Read in case of crisis reviews, rating & opinions:

Check all in case of crisis reviews below or publish your opinion.

100 Reviews Found

Sort by: Most Accurate (default) | Newest | Top Rated

  • 0

    Useful review?

    guns of glory []  2020-5-21 22:34
    [email protected]

    Just played Guns of Glory on a phone application via mistplay reviews. Played this one with amazing interest as on the mobile you got the impression of controlling your characters on the ground level, helping catch pick pockets etc etc. Like all mobile ads this was misleading. Don't obtain me wrong the android game itself was addictive and you can spend hours playing (If you play via mistplay you can earn a fair few Amazon vouchers), but yeah false advertising? Really? Unfortunately this is a huge pitfall a lot of android games like these fall into. For example you can expect a nice create your kitchen safe android game but instead you obtain something quite various (garden scapes see add for application and play game)

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    clash of clans []  2020-5-11 22:47

    recommend amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    In Case of Crisis [App]  2019-11-9 13:37

    Seems to hang, or perhaps requires a quick internet connection. Not intuitive UX.

    0  


    Add your opinion on in case of crisis or scroll down to read more reviews ↓

     

  • 0

    Useful review?

    In Case of Crisis [App]  2019-11-9 13:37

    Listed stuff does not refresh properly when downloading plans and rotating screens. Despite having no media content and having already downloaded the plan, the content loads very slow.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    In Case of Crisis [App]  2019-11-9 13:37

    Application refuses to run unless you give it every single permission it wants, and it wants excessive permissions. I don't need it to control the flashlight because I already have a dedicated button for that. I don't need or wish it to be able to add contact entries for emergency numbers. But the not good design can't accommodate individual preferences.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    In Case of Crisis [App]  2019-11-9 13:37

    Crashes everytime I test to begin

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    In Case of Crisis [App]  2019-11-9 13:37

    It says it my email is waiting for confirmation but I never received it

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    In Case of Crisis [App]  2019-11-9 13:37

    thing keeps popping up and telling me to in google play store. i dont know why

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    In Case of Crisis [App]  2019-11-9 13:37

    Got my company into so I could be ready

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    In Case of Crisis [App]  2019-11-9 13:37

    I had to use the app during an emergency. This application truly saves lives!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Crisis Management in Anesthesiology []  2020-1-20 0:6

    Simple read

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Crisis Management in Anesthesiology []  2020-1-20 0:6

    Essential for every anesthesiologist.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Crisis Management in Anesthesiology []  2020-1-20 0:6

    Very concise and little book. I was not particularly impressed when I received it, but it gave me a few amazing heads up and perspective in a few cases and I think I started to like it more!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Crisis Management in Anesthesiology []  2020-1-20 0:6

    just as described! fast shipping! thanks!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Crisis Management in Anesthesiology []  2020-1-20 0:6

    This fresh edition was very well written. I found it highly e authors are the very best of the field of anesthesiology. I recommend this book for medical, as well as the novice to learn more about the field of anesthesiology.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Crisis Management in Anesthesiology []  2020-1-20 0:6

    Very informative. Amazing read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Crisis Management in Anesthesiology []  2020-1-20 0:6

    Bought is as a bonus for my daughter who requested it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Crisis Management in Anesthesiology []  2020-1-20 0:6

    A practical, objective, clear approach facing a lot of kinds of critical situations in anaesthesiology. Recommended as a useful and rapid reading.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Crisis Management in Anesthesiology []  2020-1-20 0:6

    Concise info on management of different "oh s***" moments encountered in anesthesia, related to a book "Critical Happenings in Anesthesia", but a bit more in depth.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Crisis Management in Anesthesiology []  2020-1-20 0:6

    Great

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Fundamentals of Crisis Counseling []  2020-1-23 1:43

    Amazing book, delivery was fast. Will use again for next semester.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Fundamentals of Crisis Counseling []  2020-1-23 1:43

    This book is a amazing begin into the subject of crisis counseling, but I was disappointed that it did not contain more techniques. Since one of the better take-ways about this book is the importance of resilience and self-care, perhaps it should have focused on self-care training or resilience training. I feel it covers a lot, but it lacks depth in every topic.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Fundamentals of Crisis Counseling []  2020-1-23 1:43

    It a amazing book very helpful for crisis counselor

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Fundamentals of Crisis Counseling []  2020-1-23 1:43

    Amazing Quality

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Fundamentals of Crisis Counseling []  2020-1-23 1:43

    This book was 1 of 2 needed for my Crisis Intervention class (HSM400), and all I can say is LOVE LOVE LOVE. Obviously it is not a typical school book, but I think that's why it was so good. There was a lot of cross over between this and the text book, but to my surprise, this had a lot more info - it was my go to for all my papers and contained info the text book did so, it is well written and conversational, which makes it an simple read. I typically search my mind wonders after a bit when reading textbooks (no matter how intersecting the topic), but that was not the case with Fundementals of Crisis Counseling...One more thing- I never ever re-read assigned texts, but I plan to read this book again over my next break. BECAUSE I WANT TO. I'm looking forward to reading it front to back, without chapter skips or interuptions - this book is that dang good.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Fundamentals of Crisis Counseling []  2020-1-23 1:43

    This was amazing and very simple to maneuver while reading. The hardest part was not having actual page numbers to be able to quote or do page references. Or if there is a method to convert zone to actual page number that would be great!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Crisis of Expertise []  2020-1-21 20:53

    Amazing book: It's all backed up empirically and the theoretical frame is deeply informed and well-stated. Anyone interested in the crisis of expertise must read this cavil: This book is a small too relativistic for my taste. One could use the author's arguments to say that he is not really an expert on expertise. That's unfortunate, because he's clearly read and understood the history and theory of the topic. It's time for people at the top of their fields to be more assertive about their own authority--however badly that may play among the nattering nabobs of epistemic egalitarianism.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Fundamentals of Crisis Counseling []  2020-1-23 1:43

    This book implies that it will give you the basics, and that is all you get. The chapters are short, but not in a amazing way, more in a "I feel like I only read the abstract. Where is the rest of the article?" kind of way. This book will not be very helpful in my Counseling career, or in a crisis. This is the WebMD ver of crisis counseling; you'll have to consult someone/something else still.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Fundamentals of Crisis Counseling []  2020-1-23 1:43

    One of the best books I have read about Crisis Intervention.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times [Book]  2017-11-1 18:0

    i read this book with my own leadership experience and history in mind. i was looking for perspective, inspiration, history, learnings - all of it as it could relate to and support me personally and businesswise. as CEO of a retail company i founded 13 years ago, we are facing extraordinary times as we shift to becoming a brand from "a store". i wanted to read about significant periods in the past where other popular people were challenged to the breaking point so i could learn and review what they did to react, answer and navigate out of those moments to unmatched success. This book more than delivered on that. While i knew a lot of of the stories here i did NOT know the specifics and the analysis of what was done to achieve such leadership heights. the book is obviously timely given the globe in which we are living but also very private to me as a leader of an organization. i found it incredibly helpful as a business read but also as enjoyable as any David McCullough history book i have read. This book was terrific and i highly recommend to anyone wanting a amazing read or a lesson from history for their own life.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times [Book]  2017-11-1 18:0

    Nancy Koehn's Forged in Crisis is a book for our time. As we seek leaders with discipline, vision and a higher purpose, Ms. Koehn's book reveals five individuals who learned to be amazing leaders during pivotal moments in history and culture. These individuals were able to search a higher purpose and calling in very trying circumstances. Through the discovery of inner strength and purpose, these individuals honed their leadership abilities and provided true change in the world. We can all draw inspiration from these well-told biographies. A compelling and uplifting read!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times [Book]  2017-11-1 18:0

    Nancy Koehn writes with the authority of an academic as well as the grace of a novelist. Her lessons on leadership - and by extension, on courage, resilience, and on just doing the right thing in the face of adversity - are relevant at any time, but those lessons surely resonate more than ever today. In her scholarship and her literary skill, Koehn has done a amazing service to us all.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times [Book]  2017-11-1 18:0

    Years ago, I read and was moved by John F. Kennedy's amazing book, "Profiles in Courage." For this generation and in this time of political and social crises, there is Harvard Business School professor Nancy Koehn's perfect fresh book, "Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times." Her profiles in courage focus on Ernest Shackleton, Abraham Lincoln, Frederick Douglass, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, and Rachel Carson, whose stories she tells with an extraordinary depth and breadth of knowledge and with a can't-put-it-down style of writing -- a combination that can't be beat. Leaders are made, not born, Koehn argues, and people like these rise to the occasions they're confronted with in heroic ways. As she writes in her introduction, leaders are "effective, decent...people of purpose and commitment who wish to create a positive difference and who choose to rise: first within themselves, by claiming their better selves, and then on the huge stage, by staking out the higher ground." This is definitely an necessary book for our times.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times [Book]  2017-11-1 18:0

    Nancy Koehn's passion for this topic, and these people, comes through--these lessons and insights are critical not just for business leaders but for our nation and our world. As readers, we have the luxury of interpreting history through the rearview mirror, and it allows us to think "Of course I would have done what Lincoln did", or "Of course I wouldn't have given up until all my people were off the ice." The beauty of this book is that it shows just how hard those moments are, and how critical it was for those leaders at that time to have the courage of their convictions. Highly recommend this book for anyone who wants to create a difference, on the international, local, or even domestic scene (I will take away some insights for parenting my kids, that's for sure).

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times [Book]  2017-11-1 18:0

    Remarkable! A multi-dimensional work about multi-dimensional people—and rarely has anyone been allowed such a privileged glimpse inside the minds (and the general human messiness) of leaders as they navigate challenges. This work does not belong on a bookshelf in a dust jacket like so a lot of “leadership” volumes—it belongs, well-thumbed, on the couch, in a purse, and most importantly, in everyday, animated conversation about Shackleton, Carson, and others as the fully-fleshed, crushingly human individuals shown in these pages.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times [Book]  2017-11-1 18:0

    Superb writing from Nancy Koehn, who really puts you into the shoes of these leaders (Lincoln, Carson, Douglass, Bonhoeffer, and Shackleton) and makes you feel the weight of their decisions. From Shackelton's two-year journey trapped on ice in Antarctica to Carson's war versus time and cancer, each story is gripping and impactful. Overall, a amazing leadership tome, as well as, amazing biographies.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times [Book]  2017-11-1 18:0

    Moving and necessary! At a time when America and the globe are hungry for visionary leadership, this is a must-read. I've had the amazing fortune of seeing Dr. Koehn lecture numerous times, but it takes reading this book to fully appreciate the breadth and power of her intellect and passion. Some of these stories will be familiar -- like those of Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass. Others are lesser known -- like that of Dietrich Bonhoeffer, anti-Nazi theologian and spy who gave his life resisting Hitler's terror. All of them are powerfully relevant--especially as told by Dr. Koehn who uncovers fresh insights and eloquently distills connections to today.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times [Book]  2017-11-1 18:0

    I’ve already bought 15 books to give to my closest mates to read and give to their children. It will be my Christmas bonus for everyone on my anette S. Wagner

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Forged in Crisis: The Power of Courageous Leadership in Turbulent Times [Book]  2017-11-1 18:0

    These 5 remarkable leaders (Shackleton, Lincoln, Douglass, Bonhoeffer, and Carson) went to the ends of the earth and their wit and back. They were tested through and through, and they marched on nonetheless. Koehn's insight and writing honors these leaders and she has made a testament to the will and courage of mankind. This book is the spark humanity needs to rise to action and persevere.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium []  2020-1-18 20:44

    Industrial Age democracy promised top down infallibility, and Industrial Age media broadcast its support. But digital age media is available to all, and by casting doubt on elites has drawn the public towards nihilism.If you wish to understand media and politics, this is a amazing put to start.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium []  2020-1-18 20:44

    Enjoyed. Fifth Wave is accurate assessment. Theory would be stronger with analysis from Thomas Spence, Powerful Interaction (Univ of Chicago Press, 1992). It will always be interesting to see how the "public" reaches different homeostatic states, through positive and negative feedback loops. However: I suspect elites/authorities will learn how to read the different expansions and contractures of the public, and eventually conduct them, like a symphony. Anyway, this book created me think.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium []  2020-1-18 20:44

    A very impressive summary of global political movements post 2001. Regardless of your political leaning it is hard to dispute his observations and the, appropriately caveated, predictions. Balanced if a small repetitive at times. I particularly appreciated the author's reluctance to provide "suggestions". The conditions that fed and encouraged these movements are various in all areas and a lot of of the movements share few similarities in their objectives. I suspect that "Solutions" to the alienation or "nihilism" will also have to be local not global.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis []  2020-1-18 21:2

    Alan Jacobs defies the usual categories in theological/cultural writing. I love how he is not afraid to stake out positions that defy conventional liberal/conservative, catholic/evangelical, Republican/Democrat, literary/theological, etc. A lot of thoughtful people are starting to realize that "Skynet" is much closer to being a reality than we had thought and that the technocratic semi-totalitarian society that we've made since WWII ended is close to being irreversible with dire consequences for anyone who cares about truth, decency, freedom, privacy, and the spiritual life. How did we obtain here? Jacobs draws on 5 deeply interesting mid-20th century Christian writers who without collaborating converged on the issue in the middle of WWII, in the year of our Lord 1943 (when it was still our Lord's year and not the world's). While there maybe no feasible solution to the problem, Jacob's diagnosis reads like a amazing detective story. Anyone who loves C.S. Lewis, W.H. Auden, T.S. Eliot, Simone Weil will love this book and be shocked how such various Christian thinkers independently converge on the specter of technocracy and the method a generously orthodox Christian humanism is our only hope... Highly recommended

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis []  2020-1-18 21:2

    In his opening to the book, Alan Jacobs writes that he was attempting in THE YEAR OF OUR LORD 1943 to duplicate in print what Orson Welles had done with his film TOUCH OF EVIL. Welles popular tracking shot opens with a bomb being placed in the trunk of a car, but the vehicle eventually moves off camera and the focus is elsewhere. Jacobs attempts this with five literary figures from 1943, tracking them loosely and jumping off to other figures. I admired the attempt. I don't think, however, that he quite pulled it off, which is sort of like Welles in the movie. For the excellent casting of Dennis Weaver, there is the miscasting of Charlton Heston. The same is real for the book. The sections are Simone Weil and J. Maritain are spot on, particularly the take downs of technology as impersonal, but not so with Auden and Lewis. Perhaps familiarity with the latter figures plays a part, but the weaving of so a lot of characters does make a bias towards whose story line one resonates. The hidden value of the book is the subtle promotion of Tag Greif's The Age of the Crisis of Man. Jacob should be thanked for exposing Greif to a larger audience.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis []  2020-1-18 21:2

    This book is an perfect effort to draw together a wide-ranging band of Christian Humanists of the Anglo-American Greatest Generation responding to Totalitarianism circa 1943. What a amazing idea for a book! This should reorient the method a lot of history courses are taught to contain this intellectual and cultural history "event"--the convergence of a lot of thinkers on the need for a return to the question "What is Man?" in the midst of the twentieth-century's e audible ver is particularly well read and enjoyable and at only 8 hours of listening time very do-able.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Hidden History of Burma: Race, Capitalism, and the Crisis of Democracy in the 21st Century []  2020-1-19 21:28

    In the span of a few years, the story of Burma has gone from an admired fairy-tale-come-true to that of a fascist, genocidal outcast, home to one of the most reprehensible mass crimes in 100 years, in the form of the 2016-2017 Rohingya crisis. As Thant Myint-U’s prescient fresh book about Burma tells us, there could never be a linear history of a triumph of either amazing or evil in a put so complex, a put with a history that so palpably bears the wounds of abject isolation from global currents as well as from predatory exploitation at the hands of dictators and their regional counterparts. The stories of Burmese people’s lives captured in A Hidden History are poignant, absorbing and relevant to worldwide trends of inequality, “othering,” and the crises of modern democracy and capitalism. Perhaps the author’s greatest contribution is his pressing call for hard questions to be asked about how to characterize the past(s), how to navigate the show and – mostly importantly – how to imagine a future country and globe that looks beyond some combination of race, religion and identity as singularly uncontested manifestos that lead only to a politics of exclusion and inequality.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Hidden History of Burma: Race, Capitalism, and the Crisis of Democracy in the 21st Century []  2020-1-19 21:28

    This is a brilliantly written acc of Burma’s latest history, by turns engaging and insightful, that sheds fresh light on latest happenings from the perspective of a master historian who also had an insider view of a lot of of these events. If you read one book on Burma, this should be it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Hidden History of Burma: Race, Capitalism, and the Crisis of Democracy in the 21st Century []  2020-1-19 21:28

    A remarkable book that presents the past, show and future challenges confronting Myanmar/Burma with courage and honesty. The author is able to do so in a clear and balanced way, while also making it a very pleasant read. The author provides insights into why the fairy tale that was meant to be Burma did not happen. But I was particularly struck by the concern shown in the book for those who are, and have been, the most vulnerable in Myanmar. He locations today’s violence and injustice in its special historical context.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Hidden History of Burma: Race, Capitalism, and the Crisis of Democracy in the 21st Century []  2020-1-19 21:28

    Another masterpiece from Thant Myint - U. Thant’s fresh book “ The Hidden History of Burma” is essential reading for those who wish to understand this extraordinary and complex hn Nielsen, Danish Ambassador to Myanmar

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium []  2020-1-18 20:44

    Wish to search what Gurri says on a particular topic? You'll have to flip through the t having an index is almost an unforgivable omission in a book of such high production quality.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis []  2020-1-18 21:2

    A very satisfying slow and deep read. I knew virtually nothing of Auden, Weil and Maritain before reading Jacobs book but I walk away with reverence for their minds and spirits and efforts not to mention Lewis and Eliot. I’m search myself most intrigued by Weil.I’ve always believed we lost something truly significant in WWII despite the much celebrated military victories and large postwar economic boom. This book now gives more substance and meat to my sense and extra clarity to what was at stake then and surely before as technocracy took hold. I think the book true meaning and relevance for where we now search ourselves today.I agree with the earlier reviewer...take your time with this book and ponder it....you’ll likely search yourself reading more from each of the figures discussed herein. I also agree that Jacobs a unbelievable balance in his writing here.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis []  2020-1-18 21:2

    Profound read

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium []  2020-1-18 20:44

    For me, this book started out as profound and fascinating and I recommend taking a look for that reason. I read it as research for my own upcoming book on Echo Chambers. That being said, the author lost me about 200-300 pages in. The author's a amazing thinker, more iconoclastic and illuminating than authors I've read on related subjects like Franklin Foer, Malcolm Gladwell, and similar mainstream media cardboard cutouts, but I think this book would have benefited from a powerful editor to create it a lot more succinct. Read on Kindle.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium []  2020-1-18 20:44

    Amazing description of the symptoms and consequences of current societal dysfunction around the globe. This edition covers Trump and Brexit and explains how he and it slot in and metastasize. Not so sure that the suggested remedy will make a cure. Nevertheless, a handbook for anyone with an begin mind trying to create sense of the current situation and search a method out.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis []  2020-1-18 21:2

    The globe battles of the twentieth century signalled the power of totalitarian, technocratic states and a consequent smuthering of personhood. Jacobs tutorials the reader through the thought of five Christian thinkers who lived during the second globe battle and actively pursued the question - "what kind of people, what kind of culture, must we become, if the Nazis are defeated?" C.S. Lewis, T.S. Eliot, Auden, Maritaine, and Simone Weil. Most of their answers needed that intellectuals again take up the task of identifying what a human is and why he/she has value. In line with this they all valued education as a means to cultivate the kind of person they believed that democracy needed. Versus the groupthink of fascism, these thinkers believed democracy required a renewed Christian/humanistic individualism. Jacobs is a delightful tutorial to this story - I felt like we were sitting in a London pub or Parisian cafe. The story Jacobs tells is a tragedy - for as Jacobs points out - all these thinkers were too late - the states were here, the battles were being fought. Yet I felt it was also tragic because these thinkers perhaps used the globe battles as a pretense to justify their pre-existing concerns, T.S. Eliot telling us society needs poetry, C.S. Lewis telling us we need education. They looked at the second globe battle and saw their ideal "civilization" as the victim (admittedly they saw it as both victim and perpetrator). Such an abstraction may even be true, but more tragically it might be a distraction from the concrete victims - the Jews, the poor, the bombed. I want these thinkers had more attention to them. Even Weil, who cared so much about the outcast, was an is book will rattle around in my brain for a long time. Raising questions, providing guidance, and inviting conversation. It is a fast read and well worth your money. My only true negative is that I would have been helped by more structure and guidance - tell me why we're going to read this Auden poem before we obtain there. I'm not intelligent enough to follow some of these thinkers on my own.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis []  2020-1-18 21:2

    A very concise, well constructed, and well articulated work on a difficult topic matter. Warning: expect to read very slowly in to understand a lot of of the concepts.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Hidden History of Burma: Race, Capitalism, and the Crisis of Democracy in the 21st Century []  2020-1-19 21:28

    What happened when the 'local' (the generals, the activists, the academics, the businessmen) and the 'international' (the diplomats, the experts, the samaritans, and the global capitalists) suddenly came together to negotiate and deliver goals as elusive and intractable as democracy, development, modernity, and peace to a country like Myanmar whose history and complex realities have usually been, both domestically and aboard, reduced to narratives of 'good vs evil' and 'us vs them'? To me, this book comes across as an honest attempt to respond this question from the perspective of a person, who belongs to both the 'local' and the 'international' but perhaps does not fully identify with either. The book takes the reader through the author's intellectual, personal, and political journey in Myanmar in the past decade - in doing so, it paints a vivid picture of politics of hope, politics of cynicism, and politics of opportunism taking put in the same country at the same time. Only time will tell which ultimately wins out but the book suggests that the writing is on the wall.Highly recommend this book to anyone who is interested in Myanmar, especially to the current generation of Myanmar youth asking themselves the question of what they can do for the country.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Hidden History of Burma: Race, Capitalism, and the Crisis of Democracy in the 21st Century []  2020-1-19 21:28

    Thant Myint-U's books are needed reading for any understanding of Burma / Myanmar. They bring all components of a complex and sometiems fuzzy picture into sharp focus. His recent is both an simple read and an essential insider's chronicle of the momentous happenings of the past decade or so, placed in historical context (something which is often lacking in famous writing, journalism and advocacy nowadays).

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium []  2020-1-18 20:44

    Gurri begins as a decent analyst, with an interesting thesis that has potential. Unfortunately, he gets sidetracked trying to prove that liberals are bad, business is blameless, and the public are mostly whiners.He ends up with nihilism as the only possible motivation for a public that is in the midst of an existential crisis because he can't see why anyone would be upset with how awesome the economy is doing. A nuanced understanding of the economic stresses that are punishing the middle class would go a long method towards making Gurri's theory plausible.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium []  2020-1-18 20:44

    Using the happenings of 2011 as a scene this firmer CIA analyst examines the dynamics of social change similar to the democratization of info and its effects on the legacy, hierarchical societal structures. Written in n 2014 and revised in an attempt to explain the emergence of Trump and BREXIT. This text may have some explanation to the emergence of “Fake news” and public manipulation by social media.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis []  2020-1-18 21:2

    There is much to unpack in this short (200 page) book, and it is hard to imagine a more ambitious subject than what the author has staked out as his premise, which is that that the western globe won the greatest battle in the history of the globe by 1943 but lost the peace, or perhaps more accurately lost the understanding of what makes culture and of what constitutes “rootedness” in a globe that had lost its roots, as Simone Weil place it. Mr. Jacobs tells this story by method of weaving together the writings and speeches of five contemporary figures who, with diverse Christian worldviews, managed to arrive at very related conclusions and prescriptions for the fresh kind of dangers that the “uprootedness” at the end of the Globe Battle Two would bring to the globe at large, both winners and losers of the war. These five were WH Auden, TS Eliot, Simone Weil, Jacques Maritain and CS Lewis. Christians will recognise the crisis that confronted these five and their struggles to articulate a method forward in a globe that had gone mad, but one in which the storm of madness must necessarily be replaced by something else after the war’s end. Much like the biblical man who is exorcised of demons and whose spirit is “swept clean”, the globe would face a crisis of emptiness and, like the demon possessed man, it is the crisis of emptiness that later brings seven fresh demons worse than the first. These five voices would both articulate and warn of such emptiness, already show in the tidings by 1943. They would also articulate a Christian humanism as the important pre-condition for a successful culture, one that would withstand the fresh forces of technocracy that would bend the globe in a fresh direction in the decades following the war. But by the end of the battle all five would realise that their voices would not be powerful enough for the shocks and aftershocks of the world’s greatest battle and they would all return to less prophetic callings by war’s end. Mr. Jacobs does a fine and scholarly job of perhaps creating something new, a fresh collective voice, a still stronger voice that stands on the shoulders of five of the twentieth century’s greatest voices, reminding us in the end that life is built on one of two foundations, God or Man.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis []  2020-1-18 21:2

    As always with Jacobs' books, this one is full of interesting detail and sidepaths, and takes a difficult subject and with it very well. I'm not sure that I got to grips with it as well as I have some of his other books, so perhaps a re-read in the near future will be required.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Hidden History of Burma: Race, Capitalism, and the Crisis of Democracy in the 21st Century []  2020-1-19 21:28

    I visited Burma in 1988 and 2018. I want this book existed prior to my most latest visit. I have read his other books by this author, but this is by far his best work. Anyone interested in modern day Burma must read this book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Hidden History of Burma: Race, Capitalism, and the Crisis of Democracy in the 21st Century []  2020-1-19 21:28

    I changed my opinions after reading Thant Mynit-U informative and insightful book. The title could have been expanded to "The Hidden Story of Burma ... and the Leaders whose actions created what Burma is to today and may be in the future."Reading about the people who shaped Burma, provided me with relevant context to the conditions, relationships, interest and actions leading to current events. From various backgrounds and experiences, leaders had various ideas and paths as to what would be best for Burma.Furthermore, I found interesting and even humorous reading about the American influence and impact (George and Laura Bush, Barack Obama and others) as well as fawning celebrities such as Bono that added to a narrow world-image of the country including Aung San Suu Kai.I highly recommend the book and writings by Thant Myint-U.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium []  2020-1-18 20:44

    The author, Martin Gurri, posits his theory that the year 2011 sparked spontaneous, social media-driven protests around the globe and gives a handful of interesting examples: Tunisia, Egypt, Spain, Israel. The first two involved genuine risk, and one young man was sentenced to 19 1/2 years in prison (later reduced to four). The author's point, which I found most compelling, is that the public is no longer dependent upon institutional mandarins or professional organizers to act individually to make a movement. We don't need the old guardians of information, either - news media, academia, government, corporations - to mete out information; it's all available at our fingertips in every imaginable form, and the solons, cognoscenti, and captains of industry despise us for it. So far, so good.Where I think it goes wrong is that Gurri spends an inordinate amount of time vacillating, sitting on the fence, telling us what he will and will not address, saying he won't name the phenomenon and then giving it a name that makes small sense - "Fifth Wave" - and not making the case at all that the legitimate push for freedom of communication via Fb in Tunisia was in any method related to the largely silly and pointless tent camp "protest" by rich children in Israel. the book is also repetitive: he frets in nearly every chapter that if government doesn’t protect itself from the individual, the word will descend into a nihilist hellhole. M’kay. I think governments are doing that.Further, he goes on to somehow add Occupy Wall Road into the mix, which was in no method spontaneous, having been organized, funded, and fueled by huge leftist organizations. It had no coherent notice or solutions - actually, none of the protests he discusses did - but Occupy was a paid-for exercise in infantile narcissism that devolved into filth and violence, with comfortable, privileged, First Globe kids and adults engaging in a pointless primal scream.He says he published the book before 2014, so there is no discussion of the fascist group calling itself Antifa, but, given his inability or unwillingness to see the aforementioned examples as anything other than deeply sincere, if misguided, I really have no interest in his analysis.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Revolt of The Public and the Crisis of Authority in the New Millennium []  2020-1-18 20:44

    So says Arnold Kling in the introduction to Gurri's book, and I can't support but agree. Books claiming to diagnose and cures for "what the issue is" or aiming to describe "our current predicament" have always left a sour, often partisan, taste in my mouth. And although Gurri has his political sympathies, his book comes closest to accurately describing just what sort of situation we have on our hands - politically, socially, informationally, technologically.If you're at all interested in politics, movements, information, knowledge, political theory, etc., this book will give you something to think about. Gurri doesn't give the reader any sexy solutions to what he sees as issue our society current faces, but what he lacks in the solutions department he makes up for in rhaps that's enough. Enough, at least, to provide a novel starting point for a conversation that desperately needs to be had.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Year of Our Lord 1943: Christian Humanism in an Age of Crisis []  2020-1-18 21:2

    When Hitler appeared on the scene, the natural tendency was to condemn him. The author is asking us to examine whether our society is so pure that we can claim the moral high ground. That gets even more difficult as the battle continues into 1943. What can the universities do to support our society reclaim its moral roots and be in a position to condemn the evil forces in the world? There are no simple answers.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Hidden History of Burma: Race, Capitalism, and the Crisis of Democracy in the 21st Century []  2020-1-19 21:28

    It is a well relevant and well-timed book. I was born and grew up there and was a political activist for the democracy movement for three decades but failed to understand the fundamentals of the Union and people who created it. This book gives fresh insights on why past and show governments of Burma, as well as all players, miss the root causes of the Country’s crises. Consequently, the efforts were e Author has contributed to the County’s transition. He a various approach from much of state holders and players inside and outside Burma. The book gives us insights into how mixed races, geographic politics, and social traditions and believes system exist. It advises that oversimplifying the process and labeling won’t obtain anywhere.He wrote the book as a historian, a former diplomat, a fresh generation who has an aspiration about Burma raises again with dignity. It is well engaged.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Hidden History of Burma: Race, Capitalism, and the Crisis of Democracy in the 21st Century []  2020-1-19 21:28

    a must, for all westernes with Myanmar connections or interest

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    I grew up without running water in Boone County, WV, and wound up with a degree from Harvard Law School. JD Vance's story brought me to tears and cheers, for he has told the story of my people.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    J D Vance is a hillbilly. He comes from a long line of hillbillies and although he grew up in Middletown, Ohio, his roots are in Kentucky "hollers" that are as close to Middletown as Route 23 can create them. He grew up as the son of a mother who has suffered from addiction most of her life, and his life - and that of his sister - were largely dependent on the love and care they received from their maternal grandparents. He was the first of his extended family to graduate from college, and then went on to earn a law degree from Yale University. He was also a Marine for four years of active service. Where did this hillbilly go right? And what can his success mean for others born and raised in a difficult atmosphere of drugs, fighting, and unemployment? You'll have to read his memoir, "Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and a Culture in Crisis" to gain a perspective on what it's like to grow up white and disadvantaged.J.D. Vance wears the self-described Scots-Irish hillbilly title with both pride and defensiveness. Descended from a long line of Kentucky miners who eked out livings in the hollers of the state, his family was filled with prideful people fast to anger and fast to take offense at what others said. A quality of hot-headedness certainly makes decisions difficult to create and carry out. A lot of of these people saw economic advantages in the northern states and a lot of settled in southern Ohio after WW2. But along with themselves, they carried the culture they grew up with in Kentucky. J.D.'s own family had a redeeming feature: the love and steadiness of his maternal grandparents, "Mamaw" and "Papaw". Although they were hot-headed people themselves, they had a deep love of their kids and grandchildren that created them a sense of protection to J.D. and his older sister in the years when their mother was bouncing from husband to husband, drug to drug,city to city, poor decision to poor decision... He doesn't gloss over his own mistakes, ong with talking about his own successful lifting from his own background, he writes about how society can - possibly - support those who are trapped in the same society he was. Although Vance is only 32, he writes beautifully about himself...and the other "himselves" in society.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Summary - Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis [Book]  2017-10-14 18:10

    This summary book is a nice to read. Hillbilly Elegy is interesting and entertaining. I like how this was written. To the point and gives direct info about this topic.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A World in Disarray: American Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Old Order []  2020-1-22 22:25

    This book is a unbelievable overview of the history of relationships between and among countries of the globe - I found it fascinating, and uniquely informative. I've never had such a clear understanding of the machinations of international relationships. It's complex, and content-rich. Not a quick or simple read because there's so much to learn. It takes patience and time to read it, but my patience was rewarded by a rich learning experience. I first became aware of Richard [email protected]#$% through a TV interview, perhaps with Charlie Rose. I was very impressed with his knowledge, which lead me to read his book. After a brief rest, I intend to look into his other books. There's so much to be learned from ldfellow

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Nutrition in Crisis: Flawed Studies, Misleading Advice, and the Real Science of Human Metabolism []  2020-1-21 20:30

    A much better tome than his previous work. While the snarkiness towards more conventional dietary interventions is a bit tiresome, he goes into considerable detail as to the underlying biochemistry that he believes is central to obesity and weight loss. While the idea that excess adiposity is driven by an interaction between diet and the endocrine system is not well accepted by mainstream science, he presents a compelling argument in favor of it. Possibly a bit much for a lay person (can be a bit technical) but a worthy read for anyone interested in the subject of weight gain and loss.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Nutrition in Crisis: Flawed Studies, Misleading Advice, and the Real Science of Human Metabolism []  2020-1-21 20:30

    I work for Richard Feinman. I ended up with the job (and benefits of carbohydrate restriction) after reading Taubes – and finding out this low-carb items really works. I was then attracted to Richard’s work with its clear writing, sense of humor, and Shakespeare references! He admits that Taubes is the better writer but Richard always says his role model is A. J. Liebling who said he could write faster than anybody who could write better and could write better than anybody who could write faster. They are various writers, of course. Richard is a practicing scientist and, while he has an engaging style, on the science, he is careful not to overstate. What he says in this book he knows. I’m lucky to have an insider’s perch on someone (Richard) who, as a scientist, not a journalist, has an insider's perch - and that’s what I wish to suggest is the value for potential readers.What is necessary about this book is that there is nothing like it. You can see the mind of the practicing biochemist. It would be surprising if you could catch on to all biochemistry in one book. It's one that tells you about how to read scientific papers and even a bit of science history and some real, practical, nutrition ere’s a amazing chapter one of Richard's biochemistry colleagues who found herself, ironically, with LADA: latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (which is late Type 1). The book describes how she recognized it, dealt with it, and how she’s doing ’s one quote from the book:“If we cure diabetes by first curing cancer, it would not be the strangest thing that ever happened in the history of medicine.” It probably would be, but it’s worth finding out what he means.Obviously, five stars for the boss’s book but then again, I took the job because of the five-star message.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Nutrition in Crisis: Flawed Studies, Misleading Advice, and the Real Science of Human Metabolism []  2020-1-21 20:30

    The medical establishment is all about the evidence. Finally, here it is. This book is for those of us who truly wish to understand the current research. While it may require some concentration, understanding the science is the first step to being able to decipher the medical literature. For those of us not burdened with a biochemistry degree, Dr. Feinman enables us to create informed decisions regarding our nutrition and our health. If you dig into this book, you can appreciate the historical bias of nutrition research and be prepared to assess future studies for their own merit. You will no longer be at the mercy of the media or "expert" opinion. You can look at the evidence yourself.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City []  2020-1-16 0:9

    I liked Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha after reading just a few pages of her fresh book, "What the Eyes Don't See." Almost immediately, I started calling her Dr. Mona in my mind, meaning no disrespect by being overly familiar with a woman I have never met, but simply reflecting my growing, and now immeasurable, appreciation for her commitment to do all she could for "her" kids -- the children of Flint, Michigan who were being poisoned by lead in their drinking water. She is a kind person, and the kind of person who I would like to have as a friend, with whom I would like to be on a first-name basis. Not until page 273 did I learn that "Dr. Mona" is what she tells her children to call her.Dr. Mona is the kind of doctor we all would wish for ourselves, and especially for our children, or grandchildren. She is a teaching doctor, intelligent and professional, a trainer of pediatricians, but sees patients in her clinic as well. She cares about them as for her own. She views it as both a private and a professional obligation to look out for them. And as a public health professional, she knows the importance of getting ahead of a situation, of protecting kids from hurt before they present up in clinics and hospitals with symptoms of devastating disease."What the Eyes Don't See" chronicles how Dr. Mona became aware of the Flint water crisis and immediately jumped into a maelstrom of political denial, blame-shifting and responsibility ducking. Using rigorous science and stubborn passion, Dr. Mona and a little circle of her colleagues were finally able to to prod resistant government officials into doing their jobs. Without their activism, the public health crisis would have continued. As it is, thousands of kids were exposed to lead in the Flint water. No amount of exposure is safe, and the hurt done to developing brains and bodies is permanent. Dr. Mona's squad scored a win of sorts, but it is a win no one would ever want for: the situation was completely avoidable and should never have occurred.An necessary theme of the book is the power of government, for amazing or for ill, and the democratic necessity that government serve all citizens, especially those who need it most. The lead water crisis in Flint was the effect of a hasty and sloppily implemented decision to change the source of the town's water from Lake Michigan to the Flint River without adequate testing for, and without legally mandated treatments to address, higher levels of corrosiveness in the fresh water supply. The switch was instituted by an unelected town manager who was exclusively focused on "austerity" measures, placing cost-cutting above all other considerations. In the ensuing efforts to avoid responsibility, numerous other government agencies and individuals responsible for public health also lost their ethical bearings.Another inescapable theme is that our country is stronger because of immigrants like Dr. Mona and her family. She was born in England while her Iraqi father studied there. Rather than return to Saddam's brutal regime, he brought the family to Michigan while Dr. Mona was a young child. We are all better off because he e title, "What the Eyes Don't See," suggests a lot of meanings. One is that our empirical knowledge is constrained by our cognitive categories. If you think that the only source of lead in children's' bloodstreams is lead-based paint, then you don't look for it in water and dismiss the chance out of hand. Also, lead in water is not only colorless and invisible to the eye, it is also odorless and tasteless; it is a silent and unseen killer. And the devastating effects of lead exposure on intelligence, behavior and other outcomes are often latent, lying in wait potentially for a lot of years.Dr. Mona is an elegant and graceful writer, and even those who know the primary outlines of the Flint story will search her acc a page turner. She interweaves the main story about Flint with her own family story very is an outrage that this book ever required to be written, but given what happened in Flint I am very glad that Dr. Mona wrote it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City []  2020-1-16 0:9

    To simply say "this is a must read" is an understatement of vast proportions. Once I picked it up, I could not place it down. I have now read it completely through twice. Due to me underlining some passages, I ordered an extra copy...I desire to hold it in pristine condition. Every life touches every other life, just as every voice lifted for the benefit of another does, INDEED, create a difference. I highly recommend this book. It's a treasure.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City []  2020-1-16 0:9

    Too small focus on the crisis and how it unfolded. Too much focus on her, her childhood and private life. I was expecting an investigation style book on the Flint Water Crisis. That is not this book’s style.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Bully Society: School Shootings and the Crisis of Bullying in America’s Schools (Intersections Book 6) []  2019-12-18 20:46

    required it for a class. Came on time, amazing reads

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Bully Society: School Shootings and the Crisis of Bullying in America’s Schools (Intersections Book 6) []  2019-12-18 20:46

    I found the book a week ago .. and then yesterday, the school shooting in Newton, CT. My timing is eerily on the mark. Oh my god, if people don't search their method to this book in the aftermath of the horrific shootings .. I hope they do. I was quite taken with Jean Twenge's GENERATION ME and the amount of research and studies she cited in her book. This one THE BULLY SOCIETY is equally well done and truly a book that is masterpiece in what it tries to obtain across to the readers - WE LIVE IN A BULLY SOCIETY now. Entitled kids, I-Deserve-It kids, lonely kids, bullied by other students kids, grow up to be .. bullies.And a lot of of the parents are huge bullies ere is an entire hierarchy in our schools today and this is necessary to know because it is the law in America that all children go to school until they are 18 which means, our children are there 5 days/week, 6+ hours a day. So for most of our children that school is the center point of their lives. What goes on at school IS setting the standards for our kids. And the schools survive & thrive on the Bully ople, I am begging you, read the book. It's frightening. Oh that must be why there are only two other reviews. Nobody is reading the book. I guess people don't read the necessary stuff? I guess Fb and other trivial nonsense is more important? I really don't know and I really don't wish to judge, I just wish to obtain your attention although as a parent in the trenches with a few children in middle and high school, I see what is going on, I see my children getting bullied, I see my children bully back in retaliation, I see the hurt it causes and the scars that the children carry for life. I see an overabundance of lonely, unconnected kids. I see children on the school grounds and they don't talk, they text even to the person sitting right next to them. How stupid is THAT? But this is the culture now. These children are too young to adequately or correctly process what is occurring. All they know is that they damage and they are desperate to be accepted .. which for some means, at any cost.I can't place the book down. The stories and statistics are horrifying and I believe they are true. The bullying incidents, the shootings & violence, the suicide rates are shooting up with these kids. Their lives are filled with nonsense and bullying. Our culture condones it in a lot of ways. It has to stop. Just look at the national news today, the school shooting in Newton, CT, yesterday. IT HAS TO rents cannot be ignorant anymore. And parents have to stop being a part of the whole thing too. Bullying is everywhere. Other countries look at us and scratch their heads. The headline today in the LA TIMES was 'Shocked at the Shooting'. Well no, I'm not shocked. I'm saddened. But not much sadder can that comment be.I implore everyone, read the book. Buy it or search it at the library but READ IT.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Confronting Collapse: The Crisis of Energy and Money in a Post Peak Oil World []  2019-12-23 20:30

    As a writer, Michael Ruppert was a helluva speaker. I don't say that to denigrate this troubled, frustrated, charismatic, and ultimately tragic figure, merely to explain the modest three-star rating I gave to his book, CONFRONTING COLLAPSE (previously released under the more prosaic title A PRESEIDENTIAL ENERGY POLICY), which I believe ought to be read, or at least skimmed, by everybody in the Western a lot of people, I came to an awareness of Ruppert through the perfect (and terrifying) biopic-doc "The Collapse," which was about the idea of Peak Oil and what will happen to globe civilization as oil production inevitably collapses -- inevitably because oil is a finite, non-renewable resource which is rapidly running out. The documentary shook me so badly (and I don't consider myself all that simple to shake) that I sought out the book upon which it was based to hear his theories, opinions and warnings in more detail. Yesterday, after about two years of reading the book in little installments, I finally ppert's thesis in the book is simple. All of modern civilization is founded on oil. Everything from gasoline to plastic to resin to pesticide to paint to synthetic rubber to toothpaste, and very much else, is manufactured from petroleum by-products. Petroleum also powers our jetliners, our cars, our buses, our motorcycles, our tractors, our trains, our Navy destroyers and our tractors. It heats our homes, allows us to farm and to transport food, to extract raw material and to ship it, and to make and sustain all of our infrastructure (think: garbage collection, police cars, etc.). Everything we do in everyday life is founded directly or indirectly on oil, from brushing our teeth to throwing a light-switch to driving a vehicle to shopping at the grocery shop to making love (even condoms are created from petroleum by products, i.e. plastic). The total supply of oil on the planet, however, is now "past peak," meaning that more has been burned than remains in the ground, and the supply is dwindling faster and faster because commercial use of oil is going up everywhere in the world, especially developing nations like China and India, but most especially in energy-ravenous America. Ruppert believes, and there is considerable evidence to support, that all of human civilization is in a death spiral which will accelerate as oil usage surges even while the oil supply shrinks toward the zero point (zero point is not, incidentally, zero oil: it is the point where obtaining oil becomes so expensive and energy-intensive that there is no return for mining it...think of it in these terms: if you're starving, and somebody tells you there's a strawberry on top of a mountain, you'll burn 3,000 calories obtaining the strawberry but only 10 from eating it, rendering the journey pointless). This will produce a collapse -- power, meal and other primary necessities of modern life will no longer be available in sufficient quantity for our population, and will lead to a large die-off which will encompass wars, riots, and global e driving force behind the collapse is obviously our gluttonous appetite for the energy and products oil provides us, but Rupert argues, also the blind greed and sociopathic disregard for human life which is characteristic of modern governmental systems, be they socialistic, communistic or capitalistic. Our desire for profit and comfort are pushing us faster and faster toward the cliff which Peak Oil represents, and rather than address the problem, he points out that all nations seem to be doubling down on aggressive acquisition of oil (through drilling and if necessary, war) while making meaningless, lip-service commitments to the environment and alternative sources of energy. One of the key arguments of the book is the jinxed relationship between (fiat currency) and energy, which accelerates the collapse by building an infinite-growth paradigm: very crudely put, our economy must have infinite growth or it will stagnate and collapse, but the resources we base our currency and our growth around, are not l of these arguments are well-presented and difficult to refute on any level without resorting to sophistry or name-calling ("You're just a prophet of doom/conspiracy theorist!"), or the use of wobbly statistics and ideas that rely more on optimism and hope than fact. Nobody, after all, wants to believe our civilization is on its latest kick and that our kids or grandchildren will grow up in a dystopian future. On the other hand, some of the conclusions Ruppert reaches, and some of his predictions, are less impressive; the main difficulty with the book is that Ruppert, while highly smart and very knowledgeable, is really more of a blogger than an author. His writing style varies from arresting to amateurish, gripping to boring, and like a lot of people with martyr complexes (he committed suicide in 2014), he has a tendency toward egotism and would-be omniscience. This makes a 220-page book feel like it's 1,000 pages, which is why it took me aeons to read it when I usually burn through books of this nature in less than a week. It is also why I prefer Ruppert as a public speaker (watch his videos or the documentary), or even as an article-writer and blogger, to a book-length author.Having said that, I really do feel that CONFRONTING COLLAPSE is a book which ought to be read or at least skimmed by anyone who is still whistling past the petroleum graveyard. Our species (and all species on this planet we dominate) are in an existential struggle versus our own excesses and the paradigms we have developed to live safe and comfortable lives. It is well past time that someone in power accepted the unsustainability of our method of life and enacted radical changes to meet the future, instead of telling us a few electric vehicles and some recycling will save the day.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Confronting Collapse: The Crisis of Energy and Money in a Post Peak Oil World []  2019-12-23 20:30

    This is a amazing book for anyone wanting to know what is behind the curtain and seehow the globe really works. Its not overly complicated and is clearly worded to avoid confusion. If what Ruppert says in this book is true, well over half is not disputed by anyone, then every American should be very concerned. I would have liked to see more of the real evidences, however the book would probably 5 times the length had it all been included. Bottom line, if you wish to know about oil, money, geopolitics, alternative energy and a lot of other things that you will likely never hear about, this should be on your bookself.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    I also live in eastern Kentucky, not far from Jackson, but didn't grow up here. I've lived here for over 20 years and have witnessed first hand the people in Vances book. I've lived in Chicago, California and Arizona and have never seen such social hopelessness as in Kentucky. I agree with his conclusion that no government program will stop the continuing cycle of drugs, poverty, teen pregnancy, and the feeling of hopelessness these people have. The cycle repeats from generation to generation with no end in sight. Vance was the exception in finding a method out, largely through the love, guidance and encouragement of his grandmother. She also kept him away from the wrong kind of friends. Very few kids in his situation are as lucky. But there also had to be something inside himself that helped him escape. I thought initially that there would be a lot of political bias in his story but there was remarkably little."People sometimes ask whether I think there’s anything we can do to “solve” the issues of my community. I know what they’re looking for: a magical public policy solution or an innovative government program. But these issues of family, faith, and culture aren’t like a Rubik’s Cube, and I don’t think that solutions (as most understand the term) really exist.....Public policy can help, but there is no government that can fix these issues for us....I don’t know what the respond is, precisely, but I know it starts when we stop blaming Obama or Bush or faceless companies and ask ourselves what we can do to create things better."That about sums it e book was spot on and I highly recommend it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Summary - Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis [Book]  2017-10-14 18:10

    This summary book is a amazing memoir of a family and culture in crisis.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Summary - Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis [Book]  2017-10-14 18:10

    This summary provides enough info for the reader to determine if he wants to invest the and time to actually and read the full book itself. I myself got interested and purchased the book because the taste of the book this summary gave was quite interesting and intriguing. Nicely written and have a valuable lesson to learn. I fully enjoyed reading this book. Author did a amazing job.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Nutrition in Crisis: Flawed Studies, Misleading Advice, and the Real Science of Human Metabolism []  2020-1-21 20:30

    A phenomenal book on health by a biochemist. I’ve read dr Fung’s book, Dr. Yudkin’s, Johnathan Bailer’s, delved into dr. Listing and dr. Ludwig, but I really like the viewpoint here. It’s a amazing addition to a well-rounded health library.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A World in Disarray: American Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Old Order []  2020-1-22 22:25

    In the first part of the book Dr. [email protected]#$% gives an informed and insightful overview of the geo-political forces that shaped the globe from the rise of the modern state system in the mid-seventeenth century to the end of the Cold War. The second part chronicles the collapse of order, or the emergence of geo-political disarray, following the Cold War. As he puts it, “What exists [today] in a lot of parts of the globe as well as in different venues of international relations resembles more a fresh globe disorder.” In the third and final section of the book he goes on to prescriptions for moving forward, all under a conceptual umbrella of what Dr. Haass calls “sovereign obligation.”It is a worthy read, to be sure. Haas is clearly a player and has a scholar’s ability to read between the lines and draw broad lessons and conclusions. In that respect we need more like him.He is, however, an establishment player. That’s not meant to be a criticism, but the narrative has a familiar feel to it. His interpretations are often new, but the lens generally isn’t. And while he claims in the beginning that he won’t be partisan, he’s not completely successful in that effort. That’s okay, too, however. Non-partisan is an oxymoron when it comes to anyone with ties to Washington.He makes a powerful case that the 2003 Iraq Battle was a misguided but watershed moment in foreign policy that recklessly introduced “preventive” intervention to the foreign policy debate. The doctrine of regime change flowed from there, built, he argues, on the decidedly false assumption that the Middle East was ripe for democracy and Iraq would set the dominoes in motion.While reading the book, one of my over-arching impressions was that Dr. Haass puts amazing emphasis on traditional statesmanship (gender neutral) and statesmen. That’s no surprise given that he is the president of the Council on Foreign Relations and served as an adviser to President George H. W. Bush and Under Secretary of State to Colin Powell. I’m not sure the simplicity of amazing statespeople fits any more, however. It seems to me that the forces driving our current history, as such, are much more complex and nuanced. The statesmanship model gives insufficient weight, I think, to the role of primary economics and human psychology. (And perhaps the impact of technology.)In addition to remaining statesmen-centric, the obligation model also remains largely US-centric. I have particular reservations about his general help of a modified variation of President Obama’s “pivot to Asia.” (It was later reclassified as a rebalancing.) Having lived in China for nine years I continue to believe that American politicians and strategists—Americans in general, in fact—fail to appreciate the very fundamental difference in the Chinese globe view. We simply cannot interpret China’s behavior through a Western e only other limitation of the book is one of timing. Dr. Haass notes that he completed the book before the 2016 US presidential election and while his private choice for president is not revealed, it would be interesting to obtain his take now, given the continued march into global disarray.Which makes me wonder if the prescription he outlines (i.e. sovereign obligation), even if warranted, is remotely achievable in the current political climate. There seems to be an underlying need for social and political consensus for it to work and that just doesn’t seem possible any time the end, it’s a thoughtful read and I eagerly await the sequel, should there be one. A Globe in Disarray may not quite qualify as transformative, but it is a thoughtful and insightful move in that direction.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    A World in Disarray: American Foreign Policy and the Crisis of the Old Order []  2020-1-22 22:25

    I generally enjoyed the body of this thoughtful book, with its topic of foreign policy challenges now and in the near future for America. I noticed that [email protected]#$% repeatedly brought in the leftwing claim of "climate change" as a matter for general globe and American concern, but it was possible to skip over those short passages and the rest seemed sensible analyses and prescriptions to me. The afterword, however, is frankly anti-Trump and spoils the book, in my opinion. Haass gives the timeline for his book -- he wrote and rewrote it starting from a 2015 lecture series and sent it off for printing in early September of 2016, well before the election. Which certainly explains the praiseworthy political neutrality of the main text : he thought Hillary Clinton would win, as did the rest of us given the grossly biased and incorrect polls. We have lately seen so a lot of scholarly political books spoiled by the outraged anti-Trump bias of authors who used to have a amazing reputation for objectivity. This afterword basically says that the globe is getting much worse in terms of disarray and Trump is not the man to with it. I much preferred the analysis of long time spans past in the main text: the analysis of two years into the Trump administration is method too short term and not of interest, I'd say. The book would have been stronger without the afterword.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Confronting Collapse: The Crisis of Energy and Money in a Post Peak Oil World []  2019-12-23 20:30

    This book should be read with another book by the same author titled "Crossing the Rubicon" written 4 years earlier (2004) to understand what to expect politically and, more particularly, economically in the next 10-15 yrs. as the oil supply that drives every aspect of our lives continues to diminish and demand will continue to rise with the greater needs of China and India as well as ours. It is scary because it awakens us to the reality that we should have planned for alternative sources of energy well before today when we are still not quite aware of the magnitude of the issue to think more seriously about providing for an infrastructure to deliver the fresh sources of energy. "Crossing the Rubicon" is a must read if you really wish to understand the pervasive corruption and the intertwining of drug trafficking with branches of our governments and with the highest figures in our Federal Governments. It will absolutely shock you because Ruppert is one of the best investigative writers ever!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Confronting Collapse: The Crisis of Energy and Money in a Post Peak Oil World []  2019-12-23 20:30

    I'm about two-thirds through this book. Given the topic matter and how depressing it can be to read, I can't say that I'm loving reading it but I can say that it has a lot of necessary information.I learned about peak oil a few months ago and have been gobbling up everything I can search - I've even seen the "Collapse" video with the interview of Mr. Ruppert. It too is depressing, but there's a lot of info he gives that is e book goes through our dependency on oil, how we use it and how global oil fields are being depleted and how our economy is/will be affected as it becomes more comparison with others, Mr. Ruppert comes across as being much stronger and more 'apocalyptic' than others, but I think he does this on purpose to slap us all across the face and to create us wake up to reality.I think this is an necessary book - I'm soon to read his Rubicon - and I recommend it to others who are interested in the subject of peak oil.I only want that his solutions were something that I (personally) could work on, rather than being ones that will require global governments to work together and/or mass changes to be made, as I don't have much hope that either will happen when the crisis really gets going.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Bully Society: School Shootings and the Crisis of Bullying in America’s Schools (Intersections Book 6) []  2019-12-18 20:46

    I was writing my college term paper on School Violence. When I considered the topic matter prior to conducting any research, I was thinking about school bullying, which was the norm when I attended school in the fifties and sixties. The turning point for me was Columbine. In the late sixties, a truckline from my city in Ohio sold and relocated to Littleton, CO. My brother's fiance relocated there with her family, and in 1970, after his discharge from the Army,we went to Littleton for the wedding. When I heard of Columbine in the nineties, all I could think of was whether there were any of my old mates from Ohio involved. I started researching school shootings, and was shocked at the sheer number of them that I discovered. Near my current home in Connecticut, we just went through the shock of the Newtown school shootings. The book detailed more instances of gun violence at our schools. The books were an invaluable source of info for my paper. The only part of the debate that I don't understand is the view that armed guards are not necessary. In view of the number of innocent people who have died at the hands of these murderers, I can see no alternative. If they ask for former military members to patrol the halls of our schools, count me in.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Bully Society: School Shootings and the Crisis of Bullying in America’s Schools (Intersections Book 6) []  2019-12-18 20:46

    Came as expected. Amazing condition.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City []  2020-1-16 0:9

    This book is amazing for teaching science, integrity, family values, persistence, the importance of amazing government and the virtues of public service, while also revealing the depths of depravity and carelessness sometimes found in our actual governments.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City []  2020-1-16 0:9

    I so appreciate Dr. Mona's efforts to treat and serve the families of Flint. I thought her book was fantastic. While some book reviews question Dr. Mona's inclusion of her family life and history, I believe the story would have been incomplete without it because I believe Dr. Mona's family played an necessary role in her work. Few among us believe that our families are inconsequential in our lives including our work lives. Few of us believe that the family unit is inconsequential to an individual or a society. Lessons of compassion, service, honor, dedication, and triumph over failure are learned, taught and passed on through the family unit. It is necessary to understand the complexity of the human endeavor in to truly respect it. The problems in Flint started decades ago with a lack of caring and understanding about Flint families and their endeavors. But because of Dr. Mona, the victim statements by the Flint families have had a significant and positive impact on legal and political proceedings.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    I spent most of the latest 2 days reading this book and I can't stop thinking about it. I never heard of the author until I saw him on Morning Joe a few days ago but I looked him up and read several articles he wrote for different publications so I bought his book. He grew up in a family of what he describes as "hillbillies" from Kentucky but spent most of his life in Ohio. His family identified as being strongly Christian even though their behavior was frequently not particularly Christian. He was mostly raised by his grandparents along with his half-sister because his mother was an addict who went from husband to husband and he barely knew his father. He did poorly in school and was only redeemed by the fact that a cousin pushed him into joining the Marines. From there he went to Ohio State and then to Yale Law School.He writes very directly and honestly about the issues with white, working class America and why it is in decline. While part of the issue is societal, he believes there is an internal issue that government cannot do anything about. He suggests that tribalism, mistrust of outsiders and "elites," violence and irresponsibility among family members, parents without ethics and a sense of responsibility, not good work ethics, and an us-against-them mentality is dooming the people who live that method to becoming poorer, more addicted, and more marginalized. Perfect book and very thought-provoking.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis [Book]  2017-10-14 10:47

    Appalachia: Rich Land, Not good PeopleI had high expectations for this book. I was born and raised in Appalachia and have a amazing love for the people and the culture. No doubt the author reflects his family experience, but i do feel that his acc is not representative of the people of that put and time. As in most cultures, there is a broad spectrum of lifestyles and mores -- people with related dispositions tend to search like members for their closest association. There are a lot of unbelievable kind and loving people in Appalachia who are living out the best examples that they can for family, friends, and strangers alike. I found these people to be in the majority. They are not portrayed in this account. For a lot of summers I traveled extensively in my home county, not only the small settlements, but the houses back in the hollows and down in the narrow bottom lands. As a stranger i was almost always welcomed and offered support in getting my job done. I was often invited to take a easy meal. These people are not good with small material possessions. Yes there are some poor people as well, as a reading of the court docket in the local county papers will confirm. But do not allow that darkness of a few outlaws color the picture of an entire better understand the origins and long standing troubles of the Appalachian people i suggest you read, NIGHT COMES TO THE CUMBERLAND, by Henry Caudill of Pikeville, KY. From the cover notes: The quality of life in Appalachia declined during the Civil Battle and Appalachia remained "in a poor way" for the next century and longer. By the 1940s, 50s, and 60s, Appalachia had become an island of poverty in a national sea of plenty and prosperity. Caudill's book alerted the mainstream globe to our issues and their causes. A major factor was the exploitation of natural resources (timber, coal, and later gas) by disinterested distant owners who left the owners of these rich lands poorly educated, poorly trained, land ruined, and hoodwinked over and over. Systematically looted by the robber entrepreneurs and their local toadies. With a few notable exceptions the exploitation cycle continues. Appalachia: Rich Land, Not good People, still.JSM

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Summary - Hillbilly Elegy: A Memoir of a Family and Culture in Crisis [Book]  2017-10-14 18:10

    The author uses not good grammar and there is a lack of analysis in this summary.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    What the Eyes Don't See: A Story of Crisis, Resistance, and Hope in an American City []  2020-1-16 0:9

    This book info how an Iraqi American pediatrician proved there was lead in the Flint water using blood levels of children. She led the effort to expose the lead and force a change to prevent life long hurt to the kids of flint. The book is quite readable and provides information on public health and how the govt works or doesn't work. I commend Dr Mona, as she likes to be called, for her passion and effort to create a change to prevent life long hurt to the kids of Flint. The book would have been much stronger, and would reach a larger audience, had the author left out the flaming political shots toward the entire Republican party. Indeed she is shocked to search out one of the key individuals helping is a conservative Republican. Focusing on how people with various viewpoints can work together would have been more effective.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    The Bully Society: School Shootings and the Crisis of Bullying in America’s Schools (Intersections Book 6) []  2019-12-18 20:46

    everyone needs to read

    0  



    Search Cloud

    About us

    Use our product reviews finder and generate tons of ratings & opinions on any item, shop product or service. Search, read and publish reviews for brands, TV shows, ebooks, gadgets, video games, meals, music, household items or movies. Would you like to rate recently purchased thing? Go ahead! Express satisfaction or sadness, describe own experience & identify strengths and weaknesses of the product. Write short or detailed review with a few clicks.

    Community

    Publish review of any item you find here, registration is not required
    Share own experience, point out the pros and cons, warn or recommend
    Search for opinions on any item, product or service, read tons of reviews

    Contact

    www.add-reviews.com

    Use contact form to reach us or write a message via email:

    [email protected]

    Describe your problem, share ideas or report a bug on the site.

    https://add-reviews.com/
    0856-458-386