaphysics":Book Delta of the "Metaphysics" is referred to in the print ver using the Greek capital letter (Δ), but in the Kindle it appears as book "D". You would expect Book Zeta to cause no issues (capital Zeta (Ζ) and the modern equivalent (Z) being effectively identical) - but sometimes it becomes the capital letter "Aristotle on Science and Illusion", references to book Gamma use a proper Greek letter Γ (capital Gamma).In "Essence and Quiddity", references to Book Zeta are to Book F (e.g. zone 4112 approx); those to Delta begin out by being to D, which then revert to a genuine scalable hero Δ (Delta) for the reference to "Being and Existence", references to book Delta are given as if to book D, and references to book Zeta are to book F. Beta becomes B, and Eta correctly looks like our H. Book Gamma is referred to with mini-picture Γ (capital Gamma) (location 4286 approx).There is a Kindle typo in the Bibliography for Aristotle (Chapter 2), where the edition of what is called "Metaphysics M and H" should refer to "Metaphysics M and N".Readers wanting to follow up references to Aristotle will have to be guided by prior knowledge or by the print noticed already, footnotes are hyperlinked. The question is whether the links are accurate. A few soundings suggest that mostly they take you perfectly to the needed place. In one put (Part 4, Ch 8, n 1) the print ver directs you, correctly, to some sections on medieval ethics, while the Kindle hyperlink takes you to one section earlier (to Abelard rather than Aquinas); in another, (Part 4, Ch 11, n 4), the print ver directs you to the starting page of the section on "Aristotle's Political Theory", while the Kindle takes you to a more precise zone within that section, a few physical pages ing these pages on the Kindle is generally a delight, but it would be amazing to see the noticed imperfections corrected.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy []  2019-12-20 18:29

    From the reviews of its individual volumes, there's small I can add here. The largest complaints are Kenny's cutoff date of 1975 (30 years to the first volume's publication), that "he didn't give enough pages to Philosopher X!," and that he downplayed the contributions of 20th century Continental philosophers. It's simple to think that our favorite (and latest or current) philosopher is not just a fad but so necessary that his greatness just isn't appreciated! Yet this is the same complaint with EVERY history of philosophy. Yes, with every single one. Better it would been to have added a fifth volume for 20th century philosophy. At least Kenny recognizes that a lot of philosophies do not survive far beyond their own day and looking back, seem faddish. Thus his short-shrift of postmodernism (Have we really learned much beyond the original writings up to 1981?).Kenny does something rare, which is to credit the influence that Marx, Darwin, and Freud had on philosophy, even though they rarely can be counted as philosophers. Intended as an introductory undergraduate text, it's really amazing as such. Don't ask it to be comprehensive and don't ask Kenny to give your favorite philosopher more pages than another in the same period. As is, it's beautiful unbelievable and a welcome history.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy (Routledge Classics) []  2020-11-8 18:12

    This is a beautiful awesome compendium of Western Philosophy. I have one negative critique. There are locations where Professor Russell uses a quote and then does not say from what book the quote originates, nor is there a footnote. Of course, the quote is from the current philosopher that Professor Russell is discussing. But, once quoted, say Hegel, then the quote is not footnoted. I like to know the exact book and page of the quote. Nevertheless, this is a beautiful awesome book. The first third of the book deals with the Greeks, of course. I liked the chapters on Nietzsche and Marx the best. I know these two thinkers well, yet still learned some fresh information about them. For me, the most interesting idea in this book is the link between the Romantics, specifically Rousseau and Byron, to Hegel, to (of course) Nietzsche and the Fascism that engulfed Europe just years before this book was published. Also, the Empiricist of England (Locke the most prominent) fractured into two groups, one which produced countries like the USA and another which produced a country like the now defunct USSR. It's very interesting. A lot of philosophy books are not accessible to the layman like myself because of the obscurantist writing style of the professional university philosopher. For example, I tried to read Hegel's "Logic" years ago but only understood maybe 30 percent of what I read. Here, I understood a amazing 85 percent. Russell writes in a colloquial style that the every-day-person can grasp. However, there are some passages that will create you feel like your brain is going to explode. But again, if you are "into" philosophy, this is a amazing book. I was disappointed that there was no chapter on Kierkegaard.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy []  2019-12-20 18:29

    Kenny’s writing style is remarkably lucid and simple to read. He has a knack for distilling long timelines and complicated histories into compelling yet easy narratives. The book has both a chronological component, where Kenny sketches the history, and a conceptual component, where Kenny outlines the ideas as they fall under various categories. It’s worth the read for any student of philosophy to acquire an appreciation of the breadth of Western Philosophy, and it’s worth the read for the layman to gain an understanding of some fundamental philosophical concepts and how they have evolved, though I will admit it would be a moderately difficult read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy []  2019-12-20 18:29

    I have over the years read several histories of Western Philosophy, and this is the best of the lot. Professor Kenny gives the reader a thorough, comprehensive, and readable acc of philosophy from the ancient Greeks to the present, introducing the reader to the ideas of major thinkers and the themes that have preoccupied philosophers over time in the locations of metaphysics, epistemology, logic, ethics, politics, religion, and aesthetics.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy (Routledge Classics) []  2020-11-8 18:12

    The complete title is:History of Western Philosophy and its Connection with Political & Social Cirtances from the Earliest Times to the Show DayThis is a amazing book that I'm enjoying a lot.Unfortunately the complete title is butchered so you might think, as I did, the book is "just" about the history of omitting the complete title the publishers are dismissing the main strength of this book which is Philosophy's connections with politics and society throughout history.Had I known the book is also a history of politics and society I would have read it a long time ago.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Western Philosophy (Routledge Classics) []  2020-11-8 18:12

    The book is great; highly recommended. The kindle edition has typos, probably from an inaccurate OCR system, with quotes like "Kant says that if you are kind to your brother because you arc [sic] fond of him, you have no moral merit".The chapter metadata also wasn't loaded into the table of contents, only the division into a few multi-hundred-page main sections. That makes the Kindle edition harder to use as a reference, though the find functionality somewhat. Overall, I think the Kindle edition is still quite serviceable, but if these sorts of things bother you, maybe go for the hardcover.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Medieval Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 2 []  2019-12-20 18:30

    This fine book, the second volume in Kenny's A Fresh History of Western Philosophy, provides an overview of the major figures and problems in the philosophy of the European Middle Ages. Kenny takes an "intellectual history" approach in the opening section to provide important historical context and biographical info on the major figures he will be discussing. In the longer second part of the book, he turns to philosophical problems per se, tackling, in turn, "Logic and Language," "Knowledge," "Physics," "Metaphysics," "Mind and Soul," "Ethics," and "God." Kenny organizes this discussion around a who's who of the major medieval philosophers, including Augustine, Boethius, Avicenna, Anselm, Abelard, Aquinas, Duns Scotus, and Ockham. The chapters on ethics and God, subjects so necessary in the Christian philosophical matrix of the Middle Ages, are very good, but it is the chapter on logic and language that stood out to me as being particularly interesting--Kenny highlights the ways in which medieval thinkers were anticipating problems in the philosophy of language that have been very hot subjects among philosophers of the latest nny's book will be useful to anyone with a more-than-casual interest in philosophy or in medieval intellectual history. It may prove too difficult for absolute beginners with no philosophical background. Non-spet academics and students, among others, will relish the book both for the helpfulness of its content and for the charm and grace of Kenny's writing.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Medieval Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 2 []  2019-12-20 18:30

    A amazing introductory survey of philosophical subjects as they were treated by different medieval thinkers throughout the entire period, from late antiquity and the commentators of Aristotle, to the inception of the humanists. The survey combines what is properly called intellectual history and philosophy proper. The historical aspect is kept to a minimum (as it ought to be in a philosophy book) without sacrificing salient features of the historical context in which the subject under discussion occurred. The philosophy, on the other hand, is more developed and Kenny has an emphasis on concept explanation, as opposed to explicating arguments; though he does do both at is contains the following topics: God, Mind and Soul, Logic and Language, Knowledge, Physics, Metaphysics, Ethics, as well as an perfect treatment of philosophy and religious belief from Augustine to Maimonides,and scholasticism from the twelfth century renaissance (Abelard and the 'nominales' school) to the so-called renaissance proper (roughly 1360-1550), at which point scholasticism began to give method to the fresh schoolman, the nny is especially amazing at explaining the intellectual current of a given period and how such a current has bearing on the subject at hand, this is particularly seen in his discussion of physics. As such, the historical context of each subject and its subsequent development is presented thoroughly but briefly; however, small attention is given to the explication of any particular thinker's arguments on any given topics. For that reason, you will search small critical ysis of the particular arguments l in all it's an perfect work, written clearly and informatively, by a very capable philosopher. It's a amazing introduction for undergraduates at the freshman and sophomore level. But if you've had more than a survey course in medieval philosophy, you need something with a bit more depth.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Medieval Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 2 []  2019-12-20 18:30

    I like everything about this book. The time that it took to arrive and it has really helped me a lot in class.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Medieval Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 2 []  2019-12-20 18:30

    I took classes in philosophy for years and I have to say that I was very surprised with this book. Kenny has a amazing knack for rephrasing the arguments of the Schoolmen in modern philosophical vocabulary without loss of substance. You'll be shocked by how relevant medieval philosophy really is; I'm a small mad undergrad students aren't created more aware of this material. This book accomplishes what every history aspires to: you close the book feel well-informed and freshly energized about the craft of e only minor downsides to the book are stylistic. A few strangely-worded cultural references create you feel like you're listening to 'Old Man Kenny' on occasion. More seriously, there are some instances where it's a small hard to follow the narrative voice, leaving you unsure at first where critical exposition ends and judgment begins. Thankfully, though, these defects are minimal in number and effect. Anyone with a moderate interest in philosophy will search this a worthwhile purchase.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Medieval Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 2 []  2019-12-20 18:30

    No problems

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Medieval Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 2 []  2019-12-20 18:30

    The book expounds the main ideas of the medieval thinkers with amazing clarity and a pleasing lightness of touch. The book is not only a pleasure to read but to keep and look at. Author and publisher have both done an perfect job.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Medieval Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 2 []  2019-12-20 18:30

    Just like the first volume I've enjoyed reading this work on Medieval Philosophy. For a casual student of philosophy this is probablyas light an introduction as can be imagined. Anything less and it would miss out on a lot of necessary details. Butit's a amazing book to begin your studies in philosophy and follow up with something a bit more in-depth.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Medieval Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Volume 2 []  2019-12-20 18:30

    Dr. Kenny is the Copelston for the fresh generation. Kenny's attempt to place the history of Western Phil. into four volumes (about 1100 pages) is probably amazing enough. The organization of volume 2 is very good: roughly 100 pages of history and another 180 pages organized by major topics. This should work well for the reader who has small or no background in Medieval European philosophy. All the prime suspects are given time in the text, even some to the lesser knows obtain space: Eriugena, John of Mirecouts, & St. Bernard. Kenny's topical review is balanced and does create an effort to bring up uncomfortable topics. Kenny's explanation of Aquinas on property is absolutely correct. Aquinas states explicitly that taking the property of others is NOT a sin when taken out of need. Kenny reminds us of what genuine Christianity is ever, Kenny does sometimes need to create connections to Frege, Wittgenstein or Russell, none of which is likely helpful to undergraduate students of philosophy. And although I might have congratulated Kenny for his inclusion of Hypathia (he does give a proper overview of what small is known of her life and work) IF he had NOT chosen to illustrate her through the use of a 19th NUDE painting. His illustrations of Augustine, Boethius, Ockham, Duns Scotus, & Averoes all seem to have found some method to place clothing on, but not Hypatia, who is depicted as a victim rather than a scholar. ism in philosophy has a long history and Kenny's book is only one little part of it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy: In Four Parts []  2020-9-3 18:49

    This is a unbelievable overview of the whole of Western Philosophy written by an perfect if somewhat unsung philosopher and historian, Anthony Kenny. Mr. Kenny’s approach of first giving the philosopher’s history and then an in-depth study of the philosophical work they covered, works very well for spot reference, though I couldn’t support reading it from cover to cover. The book really rounded out my understanding of this nebulous topic’s growth and specialization though the centuries. I highly recommend.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy: In Four Parts []  2020-9-3 18:49

    I learned much from this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy: In Four Parts []  2020-9-3 18:49

    Kenny’s writing style is remarkably lucid and simple to read. He has a knack for distilling long timelines and complicated histories into compelling yet easy narratives. The book has both a chronological component, where Kenny sketches the history, and a conceptual component, where Kenny outlines the ideas as they fall under various categories. It’s worth the read for any student of philosophy to acquire an appreciation of the breadth of Western Philosophy, and it’s worth the read for the layman to gain an understanding of some fundamental philosophical concepts and how they have evolved, though I will admit it would be a moderately difficult read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy: In Four Parts []  2020-9-3 18:49

    Amazing book - very comprehensive. Well worth the money.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy: In Four Parts []  2020-9-3 18:49

    I have the highest regard for this history, or I would not have both hardcover and Kindle versions of it. These notes concern the transition to the Kindle format, as experienced on the original vigation is mostly excellent, as it should be for a work which will be used as a work of reference as well as one of which substantial portions will be read from beginning to end: there is a table of contents with the major divisions of each of the Four Parts (originally published separately), and at the begin of each Part there is its own more detailed contents section. Cross-references and footnotes are hyperlinked. The only improvement to navigation would be if the page references in the Index were hyperlinked e smaller typeface used in my printed volumes for whole paragraphs of quotation is missing, except in Part Four. Thankfully, in the other Parts there is additional white zone before and (usually) after the quoted passage. This white space, plus the almost inevitable reference to the cited work, ensures that in practice one can work out where the quotation ends. However, the conventional layout is there for a reason, and we should not have to deduce where a quotation begins and me "tabular" textual layouts (which occur infrequently) are not really satisfactory. So two columns of text (e.g. parallel syllogisms, or the square showing "Intellect, Will, Sensation, Desire" at about zone 4670) obtain run together in a method that is frankly ere are some strange and arbitrary changes to the printed text: at one point the transliteration of the Greek for "the now" (an italicised "to nun") loses the italics for the article "to". At another, on motion, there are apostrophes representing the primes in p' and p", which is not beautiful but suffices. Then suddenly they disappear and what should read « p' to p" » now reads on the Kindle « p to p ». Again, for some reason on the Kindle a zone is introduced into the term "not-p" so that it becomes "not -p" and the reader stumbles briefly over whether the hyphen represents the ¬ sign for negation (location about 3138).There are no illustrations in the Kindle version. The map, as usual on my Paperwhite, is e page numbers are continuous, doubtless representing those of the one-volume edition of the work rather than of the separately published volumes. The frequent headings (hyperlinked as already mentioned), rather than the page numbers, let one quite easily to relate the Kindle text to one of the printed eek letters obtain very uneven treatment in the Kindle version: sometimes a proper, scalable Greek letter is used; sometimes a Roman letter equivalent based on the letter's appearance (e.g. Zeta and Zed/Zee); sometimes a Roman letter equivalent based on the letter's position the respective alphabets (e.g. Zeta and F); and sometimes a non-scalable graphic. (A lower-case Greek Phi given the latter treatment looks rather like a smudge on the screen.) Examples follow - all from Volume One, where there are frequent references to Aristotle's "Metaphysics":Book Delta of the "Metaphysics" is referred to in the print ver using the Greek capital letter (Δ), but in the Kindle it appears as book "D". You would expect Book Zeta to cause no issues (capital Zeta (Ζ) and the modern equivalent (Z) being effectively identical) - but sometimes it becomes the capital letter "Aristotle on Science and Illusion", references to book Gamma use a proper Greek letter Γ (capital Gamma).In "Essence and Quiddity", references to Book Zeta are to Book F (e.g. zone 4112 approx); those to Delta begin out by being to D, which then revert to a genuine scalable hero Δ (Delta) for the reference to "Being and Existence", references to book Delta are given as if to book D, and references to book Zeta are to book F. Beta becomes B, and Eta correctly looks like our H. Book Gamma is referred to with mini-picture Γ (capital Gamma) (location 4286 approx).There is a Kindle typo in the Bibliography for Aristotle (Chapter 2), where the edition of what is called "Metaphysics M and H" should refer to "Metaphysics M and N".Readers wanting to follow up references to Aristotle will have to be guided by prior knowledge or by the print noticed already, footnotes are hyperlinked. The question is whether the links are accurate. A few soundings suggest that mostly they take you perfectly to the needed place. In one put (Part 4, Ch 8, n 1) the print ver directs you, correctly, to some sections on medieval ethics, while the Kindle hyperlink takes you to one section earlier (to Abelard rather than Aquinas); in another, (Part 4, Ch 11, n 4), the print ver directs you to the starting page of the section on "Aristotle's Political Theory", while the Kindle takes you to a more precise zone within that section, a few physical pages ing these pages on the Kindle is generally a delight, but it would be amazing to see the noticed imperfections corrected.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy: In Four Parts []  2020-9-3 18:49

    I have over the years read several histories of Western Philosophy, and this is the best of the lot. Professor Kenny gives the reader a thorough, comprehensive, and readable acc of philosophy from the ancient Greeks to the present, introducing the reader to the ideas of major thinkers and the themes that have preoccupied philosophers over time in the locations of metaphysics, epistemology, logic, ethics, politics, religion, and aesthetics.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy: In Four Parts []  2020-9-3 18:49

    This is a brilliantly written book that successfully balances the historical and philosophical detail of western thought since the early Greeks. While I have not read Russell's acclaimed title, I can confidently say that this history is exactly what I required as an average reader of philosophy with a desire to expand my knowledge of the discipline and achieve a broader understanding of the contributions of its major figures and others have pointed out, this history is particularly special for its acknowledgement of thinkers that are traditionally excluded from histories of philosophy but which have influenced the development of philosophy in lasting and compelling ways. Additionally, and most surprisingly, Sir Kenny's history remains remarkably accessible and enjoyable throughout without sacrificing clarity and precision. Truly a special contribution and one that will likely grow in acclaim as years go on.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy: In Four Parts []  2020-9-3 18:49

    Makes it a quick simple reference.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy: In Four Parts []  2020-9-3 18:49

    If any person is looking for just one book to give them an overview of every major western philosophical notion of the latest 2500 years this is it. It does not go into as much detail on some specifics as other amazing classics such as Russell's not so fresh ver of the same title, or Durant's attractive Story of Philosophy, but it does cover far more ground than any other work in the sense of understanding the huge picture of western reading this book one will gain the best initial understanding of how a certain philosopher connects to another, or how a certain school of thought leads to the next. This book, it is true, does not go into amazing detail on any particular philosopher. But that is not what scaping histories are for. If that is what is being sought after, buy individual books on individual philosophers or far as the authorship goes, it is highly readable. It is not quit as attractive as Will Durant's prose scholarship (though of course no one's is) but it was about as close as a page-turner comes to non-fiction. I found myself highly fascinated and growing deeper in my understanding of overall philosophy - often going through tons of pages without even noticing. Each chapter flows logically into the next and makes excellent sense. Kenny certainly mastered the art of high quality scholarship without being sically, if one is anything less than an expert on western philosophy this book holds value. If one has absolutely no, or at least very little, understanding of philosophy then this book will begin a whole fresh globe to their mind. Even if said reader is well educated in philosophy this book will increase one's overall understanding so that they may go on to, through other books, better learn of the amazing a lot of philosophical specifics. I will both gladly and hastily recommend this book as the first for anyone to gain knowledge in philosophy. Surely this will become the standard survey into western philosophy for the next half-century.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A New History of Western Philosophy: In Four Parts []  2020-9-3 18:49

    From the reviews of its individual volumes, there's small I can add here. The largest complaints are Kenny's cutoff date of 1975 (30 years to the first volume's publication), that "he didn't give enough pages to Philosopher X!," and that he downplayed the contributions of 20th century Continental philosophers. It's simple to think that our favorite (and latest or current) philosopher is not just a fad but so necessary that his greatness just isn't appreciated! Yet this is the same complaint with EVERY history of philosophy. Yes, with every single one. Better it would been to have added a fifth volume for 20th century philosophy. At least Kenny recognizes that a lot of philosophies do not survive far beyond their own day and looking back, seem faddish. Thus his short-shrift of postmodernism (Have we really learned much beyond the original writings up to 1981?).Kenny does something rare, which is to credit the influence that Marx, Darwin, and Freud had on philosophy, even though they rarely can be counted as philosophers. Intended as an introductory undergraduate text, it's really amazing as such. Don't ask it to be comprehensive and don't ask Kenny to give your favorite philosopher more pages than another in the same period. As is, it's beautiful unbelievable and a welcome history.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Classics of Western Philosophy []  2020-10-3 18:14

    I love how a lot of various texts this covers. If you're a philosophy student then you'll be expected to read almost all of these throughout the course of your education so you might as well obtain it now. It is much much much cheaper than buying each of them individually and the translations can really aid in your understanding of each philosopher. Cahn is so amazing that even Kant's Critique of Pure Reason (which is notoriously dry and complex) isn't difficult to comprehend.I've noticed some complaints in the other reviews regarding whether or not this should be used as a basic text. I would, personally, say that this is the excellent material. Those who argue that there are no logical connections between the texts must be out of their mind. The older philosophers presented at the beginning have provided a foundation that the later philosophers tinker with. For example, Aristotle's idea of the "Golden Mean" can later be connected to Hume, who even references the Peripatetics. Any amazing professor can search ways to bring a fresh philosopher back to an older one. A amazing professor will also be able to search where two philosophers may be talking about the same problem without it necessarily being so, I search it ridiculous that one would feel the need for a narrative structure among all of these texts. When you read an anthology, do you expect all of the stories to be the same? You can always pick and choose the texts that you or your class will read from this text. There's never any need to read each and every one of them in sequence (unless you wish to). This is simply the cheapest method to acquire a huge number of some of the most valuable philosophical texts in history. You might as well have a student buy this instead of having to spend three times as much purchasing individual copies of each author's work as the need arises.I do, however, have an problem with this format of this text. It's not that there are no page numbers (as most kindle books don't have those- there is a completely separate method to cite a digital text that doesn't depend on the page numbers) but rather that it is so difficult to work with in a digital format. As it is a huge text, the find function takes a very long time to run through the entire book and I create so a lot of notes/highlights/bookmarks that I have to scroll quite a bit to reach whichever one I went digging for. It can also be difficult to read along with the rest of the class if your professor asks you to refer to a specific page number. You can always ask for what section you're looking for, though, and that will support you search where everyone else is.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Classics of Western Philosophy []  2020-10-3 18:14

    Perfect rental. Book was in perfect shape!!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Classics of Western Philosophy []  2020-10-3 18:14

    There are no page numbers whatsoever in the Kindle edition of this book, which makes it useless for classroom assignments. If you are buying this for a university class (of course you are), buy a hard copy and save yourself some angst, as well as $$.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Classics of Western Philosophy []  2020-10-3 18:14

    Amazing Condition

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Classics of Western Philosophy []  2020-10-3 18:14

    Unfortunately it is only selected works with some huge sections of some of the works missing. Textbook for a class on philosophy I was taking. I will hold it for my library.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Classics of Western Philosophy []  2020-10-3 18:14

    son required for class

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Classics of Western Philosophy []  2020-10-3 18:14

    It does its job but I dont like that the page numbers dont work correctly on kindle

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Classics of Western Philosophy []  2020-10-3 18:14

    NO PAGE NUMBERS! Very disappointing to purchase this for a college class and when your teacher says to read page 27 - 39, you have no idea where it is! I spent most of the time trying to decipher page numbers vs learning the actual content of the book.I contacted Amazon and they beautiful much told me that they cannot do anything for me in offering a ver that has page numbers.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Classics of Western Philosophy []  2020-10-3 18:14

    the book it self it's amazing but the condition it came in was terrible

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Classics of Western Philosophy []  2020-10-3 18:14

    product arrived as promised and expected.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance []  2019-12-20 18:30

    Excellent

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance []  2019-12-20 18:30

    Right balance of context, content, fact and ysis--fascinating subject--not inaccessible as philosophy was often followed and greatly enjoyed by huge audiences of the time. A must read for everyone.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance []  2019-12-20 18:30

    No doubt this is the most entertaining history of Greek philosophy currently available. One caveat: the book purports to cover from the early Greeks to the Renaissance; however, Medieval philosophy gets small to no discussion. Still, for what it does cover, certainly worth a read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance []  2019-12-20 18:30

    What distinguishes this book from others in my opinion, is its intent to debunk commonly held myths and misconceptios about some antiquity philosophers and its ideas. Very well written, its simple to read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance []  2019-12-20 18:30

    A+++++

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance []  2019-12-20 18:30

    It has taken me a lot of moons to complete this book, which I’ve greatly enjoyed. I was seeking a good, non-superficial introductory book that delved into the history of Western thought and philosophy, one that would confer a amazing primary grasp of the problems and complexities of the evolution of men’s e main benefit of reading this book is that it’s chronological and starts with the earliest Greek philosophers. In the process of reading, one clearly understands how each thinker was reacting the ideas of the schools that came before, and how dialectical relationships r instance, I knew that Epicurus was influenced by Democritus’ atomism, but I had no idea that Democritus had been reacting to Parmenides’ early physics. These threads of philosophy become simple to discern when one reads this book. One also begins to create a more or less clear profile of some of the amazing philosophers, their personalities and central themes. In the case of Aristotle, because he wrote so much and his intellectual legacy was so varied and complex, I felt that the introduction was somewhat superficial, but this is to be expected. Aristotle deserves an entire book.I was initially annoyed that Sceptics, Epicureans, and Stoics were all included in one single chapter that dealt with the three therapeutic philosophies of the Hellenistic era, but there are several introductions out there on Epicureanism, and what this chapter did for me was to accentuate the amazing in each one of the three Hellenistic schools and contrast where they differ, for e book only goes up to the Renaissance. When one arrives at the Middle Ages, it’s truly sad how the intellectual development of the entire continent of Europe was held hostage by the church, which restricted all thought and whose supernatural claims become intrusive points of reference in all of philosophy. European philosophy during the Dark Ages is compared to the Sleeping Beauty.Overall, this book is amazing for those seeking to cover the basics of how philosophical thought evolved.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance []  2019-12-20 18:30

    This easy-to-read book, which paints the history of pre-modern philosophy in broad strokes, makes up for the lack of detail by giving us a nicely integrated panoramic view. It has been said that all of modern philosophy is small more than footnotes to Plato, Aristotle, the Sophists and the Skeptics. There is some truth in that; in any case, this book reminds the reader of the ubiquitous contribution of the ancients to the philosophical construction of the modern e author's style contains plenty of pithy remarks, often amusing photos and clever phrases that - had he been a political speech writer - might have become more widely known quotable sound bights. I found it an enjoyable read, and strongly recommend it for the reader looking for a amazing introduction.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance []  2019-12-20 18:30

    This is an perfect introductory tutorial to Western philosophers. I look forward to further writings from Mr Gottlieb in the future.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance []  2019-12-20 18:30

    Amazing book. It's written in a method that is understandable for most anyone. I follow along easily with my philosophy professor. I do the reading assignments and actually have fun them.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance []  2019-12-20 18:30

    Arrived quickly and was as described.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy: Conversations Between Men and Women Philosophers []  2020-1-21 20:55

    Karen J. Warren provides us with a long overdue study of female philosophers, but still does so only within the context of male philosophers who are implicitly treated as the senior partners in each of the pairings offered by Professor Warren. I think it is noteworthy that each of the male philosophers can be listed with one name with no doubt as to their identity, this is not the case for most of the female philosophers e pairings themselves, though very thought provoking, are in some cases problematic and seem to be a bit contrived. For example, Diotoma is likely apocryphal, and some of the parings, the most obvious example of which is Augustin (354 – 430) and Hildegard von Bingen (1098 – 1179) are not of contemporaneous thinkers in direct contact. There are certainly male and female philosophers, and each should be accorded their due according to their merit, and within their social and temporal context, but there is no such thing as male or female philosophy. This separation creates another false dualism, of which I should think we already have quite enough to satisfy a range of metaphysical tastes.Each chapter in the book leads off with a fine expository essay by Professor Warren putting the philosophical problems into context, contrast and better perspective than found in most standard history of philosophy texts. The book itself provides a very amazing reading of the traditional or standard western philosophical cannon, but with a wider perspective which should be welcome. The western philosophical cannon is incomplete without the inclusion of female philosophers to the detriment to all those who study e greatest contribution of this book is to remind us that male and female philosophers, when taken together, enrich the philosophical enterprise by offering deeper ysis to serious readers with a desire to develop their knowledge, broaden their perspective, widen their horizons, and become more thoughtful, enlightened, tolerant and better persons. This book is a welcome and uniquely indispensable resource for those with a genuine care about the importance of philosophical are the pairings:Plato-DiotimaAristotle-Periktione and TheanoAugustin-Hildegard von BingenAbelard-HeloiseDescartes-Elisabeth, Princess PalatineHobbes-Catharine Sawbridge MacaulayLock-Damaris Cudworth MashamLeibniz-Vicountess Anne Finch ConwayRousseau-Mary WollstonecraftKant-Anna Maria van SchurmanMill-Harriet Taylor MillHeidegger-Hannah ArendtDewy-Jane AdamsWittgenstein-Elizabeth AnscombeSartre-Simone de Beauvoir

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Philosophy []  2019-12-20 18:33

    I’ll admit, the history of philosophy is one of my favorite genres, having read the works of Bertrand Russell, Will Durant, Anthony Kenny, Bryan Magee, Nigel Warburton, and others. Each has its pros and cons, so it’s hard to rank them, but if I had to, Russell’s The History of Western Philosophy and Magee’s Confessions of a Philosopher would top the list. (A Small History of Philosophy by Nigel Warburton would come in a close third, for those looking for a quicker read.)But now, if I had to recommend one book to someone interested in the subject, it would be A. C. Grayling’s latest, The History of Philosophy, and here’s r a single-volume work, this book has the most extensive coverage, not only because of its higher page count, but also because it packs the most content into each page. Grayling states in the introduction that his goal is to write about each philosopher as clearly and concisely as possible without sacrificing the complexity and subtlety of their thinking, which he masterfully achieves.Whereas Russell’s history only covers up to John Dewey, Grayling takes the reader through the entire twentieth century up to Kripke, and even manages to squeeze in a section on Indian, Chinese, Arabic-Persian, and African philosophy, in addition to an appendix on logic, all in roughly the same number of does he do this? Other than by writing clearly and concisely, unlike Russell, who spends 190 pages on Catholic philosophy, Grayling covers Medieval and Renaissance philosophy in 58 pages. Grayling’s principle of selection is more focused, as he makes the valid point that theology is not philosophy and that it requires its own history, much like science. As Grayling wrote, “if the starting point for reflection is the acceptance of religious doctrine, then the reflection that follows is theology, or theodicy, or exegesis, or casuistry, or apologetics, or hermeneutics, but it is not philosophy.” This allows him to dedicate more zone to modern and contemporary is is not to say that he ignores Medieval philosophy, just that he covers it in a rather brilliant way. Rather than focusing on the philosophical debates regarding imaginary entities (e.g., the nature of the holy trinity), he simply comments on the legitimate philosophical problems that “arise from or impinge upon” theological thought, i.e., the philosophical issues of time, free will, ethics, addition to more focused content, you might think that Grayling would have the edge on Russell for no other reason than the fact that his history was published 74 years after Russell’s, incorporating the recent research and progress in philosophy over the latest three quarters of a century. But it’s not only for this ssell’s acc has been legitimately criticized for lacking objectivity and for providing inadequate or misleading coverage of several philosophers. Grayling’s history is an improvement in this regard, as it provides both a more objective and deeper acc of each philosopher. Not that Grayling will escape the criticism of bias; for as Russell said, “a man without bias cannot write interesting history — if, indeed, such a man exists."Grayling is not such a man, but this is a amazing thing. He does a commendable job of walking the fine line between the objective presentation of each philosopher’s ideas and the ysis and commentary that by definition must be biased toward a particular perspective. (A completely objective history of philosophy without commentary would be nothing other than a series of dull Wikipedia entries.) That said, I wouldn’t be surprised if Grayling is criticized for not hiding his atheism and contempt for religion, but, as he accurately noted, religion is most definitely not philosophy, for several reasons he makes perfectly st, I can confidently say that, out of the a lot of works on famous philosophy I’ve read, Grayling provides the clearest accounts of the even the most difficult philosophers (Kant, Hegel, Heidegger). I came away from this book with a sense of greater understanding of the most challenging ideas thanks to what I’m sure was a tremendous amount of work that Grayling place in to create the ideas come to life for a non-philosopher (this is a majorly underrated skill).Grayling is simply a masterful writer, providing a clear, concise, and entertaining narrative of the deepest and most profound thinking in the history of our species, updated for the twenty-first century (a time in which we need philosophy more than ever). While I wouldn’t say that Grayling’s history replaces Russell’s (Russell is not replaceable), if you decide to read only one book about the history of philosophy, create it this one.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Political Philosophy []  2020-9-21 18:37

    I am an adult returning to college and taking Philosophy 100, which contains study of Plato, Hobbes, Mill, and Aristotle. Can be rough going to interpret writings such as these and professor recommended this book as secondary source. It has been a terrific complement to the course and will serve me in amazing stead as I continue to study other philosophers.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Philosophy []  2019-12-20 18:33

    Grayling is a Humanist philosopher that I’ve always admired. If you lean toward a humanistic view of life then he’s your guy. Heidegger he’s not.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Political Philosophy []  2020-9-21 18:37

    A has must for any political theory/philosophy student. I wouldn't have had a prayer in hell of passing my comprehensive exams without this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Political Philosophy []  2020-9-21 18:37

    This book totally helped me out for a presentation in my philosophy class this semester!! It's a small huge to carry to class everyday, but it's totally worth it. =)

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy: Conversations Between Men and Women Philosophers []  2020-1-21 20:55

    Professor Karen J. Warren brings together and sets into conversation fifteen pairs of Western philosophers, including Augustine and Hildegard, Abelard and Heloise, Descartes and Princess Elisabeth, Hobbes and Macaulay, Leibniz and Conway, Rousseau and Wollstonecraft, and Sartre and Beauvoir. Excerpts from key texts by these philosophers let the reader to compare insights between women and men who philosophize. Reading this book created me more aware of how thoroughly we must revise the Western canon; I look on my shelves at the Sixty Amazing Books collection and feel amazed at how few women present up some cases--Dewey and Addams for example--men and women enriched each other's thought. In others, the women supply exactly what's missing from a man's philosophy. Reading the questions posed by Princess Elisabeth to Descartes, questions he was unable to answer, stirs amazement that she anticipated so a lot of criticisms we now take for granted. Today a lot of of us see Descartes' thought as dualistic, disembodied, and disconnected from the world, but she saw it first, and told him dispensable collection for the serious philosopher.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy: Conversations Between Men and Women Philosophers []  2020-1-21 20:55

    The book juxtaposed better known male philosophers, with often less well known women thinkers. I found the women often showed more emotional groundedness in their philosophical stances. The men sometimes came off as ivory turret types who didn't live their own perspective in the nitty gritty of their own lives. But this is no mere "feminist reconstruction" of the past. I found the editor and the writers of individual chapters to be honest and fair in what they wrote. This is exactly what I was looking for to support flesh out the early lectures in a History of Psychology course I was teaching. Very interesting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The History of Philosophy []  2019-12-20 18:33

    I've only reviewed the Table of Contents, browsed some random pages, and listened to the first chapters. Having just finished a Continuing Education course in "Ethics" (which was really "do nothing meta-ethics") I want I could obtain my $2K back and buy that a lot of mates of mine that a lot of copies. This focuses on understanding the history, and presenting the debate, which is both what the title suggests and what I was looking for ... so I agree with any review using the term "landmark".

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Political Philosophy []  2020-9-21 18:37

    I read the first chapter but now search it difficult to obtain further. It is outstanding. I had 7 years of ancient greek in school and only now, at a considerably later age, I have fun this essay on Tukydides and the perspective to read those to come later in the book. Amazing times we live in, at least in thos respect.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy: Conversations Between Men and Women Philosophers []  2020-1-21 20:55

    awesome, not just old white guys

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Political Philosophy []  2020-9-21 18:37

    Like Cliff notes written by clear writing philosophers of superior understanding and intellect.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Political Philosophy []  2020-9-21 18:37

    An early achievement of two amazing minds. Earlier editions have advantages, especially the essay on Aristotle by Harry Jaffa. The work as it stands still the best thing of its kind by far.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Political Philosophy []  2020-9-21 18:37

    Leo Strauss was known for his close careful deep reading of classic Western Civilization philosophic texts. It shows here with him and his students doing a magnificent job. This book can be looked upon as a survey of the best of western thought. Now Strauss in his readings stresses taking the authors on their own terms in the context of their other works and their fellow countrymen who they are engaged in a dialogue with. We should judge them as real or false or indeterminate in our thinking about them--grapple with them and take them seriously. According to Strauss we are not to relativize them as progressing to our more enlightened modern view. In fact Strauss thinks classic political philosophy may be an aid to resolving what he takes to be our show crisis of modernity. Be that as it may these readings can be very deep such as the one on Nietzche. Eric Warwick

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Political Philosophy []  2020-9-21 18:37

    I found this book to be compelling and broken into its parts in a digestible format. I particularly enjoyed the chapters on Spinoza, Hume, Nietzche, Tocquerville, Mill, Hegel, Smith and Marx. If you are interested in understanding how we got to where we are with our political institutions and what were the main questions and concerns in the development of these institutions, this book is a first rate tour that will enrich your comprehension of the Western political tradition. It is a tome that is definitely an investment of time, but I'm confident in the opinion that this is well worth the time.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Political Philosophy []  2020-9-21 18:37

    I am approaching this review from the viewpoint of someone who has a bit of working knowledge on the topic of political philosophy. That said, it is necessary to recognize the monumental achievement of this collaboration. Each author treats his particular topic with expertise, and each author lays out the necessary works of political philosophy by each major political theorist. The authors point out (where appropriate) the distinctions in the political writings of the philosophers (Augustine, Locke, Kant, Aquinas, Plato, Aristotle,etc), from their otherwise non-political oriented works. This is important, as not every thinker discussed is a political philosopher in the strictest sense. Rather, some of the philosophers are known primarily for their contributions in other branches of philosophy (Kant-Metaphysics, Epistemology; Descartes - metaphysics, epistemology; Locke - Epistemology; Augustine - Theology; Aquinas - Theology; etc). This is not to point out a shortcoming of the work but rather one of its greatest strengths. Five stars for an perfect and diverse treatment of highly complex topic matter. Caution: not for fresh comers; I would probably recommend an encyclopedia to obtain your feet wet before delving into this advanced work.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    History of Political Philosophy []  2020-9-21 18:37

    Excelent my book is nice!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance (New Edition) []  2019-12-20 18:29

    Exceptional. I read Bertrand Russell's A History of Western Philosophy, and while I found it intriguing was a small disappointed that it was less a history, and more of Russell's opinions on philosophies in history (although it was still enjoyable to read, as Russell is a amazing writer, and has interesting opinions). Gottlieb may have been influenced to write this because of this, as he even mentions Russell's book sometimes within the book.Having said that, I think Gottlieb's book is far superior as a history of , I know the book to give to people wanting to know more about the History of Western Philosophy: this book. Gottlieb's writing is superb, and the narrative flow works excellently. It is extremely throughly researched and sourced, so that if you wish to learn more, you can look at his sources easily. More than that, the tone is respectful and objective, and Gottlieb explains the context as well as the arguments of the ancients. Some ideas are very confusing from a modern persepective, but Gottlieb always does a amazing job of explaining how the idea came about, what environment the idea lived in, and he tries to give the best gloss to it. This is what we need to do if we are to actually engage in fresh ideas, or consider fresh ones.I really, really recommend this book, as it is just full of interesting stories about philosophy, and the interesting people of philosophy. I can't wait to read Gottlieb's next book The Dream of Enlightenment.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance (New Edition) []  2019-12-20 18:29

    A rereading of Bertrand Russell's History of Western Philosophy: And Its Connection with Political and Social Cirtances from the Earliest Times to the Show Day led me to seek more contemporary accounts of the history of philosophy. Russell's history is considered polemical by scholars. For alternatives to Russell's History, I turned to Leiter Reports, the most widely read philosophy blog. A post in Leiter Reports from June 2010 (from a reader also seeking an alternative to Russell's History) solicits from readers their recommendations for histories of philosophy. More than one commenter suggested "The Dream of Reason" by Anthony Gottlieb, a former executive editor of The Economist.I ordered the kindle and Audible editions and was immediately disappointed by Gottlieb's journalistic, deflationary view of philosophy. "The latest thing I expected to search when I began work on this book, a lot of years ago, is that there is no such thing as philosophy," he writes. It's not an entirely mistaken view: some philosophers keep that philosophy doesn't have a topic matter. Others don't give much thought to it. The question of purpose, function, or justification of philosophy is not a concern. Instead, for them it involves intense cerebration on deep attractive ideas. What counts as deep and attractive depends on historical cirtance. For those philosophers, philosophy is what philosophers do, in more or less the same method that mathematics is what mathematicians do. This circular definition suffices for the historical, accidental reason, as Russell himself suggests, that the questions that fall within the purview of philosophy are limited to those amenable to the dialectic methods of Plato. Those methods are inadequate for scientific questions, among others. The suggestion that philosophy has a Wissenshaft is already beyond Gottlieb's finding that nothing lies at the intersection of his survey of the history of philosophy.But there is at least one defensible definition that can withstand the splitting off of independent disciplines, and subsume therapeutic and harmonizing notions of the function of philosophy. At the conclusion of Philosophy for Graduate Students: Metaphysics and Epistemology, Alex Broadbent writes, "my more considered definition is that philosophy is the study of the relation between thought and the world."Some remarks on this definition. I've heard some philosophers claim that philosophy doesn't add anything to human knowledge. Instead it acts like the conceptual border police between disciplines, preventing the unjustified use of ideas from one domain in another. This is to me an unnecessarily limited and dull take on the subject, but it is subsumed under Broadbent's definition. It's also begin to the charge of presumptuousness: as if the practitioners of those disciplines that do add to the stock of human knowledge can't obtain their own stories straight! A less presumptuous attitude (all are represented in philosophy--there is something for everyone) is that philosophy serves a harmonizing function among disciplines. Another view, I think due to Russell (and maybe Collingwood and others), is that philosophy is the reflection on unanswerable questions considered (by Russell, for example) to be worthy of consideration, despite their unanswerability. While I'm inclined to take Russell at his word, neither of these views offer much justification for doing philosophy. At least studying the relation between thought and the globe already sounds unapologetically important.An update: another helpful view of philosophy, due to Professor Robert Paul Wolff, is worth keeping in mind: "I have long thought that the distinction between Appearance and Reality is the fundamental idea on which all Philosophy builds. It lies at the core of Plato’s Dialogues and everything that comes after. Plato expresses the distinction, especially in the early Dialogues, by means of the literary trope of Irony. ..."Aside from my initial impression,The Dream of Reason is a worthy successor to Russell's history. Even more so is A Fresh History of Western Philosophy by Sir Anthony Kenny.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance (New Edition) []  2019-12-20 18:29

    Interesting thesis that the development of western civilization had two bursts: One around 400 BC and another around 1700-1800 AD. This book is about the first burst, and his other book on Dream of Enlightenment is about the second. The presentation is a balance between detail and generalization that I really like. I found it interesting that the Greeks posed 5 methods to govern a state and democracy was next to latest in desirability. Most of the predicted issues with democracy are exactly what we see unfolding now.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance (New Edition) []  2019-12-20 18:29

    Amazing history. But from the perspective of a progressive ex seminary student, disappointed he gives short shrift to religoius thought. St. Augustine is almost the excellent antidote to the anti science nonsense of fundamentalists and certain evangelicals. And the ability of religious/mystical/mythopoetic thought and experience of both the west and east to inspire just cannot be matched by dry philosophy. Still, an interesting read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Dream of Reason: A History of Western Philosophy from the Greeks to the Renaissance (New Edition) []  2019-12-20 18:29

    Merely reading one book does not create a man wiser but would orient him to the gate of ch readable than Russell's and give a better perspective into life.

    0  



    Search Cloud

    About us

    Use our product reviews finder and generate tons of ratings & opinions on any item, shop product or service. Search, read and publish reviews for brands, TV shows, ebooks, gadgets, video games, meals, music, household items or movies. Would you like to rate recently purchased thing? Go ahead! Express satisfaction or sadness, describe own experience & identify strengths and weaknesses of the product. Write short or detailed review with a few clicks.

    Community

    Publish review of any item you find here, registration is not required
    Share own experience, point out the pros and cons, warn or recommend
    Search for opinions on any item, product or service, read tons of reviews

    Contact

    www.add-reviews.com

    Use contact form to reach us or write a message via email:

    [email protected]

    Describe your problem, share ideas or report a bug on the site.

    https://add-reviews.com/
    0856-458-386