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    Introduction to Embedded Systems: Interfacing to the Freescale 9S12 []  2021-1-5 19:35

    Amazing detail. Perfect introductory material. Recommended to students.

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    Introduction to Embedded Systems: Interfacing to the Freescale 9S12 []  2021-1-5 19:35

    Product is very good, delivery is packaged very quickly and to be further recommended.

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    Introduction to Embedded Systems: Interfacing to the Freescale 9S12 []  2021-1-5 19:35

    Love it

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    Introduction to Embedded Systems: Interfacing to the Freescale 9S12 []  2021-1-5 19:35

    This book is needed for a course in the ECE Department at the University of Texas, and was written by a faculty member who teaches the course. While I've heard amazing things about his teaching ability, he isn't too skilled at writing textbooks.Looking at the table of contents, you are given the illusion of a semi-decent organizational structure. Once you obtain into the actual text, the illusion is exposed for what it really is. The book fails to stay on subject and goes off on tangents method too much where a reference to another chapter would suffice. There are a lot of grammatical errors which, while not affecting the info being presented, damage the professionalism and credibility that a textbook must strive to the end, the book serves best as a reference for programming the Freescale 9S12 microcontroller and not as a learning tool, which I think is what it was intended for. Since this is the first edition, hopefully these issues will be acknowledged and corrected.

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    Electronic Projects for the Raspberry Pi: Book 1 - Interfacing to LED displays, speakers and simple sensors []  2019-12-24 19:50

    Amazing book to obtain you started, but would have benefitted from more formal circuit diagrams.

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    Exploring Raspberry Pi: Interfacing to the Real World with Embedded Linux []  2020-9-24 21:12

    This review is about the Kindle edition not the paper one. I agree the the traditional paper book deserves the 5 star rating. I purchased the book first and I liked it so much that I bought the Kindle edition to highlight, create notes in, and to hold as a handy screen based reference for my Pi based electronics e Kindle edition's a disappointment. Here's why.1. The book has a amazing table of contents with a 3 level outline; chapters, sub headings under each chapter and sub subjects under each sub heading. The Kindle edition only has a 2 level outline, no sub topics, making it extremely bersome, if not useless, as a navigation tool.2. The Kindle edition left out the index. Really, no index, and no, the global word find is not the same as a amazing index made and edited by a professional minimal table of contents and no index makes the Kindle edition beautiful useless as a convenient reference. If you don't believe me, test to search the subject section on Transistors using the Kindle edition. I'm sure you can eventually, but it's a the way, I think it's sad that my one star review brings down the rating of the paper edition. Amazon, I should be able to review the Kindle edition separately from the paper edition. Especially if they are substantially different.

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    Exploring Raspberry Pi: Interfacing to the Real World with Embedded Linux []  2020-9-24 21:12

    I'm a long time Linux user at work and home. I've been playing with the Raspberry Pi for a few years now as a primary Linux computer, but I always felt that interfacing it to other devices would create this a much more strong small platform. This books covers all that's important to do that, but beware - it's not for those who don't wish to dive deep into the technical details. Dr. Molloy teaches computer science at the college level, and there's detail here that represents that background. But it's all extremely well-supported within the book, along with his dedicated book website. All of the code examples he writes can be found there, along with perfect supplemental e book starts from basics - Raspberry Pi hardware, primary Linux commands, primary circuits for interfacing, etc. He then gets into the depths of how to interface all of these together. I'm fortunate to have enough background in these locations to weave through this, but those with less of a computer or electronics background might wish to have a local geek or two handy to call in for support when needed. He has perfect coding examples in multiple languages, builds from easy to more complex examples, and provides libraries to continue your own programming projects using the knowledge you have gained throughout the book.I'm an Electrical / Computer Engineer by trade, and I've had an interest in introducing hobby electronics to my kids. When I first saw the Raspberry Pi, I thought this might be the ideal platform on which to develop that. This book is the missing piece to that puzzle for me. It's exactly what I was hoping for, with all the info one could wish about making this magnificent small board talk to other devices. I picture a lot of blinking lights and beeping speakers in the months to come as a effect of this book! I consider this a bargain-priced book for everything that's contained within it. If there's something you wish to connect up to a Raspberry Pi, odds are, there's a solution somewhere in this book. I highly recommend it.

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    Exploring Raspberry Pi: Interfacing to the Real World with Embedded Linux []  2020-9-24 21:12

    This is a superb piece of technical writing, truly a joy to read (speaking as a computer geek, of course!). Not only is the coverage of amazing breadth, but most subjects are covered in amazing depth, too. The examples are clear and concise, and I have followed a lot of of them on my Linux laptop with networked Raspberry Pi. The chapter on software cross-development was particularly useful, and be sure to watch the author's YouTube video on the same subject. Although the book is about the Raspberry Pi, I found that reading it greatly increased my knowledge of Linux-based software development, including clearing up a lot of mysterious points that I haven't found well-explained until though it is a masterful work, it is also quite technical, so this might not be the best book for people just starting out with programming and computers. But if you are a "maker" wanting to use a Raspberry Pi, I consider this book to be an essential gold mine of info and techniques. A slight shortcoming: a lot of of the printed diagrams are quite little (no doubt to hold the page count down - it's already a huge book), but the companion www service for the book has huge color versions of a lot of of the diagrams.

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    Exploring Raspberry Pi: Interfacing to the Real World with Embedded Linux []  2020-9-24 21:12

    Derek Molloy has my favorite videos on setting up the Pi and the Beaglebone, as well as real-world interfacing. Between the books and the companion websites, it's the kind of info you need to understand how to develop your own projects. Highly recommended.

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    Electronic Projects for the Raspberry Pi: Book 1 - Interfacing to LED displays, speakers and simple sensors []  2019-12-24 19:50

    Hmmm.... Disappointing, even for $5.99.I thought it'd be a small more substantial. This 'book' is merely a 1/4 in. thickcollection of really primary experiments, with not much explanation on anything."Plug this, write a few lines of python, and voila, it works". Next.

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    Electronic Projects for the Raspberry Pi: Book 1 - Interfacing to LED displays, speakers and simple sensors []  2019-12-24 19:50

    My only problem with the book is that not all the projects work! The 7 segment display is one that I can not obtain to display no matter how a lot of times I repined it...Overall still a amazing book

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    Electronic Projects for the Raspberry Pi: Book 1 - Interfacing to LED displays, speakers and simple sensors []  2019-12-24 19:50

    It is old and the examples very simple. It is a amazing put to start.

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    Electronic Projects for the Raspberry Pi: Book 2 - Interfacing to ogue Signals []  2020-1-21 19:43

    Informative and right to the point.

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    Exploring Raspberry Pi: Interfacing to the Real World with Embedded Linux []  2020-9-24 21:12

    This book is fantastic. I loved Eben Upton's latest book on learning computer architecture through the Raspberry Pi, but I like this one even create this review much shorter - if you wish to do projects with the RPi, buy this book. It explains things about how the RPi works in amazing detail, gives dozens of examples of sample circuits, and shows the math as well for calculating current drain and voltage drops for most of the circuits, so you're not just plugging things in blindly. It is full of practical tip on how to wire things up so you do things properly and don't blow up your Pi (like "use an optocoupler if you have an external power supply connected to the load").Further, it has an extensive section on programming the Pi, showing programs at a dozens of complexity levels and running times to turn the GPIO pins on and off (which is what we most care about when programming the Pi).

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    Electronic Projects for the Raspberry Pi: Book 2 - Interfacing to ogue Signals []  2020-1-21 19:43

    A amazing reference for taking og signals into the Raspberry Pi which in turn enable Raspberry Pi to take og signals, interpret it and then take action with it

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    Electronic Projects for the Raspberry Pi: Book 2 - Interfacing to ogue Signals []  2020-1-21 19:43

    Related to the companion book - this is a amazing book to obtain you started with interfacing hardware to your Raspberry Pi, but it would have been better if it included more formal circuit diagrams.

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    Electronic Projects for the Raspberry Pi: Book 1 - Interfacing to LED displays, speakers and simple sensors []  2019-12-24 19:50

    Fast and simple to follow. I learned a lot here

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    Exploring Raspberry Pi: Interfacing to the Real World with Embedded Linux []  2020-9-24 21:12

    The book is a very amazing reference for the Raspberry Pi and using the Pi's GPIO interface. It is not, however, a particularly amazing guide for someone trying to figure out his/her fresh Raspberry Pi. My largest complaint lies with the sections devoted to control of the GPIO interface. Dr. Molloy never makes it clear that you "speak" to the GPIO via files. His examples are rooted in using bash scripts or C++ programs, and file control with either of those approaches results in some beautiful arcane syntax. I was at the point of putting the book in the paper recycling when I discovered that there are a number of very amazing beginner guides for the Pi on YouTube. After wading through a series of those guides where the interface language was Python I finally figured out what's going on when you control GPIO on the Pi. I think if Dr. Molloy had stayed away from bash scripts for the early introduction of GPIO the book would have been a whole lot more valuable as a learning tool.

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    Electronic Projects for the Raspberry Pi: Book 1 - Interfacing to LED displays, speakers and simple sensors []  2019-12-24 19:50

    A very primary introduction to interfacing Raspberry Pi with the true word which basically the primary for control systems using Raspberry Pi

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    Electronic Projects for the Raspberry Pi: Book 1 - Interfacing to LED displays, speakers and simple sensors []  2019-12-24 19:50

    Estupendo

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    Exploring Raspberry Pi: Interfacing to the Real World with Embedded Linux []  2020-9-24 21:12

    Create no mistake, this is not for beginners. You need to know how to program already, or you will be totally lost. And as far as EE stuff, you have to be a fast learner, and beautiful intelligent to be able to starting building circuits from this book. That said, the book provides enough info to both build the circuits and program the code without needing any other training. But coming in cold you will struggle a bit. This is an advanced book. I would still advise to obtain this book! Because you can supplement if you obtain stuck. But this book takes you through every part of the pi from the hardware to the custom linux kernel, and explains everything in gory detail. It teaches the fundamentals of every interface on the pi: gpio, spi, i2c, uart, wireless, you name it. And it teaches you the primary concepts so that you are empowered to hook ANY device to it. Its not just a cookbook for say, connecting a temperature sensor to i2c. It teaches the electrical interface, protocols, and linux code to hook up any i2c decive and write your own driver code. My background is a c# web developer with hobby level ee knowledge. I had no issues with hitting the ground running with everything in the book, even coding in c, which i have no really ever done professionally, and not for 20 years. Obtain this book.

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    Exploring Raspberry Pi: Interfacing to the Real World with Embedded Linux []  2020-9-24 21:12

    I'm a professional firmware developer I bought this book as an intro and reference to the pi. Unfortunately, it fails miserably at both. What it is for is a course on the pi. It's exactly what you would expect from a professor, and although his work is good, there are two huge problems. First, he contains chapters in order to complete academic exercises without external references (or knowledge) - to light the l.e.d. you need to know about ohms law, etc, so there is a bunch of the text dedicated to primary electronics. If you're a student and wish to do the exercise, it saves going elsewhere, but if you aren't interested or already know it, it clutters up the book. This is only one example. There are others. It becomes a can't see the forest for the trees scenario. The second huge issue is that he goes into heavy detail on everything. Again, this is amazing if you are dedicating part of your life to slogging through, but if you're looking for something specific, amazing luck finding it, and if you do, it will be missing anything "external" to the pi. For instance, cross compiling from another machine. The relative importance of different info is ignored throughout the book, which was the worst issue I had with it. Everything is as necessary as everything else. As a professional this book has been a bust. For a non pro, you should also look elsewhere. Online info is much easier to reference, more complete, more current and gets to the point better so you can obtain it done and be on your way. If you wish to go to class on the pi, and spend a "term" studying it, ignoring the true globe (things external to the pi), the go for it. I'm giving it 2 stars because there is some amazing items in there if you can search it, and because of the high level of effort taken to compile this work, but I will not be keeping it.

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    Electronic Projects for the Raspberry Pi: Book 1 - Interfacing to LED displays, speakers and simple sensors []  2019-12-24 19:50

    The projects are not very interesting.

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    Electronic Projects for the Raspberry Pi: Book 2 - Interfacing to ogue Signals []  2020-1-21 19:43

    Now, this one is slightly better, more useful than Volume 1 from the same ill, it's fairly light reading. Barely 1/4" does present several examples using different og sensors. Covers Operational Amps eresting. A amazing reference, t sure it's worth $5.99 though. Search a used copy.

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    Exploring Raspberry Pi: Interfacing to the Real World with Embedded Linux []  2020-9-24 21:12

    This book covers a lot of zone but be prepared to work hard if you read it. The examples are available for download on Github. The book is absolutely excellent. Clearly written with a amazing amount of detail, though the reader must realize there is a limit to how much information can be packed in a single book. Although beginners could read this book, I believe that it would be slow going for them. If you don't have some technical background I would suggest you look for a more primary book. This book covers subjects such as RPi boot up sequence, Linux commands, hardware interfacing and useful projects. I'm an EE with programming experience in Windows and I found the Linux section simple to understand, but very slow going, due to the vastness of Linux. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in putting in the effort needed to really learn the RPi and how to interface to other computers.

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    Exploring Raspberry Pi: Interfacing to the Real World with Embedded Linux []  2020-9-24 21:12

    5 star review for the content; It's borderline textbook quality in depth and sually though, everything is l pictures are black and white, diagrams are greyscale, and most call-outs are grey bg/black fg text. To most, this probably seems little and stupid to complain about, but I'm both a beginner at the RPI and electronics in general as well as getting older. As a result, I have a bit of difficulty reading quite a bit of the non-text material. Still, as I said, the content is perfect and for that the book is more than worth picking up.

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-11-21 19:33

    I have only had this book a few weeks but I have learned a lot already.I like the method the author writes and explains things in a method that I can easily understand.I only want that I would have purchased this book sooner.

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-11-21 19:33

    Well organized. Simple to follow.

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-12-12 19:40

    The only mistake you can create buying this book is buying it for the wrong ver of the software you are using. This cannot be stressed enough. There are huge changes between Adobe Premiere Elements 2020 and the 2019 or other software versions.

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-12-12 19:40

    I have only had this book a few weeks but I have learned a lot already.I like the method the author writes and explains things in a method that I can easily understand.I only want that I would have purchased this book sooner.

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-11-21 19:33

    The only mistake you can create buying this book is buying it for the wrong ver of the software you are using. This cannot be stressed enough. There are huge changes between Adobe Premiere Elements 2020 and the 2019 or other software versions.

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-11-21 19:33

    It covers all functions beautiful well, but, in my opinion, should have more examples on how to do.

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-11-21 19:33

    Through the years, I have bought a number of Steve's tutorials for Premiere Elements and Image Elements. I am a retired high school science and system wide instructional technology teacher. My basic hobby is creating a family legacy with our a lot of home videos and family photos. I build my own computers. Based on my experiences with a lot of user's manuals and guides, I always search Steve's guidance clear, effectively illustrated sequenced logically. And if things are still not understandable, Steve (and others) will answer in a timely manner on his site. You just can't beat that!!!

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-12-12 19:40

    Through the years, I have bought a number of Steve's tutorials for Premiere Elements and Image Elements. I am a retired high school science and system wide instructional technology teacher. My basic hobby is creating a family legacy with our a lot of home videos and family photos. I build my own computers. Based on my experiences with a lot of user's manuals and guides, I always search Steve's guidance clear, effectively illustrated sequenced logically. And if things are still not understandable, Steve (and others) will answer in a timely manner on his site. You just can't beat that!!!

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-12-12 19:40

    Well organized. Simple to follow.

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-11-21 19:33

    An perfect book on Adobe Premiere Elements. It covers all the options and has lots of examples, both in the book and on the youtube videos and their web site. Well worth the cash if you wish to learn this program.

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-11-21 19:33

    Adobe has a PDF manual I scrolled thru while waiting for this book. I have been a long time fan of Adobe but their guide books are not worth the money. Maybe that is the reason why they stopped adding them to their software. The $30 saved can be better spent with a quality book such as this one. I like it and would recommend it.

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-12-12 19:40

    Adobe has a PDF manual I scrolled thru while waiting for this book. I have been a long time fan of Adobe but their guide books are not worth the money. Maybe that is the reason why they stopped adding them to their software. The $30 saved can be better spent with a quality book such as this one. I like it and would recommend it.

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-12-12 19:40

    An perfect book on Adobe Premiere Elements. It covers all the options and has lots of examples, both in the book and on the youtube videos and their web site. Well worth the cash if you wish to learn this program.

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    The Guide to Adobe Premiere Elements 2020: The tools, and how to use them, to make movies on your personal computer []  2020-12-12 19:40

    It covers all functions beautiful well, but, in my opinion, should have more examples on how to do.

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    TOO BLUE!: The IBM PC from an Acorn to a Renegade []  2020-12-16 20:35

    Author Dennis Andrews earned his degree in Theoretical Mathematics from Penn State University and worked for IBM in Boca Raton, Florida experiencing the debut of IBM’s PC and PS/2 – those formative years for computing. Following that experience he became a division president at Xerox and worked with five start-up software companies. Now retired, Dennis summarizes his experiences in his debut book – TOO BLUE: THE IBM PC FORM ACORN TO e computer – our globe at home and in business and in entertainment and everywhere – is such a friendly ally that it seems unthinkable that there was life before its existence. Dennis Andrews invites us on a time travel adventure about the inception of computers: 'In its telling of the history of the private computer, the computing globe has understandably been mainly focused on Microsoft and Bill Gates or Apple and Steve Jobs. IBM’s contribution has been forgotten to a huge extent – though a flurry of backward-looking articles in the media accompanied the sale of the company’s PC business to Lenovo in 2004-2005. We cannot understand the genesis of the private computer without including the story of the IBM PC and the family of computers that followed. IBM made a revolutionary project, and I was a front-row witness to and participant in this pivotal point in computing history.’From that jolt to our attention, Dennis provides a solid and thorough history of the PC in a manner that is not only informative, but also equally entertaining. ‘The first phase of this journey is pure acceleration to escape the weighty atmosphere of the “business as usual’ computing environment of IBM. Once free of gravity, the journey will contain challenges and choices almost too profound to fathom, along with the large successes, sinking failures, and powerful recoveries. Add to this some espionage, legal convictions, and the premature death of a amazing man, and the effect will be the greatest business story never told.’ And at the end of this fascinating book, Dennis states, ‘Prior to IBM entering this very private and low-end of computing, there was no direction, no meteoric growth, and no worldwide acceptance that computers were anything that should and could benefit and interest everyone. We called this the “democratizing of computing.”A reflection in history has rarely been more informative and interesting as this book offers. Well written and full of surprises and ‘aha’ moments, this is a book that everyone who taps a keyboard or slides a mouse or fingers a screen will search revelatory! Recommended for all computer novices – and geeks! Grady Harp, December 20

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    Astronomy with your Personal Computer []  2020-8-6 18:44

    Perfect Book, opened a globe of astronomical math functions for me.

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    Astronomy with your Personal Computer []  2020-8-6 18:44

    Amazing set of astronomical algorithms and GWBASIC code for them + explanations. Code would need to be converted into a more modern language, but the algorithms are just as valid. Of course, more extensive and precise algorithms exist, but these are a amazing optimization of simplicity and accuracy.

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    Fire in the Valley: The Birth and Death of the Personal Computer []  2020-5-23 18:28

    After reading the book, I feel like I have completed a college course I've long wanted to take. I appreciate the names, the general history, the telling the technical story of the development of the smart-machine itself, the demonstration in the telling of how to screw up a business and how not to screw it up--really, I appreciate all the info this book has given me. It must have taken forever to write. What an wonderful effort. You definitely obtain your money's worth!

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    Fire in the Valley: The Birth and Death of the Personal Computer []  2020-5-23 18:28

    Amazing computer history book. I read original ver in early 80s while in college. I still remember the Altair (bought the assembly manual but not the kit) and watched the revolution develop through the 70s.

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    Fire in the Valley: The Birth and Death of the Personal Computer []  2020-5-23 18:28

    This is a very amazing book to read. Anyone who wants to understand how the private computer came about should read this book.

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    What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry []  2020-7-11 18:38

    "What the dormouse said" explores the link between the 60s counter-culture, LSD, anti-vietnam, anti-establishment movement and the creation of the private computer. The author argues that the creation of the private computer was a statement of freedom from bureaucratic huge organizations. It tells the history of the creation of the first PC... or actually what all happened before e book starts with two major subjects and then links this to several other happenings that happened around the same time. The first major subject is how Dough Engelbert made the SRI augmentation laboratory and made a glimpse of what a private computer should be like. The second one is that of McCarthy (creator of lisp and time-sharing systems) and how he moved from MIT to Stanford to set up the SAIL lab. People who worked in these two labs would later come together in Xerox Parc where they would make the first PC -- the the same time, people were experimenting with LSD and its result on creativity. Plus the freedom, anti-establishment, movements happened. All of these tracks eventually got together with the creation of the Homebrew computer club. Some of its members (Steven Jobs) visited Xerox Parc and got some of its inspiration from the Alto. He, of course, would later begin Apple and become the first major PC vendor."What the dormouse said" is a fascinating book with lots of little info about the history of the PC and its links between the culture at that time. I wanted to give this book 4 our of 5 stars because of its content but decided on 3 (3.5) stars. Why? One thing I did not like about the book is how it would sometimes go into various directions which later didn't seem relevant anymore. It introduces so much people and links that it is sometimes hard to follow who did what, when and how they were linked. The main issue seems to be that the author tries *too hard* to establish the link between the 60s culture and the PC revolution. I do agree there is a link, but the author points out every single link there is and does as if they were all of the same importance. That, at times, makes the book hard to ill, if you are interested in the history of the PC and how it relates to the 60s culture, this book will be a amazing start.

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    What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry []  2020-7-11 18:38

    If you are a student of the history of the private computer, this is a unbelievable exploration of the PC's "prehistory." Very readable and very informative. Full of the oddball characters one would expect to search in the San Francisco Bay zone of the time. I don't think, however, that the author achieves his goal of showing how the sixties counterculture shaped the computer industry, other than pointing out that a lot of computer engineers in California in the 60s and 70s dropped acid and smoked pot. A lot of other engineers dropped acid and smoked pot during that time but it wouldn't be accurate to say that the counterculture shaped the interstate highway system or the moon landings that they engineered. Read this book first and then read FIRE IN THE VALLEY for a amazing introduction to the history of the private computer.

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    Astronomy with your Personal Computer []  2020-8-6 18:44

    if there was a choice between this boolk or Celestial BASIC, I would recommend this book over Celestial e reason is that Celestial BASIC isn't a amazing book - it is. But Astronomy With Your Private Computer is a amazing book for anyone who is going to write their first total observational astronomy system. For those who are not sure the code will be compatible to your BASIC interpreter or compiler, Peter Duffett-Smith wrote his code using the most primary subset of the BASIC language, or called Minimal BASIC spec'd out about the mid 1970's, so the code should work out of the box with little changes to it. I have run the first few programs with QB64 (on my macOS and Linux Mint i386/AMD64 CPU), BestBASIC on my MAC (written with the Minimal BASIC standards plus some improved features), and with TechBASIC on my iOS iPad.Unlike the code that comes with Celestial BASIC, Smith's code is little and what we would call "tightly integrated." the drawback is that he uses only two letters for his variable names, which makes it impossible to tell what they are, and the tightly written code will be tougher to EVER, Smith does an perfect job docmenting practically every line of code (photo attached), explaining what he's trying to accomplish with it. and like other books that test to teach you a programming language, he provides the code on the right-side of the page, and the descriptions next to it on the e sample page, from a just more than a page of code to type, shows how he explains things, how tight his code is, and for every function, subroutine or module, he also provides a sample output, which gives you a method to try what you typed in to see if you are getting the right answers.I wish to create a point here clear about the other book, Celestial BASIC, which I also bought and when I read through it in the next few days, I will write a review. Written by Eric Burgess, was one of the first book of its kind first published in 1982 with its second printing in 1985, the same year Smith's book was published, it too is very well written and even provides you with historical context of the formulas you are inputting your program for, which runs about 3 book pages, is written for Apple II's Applesoft, Apple IIgs and TRS-80 computers. While Apple IIgs BASIC's rivals that of PowerBASIC of today, Burgess' code is also well written, but caters more to those who are technically proficient in ASTRONOMY (just my opinion). His book is 60+ pages longer, and even offers multiple coding solutions in the appendix to some of the code found in the text. Burgess also kept his coding to the Minimal BASIC standard, which 35 years later still makes it just as viable a tool for amateur astronomers today as it was when first printed in 1982. (Find my review of his book a few days after this one).As a computer scientist of 45 years, and a professional cosmologist, I tend to write my systems based on books like Celestial Calculations (another book I purchased to replace a copy of a related book I had a lot of years ago) and I take the raw formulas and derive my own computer systems. Look for my review on that book as well.If you can afford it, I would recommend that you also purchase Celestial BASIC along side this book (Astronomy With Your Private Computer), and you'll have a very complete set of code and doentation that will enhance any code you plan to use in your studies, whether it be academic or scientific as an amateur astronomer/cosmologist.

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    Astronomy with your Personal Computer []  2020-8-6 18:44

    Although the book covers a amazing range of astronomical programs, its psudo-code doesn't create for simple translation into other landuages like C++ or Pascal. He goes through the program one by one, but one can't support but feel it was ment to writen as one huge program. Not for the novice astronomer or programmer.

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    Fire in the Valley: The Birth and Death of the Personal Computer []  2020-5-23 18:28

    This book was the source material for the Pirates of Silicon Valley movie. It's been updated since then. It's a great, easy, well-written read. If you have any interest in the birth of Silicon Valley, I highly recommend it.

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    Fire in the Valley: The Birth and Death of the Personal Computer []  2020-5-23 18:28

    This is a classic. I often return to it and read random sections.

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    What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry []  2020-7-11 18:38

    When this book claims to discuss the shaping of the private computer industry in its title, it is misleading the reader. This book is actually about the predecessors to the private computer industry. As soon as it gets up to the period where the Apple II and other practical PCs were hitting the shop circa 1977, the book stops. Steve Wozniak is barely mentioned as someone interested in phone phreaking, Steve Jobs is only given a sentence in the introduction of the book and is nowhere to be found elsewhere, Bill Gates is only mentioned as an adversary of free software sharing in the latest 20 pages of the book, MITS (the inventors of the Altair 8800) and all of its employees are a faceless entity near the end of the book, and so on. Basically, all of the people that had a direct connection to the making of the private computer are not in this book, or not enough. This book is really about Doug Engelbart and his squad that worked on the "Mother of All Demos" technology displayed in 1968 to the public. The vast majority of the book, over 200 pages worth of the 287 total, is about him and his projects. It seems like this author had a long conversation with Doug Engelbart and his crew, and wrote down what they told him. That's really it. I figured the book would be more about things like "Computer Lib," a book that seems to hit the title's subject dead-on and yet only gets a few paragraphs at most dedicated to it in this book. There are some interesting info in here about how hippie communes, anti-capitalist philosophies, draft-dodging, LSD, and a few other things associated with the Sixties counterculture, but really I felt like the author was usually trying to tell two stories at once that only have chronological connections to each other.If you're looking for a amazing history on private computers, or even the stories of the people mentioned previously that helped make it, this book isn't it. But if you'd like to see the connections between the Sixties counterculture and the beginnings of technology that we're familiar with today, like the mouse, the private computer, and networking, this will have to do. I didn't feel absorbed into the author's storytelling, nor did I feel entirely convinced that the Sixties culture directly made the idea of the private computer, but the book itself is a fairly enjoyable read and will bring up info that you probably will never search in a standard history on computers. I would only recommend reading it after you have the general history down, which you can obtain from other books that I have reviewed.

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    What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry []  2020-7-11 18:38

    Amazing book, it lays out the history and impact of the silicon revolution by following the tales of several radical radical academics. These researchers piloted the future of computing into uncharted territory, accelerating research by experimenting with using LSD as a problem-solving aid. A amazing read if you have fun an anecdotal story-telling style, on a very interesting topic.

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    Fire in the Valley: The Birth and Death of the Personal Computer []  2020-5-23 18:28

    I have the original book. As promised, this ver is even better. Nice having the portability. I'm reading it on the iPad Air 2.

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    What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry []  2020-7-11 18:38

    This book was a fascinating history of private computing in America, most specifically in Northern California, most especially in the Stanford region. I swear, I had no idea that Stanford played such a strategic role in the development of the private e book attempts to tie together nerdie engineers with counterculture LSD gies with free love types with antiwar activists with students with hackers and the mix is considerably hard to pull off, even for a writer as accomplished as Markoff. In fact, I would say that he fails at it. Still, he tries, yes, he does. He tries a chronological approach to things and soon we have computer science engineers dropping acid in what will become Silicon Valley, leading to who knows what kinds of creativity. But Markoff really concentrates this book on two or three people: Doug Engelbart and his Augmented Human Intelligence Research Center at SRI (Stanford Research Institute) and John McCarthy’s SAIL (Stanford Artificial Intelligence Laboratory). Another necessary figure is Stewart Brand, author of the Whole Earth Catalog. Finally, there was programmer extraordinaire, Alan Kay.Engelbart had a vision and he pulled in people to make his vision. He envisioned a computer — this was the 1960s — that would augment how people thought and what they did. McCarthy also envisioned a computerized world, albeit a slightly various one. Brand envisioned a computer for every person, while Kay envisioned little computers — laptops of today — that were so simple to use, that little kids could be taught to use them. And these men all pulled it off!Engelbart plays such a huge role in the book, that it’s nearly all about him, and I think that does the book a bit of a disservice. Nonetheless, it’s he who creates the mouse to use with a display and keyboard in the late ’60s. He was funded largely by ARPA and was critical in the development of the ARPAnet, the precursor to the some point, the book shifts to Xerox PARC (Palo Alto Reserch Center), the infamous Xerox research facility that had the most brilliant geniuses of the twentieth century under one roof and who literally did invent the private computer as we know it to be. This was before Steve Wozniak and his popular claim that he invented the private computer. Under Bob Taylor At PARC, Kay and the others who had shifted over there invented a graphical user interface, an operating system, a text editor (word processor), programming language, software, Ethernet for networking, a mouse, display, keyboard, audio, and a laser printer, which would be the only thing Xerox would go on to create cash with. Xerox was so stupid, they never realized what they had in hand and they could have owned the world, but they didn’t. Stupid, stupid, rkoff weaves different stories of people like Fred Moore throughout the book, attempting to capture the counterculture spirit, but it seemed a small lost on me. Most of the techies weren’t overly political. Most avoided Vietnam by working in a research facility that did weapons research (SRI). Most dropped acid at some point, but very few seemed to create that a lifestyle choice. I thought it was an interesting book, as the subject is personally interesting to me, but it wasn’t the most cohesively written book and I would have expected a small more from a writer of Markoff’s stature. Still, four solid stars and recommended.

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    What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry []  2020-7-11 18:38

    Awesome story detailing the early semiconductor and early processor explosion and creation of the Silicon Valley alongside the early SF culture. Specifically, electronics companies allowing and in some cases encouraging employees use of LSD. It seems likely that most of it's real and even if only some of it is real it's unbelievable. It ties this in with different other things, like Ridge Vineyards and Ken Kesey / Penny Lane, among other things.

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    Astronomy with your Personal Computer []  2020-8-6 18:44

    I own the original 1985 printing. I bought it for use on my AppleII+ probably back in l the code is written for very primary BASIC. Yes, it is all suppose to be written as ONE program. The code routines all use GOSUB's. None of it is written for todays BASIC, or even older Basics like QuickBasic. Trying to translate or port the routines to todays languages is nearly impossible. First, it only supports Integer numbers, no floating point, so there is high inaccuracies in the would spend more time trying to translate this code then you would going it from is book is too outdated to be of any use on todays computer languages. It was amazing in its day - it's useless now.

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    Astronomy with your Personal Computer []  2020-8-6 18:44

    I bought this book out of curiosity, and found the functions fun to play with. I ported some of them to 16bit assembly language and had to create a floating point adder as this book uses a lot of true type numbers. However, the code may not run in newer Primary compilers like Qbasic as the syntax is more for AppleIIe/Commodore 64 basics. So some porting will be necessary.

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    What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry []  2020-7-11 18:38

    John Markoff’s book traces the origins of interactive computing from the perspective of the community surrounding Stanford in the 60’s and 70’s. The acc info the rise of the Stanford AI lab, and the NLS project at the Stanford Research Institute. The latter produced the “Mother of All Demos” in 1968, where lab leader Douglas Engelbart demonstrated technologies such as hyperlinked text, the mouse, copy & paste editing and video conferencing, decades before they became commonplace. Along the method Markoff describes the environment of battle protest, free universities and psychedelic surrounding the developers of the technology. Computers were still very much a fresh thing then, and the paths people took becoming involved with them were varied and is book is very much focused on the Stanford tech community in the 60’s and 70’s, and not the history of the private computer as a whole. Necessary figures in the development of the PC (e.g. Steve Jobs, Bill Gates), as well as pioneering work done elsewhere are only mentioned in passing here. Silicon valley in the 60’s and 70s was a very various put then than the hyper-expensive “Internet Valley” it’s become now. As a special and detailed acc of that moment in time and place, the book tells the story well.

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    What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry []  2020-7-11 18:38

    Most histories of the private computer start with Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and Apple in 1976, but while hanging out at SAIL in the mid 1970s, and at the First West Coast Computer Faire in 1977 I heard highly attenuated versions of the folklore that Markoff has only now, after nearly 30 years, run to ground. Conventional histories of the PC create passing reference to the MITS Altair (1974) before going on the talk about the Apple, the IBM PC (1981) and what followed. The more sophisticated would conspiratorially tell the story of how Steve Jobs "stole the idea" for the Macintosh from Xerox's fabled Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) as they were "fumbling the future", and nearly everyone knew that Bill Gates then stole the ideas from Apple.But the truth of those half-heard folktales from my youth is that nearly every concept in the private computer predates all of this, in a delightfully picaresque tale that starts in the late 1950s and weaves together computers, LSD, the Berkeley Free Speech Movement, the Vietnam Battle and tons of hn Markoff, veteran technology reporter for the Fresh York Times, is the first to comprehensively tell this story in his fresh book What The Dormouse Said: How the 60s Counterculture Shaped the Private Computer Industry. Markoff, best known for Cyberpunk and Takedown: The Pursuit and Capture of Kevin Mitnick, explodes the conventional notion that the PC replaced the mini-computer in the same method that the mini-computer replaced the mainframe -- by a sort of evolutionary selection within the computer business, by persistently investigating the roots of the PC its unsung pioneers, its user interface, and the culture of open-source software in the San Francisco and anti-war culture of the late 1950s and rkoff has painstakingly researched the men (and a few women) who populated the cutting edge of the computer revolution in 1960s San Francisco, capturing an oral history of the PC never before recorded. Central to "Dormouse" is the story of Doug Engelbart, the "tragic hero" of computing, and the man who invented -- and demonstrated -- virtually every aspect of modern computing as much as a decade before the PC. Engelbart presided over the ground-breaking 1968 demo of his Augment concept, which included multiple overlapping windows, the original mouse, a screen cursor, video conferencing, hyperlinks and cut-and-paste -- virtually every aspect of the modern PC user interface three decades later. Yet the combination of Engelbart's ego and his not good management skills doomed the project, and his best squad members leaked over to Xerox PARC, where they worked on the equally doomed "Alto" workstation, source of Steve Job's parallel to this central story are those of the Stanford AI Lab (SAIL), the Free University, the People's Computer Company, and the Homebrew Computer Club, all located within a few miles of the center of the San Francisco peninsula. SAIL, in its first incarnation under John McCarthy and Les Earnest, may have been the first put where computers (or the strong access to a time-sharing server) really were "personal", and was almost certainly the birthplace of the first real computer game, SpaceWar. It was the locus of naked hot-tub parties, a video, and not a small bit of LSD (taken both as serious experimentation and recreationally) that fueled a cast of characters dodging the Vietnam battle at Stanford and at the ARPA-funded Stanford Research Institute and creating a counter-culture. Virtually everyone linked to the genesis of the PC spent some time at SAIL, including Alan Kay, who conceived the first notebook computer, who appears first at SAIL before running into Englebart and his enrapturing demo of Augment, leading him to PARC and eventually Apple."Dormouse" is peppered with odd juxtapositions and combinations of characters including Fred Moore, the anti-war activist and single father who knit the community together with a pile of unique punch cards and a knitting needle and helped make the People's Computer Company and the Homebrew Computer Club. Another, Steve Dompier, was widely accused -- falsely, Markoff convincingly reports -- of being the source for the infamous distribution of Gates' early Altair BASIC. ...If the book has a problem, this is it. Markoff neither presents a first-person oral history nor is he able to tease a single central narrative thread out of this creative soup. He tells several interwoven stories, but there is so huge a cast of characters that one must be a dedicated reader (or have a previous knowledge of some of the happenings described) to hold everything straight. Without a single narrative, the book returns several times to the begin of a timeline, retracing it from another perspective, and after a while you feel the need for a rkoff's own "Takedown" shows that with a clear narrative arc he is a unbelievable writer, and while the complexity of the tale create hold away casual readers, Markoff does the entire technology industry a amazing service by capturing these tales while most of the basic sources are still alive. The central story of Doug Engelbart deserves a book of its own -- a better book than the nearly unreadable Bootstrapping by Thierry Bardini -- and one can hope that Markoff revisits the trove of original material he located for this story to write that book."Dormouse" is an essential "prequel" to Michael Hiltzik's perfect Dealers of Lightning, the definitive work (so far) on Xerox PARC, and belongs on every bookshelf that contains Katie Hafner's Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins of the r anyone who thinks they know anything, or wants to know anything, about the true roots of the PC revolution and the pioneers who never got famous, this book is needed reading.

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    Fire in the Valley: The Birth and Death of the Personal Computer []  2020-5-23 18:28

    Having worked I Silicon Valley at that time for one of the companies in the book I found it an extremely accurate and exciting read.

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    Fire in the Valley: The Birth and Death of the Personal Computer []  2020-5-23 18:28

    Amazing book!

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    Astronomy with your Personal Computer []  2020-8-6 18:44

    HelloI have already created calculations according to the book: Practical astronomy with your calculatorBut now I was interested to search more accurate calculations especially for the is book Astronomy with your Private Computer was exactly what I needed.And even to create more accurate calculations for the planets was very amusing.I create the calulations in Excel, so it took a small time to transform the original formulas.But it was worth it!Kindly Ingemar Strid

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    Astronomy with your Personal Computer []  2020-8-6 18:44

    Nice

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    Fire in the Valley: The Birth and Death of the Personal Computer []  2020-5-23 18:28

    At one point My Commodore 64 was the best selling computer? Was tired of books where only the winners got to finish the story of the PC. Swaine digs deep and mentions all the players and how the whole PC history REALLY played out. Amazing read of PC history buffs.

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    Fire in the Valley: The Birth and Death of the Personal Computer []  2020-5-23 18:28

    This is a robust look at the rise of the private computing phenomenon, told from the perspective of those who watched the industry explode from a spark to a conflagration within a couple of decades.Rather than taking a pure chronological approach, the narrative groups the material into themes like hardware development, evolving operating systems, user reactions, investor relations, business adoption, the growth of multimedia, corporate rises and falls, and the like. While this occasionally caused some timeline confusion (okay, are we still in the 90s? Back to the 70s?) it created the trends of history easier to follow and is is the third edition of this unbelievable work, and the authors do a credible job of describing today's melding of private computing into the more intuitive globe of private devices (phones) and a more immersive experience with the Internet. Curiously, the authors obliquely refer to this as the "fall" of private computing, where I see if as more of an evolutionary step in our use of the technology.I highly recommend this work to anyone who ever looked past the edges of the "C:/" prompt or the Begin Button and wondered how this all really worked, and WHY computers do what they do. And for younger readers who have never known a moment without a digital connection at their side, this is a truly illuminating glimpse into the vision of those who gave us that world.

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    What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry []  2020-7-11 18:38

    A fascinating history of the development of computing in America, with unique focus on the Silicon Valley. This is not a book on the PC revolution, but of an era which paved method to the PC era. The book connects the sixties counterculture and the beginnings of e book is a chronological approach to the development of computing with specific focus on Doug Engelbart and his squad at SRI, John McCarthy’s SAIL and Stewart Brand, author of the Whole Earth Catalog. Finally, there was programmer extraordinaire, Alan e book takes the reader to the time when people were experimenting with LSD and the development of the anti-establishment movement, which had a large impact on the creation of the Homebrew computer club. Steven Jobs, who was a member of the club, would later visit PARC and got and would be inspired to begin Apple and become the first major PC vendor.If you are interested in the history of the PC and how it relates to the 60s culture, this is a amazing book.

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    What the Dormouse Said: How the Sixties Counterculture Shaped the Personal Computer Industry []  2020-7-11 18:38

    John Markoff tells the true story of private computing. The heroes are not your usual suspects like Gates and Jobs, but men behind the scenes like Doug Engelbart, Alan Kay, Larry Tessler and Fred Moore. This is a fascinating story filled with crazy dreams, wild sot experiments, free love and liberal intake of psychedelic . I think the private computer is a freak accident in the history of computer science. Nothing was obvious about its development. By all means, computers were supposed to be large and bulky machines controlled by huge industrial companies and by the government. In fact, the same nightmare scenario is now getting operational with the globe wide web, where the huge computing clusters, known as the "cloud", are in the hands of a few companies and spying agencies in the government.What happened in the 1980s and 90s with private computers was a freak development. But we need to go further back in time, to the 1960s and 70s to uncover the mystery, behind why this happened. This is where heroes like Doug Engelbart and Alan Kay come into the picture. Without their crazy dreams and vision, we would have been living in a various world. The private computer revolution, while it lasted (remnants of this dream are still alive to this day of "big data" and the "cloud"), burned brightly in our imagination.

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    the dentist []  2020-11-21 20:54
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    Lost my pin for RSweeps

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    bringg dispatch How to setup [For Panera Drivers]  2020-5-28 1:23
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    How To Upgrade And Repair Your Personal Computer (Repair and Upgrade Of PCs and Laptops) []  2020-1-25 6:21

    I just googled a statistic that said that there are computers in almost 90% of U.S. households, another stat said that 2/3 of American families own one. Those numbers will only continue to grow. But when those millions of people are faced with the prospect of computer problems, the vast majority are baffled. Most either go the Geek Squads, or the nerd patrols, or just buy a fresh computer. Whatever the solution, you can bet that hundreds of dollars will be spent, if not thousands by each computer owner. What this e-book, "How To Make batter And Repair Your Private Computer" points out is that in a lot of cases, you don't need take out a second loan on your house to fix/replace your computer, you just need Mr. Blackmon's support through this e-book and you can fix it yourself. The book, written in language that everyone can understand is also helpful when there are issues that go beyond what the average person should attempt. So you end up knowing what you can fix, and what is truly better left for the experts. Rick Blackmon has had a lifetime of experience in working with computers, and working with the public, and he knows how to write in terms that the computer novice can understand. If you're a PC computer owner, you know how much you can lay out in expenses for computer similar gadgets, software, hardware, repair and replacements. The $3.00 you spend for this e-book can create that investment go a lot further.

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    How To Upgrade And Repair Your Personal Computer (Repair and Upgrade Of PCs and Laptops) []  2020-1-25 6:21

    Amazing primary manual.

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    How To Upgrade And Repair Your Personal Computer (Repair and Upgrade Of PCs and Laptops) []  2020-1-25 6:21

    I have the eBook ver and it's full of typos and incomplete sentences. A lot of the info repeats, word for word. There isn't much actual info provided because just about everything requires clicking on a link to an online article or video. I couldn't obtain the pages to load on my Kindle Fire so I gave up.

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    Windows 10: 2020 User Guide to Master Your Personal Computer with 33 Windows Hidden Features . []  2020-7-23 20:49

    This book is a complete introduction on window, how to use it, how to install, its benefits etc are given in detail. After read this book I can use window 10. Very simple to understand. I found this book to be very helpful and simple to understand. Windows 10 changes so frequently, but this book is about as current as you can get. Very informative and descriptive.

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    Windows 10: 2020 User Guide to Master Your Personal Computer with 33 Windows Hidden Features . []  2020-7-23 20:49

    Takes you rite into the Puss Filled Guts of Windows 10 A Must Have !!

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    Windows 10: 2020 User Guide to Master Your Personal Computer with 33 Windows Hidden Features . []  2020-10-4 19:29

    Hints and tricks for fresh apps and features are what I really like from this book, also it explains everything very well. Really this book is so helpful.

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    Windows 10: 2020 User Guide to Master Your Personal Computer with 33 Windows Hidden Features . []  2020-10-4 19:29

    This is an perfect Windows 10 book. Every page of the book impressed me. The authors have been able to highlight the contents of the book very well. I think everyone will have fun anything from here.

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    How To Upgrade And Repair Your Personal Computer (Repair and Upgrade Of PCs and Laptops) []  2020-1-25 6:21

    "This is something that can come in handy!"

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    How To Upgrade And Repair Your Personal Computer (Repair and Upgrade Of PCs and Laptops) []  2020-1-25 6:21

    Very primary info that can be found easily online. I did like that he added links but only the video ones are useful on the Kindle.

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    Windows 10: 2020 User Guide to Master Your Personal Computer with 33 Windows Hidden Features . []  2020-7-23 20:49

    I hope. this is an perfect Windows 10 book. Every page of the book impressed me. The authors have been able to highlight the contents of the book very well. I think everyone will have fun anything from here.

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    Windows 10: 2020 User Guide to Master Your Personal Computer with 33 Windows Hidden Features . []  2020-7-23 20:49

    My favorite Windows 10 book. Deep and concise as it should be.

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    Useful review?

    Windows 10: 2020 User Guide to Master Your Personal Computer with 33 Windows Hidden Features . []  2020-10-4 19:29

    This Book was full of informative information. It was very simple to read and understand.I appreciate the info about the anks author for this amazing book.I highly recommended this book.

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    Useful review?

    How To Upgrade And Repair Your Personal Computer (Repair and Upgrade Of PCs and Laptops) []  2020-1-25 6:21

    Finally, a book outlining troubleshooting and computer repair that even I can understand. I have watched my husband build computers over the years, but since he takes care of maintaining our computers, that was something I never paid much attention to. That was when I started looking for a book that would lay everything out so that a layman could understand. I realized that I required a "cheatsheet" and this is an perfect one. As I read this book, I remembered watching my husband take mostly the same steps to fix a particular problem. Now, if I have a issue and my hubby isn't home, I can fix it myself. Thank you Mr. Blackmon!

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    Useful review?

    How To Upgrade And Repair Your Personal Computer (Repair and Upgrade Of PCs and Laptops) []  2020-1-25 6:21

    Amazing primary information on computers. Whether first time or just for review. Fast and to the point to lead into other avenues of computer tech.

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    Useful review?

    Windows 10: 2020 User Guide to Master Your Personal Computer with 33 Windows Hidden Features . []  2020-7-23 20:49

    Call me ancient school but I like manuals and this one is incredible, well organized, easy to perused, has funniness and parcels of valuable tips. Been battling with Windows 10 for a year presently. On line offer assistance frequently futile and obsolete.

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    Useful review?

    Windows 10: 2020 User Guide to Master Your Personal Computer with 33 Windows Hidden Features . []  2020-7-23 20:49

    I have fair changed to Windows 10 from Windows 7 Calling so thought a reference book was required. I've as it were been utilizing Windows 10 for a week but I think this will be a convenient point of reference over the a long time.

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    Windows 10: 2020 User Guide to Master Your Personal Computer with 33 Windows Hidden Features . []  2020-7-23 20:49

    This Book was full of informative information. It was very simple to read and understand. I appreciate the info about the content. Thanks author for this amazing book. I highly recommended this book.

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    Windows 10: 2020 User Guide to Master Your Personal Computer with 33 Windows Hidden Features . []  2020-10-4 19:29

    Enjoyed this book! Very useful information. It was a very simple read and provided very detailed information, pros and cons of each option and helpful resources. I also love the tone of this book and the personable manner it was written. Would definitely recommend!!

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    Windows 10: 2020 User Guide to Master Your Personal Computer with 33 Windows Hidden Features . []  2020-10-4 19:29

    This book is truly outstanding about the was very simple to read and understand. I also love the tone of this book and the personable manner it was written.Would definitely recommend!!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Windows 10: 2020 User Guide to Master Your Personal Computer with 33 Windows Hidden Features . []  2020-10-4 19:29

    This book gave me a lot of information. This book is amazing to read and I think this book is the best book of this topic, and I really appreciate this book.

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