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    Liberating Structures review [App]  2019-11-17 13:45

    Exactly what I required to obtain started. Love, how the application offers ideas how to combine activities. Excellent.

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    Liberating Structures review [App]  2019-11-17 13:45

    Amazing resource for LS right in your pocket!!!

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    Liberating Structures review [App]  2019-11-17 13:45

    Very helpful hints and exercises to plan any squad off-site or even a fast strategy session.

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    Liberating Structures review [App]  2019-11-17 13:45

    Simplicité

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    Liberating Structures review [App]  2019-11-17 13:45

    Wow! This application is so user friendly, I feel like I am with my book in my hands!

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    Liberating Structures review [App]  2019-11-17 13:45

    I didn't realise how useful having this items on the go is!

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    Structural review [App]  2019-5-12 13:6

    this application constantly crashes

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    Structural review [App]  2019-5-12 13:6

    [object Object]

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    Materials Engineering: Bonding, Structure, and Structure-Property Relationships review []  2019-12-23 20:27

    One of the best written crystal chemistry focused, materials engineering textbooks to date. Amazing for graduate and undergraduate levels alike!

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    Structure & Function of the Body - E-Book (Structure and Function of the Body) review []  2020-1-21 20:7

    Amazon's policy and assistance was GREAT!!!Having taken A&P Courses for years....this book and format is HORRID. I didn't have a choice on the book because of my classes. If you have a choice - look elsewhere!!!

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    Structure & Function of the Body - E-Book (Structure and Function of the Body) review []  2020-1-21 20:7

    Amazing book. Simple to follow, lots of pictures and extra knowledge tips. Glossary and index included. Goes over all major body systems as well as some body chemistries

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    Structure & Function of the Body - E-Book (Structure and Function of the Body) review []  2020-1-21 20:7

    The book is amazing but considering I purchased it brand new, it should have came with the access code for the evolve website. So now I have to purchase it separately which is incredibly inconvenient.

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    Structure & Function of the Body - E-Book (Structure and Function of the Body) review []  2020-1-21 20:7

    Unbelievable text - amazing depth, accessible yet concise, extremely well-written, with extra's and features for supplemental study. In a word, EXCELLENCE.

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    Structure & Function of the Body - E-Book (Structure and Function of the Body) review []  2020-1-21 20:7

    Amazing book for anatomy class, very simple read and you can download quizzes and self tests to support along the way!

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    Structure & Function of the Body - E-Book (Structure and Function of the Body) review []  2020-1-21 20:7

    I required this book for class and it is simple to understand and I like the detailed pictures which was simple to follow as well.

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    Structure & Function of the Body - E-Book (Structure and Function of the Body) review []  2020-1-21 20:7

    Very well organized, illustrated, and challenging text for the AAPC Anatomy class requirement as pre-requisite for Medical Coding certification.

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    Structure & Function of the Body - E-Book (Structure and Function of the Body) review []  2020-1-21 20:7

    Amazing book, simple to read, amazing edition

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    Structure & Function of the Body - E-Book (Structure and Function of the Body) review []  2020-1-21 20:7

    I bought this book used, it came like new. Just had few highlights and this book is so simple to understand break down each topic perfectly.

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    Structure & Function of the Body - E-Book (Structure and Function of the Body) review []  2020-1-21 20:7

    Simple to understand

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    Structural Analysis: With Applications to Aerospace Structures (Solid Mechanics and Its Applications Book 163) review []  2020-1-21 21:47

    The book itself is fine, but Amazon's kindle ver has incorrect page ordering. I spoke with several representatives and nobody was able to help me with this issue. They lied to me about being able to download the book to confirm my problem, and the whole experience was less than pleasant. However, I think this speaks more about the issue with Kindle books than with this particular text. I would buy a hardcover copy if I didn't already shell out for the Kindle version.

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    Structural Analysis: With Applications to Aerospace Structures (Solid Mechanics and Its Applications Book 163) review []  2020-1-21 21:47

    Very difficult to understand. Skips over a lot of of the fundamentals when explaining problems. Not recommended if you're trying to self-study for the course.

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    Structural Analysis: With Applications to Aerospace Structures (Solid Mechanics and Its Applications Book 163) review []  2020-1-21 21:47

    Although there is a lot of amazing material in this book, it is very hard to follow and should not be used for supplemental learning in mechanics education. Essential info and equations are scattered and badly presented. I would suggest multiple other textbooks over this one for engineering majors.

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    Structural Analysis: With Applications to Aerospace Structures (Solid Mechanics and Its Applications Book 163) review []  2020-1-21 21:47

    Covers a whole lot of topics. This book offers a lucid and thorough explanation for all subjects in Structures.

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    Structural Analysis: With Applications to Aerospace Structures (Solid Mechanics and Its Applications Book 163) review []  2020-1-21 21:47

    Amazing technical text for course work and beyond...

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    Structural Analysis: With Applications to Aerospace Structures (Solid Mechanics and Its Applications Book 163) review []  2020-1-21 21:47

    You can either read 60 pages of this overly wordy text or watch a ten min youtube video to understand a easy derivation.

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    Structural Analysis review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    Does what it says. Came in amazing condition.

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    Structural Analysis review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    The book has the same content at the American version, but some of the issues have a various number than the actual book

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    Structural Analysis review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    Arrived in not good condition

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    Structural Analysis review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    The spine of the book seems to be damaged quite significantly when received.

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    Structural Analysis review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    Great

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    Structural Analysis review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    Page numbers are off. Some of the first pages are missing (Deflection equations for cantilever beams). Hardcover is different.

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    Structural Analysis review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    Pages coming off spine

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    Structural Analysis review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    Amazing book

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    Structural Analysis review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    It was exactly what I had expected! Even newer then I anticipated.

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    Structural Analysis review []  2020-1-15 19:18

    good

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    Cinderella Liberator review []  2020-1-20 19:32

    I’ve been thinking about fairy tales a lot recently. Specifically feminist fairy tales. They aren’t a particularly fresh concept but in latest years there’s been a distinct increase in their numbers. At their best they can provide an innovative, sly commentary on everything that’s wrong with the Disney model. At their worst, they can be preachy, didactic, and not very much fun. The fun is necessary because that’s beautiful much the only reason children like fairy tales in the first place. What kid wants to be spoonfed some moral lesson couched in fairy tale trappings? A bit ironic, I guess, since there was a period back in the day when fairy tales were separated from their semi-sociopathic, very adult, beginnings and given a fast coating of moral teachings. Now we’re doing it again and the results are decidedly mixed. Generally what happens is that you’ll obtain a collection of tales, and each one will be a familiar fairy tale but with a modern twist. There’s nothing particularly original or kicky about these, and half the standalone feminist fairy tales do the same thing but in picture book form. That’s what’s so interesting about Rebecca Solnit’s Cinderella Liberator. It’s a reinterpretation of Cinderella, but done in such a method that’s fairly original. Wish to look at Cinderella through the mores of the 21st century? I suggest pairing yourself up with an artist that’s been dead for 80 years. Why it’s so crazy, it just might work.We all know the classic story of Cinderella. A girl who worked while her stepsisters flounced. A young woman who grew powerful from her chores, meeting people at the marketplace, understanding the logistics of keeping everyone fed. Small wonder that she’d also pine for something as fun as a amazing ball. Uninvited, she was clearly place out, but a fairy godmother helped her with the info and soon it was ball time. All this, we already knew. What changes is what happens when the prince, a perfectly decent guy, tracks her down afterwards. Instead of marrying him, the two begin talking about what they really want. For her, to have a cake store of her own. For him, a small more freedom and actual work. And when the amazing fairy tells them they have the power to take their future into their own hands, you can bet they do so and with stellar e author’s name on this one caught my eye. Solnit . . . Solnit . . . why did I know that name? Well, my day job is buying adult materials for my library and you just don’t forget a book with a title like Men Explain Things to Me. She’s apparently written seventeen of the darn things, but Cinderella Liberator is the first children’s title she’s tried. This could always be considered a point of concern. Adult authors can be very touch-and-go when it comes to writing books for kids. It’s baffling to watch these exceedingly clever wordsmiths just muck up picture books left, right, and central. Solnit’s a bit different. It helps that she has a powerful framework to work off of, and there are some nice moments. Lines like “She looked like a girl who was evening, and an evening that had become a girl.” Then there are the distinctly feminist touches. Solnit makes all the critters turn into footwomen and coachwomen, which wouldn’t really be a issue except that the accompanying illustrations don’t really back that change up. Other changes are a bit more surprising. In the story Cinderella’s stepmother transforms into “the roaring in the trees on stormy nights” which is one method of getting her out of the way.And yeah, I won’t lie to you. There’s going to be a kid reader out there that gets super upset that Cinderella doesn’t “get” to be a princess. You know kids. Changing the stories they know by heart isn’t always received with, uh, bliss. This begs the question of what age, precisely, you should hand this book to. I’d say that if a child is ready for a text-heavy book and isn’t a fairy tale / Disney fanatic then feel free to read it to them if they’re anywhere between 5-7. If, however, that child is utterly bonkers for the princessey aspects of the original, wait until they’re a small older. Say, 9 or 10 or even 11 or 12. An age when they’re a bit more intrigued by reinterpretations and stories that break down problematic texts. There’s a lot here to chew on and discuss with older kids. Amazing lines and the changes by and huge at said, one change Solnit created to the story was just baffling to me. For whatever reason, Solnit could not hold Cinderella parentless. So it is that the fairy godmother tells Cinderella at the end that, “You are the daughter of a amazing judge, who had to go far away to support others and thought his fresh wife and her daughters would be kind. You are the daughter of a amazing sea captain, who lost her ship at sea and will come home one day on another ship.” This just clutters up the story considerably. I mean, it’s nice to have parents and all, but at the same time it’s hard to care about this judge or sea captain, particularly when all you really wish to do at this point in the text is search out what Cinderella’s going to do with her life. Additionally, Solnit follows this section up with the fairy godmother, after expounding on how marvelous Cinderella’s true parents are, saying, “nobody is amazing or valuable because of who their parents are, or poor because their parents are bad.” Really? Because you just created it clear that our heroine has assassin cool parental units, whereas her stepsisters got stuck with a lady that ultimately dissolves into loud air due to her rotten nature. Strike this section from the book and you’d have a sleek, slim, handsome story. Which, for the most part, it really is.A amazing author once told me the difference between fairies and princesses. Fairies, she pointed out, are free. They zip about on wings. They have magic. They obtain to have adventures. Princesses, in contrast, wear corsets. They hang out in towers. Sometimes, if they’re lucky, they obtain to swim, but that never really ends very well. Half the time they’re yearning for freedom, but the min they obtain it (whether they’ve escaped sleep, the villain, poverty, you name it) they immediately obtain married and trapped in an all fresh way. I mean, if you had to choose, you’d go with being a fairy anytime, right? But there’s much that I can understand about the appeal of princesses. A lot of of the books about them present them getting wildly fancy. The meal looks good, and dress-up is fun. And who doesn’t wish to be gorgeous once in a while, I ask you? That’s what children are asking for when they ask for princess books. Maybe they wish the romance, but for a lot of them it’s the beauty. Therefore, if you wish to do a fairy tale that keeps its heroine from ever becoming a princess, you need to appeal to the fancy and the fun, but not go so overboard that true life pales horribly in comparison. Solnit says that when she was writing her ver of Cinderella she came across Rackham’s silhouette illustrations and fell in love. Not only that, he provided the excellent solution to this thorny ’s interesting to think that Arthur Rackham isn’t remembered for his silhouettes much at all, today. His paintings are always so grandly grotesque and strange that anything else he might have done could fade from memory quite easily. Looking at the art for this book, however, I was just floored by the man’s attention to detail. There’s a shot of Cinderella holding out her ragged dress, holes apparent and even her small sleeves spitting threads at the shoulders. It’s amazing but look at Cinderella’s feet. Rackham has taken the time to create her small toes splay out a little. The distinct gap between the huge toe and the rest of the foot keeps her from looking like she’s wearing ballet slippers or something. It’s a meticulous attention to detail that stands out to this day. Solnit also points out that in selecting this particular art, “Silhouettes meant that the story might not feel so racially determined as the other photos by Rackham”, a fact that I noticed as well. There’s a final shot of Cinderella speaking to some local kids that felt so modern (the kids’ clothes and hair honestly feel diverse and contemporary) I more than half wondered if the photo had been tweaked for a 21st century book. It hadn’t, for the Shannon Hale tells a story that perfectly highlights the issues that come with having issues with princesses. There was a well-meaning teacher reading her Princess in Black books to his students. As part of the lesson, he created it very clear to the children that when Magnolia was in her princess form, it was a poor thing, whereas when she was in her butt-kicking superhero form, that was a amazing thing. Hale protested this lesson, pointing out that there is nothing inherently wrong with one model or the other. The whole point is that Magnolia is free to CHOOSE whether or not she wants to be a princess or a superhero. Being a princess is absolutely fine if that’s what you choose. It’s having those choices taken away from you that create for huge problems. Cinderella in Solnit’s book is given that choice. She’s allowed to say what her dreams are, and then she goes out and attains them. And they’re not large ridiculous dreams but small, happy, manageable ones. Ultimately, that’s the bonus Ms. Solnit is giving children with this book. Thanks to Rackham’s art, they obtain the beauty of a princess story, and thanks to Solnit they obtain a feminist retelling that doesn’t sacrifice fun. When I read the title of this book, I assumed it would be about a Cinderella that freed everyone like some kind of 18th century Katniss Everdeen. Instead, she frees herself. And that’s beautiful amazing r all ages.

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    Cinderella Liberator review []  2020-1-20 19:32

    Cinderella Liberator is a new re-envisioning of the old fairy tale by one of our clearest progressive and feminist voices writing today, Rebecca Solnit. Gracefully illustrated with selections from Arthur Rackham's classic silhouettes, it retells the story for our time, with an emphasis on making and enabling free individual choices, on amazing will, economic justice, and finding one's right work, and on private joy and growth being tightly bound to an ethics of care and responsibility. Solnit's afterword is worth reading closely. Give it to a kid -- have fun it yourself -- as a collector of illustrated and retold fairy tales, this gets a prize spot on my shelf!

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    Cinderella Liberator review []  2020-1-20 19:32

    Our copy of "Cinderella Liberator" arrived yesterday, and I immediately sat down with my 5.5 and 2.5 year old and read it. It is unbelievable and delightful, and I highly recommend it for all ages. I didn't cringe or feel the need to change a single detail (a rare treat, especially with a fairy tale -- we've never found a ver of Cinderella I wanted to read my children before). Between Solnit's attractive writing and experiencing the differences between this tale and the one I grew up with, I occasionally felt a shiver run up my spine. I'd begin sharing favorite quotes, but I'd fill pages.

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    Cinderella Liberator review []  2020-1-20 19:32

    In this weak, wordy and convoluted retelling of Cinderella, the author insults the reader by switching from third person to second to create clear what is “good” and what is “not good.” The misuse of commas and the absence of semi colons are distracting and negligent. I am very disappointed in the story, the editing and illustrations.

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    Cinderella Liberator review []  2020-1-20 19:32

    Very nice book, the look of the pictures was beautiful. The theme of the book is finding your strengths, using your ambitions, being kind to others. Cinderella isn’t rescued but befriends the prince and they save themselves from situations they aren’t satisfied in by finding their passions and opening in their own businesses to search fulfillment. Has cute small pro-women things sprinkled in like “all dresses should have pockets”, and also more serious powerful feminist messages. Definitely would recommend. Amazing for ages 3-12, but I think any age would have fun it!

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    Cinderella Liberator review []  2020-1-20 19:32

    I loved the emphasis on the fact that people have choices in life. And the need for kindness in our interactions. There's a lot of grownup humor in here too. The story still retained all the main characters but reframed them in terms that are more modern.I didn't relate to the bit about Cinderella's parents returning. I didn't think the book required that but it certainly wasn't a deal-breaker for me. I bought the book to give to my 7-year old niece for Christmas.

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    Cinderella Liberator review []  2020-1-20 19:32

    I *love* this. The story removes all the absurd motifs of traditional femininity and replaces them with liberation and goodness. Spoiler alert: she and the prince become friends, not spouses. The satisfied ending is that everyone gets to be his or her best [email protected]#$%!/he determines. What a refreshing antidote to the Disney crap poisoning our children's minds with ideas of value that are shallow, but fierce traps.

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    Cinderella Liberator review []  2020-1-20 19:32

    Excellent bonus for young and not-so-young women. Rebecca Solnit liberates the characters to allow them become more complete human beings. I love the strength of Cinder Ella and the liberation of the step-sisters. Be sure to also read the brilliant BrainPickings blog about the book written by Maria Popova. Inspiring as we work to build the next generation of leaders -- both female and male.

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    Cinderella Liberator review []  2020-1-20 19:32

    There have been failed attempts to "update" classic fairy tales, often to create them less violent, less demeaning of women and girls, less prone to stereotyping of poor guys, and so on. They fail because they are lousy literature. Not this one! The writing is fluid and lovely, the psychological insight (an necessary feature of fairy tales) is profound, and the revisions to more familiar versions are witty and wise. Spoiler alert: there is no "happily ever after." This is the BEST ver of Cinderella since ever. A joy to read at any age!

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    Cinderella Liberator review []  2020-1-20 19:32

    Intoxicating, I want I had read this as a child. It would have been my compass helping me navigate my difficult life. Books have always been my compass, nature has always been my tiger balm. My inner kid loves this book. It's very ank You!

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    The Retreat of Western Liberalism review [Book]  2018-1-4 18:0

    The Retreat of Western Liberalism is the book I've been waiting for. Its sweep takes in America, the UK and continental Europe and highlights the structural forces that's ailing the middle classes across all those countries. Other books focus only on America, or Brexit Britain, or the French far right. Luce's work stands back from the particularities and brings out what is threatening the west in general. The writing is pacy and engaging. The analysis is acute and the forecast is troubling. As Luce argues, western liberalism is in retreat but that does not mean that it has collapsed. It is up to us - the readers - to do something about it. I couldn't recommend this book more highly. Five stars.

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    The Retreat of Western Liberalism review [Book]  2018-1-4 18:0

    I thought Mr. Luce's previous book, "Time to Begin Thinking" was disturbing. Then I began this one and it created the previous volume seem positively Pollyannaish. His dissection of the American and general Western political climate is spot on, and his extrapolation of the possible outcome of Mr. Trump's "leadership"is frighteningly plausible. And then he points out that, "...as Winter follows Autumn...", he fears what and whom follows Trump even more.And I'll be damned if I can come up with any sort of argument to refute his reasoning. It's a amazing reminder that amazing people of conscience must remain vigilant and prepared to take peaceful action to both resist the creep of autocracy, but also to rebuild the social compact that binds a nation together. It is our responsibility to be brave, to be strong, and to foster the trust that is the foundation of a free society.

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    The Retreat of Western Liberalism review [Book]  2018-1-4 18:0

    This is a difficult book to review because it has the ring of truth that most other authors either ignore or smother with self-serving propaganda to advance their political agendas. To write a proper review that conveys the entire notice of this book, I would have to quote almost all of it. It was one of those rare books that I read slowly in order to absorb it thoroughly and spread out the enjoyment of reading it over a lot of days.Edward Luce writes in a style you’d expect from a Globalist academic. However, he provides a deep and intellectually honest analysis of the broad spectrum of problems that have undermined globalism. He explores the root causes of our disappointing domestic and global economies, which are in turn unraveling the political and economic consensus for maintaining ’s a fun read because it relates the latest thirty years of history through Mr. Luce’s eyes. He talks about how life is lived not just by elitists like himself, but with a keen insight into the “forgotten middle class” that voted the USA and UK in Populist directions in 2016. He has been in the right locations to experience the highs and lows of latest history, starting with the win of the West in the Cold Battle of 1989.=====The year was 1989. Having grown up under the Cold War’s nuclear shadow, the temptation to catch a glimpse of its physical demise was irresistible. Being students, we did not inform anyone of our absence. The instant we heard East Germany had opened Checkpoint Charlie, uniting Berlin, we were on our way. We were infected with optimism. As a student of Philosophy, Politics and Economics at Oxford University, I imagined that I possessed the key to the historic significance of the arly three decades later, in the aftermath of Donald Trump’s 2016 election victory, I found myself in e worm had turned. America had just elected a president who was a huge fan of walls and a huge admirer of Vladimir Putin.=====Mr. Luce speaks not only for himself, but also for me. I, like millions of American Midwesterners, voted for Barack Obama in 2012, and Donald Trump in 2016. We flipped the states of Pennsylvania, Ohio, Michigan, Wisconsin, Iowa, (and also Florida) from Blue to Red, thereby transferring 99 of the electoral votes that elected Obama in 2012 to Trump in the main, we the people of PA, OH, MI, WI, IA, and FL are not ideology-bound political partisans. We voted our states for Obama in 2012 because we thought he was a fair-minded President who was moving the economy forward. We voted for Trump in 2016 because we thought he was more competent on economic problems of restricting excessive immigration and reining in ‘free” trade than Ms. Luce, being an academic economist of globalist bent, does not think much of Donald Trump. Nor does he create excuses for Ms. Clinton. “I have spent a fair amount of time interviewing leaders of ultra-nationalist movements, cult groups and fanatics of all kinds around the world. I have yet to come across a more airtight example of groupthink than Hillaryland.”His critique of Trump is that Trump appealed to the Populist, quasi-barbarian instincts of a disgruntled population. His critique of Ms. Clinton is that she tried to pretend that the disgruntled population did not exist. The same thing happened in Mr. Luce’s native Britain where the people booted the old order of Globalist Conservatives (roughly equivalent to our Republican Establishment) in the Brexit vote, but who are also unwilling to trust the left-of-center Labor Party to , what is it that has so a lot of people riled up, and leads them to reject the nostrums of both political part establishments? Luce illuminates the points as to what motivated so a lot of of people, including former Obama voters to switch to Trump:• By any numerical measure, humanity is becoming rapidly less poor. But between half and two-thirds of people in the West (USA and Western Europe) have been treading water – at best – for a generation. Tens of millions of Westerners will struggle to hold their heads above the surface over the coming decades.• The median income in 2007 was below what it was in 2002, at the begin of the business cycle that lasted for most of George W. Bush’s presidency. What is amazing for Apple may not be amazing for America. [Apple] shuttered its latest US production facility in 2004. The Bush expansion was the first on record where middle-class incomes were lower at the end of it than at the start. Today [after the Amazing Recession] the US median income is still below where it was at the beginning of this century. Clearly what the typical American understands by growth differs greatly from that of macroeconomists. GDP numbers insist we are doing well, at a time when half the country is suffering from private recessions.• Between a quarter and a third of people in the West have negative or zero net wealth. They face penurious retirements.• The most crushing result is stagnation. A lot of of the tools of modern life are increasingly priced beyond most people’s reach. In 1950 it took forty-five hours per month [to pay an average month’s rent]. Today it takes 101 hours. Much the same rising unaffordability applies to the cost of decent health insurance in America, and higher education.• When people lose faith in the future they are less likely to invest in the present. That sense of private stagnation – and the gnawing fear you may even be sinking – casts an enervating pall over the human spirit. Ronald Reagan once said, ‘Progress is our most necessary product.’• In 2000, exactly a third of Americans described themselves as lower class, according to Gallup. By 2015 that number had risen to almost half…They express a feeling people have about being shut out from society. It is a very un-American state of mind.• Today’s equivalent [of upward mobility] is probably ‘get an engineering degree’, but it will not necessarily be as lucrative. A third of Americans who graduated in STEM topics (science, technology, engineering and maths) are in jobs that do not require any such qualification. Up and down America there are programmers working as office temps and even fast-food servers. In 2006, Google bought YouTube for $ 1.65 billion. Such riches are small comfort to the thousands of engineers who cannot search work.• The next time an economist boasts about America’s low unemployment rate, remember that number means something very various from what it used to. This is not your parents’ economy [where everybody who wanted to work fulltime in their profession or trade had lifetime employment]. Almost half of Americans would be unable to pay a $ 400 medical emergency bill without going into debt.• The left urges incremental steps such as better worker training, smarter schools and infrastructure. These are worthy causes. But they are a bit like prescribing aspirin for cancer.• It should come as no surprise that democracies are now loath to ratify such [trade] agreements. Now Donald Trump has killed the Trans-Pacific Partnership, the deal that was launched by George W. Bush and completed by Barack Obama. Trump is also picking apart the Clinton-era North American Free Trade Agreement and has buried hopes of a transatlantic agreement. Britain, meanwhile, is abandoning the European single market. The world’s elites have helped to provoke what they feared: a populist uprising versus the globe economy.=====That sums up the method the American and British middle classes feel. Most see a dim future of declining wages and more frequent layoffs. “Getting a degree in STEM” isn’t going to support most people, because A) They don’t have the smarts to be engineers and B) STEM people are getting laid off too, as are bankers and stockbrokers. The “Populist” minded voters see a grim show and a worse future. The only thing propping up the USA economy is zero interest rates and a $20 trillion debt that is scheduled to rise to $40 trillion in 15 years. At some point it will become unpayable, and the USA will convert into a poverty-stricken banana republic. Perhaps it will dissolve under the weight of a failed capitalist economy, the same as the Soviet Union dissolved under a failed communist some ways, the USA and UK are even more oppressive of their citizens than was the old USSR. Foreign-born immigrants into the USA and UK keep vast amounts of government welfare assistance plus “affirmative action” programs that bring them to the front of the queue of jobs and education. Citizens born in the USA and UK pay taxes their entire lives and then are rewarded with layoffs and foreclosures in their 50’s and 60’s when they are most in need of financial stability. It is no surprise that people in both countries despise the Globalists of both parties who sent their jobs overseas, told them to “go to he**” and then opened the borders to millions of foreigners who are cherished as if they were born superior to the legacy citizens of the e other group who lives off the fat of the land without working very hard to earn it are the Globalist Crony Fatcat Society of politicians and the corporate CEO’s who own them. Their goal is to beat American and UK citizens out of their jobs and replace them with foreigners who will vote versus the citizens’ best at’s a comprehensive litany of complaints versus Globalization, but what is the solution?This is where Luce, like most every other author comes up short. His “solution” to the rollback of Globalism (which he equates with Liberal Democracy) is that we should be patient and let democracy to fulfill its function of electing leaders who will move the USA, UK, and the globe in the direction Mr. Luce desires. Indeed, this is precisely what happened with the election of Emmanuel Macron in France latest month.I, like a lot of Trump voters would prefer action to patience. Free Trade does not work in the best interests of the United States, and needs to be constrained. Why are we the ONLY country in the globe that runs $750 billion trade deficits each year? Why do other countries protect their markets from made-in-USA products, while demanding that we begin our shop to imports of their products?Why do we permit American companies to lay off American workers and move their jobs to Mexico and China?Why do our Republican and Democratic party Establishment leaders believe that foreign-born immigrants are superior to born-in-the USA citizens?Why do they always describe American citizens as “fat, dumb, lazy, and mal-educated” while assuming that half-educated, bomb-throwing, and crime-prone foreigners are superior forms of humanity?I am married into an all-Hispanic immigrant family who arrived in the USA legally. Some waited 12 years in queue for their number to come up. I am not at all anti-immigrant. Nor am I anti-globalist, having created much of my career writing software to manage trade between the USA and {Canada, Europe, Asia, the Middle East, and Latin America}. But I do wish trade and immigration to be managed so as to work for the American people instead of being used to beat them out of their jobs, while possibly internationalizing the USA out of its identify as a sovereign nation.I am rating this book four stars because I don’t believe in a patient waiting of things to sort themselves, thereby avoiding our taking action to strike at the root causes of our economic malaise. We have been waiting long enough for things to “sort themselves out” and they have only gotten worse. Now is time for action. Trump was elected because he was the only leader of either party who promised to do it. Brexit happened in the UK because people saw no reasonable hope of their economic fortunes improving by remaining in the Luce and I disagree profoundly on our proposed solutions to the economic malaise. But I immensely enjoyed Mr. Luce’s book and his intellectual honesty in pointing out the economic distress of the middle class that is causing the retreat of Globalism and Liberal Democracy (which in his view are one and the same)He’s a very talented writer who tells the story of his private journey into the center of the world’s amazing controversies. Whatever your political view, I believe you will take away the same feeling, as I did, that Mr. Luce is writing YOUR story as well as his own.

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    The Retreat of Western Liberalism review [Book]  2018-1-4 18:0

    Edward Luce is a tremendous journalist. Not only does he work very hard, not only has he earned access to some of the sharpest minds in business and politics, he also commands the mightiest pen at the Financial Times, bar none.And that’s why I bought his previous book, “Time to Begin Thinking.” I did not much have fun it, though. In fact I thought it a waste of my reading time, about which more later. But long after the average sensible reader would have dismissed “Time to Begin Thinking,” he might recall that on page 247 of this 2012 book Edward Luce beautiful much predicted that Donald Trump might one day become president, and the man has at’s not good news, because on pages 145 – 153 of “The Retreat of Western Liberalism” the oracle of 1 Southwark Bridge, SE1 (yes, I admit it, I looked up the FT’s address online) is predicting a battle between the US and China over Taiwan, to take put in year 2020, with a ceasefire to be negotiated by none other than Vladimir Putin. And, believe me, he makes it sound much more probable than a Trump presidency sounded back in e main thesis of the book, basically, is that perhaps the West has crossed a bridge to a put where liberal values such as openness and democracy may be in retreat, and then anything is possible. Radical uncertainty, here we ’s written very very well. And it covers a lot of ground. If you wish to obtain your thoughts together about what went wrong, this book truly summarizes 99% of all the amazing explanations I’ve ever read. My favorite is on page 47, where Luce outlines all the proof you need of the fact that the Democratic party these days only pays lip service to liberal values and mainly serves the rich: “every single one of America’s 493 wealthiest counties, almost all urban, voted for Hillary Clinton.” But it’s really all here, and (as the author promises in the introduction) you can read it all in the zone of three hours.If I had to recommend to a mate only one book to understand where we search ourselves today as a society, this would be the one. azingly, however, and this truly baffles me, the very best explanation I’ve ever read about what just happened in the US, not only was proposed by Edward Luce in the FT on July 31, 2016, but is conspicuous in the book through its absence. In an amazingly incisive article he penned at the time, Luce explained that an American is first and foremost a consumer and that it is primarily as a consumer that he is rebelling versus the system. I was dying to read the longer ver of this thesis, and in particular I was dying to see Edward Luce weave this explanation into the general theme of the decline of liberalism, but I guess the book had to obtain out quickly, so it’s not there. What a crying shame!So you will let me to be uncharitable for a millisecond and suggest that perhaps that favorite article of mine may have been ghostwritten by somebody like Larry Summers (for whom Luce has written dozens of speeches before) and here’s why I’m saying so: because Luce can write like God, it’s simple to forget that he does not always 100% know what he’s writing about and is merely sampling from sources he thinks are good, rather than doing the deep thinking himself. So a amazing 60% of his previous book is a paean to industrial policy (and indeed could easily pass for a Trump speech with all its China-bashing and FDA-bashing). Also, he really cannot resist a amazing quote, even if he has not read the source and does not understand the favorite example: he had to obtain the “Thucydides Trap” in there as an expression, it sounded too cool to leave out, but on page 156 he suggests that Sparta lost the Peloponnesian War. I’ve only really read the relevant history book in translation, I must admit, but I seem to remember they won, overwhelmingly…So read this book with caution. It’s truly fantastic, it’s the best summary in print of where we stand in the battle between our liberal beliefs and the forces of autocracy, but read it the same method you read WebMD if you think you’re sick: as a put to begin rather than end your diagnosis.

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    The Retreat of Western Liberalism review [Book]  2018-1-4 18:0

    Edward Luce is the Washington correspondent for the Financial Times. This is a short book, about 55,000 words. Luce summarizes what is ailing the West, and makes a few suggestions for the future. He is much better at identifying issues than finding solutions. I have enjoyed two of Luce’s earlier works, but I was a bit disappointed with this one. The book’s title is a small misleading. He is not referring to liberalism in an American sense, but liberal the first part of the book he covers a lot of familiar ground. China and India are on the rise. The West is in relative decline. The American model has been successful in that more people are being lifted out of poverty than at a faster rate than at any time in human history. However, the American globe order is starting to unravel. Most countries see the benefits of capitalism but they don’t necessarily wish democracy. A lot of countries appear satisfied with their authoritarian leaders. Trump seems to have acknowledged that this is the reality. Luce believes that the “reckless” foreign battles of George Bush have damaged America’s influence abroad, and its ability to promote democracy. China is not democratic yet it has the world’s biggest economy in PPP terms. China is unlikely to wish to inherit America’s global role. Luce predicts that the effect is likely to be chaos. Luce provides a long rant about Donald Trump and he suggests that a battle with China may come about because Trump is an rk Mazower, a professor at Columbia University, wrote “Dark Continent” in 1999. He argued that the 20th century in Europe was a war between three rival ideologies: communism, fascism, and liberal democracy. He concluded that most of Europe did not have much experience with democracy prior to 1945, so it was not inevitable that liberal democracy would victory out. It was a consequence of who won WW2. He believed that Europeans could have lived happily under authoritarian leaders and that it was democracy which was an aberration. He seems to have be proved right in Russia, Turkey, Hungary and Poland. Luce suggests that authoritarianism may be about to become the global norm. However, we have been here before. In 1980, half of Europe and much of Asia was ce writes about the decline of the Western middle class. Sending jobs overseas has benefited China, Mexico and Poland but it has reduced the standard of living of ordinary people in the West. The wages of Americans have stagnated since the 1970s and they have less job security. In an interview, Luce claimed that in 2000, 30% of Americans categorized themselves as lower class, but by 2016 that had reached 49%. Social mobility is now lower in the U.S. than it is in the UK. He suggests that when people don’t share in economic growth or are excluded from the affluence around them, this can become risky for societies and usually produces ce recognizes that globalization has made issues for ordinary people, but he also maintains that globalization is inevitable and resistance is futile. He discusses Brexit and accepts that the EU is undemocratic. Some of what it proposes, like the European Arrest Warrant, is at odds with ancient British liberties. However, most Europeans don't seem to mind. He also observes that poorer people often value democracy more than the rich and the elite. The main objective of the EU is to make a federal super state, a United States of Europe, without the democratic checks and balances. Some of its proposals have proved disastrous, like the single currency. The EU currently has a population of 508 million and it wants to expand to contain Ukraine, the Balkans and perhaps Turkey. EU citizens can live and work anywhere in Europe and that became an problem in Britain. Britons eventually discovered that they were supposed to regard national sovereignty as a thing of the past. A lot of Britons began to object and Brexit became an beautiful option for the growing number who did not like what the EU was becoming. Leaving became the only option because Britain could not search allies who shared its concerns. Luce works for an editor at the Financial Times who is a well known EU supporter, so he probably has to be careful what he says, but he does point out some of the EU's ce believes that the rich and the left are starting to become disenchanted with democracy. He describes the extraordinary inequality levels and views it as a fresh Gilded Age. With growing inequality, the rich begin to obtain nervous and start to fear the mob. One Fresh York billionaire suggested to Luce that there should be competence tests for voters, only well-informed people should have the right to vote. The left has also begun to despise the working classes. If you read the commentators in London’s left of center Guardian, a lot of seem to believe that ordinary people are not qualified to vote on problems like e left in the U.S. and the UK have made rainbow coalitions which have left out the traditional white working classes. The left has been taken over by people from elite universities. They have small in common with the often socially conservative white working classes, whose views on immigration are often regarded as racist by liberals. Politicians like Bill Clinton and Tony Blair chose to abandon not good white people in the 1990s. Obama bailed out Wall Road but not the ordinary people who had their houses foreclosed. The Democrats now keep huge donations from Wall Road and Silicon Valley, so their interests have ce has fun with Hillary's clueless election campaign. The Democrats believed that they had demographics on their side. They forgot that immigrants become like everybody else once they stay long enough. They can even morph into Republicans. Luce believes that by abandoning the politics of solidarity with the white working classes Democrats have shot themselves in the foot. Not good whites have turned to people like Trump because he is the only person who will listen to them. Luce does not see Trump or populist nationalists in Europe, like Marine Le Pen, as the causes of today’s crisis in democratic liberalism but rather as symptoms. Luce does not believe that Trump and Brexit are one-offs, they represent dissatisfaction with the status quo. He argues that Washington is out of touch, since 91% of D.C. voted for Hillary.What is to be done? Luce’s solutions are underwhelming. He calls for a Marshall Plan for the middle classes. This mostly involves retraining the people who lose their jobs because of globalization. He uses Denmark (population 6 million) as an example. He wants an increase in investment in education. He argues for a stronger safety net and universal health care. He complains about inequality but does not wish to increase wealth distribution because that would be poor for growth. However, the thirty years after WW2 were amazing for America and its middle class. The top tax rate during the Eisenhower era was 91%, while the economy grew by 37% during the 1950s. If ordinary workers have more cash to spend on goods and services that will generate economic growth, the very rich tend to stash their cash offshore.Where the U.S. differs from Denmark is that it is huge enough to change the rules of the game. It can create things happen rather than just react, like Denmark. These days, getting agreement on what needs to be done is a serious issue. Luce wants to look at gerrymandering because he argues that House representatives choose their voters. However, not enough people in the major parties seems to care enough about the white working class to resolve their problems. The growth of AI and the rise of the robots are likely to create things worse. He mentions that over 50% of current jobs can soon be done by machines. If we wish to avoid becoming a feudal society, we need to first admit we have a problem.

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    The Retreat of Western Liberalism review [Book]  2018-1-4 18:0

    The fall of the Berlin Wall brought widespread optimism and Francis Fukuyama's hope that we were witnessing 'the universalization of Western liberal democracy as the final form of human government. No longer would nuclear-armed ideological camps face each other across Europe. Warsaw Pact regimes were falling like dominoes to peaceful demonstrators. Nationalism was also dying, and a unipolar globe was dawning - per author Luce. The street seemed clear for Washington to lead the world, , almost three decades later 'the worm has turned.' Vladimir Putin is pursuing a reconstruction of Russia's former empire - while also rebuilding and modernizing its military, Donald Trump has rejected the nearly universal agreement to mitigate global warming, China is taking steps to grow its international influence and minimize that of the U.S. in the Pacific, the U.S. has squandered trillions of dollars and thousands of lives in the Middle East - with small or nothing to present for it, and North Korea's former piddling threats are becoming more serious and credible every year. Simultaneously, global economic insecurity is mounting - between half and two-thirds of those in the West have been treading water for a generation, though hundreds of millions in the Far East have benefitted. Automation threatens the structure of Western societies.Western democracies have been held together by economic growth. When that growth shrinks or disappears, things turn into a nasty zero-sum battle. The West's median income has barely budged in the latest half-century. Inequality is also growing - history reports that is like to greatly intensify economic wars and discontent. China has become the world's leading trading nation, and has a long method to go - along with India, South Korea, and Taiwan. Incomes in Africa, the world's worst-performing continent, have almost doubled since 1970. (Asia's per-capita incomes increased 5X since 1970 - in some parts such as Singapore and South Korea, incomes have either overtaken or are level with the West.)China's unorthodox route to development (eg. opening slowly and on its own terms) exposed the limits of the Washington Consensus. This was reinforced by it high growth rate being unaffected by the 2008 'Great Recession,' while eg. South Korea and Mexico (loose, if any, limits on capital inflow) incurred considerable upheaval. U.S. median income is still below where it was at the begin of this century. The top 1% share about one-third of global wealth, the 1,406 richest in the globe claim assets exceeding those of 250 million of the least wealthy ween a 5th and a 3rd of the Western labor force is already engaged in independent work, per the McKinsey Global Institute. (Some are supplementing full-time work.) This rising share of independent workers acc for all jobs growth since the Amazing Recession. There is now a higher share of French males in full-time jobs than Americans - a statistic that reflects poorly on America, rather than well on France. U.S. life expectancy has dipped in latest years - something not supposed to happen in peacetime. America's per-capita rate of patent applications filed in the U.S., Europe, and Japan (screens out the frivolous ones) has fallen by a quarter since 2000. The fastest-growing troops in huge Western companies are the legal and public relations departments. Huge companies devote the bulk of their earnings to buying back shares and boosting dividends, less than previously on R&ina's urban per capita income now approaches half that of the U.S.; a generation ago it was one-sixth. The median worker today paying median rent in one of U.S. huge cities uses 101 hours to cover his/her rent, vs. 45 hours in 1950 and 56 hours a generation nomists and politicians are notorious for getting the future wrong, as well as peerless at explaining the past. In latest years economists have consistently predicted growth where none has materialized - since 2008 forecasts have annually over-estimated the next-year's growth. Arguing for China's admission to the WTO, President Clinton stated that China's entry would reduce America's bilateral trade deficit with lower tariff rates on its imports. Since then America's trade-deficit with China has leapt almost five-fold and China and its peers can now bank on the help of their biggest foreign investors. China's economy surpassed the U.S. in terms of purchasing power parity in 2014, and will likely be double that of the U.S. by 2050 - 100 years after its communist revolution. By then, India's will be roughly the same size as America's.When people lose faith in the future, they're less likely to invest in the present. Currently, the proportion of French males in full-time jobs is higher than that in America. Overdose rates have tripled since 2000. Rising intolerance and incivility are consequences of stagnation in American middle-class living standards.Every one of the 493 wealthiest counties, almost all urban, voted for Hillary. The remaining 2,623, mostly suburban or little city dominated, voted for -third of Americans who graduated in STEM topics are in jobs not requiring such bought U-Tube for $1.65 billion in 2006 - paying $25 million for each of the 65 employees at the time. Fb bought Ig for $1 billion in 2012 - 13 were then employed = $77/employee. The WhatsApp with 55 employees was purchased for $19 billion in 2014 --> $354 million/employee. Fb servers are managed by one technician/20,000 computers. The median pay for U.S. entry-level graduates @#$%!52,000 in 2000, down to $46,000 in 2014; flat for re than 160 million westerners now work in the 'gig economy,' per McKinsey. Of these, about a third do so 'out of necessity.' The bottom half of Americans own just 1% of the nation's wealth. Full-time employment has shrunk 0.1%/year since the 2008 nce the turn of the millennium, and especially over the past decade, 25 democracies have failed. Poland may soon join them. Latest December, hard-right nationalist Norbert Hofer came very close to winning Austria's presidency. Le Pen's Front National has the help of about 40%. Distrust in American politics almost paralyzes the turn of the millennium, there were more than 100 democracies worldwide. It was believed that one could not develop an economy without democracy, and that the Washington Consensus provided the toolkit for developing an economy. These beliefs ignored obvious exceptions such as the U.S. and England pursuing protectionist policies early on, and Bismark's Germany and Japan's Meiji Restoration. There also was Russia's disastrous 1996 shock therapy privatization and elimination of price controls - with democracy, and China's avoidance of the 2008 Meltdown by its ignoring the Washington Consensus (South Korea, Mexico and other East Asian nations were pummeled for allowing unregulated capital inflows.) There are now 25 fewer democracies - including Russia, Venezuela, Turkey, Thailand, and Hungary.We still call the 2008 meltdown a global recession. Actually, it was an Atlantic recession - in 2009, China's economy grew almost 10% and India's by almost 8%. Since 2009, the U.S. economy grew by roughly 2%/year, yet it's taken until 2015 for the median income to regain the level it was at prior to the Amazing Recession. U.S. median income is still below where it was at the beginning of this century - yet, GDP numbers say we're doing well. Under the old model, where most production was clustered behind national barriers, what was amazing for G.M. was amazing for America. Today, what is amazing for Apple (shut its latest U.S. production facility in 2004) may not be amazing for ipulations of truth have become almost a everyday occurrence since Trump's election. Prior to that came Bush II's falsely 'justified' invasion of Iraq, torture, and Bremer's inept management of ina's development banks are providing loans without pro-democracy strings. The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank was panned by Obama - yet, Britain, France, Germany, and Australia joined as charter members. Beijing now has over 500 Confucian Institutes worldwide. It's aim is to rupture the West's claim to most 40 nations, led by Russia and China, have muzzled/expelled foreign NGOs since 2008, mostly Western. China's CCP views U.S. democracy as run by America's moneyed classes to defend the interests of capital, and its Democracy as a sham. Trump serves neither Wall Road nor Luce sees 'Hillaryland' as one of the world's strongest examples of 'groupthink.' U.S. voters describing themselves as independent has been rising for years. More than half of U.S. Hispanics prefer to call themselves white - thereby undermining the logic that minorities will become a majority in 2044. A greater share of Hispanic voters backed Trump in 2016 than Romney in 2012. Democrats giving higher priority to the politics of ethnic identity than people's common interests contributes to factionalism and racism. At the turn of the century, 11% of Brits saw immigration as a top concern - now it's up to ce ends by posing how today's environment could easily escalate into armed confrontation. Secretary of State Tillerson spoke of denying access to the South Sea islands China claims. Anti-dumping duties on China. Chinese missile tests. U.S. action on North Korea. U.S. flights and ships patrolling/spying just outside ump's White House squad has publicly told U.S. diplomats to resign rather than express misgivings via the State Department's long-standing dissent channel that permits concerns to be forwarded anonymously. Trump has come out as anti-NATO, anti- European Union, anti-Paris global warming pact. Eventual effect - chaos.

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    The Retreat of Western Liberalism review [Book]  2018-1-4 18:0

    Luce’s work walks into the morass of modern times showing what was the pride of Western Societies -- Liberalism that had evolved out of the Enlightenment as power was dispensed more broadly and the term Citizen took on meanings of obligations but also of entitlement -- has slowly evaporated so that now the Citizen is the voter, or apathetic, and the power lies the American case he shows the slow development of a just society coming out of WWII with institutions in put to control the turbulence of the shop economy and simple the hardships of the unfortunate and a political system capable of compromise and even compassion. Then its elements fall away. Have you noticed?Democracy itself has become suspect; not only here but in general. As Brecht once said: ‘All power comes from the people. But where does it go?’Luce’s style mixes hard facts with a playful take on current personalities ruling the headlines, but never misses the development of the underling story of societies in turmoil. On Trump his concern is who comes next as the failure of his tenor passes.What he raises well is the Sustainability of the prevailing Inequalities that have formed in current times. The rich are riding high but will need to explore means to offset the discontent created, or fortify their quarters. He covers a lot of of the suggestions* that are developing to deal with the further displacement expected from automation and artificial intelligence. The West is in retreat. “For the first time in centuries, the West must obtain used to that. It has to learn the arts of persuasion and compromise.” A very wise ce’s The Retreat of Western Liberalism is a kind smart forceful synopsis of our times, a amazing read of discovery for those wishing to obtain back to the role of ‘Citizen.’*(Austria has had for a long time a U.B.I. system for those interested in the topic.)

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    The Retreat of Western Liberalism review [Book]  2018-1-4 18:0

    I loved Edward Luce’s writings during the US presidential election on the struggles of middle class America, and why people would (and ultimately did) vote for Donald Trump. I have been waiting for his broader take, and I wasn’t e Retreat of Western Liberalism is quick paced and simple to read. The core argument is that “it’s the economy stupid” and the Left (and the Right for that matter, but his focus is on the Left), has been too focused on identity politics to offer effective solutions. Luce also shows convincingly that the issue isn't restricted to the United States, his basic focus. All liberal democratic societies are struggling as globalization upends existing economic arrangements. It's a broad structural issue that won't be solved through the lens of identity r Luce the entire liberal order is on the verge of collapse (i.e., liberals aren’t being hysterical), and preserving it will be really really hard. But its a cause he believes in, and one he's willing to war for. This isn’t a fun book, but it’s an necessary book. It should definitely be on the must read list of anyone trying to figure what in the globe is going on.

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    The Retreat of Western Liberalism review [Book]  2018-1-4 18:0

    Edward Luce is English, well educated, and experienced -- served as bureau chief for the Financial Times for four years in India, then in D.C. for a lot of years. Unlike the U.S. press, which always writes as though both American political parties were equally devious and dangerous, he writes explicitly about the turn of the Republicans to deception, bold faced lying, disinformation, and stoking racial and economic hatreds in their quest to establish a plutocratic ver of fascism in the U.S. He knows economics, trade, foreign leaders and capitols, and current history. By Western Liberalism he does not mean the U.S. Democratic Party, he means "liberalism," the whole panoply of rights and values associated with the Enlightenment, individualism, freedom of choice, and responsibility. What we are getting is a bastardized form of authoritarianism. We are ripe for this due to thirty years' worth of flat income levels for everyone below the top 10% and a bleak future of a lot of more jobs lost to robotics and vulture capitalism. I learned a amazing deal reading the book, even though I have been a close and frustrated observer of the passing stage for more than 60 years.

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    The Retreat of Western Liberalism review [Book]  2018-1-4 18:0

    A brilliant analysis of the reasons behind much that is going on in the globe and America's put in it. Luce's description of the dangers of Trump are at times frightening. This is a book everyone interested in western democracy's sad state should read. Populism,nationalism and their connection to the decline of the middle class is explained clearly and convincingly.

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    Animal Liberation Conference review [App]  2018-5-21 21:6

    Vegan living! Application it up to save animals!

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    Animal Liberation Conference review [App]  2018-5-21 21:6

    Awesome! This is an awesome conference of activists who truly love animals!

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    Animal Liberation Conference review [App]  2018-5-21 21:6

    Amazing app. Just needs people to use it. Maybe contain a list of all users and a method to text them.

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    In Defense of a Liberal Education review []  2019-12-18 20:33

    This is a marvelous book. It clearly defines what a liberal education is, describes the history of universities through the ages, explains various models for running universities and other organizations of learning, and debunks urban myths about why, for example, Chinese students try two years ahead of their U.S. counterparts (it's because the go to school much more of the year than students do in the U.S., so that when this oft-cited) try is given, the Chinese students have literally been in school two years longer than US students of the same age!). The author also gives a very private acc of the experiences he and his brother has coming to US universities in the very early wave of Indian students who were middle class and had just been stripped of any possibility to gain scholarships to study in England, the traditional destination for Indian scholars to pass through. Thanks to Margaret Thatcher, the brightest Indian minds came to the US, if not all of a sudden, quite soon. I cried when reading excerpts from the article written by the author's mother after dropping her older son off at Harvard. It created me think of my country as it was, a country that has been lost in the latest political upheavals and surging xenophobia. I hope we regain that place, that dignity, and I hope that the liberal education defended by Mr. Zakaria regains its proper respect because it trains people to think for themselves in a critical, data-driven manner, whether for self analysis or globe ank you, also, Fareed Zakaria, for your defense also of young people today and your dismissal of the stereotypes so famous with old men, white and American or , I am not my father and could never be him. However, I know that he would have loved your book also, being a physicist who grew up in the slums during the Amazing Depression, spoke a lot of foreign languages, loved literature, the symphony, art and theater, and who traveled the globe to work with scientists of a lot of nations order to carry out his life's work.

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    In Defense of a Liberal Education review []  2019-12-18 20:33

    This is a fascinating review of why youth should seek education for learning's sake rather than to obtain a particular job. They should be learning "for their 6th job rather than 1st job." It gives a amazing perspective and hope for the current generation of youth, pointing out their pluses when so a lot of people focus on the negatives of the generation. Even my 10th grade daughter read the bulk of it after looking up certain parts for a research paper on millennials. You know the book is something unique when your teen says "This is beautiful interesting," without being needed to read it. Zakaria is a talented scholar and pundit. This book is a worthwhile investment for anyone with children, particularly teens, those who work with youth, or anyone who has (or wish to have) hope for the future. It is also well done enough and interesting enough to catch the interest of a college bound teen. I want more writers gave us this type of amazing info without being so dense as to be unreadable. "In Defense" tells a story, educates, and promotes ideas for the benefit of youth and society - all in a readable format.

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    In Defense of a Liberal Education review []  2019-12-18 20:33

    Fareed Zakaria is an American journalist from Mumbai, India. He writes a weekly column for the Washington Post. He is the host of CNN Global Public Square (GPS) that discusses issues plaguing the globe and possible solutions. He has authored a few books including “In Defense of a Liberal Education” and “The Post-American World.”Zakaria is extremely astute in his analysis regarding liberal education. Higher education programs have moved away requiring liberal arts courses in their programs. The main focus is learning the skills important to search employment upon graduation. Zakaria argues that it the study of liberal arts and humanities that gives people the common ground for mutual respect, understanding, and to have meaningful conversations. He discusses the aristocratic origins of the liberal arts and why such education is no longer compulsory. He compares the experience of being raised in India and then coming to America to study at a university vs that of a student raised in America.Our vocational programs no longer require writing papers. We no longer write clear and concise. Zakaria points out to write clearly one must think clearly and organize one’s thoughts. I found this to be real in latest graduate courses. Students would submit their responses to assignments but they were not clear. They rambled with run-on sentences and would become defensive if I asked for clarification. It seemed they never revisited what they wrote before submitting it. I found it frustrating that professors did not keep students accountable for quality writing with clear and developed ideas. Thank you for indulging me in my grumbling. If our higher education institutions do not uphold academic standards this is a disservice to the students. Something that is missing the amount of reading required. Reading comprehension is a necessity. The best method to write better is to read, read, and beral arts helps students to speak. In India, part of a student’s grade is the ability to speak and communicate your mind. As Zakaria points out, to clearly verbally the thoughts of one’s mind requires an understanding one’s mind. It is important to pause and place thoughts into a logical order so others may understand the message.Another strength Zarakia attributes to liberal education is learning how to learn. He realized his most necessary gain from college and graduate school is understanding how to acquire knowledge on his own. Much is this is seeking out fresh resources and doing research. He learned how to read papers and books and understand the author’s premise. He learned to approve and to respectfully disapprove the hypothesis. He learned how to professionally show an opposing view. For Zakaria, and hopefully most of us, learning is a pleasurable journey of exploration.Vocational skills may likely be irrelevant in the work after graduation. Learning how to learn, verbally communicate, develop and try ideas are skills that will a lifetime. A liberal education re-establishes the mutual ground of knowledge to foster relationships, respect, and humankind. With so a lot of Heavy Begin Online Courses (MOOCs) there is still the opportunity to study and learn humanities, history, art, and culture.If you have not watched Fareed Zakaria’s GPS present I highly recommend it. His analysis is through, developed, and logical. His presentations are clearly articulated. This is the effect of hard work, focus, and being willing and knowing how to learn. Some people suggest the audience is parents and prospective students. I believe this would be a wake-up for higher education institutions and for legislatures defining public education policy.

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    In Defense of a Liberal Education review []  2019-12-18 20:33

    “I hope that all of you who graduate today, and who experience the power of education in your own lives, will become advocates for the value of higher education in our society. There is a national conversation taking put right now about the value of higher education, and we need your voice in that conversation. We need you, in other words, to support others to achieve in the future what you achieve today.” - Christopher L. Eisgruber, President; Princeton University; Commencement Speech, June calling for advocates for the value of higher education, President Eisgruber, as well as all others so concerned, might well be happy with Fareed Zakaria’s well thought out and articulated book, ‘In Defense of a Liberal is insightful book, begins with the following quote:“We are drowning in information, while starving for wisdom. The globe henceforth will be run by synthesizers, people able to place together the right info at the right time, think critically about it, and create necessary choices wisely.” - E. O. Wilson… and, concludes with the following selected words from the author …“Because of the times we live in, all of us, young and old, do not spend enough time and effort thinking about the meaning of life. We do not look inside of ourselves enough to understand our strengths and our weaknesses, and we do not look around enough - at the world, in history - to ask the deepest and broadest questions. The solution surely is that, even now, we could all use a small bit more of a liberal education.” - Fareed ZakariaThe main content of Mr. Zakaria’s perfect book, is clearly sandwiched between these two meaningful quotes, and I can assure you, that investing the time and effort requisite to search out what that content was - was clearly the privilege of this reader, and therefore, I highly recommend it!

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    In Defense of a Liberal Education review []  2019-12-18 20:33

    Fareed Zakaria has written some very amazing books before, including The Future of Freedom and The Post-American World. Those were like his TV present on CNN--smart, knowledgeable discussions of politics and global affairs, helping readers understand what was going on in the world. This book is different. First of all, it's shorter and simpler. Second, it's more personal. The whole first chapter, for example, is about his own childhood and education, and throughout he talks directly to the reader in a conversational tone, often about his own experiences. And third, the topic of the book is education--what it really is and how to obtain it. He argues that a liberal education--studying a broad range of subjects, including the humanities such as history, literature, and the arts--is the best method to train one's mind and even character. Instead of using school to obtain facts or pre-professional training, this kind of education teaches you to read, to write, and to learn, all of which let you not only to retool yourself over time, but to live a conscious, self-aware life. The book moves on from that to discuss education more generally, as well as the qualities of young people today, and what all that says about the state of the globe and its e obvious target audience is students and their parents, and in fact the book grew out of a commencement speech he gave a while back. But it's one of those plain, wise talks that sticks with you, because it says necessary things well. Why do I say it's his most necessary book? because what he's really doing is explaining how he developed the mental tools to write his other books, and offer the commentary that he does every week on his show, in his column, and in his talks. In this book, he's not offering readers fish--he's trying to teach them how to fish, so they can catch the slippery small buggers themselves. Zakaria haters will scoff, and there are obviously a lot of those. But ignore them: if you've watched or read him and wondered how he became so well-informed and thoughtful, this is his answer--and he makes it completely clear that it applies to everybody. It's a must read not just for his fans, but for anybody who cares about education and living a full, rich mental life.

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    In Defense of a Liberal Education review []  2019-12-18 20:33

    Technically, I give this book a 3.5 score. I did like it and it was worth the time. It's well written and it's short. The case Zakaria argues is simple: is college worth it? For the most part, he has some amazing ideas and evidence of college grad value. However, it's just not quite enough to convince me that it should be held in such high n't obtain me wrong. I have two master degrees and I thought college was valuable. However, my student debt and current job would argue the opposite. We're all wondering about the real value of a 4-year degree given the non-stop tuition hikes and questionable job prospects post-graduation. If you had a kid today, chances are by the time they're 18 you will be staring down $300,000+ in college tuition for a decent school. That's where tuition and the economy is going these days according to the experts. That's a lot of cash to spend on a speculative future.I think Zakaria's huge task was to give solutions or options to create college a amazing choice. He required to jump more into the intrinsic and extrinsic value. His quote about Jeff Bezos needing execs that can write well was a step towards this. People need to be T-shaped workers: a small width (broad knowledge of similar subjects) and quite deep (narrow, specialized knowledge one masters in that field).Elon Musk has a better answer. I know that private accounts are hardly amazing evidence, but the man runs four history-making companies. There is some value in this. He writes:“It is necessary to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree — make sure you understand the fundamental principles, i.e., the trunk and huge branches, before you obtain into the leaves/details or there is nothing for them to hang on to.”If liberal arts colleges and Zakaria expanded on that, I think a stronger argument for a liberal arts college could be created for both intrinsic and extrinsic value.

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    In Defense of a Liberal Education review []  2019-12-18 20:33

    “There is today a loss of coherence and purpose surrounding the idea of a liberal education.”Nearly every week I see an article online about which college degrees lead to the best paying careers and which ones do not. I read these articles and I am saddened. These articles promote education only as a means to earn money. And schools are partly to blame. For decades, colleges and universities have been avidly advertising the (very true) fact that people with a college degree earn significantly more cash over their career than their non-degree holding counterparts.While it is not evil to consider job prospects and salary when choosing a school or major, it is completely gut-wrenching to see a student choose a business degree rather than melody solely based on future job possibilities. It is so difficult to see students choose a path of comfort over a path of courage and passion.When I was in college I chose a major I was passionate about. I had no clue what job I would obtain with it, but I knew my passion would be contagious in whatever vocation I choose. Things worked out for me, I know for every success story there is a discouraging Defense of a Liberal Education by Fareed Zakaria is about turning back to the foundation of liberal education. “The solution to the issues of a liberal education is more – and better – liberal education.” This is a unbelievable and concise book that describes that challenges and benefits of a liberal education in a modern Western society.I highly recommend this book as a ringing endorsement for a liberal education.

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    In Defense of a Liberal Education review []  2019-12-18 20:33

    If you believe the globe is headed to hell in a hand basket, or that today’s over-programmed, over-anxious millennials will drop civilization’s ball when it is handed to them, read this then karia is uniquely gifted and informed to describe Western civilization’s ambiguous, on-again, off-again relationship with philosophy and science beginning with Prometheus. (Why did Zeus torture the titan who brought fire and knowledge to humans? And later why does the God of the Old Testament punish Adam and Eve for tasting the forbidden fruit of knowledge?) No other globe religions are founded on the premise that knowledge of the globe is evil and a seditious insult to the authority of the gods.And yet it is the western academy with its secular liberal educational values that has driven disease, ignorance, squalor, battle and intolerance into retreat behind its relentless pursuit of this knowledge.Whether you agree or disagree with the thesis, you should read this crisp summary of the role that the expansion of general knowledge continues to play in improving civilization.

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    In Defense of a Liberal Education review []  2019-12-18 20:33

    In his treatise In Defense of a Liberal Education, journalist and political commentator Fareed Zakaria makes a fervent appeal to recognize the significance of humanities and the arts to the development and sustenance of our global society.He says, "Technical skills by themselves are a unbelievable manifestation of human ingenuity. But they don't have to be praised at the expense of humanities, as they often are today. Engineering is not better than art history. Society needs both, often in combination."At a time when technology has come to dominate the discourse in all spheres of human endeavour, and especially education, Zakaria's impassioned plea may seem antediluvian, if not irrelevant.His argument is compelling, but it's unlikely that it'd amount to anything more than a amazing read, and a reaffirmation of the values that are necessary to people like me. This is because education is linked to jobs, and jobs in the 21st century will require advanced technological a father of an 18-year-old, I'm apprehensive when my son decides that he'd rather test to be a broadcaster than become an engineer. This fear stems from a concern that it'd be a waste of resources to acquire an education that may not guarantee a stable, long-term career. I'm sure this apprehension, is shared by parents everywhere.And Zakaria, too, accurately captures the cause of this apprehension:"A amazing college degree has become more crucial in everyone's mind. The post-industrial economy rewards people who have academic training and credentials, or "knowledge workers," even more so than before. College sports have become more famous and more profitable for the schools. But they face one trend that seems utterly unsustainable: the rising cost of college. The average college tuition has increased at an eye-popping pace - over 1,200 percent since 1978, the first year complete records were kept. That is four times the pace of the consumer price index and twice as quick as medical costs. This extraordinary cost spiral, in an age when the prices of almost all goods and services have declined, is surely one of the most striking phenomena in modern American life, and it has largely been accepted without much controversy."That rise in cost is at the heart of a lot of of the concerns about the value of a liberal education. After all when one is questioning whether a product is "worth it" - be it an outfit, a car, or an education - crucial to that determination is its price. A liberal education was affordable to a middle-class family in 1965. It is much less so today. That means families have to create trade-offs between spending cash on an education and earmarking it for other things. It's often noted that the data present that a college degree improves one's lifetime earnings, so that even a huge investment in a college education is worth it. That may be true, but it also explains why families so anxious about this onerous price mark worry endlessly that their son or daughter could jeopardize everything by majoring in the "wrong" topic or getting a less marketable degree. The fact that we now use the language of `return on investment' to describe the experience of getting educated is revealing."The book is focused on the educational system in the United States of America, but it has a broad historical and geographical sweep that takes into acc global developments in the karia is a amazing polemicist, he marshals facts to suit his arguments, and cleverly juxtaposes facts and opinions. To his credit, he doesn't hide or camouflage his bias. For instance, at one point, he says, "For me, the central value of a liberal education is that it teaches you how to write, and writing makes you think. Whatever you do in life, the ability to write clearly, cleanly, and reasonably quickly will prove to be an invaluable skill."I wouldn't expect a writer - and he's extremely gifted - to say anything different.I want my son reads this

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    In Defense of a Liberal Education review []  2019-12-18 20:33

    Well researched and written. A thoughtful piece on the value of a LA education. I was particularly impressed with the ancient roots of the tradition. A must read for those who think university education is some sort of job training program. I don't know how a lot of people I've watched over the decades go in chasing the hot degrees only to emerge 4 years later into an overcrowded field. Or who took bailout majors just barely within the figleaf of the undergraduate school of business and were essentially both unemployable and uneducated. (I've long thought that accounting and finance should be moved to the Math department and Economics to the Social Sciences and all undergraduate Schools of Business be closed as a farce perpetrated on students and their parents).Knowing how to think, having things to think about, material to work with, knowing how to learn and to be self-taught, are vastly more useful lifeskills than a lot of of the degrees students are being stampeded into today. In the end, I created a living with a $5,000, two-week SQL database course a lot of decades ago, but I lived inside of and through my Liberal Arts education. And my life has been all the richer for it.

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    Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down review []  2019-12-23 20:23

    Structures: Or why things don’t fall down A very interesting book, covering a wide field of topics, from the ground up you might sic concepts of forces are addressed. Compression, tension, shear and torsion forces, and their occurrence in everything from bridges, ancient coliseums, trees, boats and human biology. This, the author does very well; constantly interweaving the effects of different types of strains and stresses and fractures as they occur in wood construction and metal beams, as well as human skeletons and asons for, and types of failure are described for wood, concrete, boat sails, steel, femurs and aortas. Advantageous shapes of design for handling wind and accepting impacts are given, and reasons for spoke wheels. Critical and safe limits of fatigue and fracture are described…historical cases are offered, describing why early aero planes crashed and bridges fell down, and why boats utions are pointed out. Over design of repair: The repair must work in harmony with the repaired material, and not be so unyielding that it works versus it. So a lot of invisible forces of tension and compression are at play, and violation of acceptable limits must be watched for when they manifest in fractures.Different approaches to bridge trusses are explained, not so much mathematically, but in concepts of load bearing and the transference of force throughout the truss. By method of example, Bowstring bridges seem quite clever in design, where the internal force of the arch pulls the roadway below it taught so that the whole thing is held in equilibrium like a bow and arrow on a giant e all necessary “thrust line” is a constant theme from chapter to chapter. Now I know why those old cathedrals have so a lot of spires and spooky statues method up there, and it’s not for warding off evil spirits, it’s because they’re ere are photographs, all clumped together in the middle of the book. Black and white, kind of blurry, but still a helpful aid. Very nice drawings, not blurry, and graphs are abundant in all chapters to support visualize the subjects being ese and a lot of more subjects and app fill this book, none of it came across as boring or yond the final chapter, a few concepts are given a light mathematical treatment. Moments in I-beams, deflections in cantilevers and so e pages are created of sturdy massive paper, the printing is nice size and clear for those who require reading glasses, with ample zone around the print for making marginal notes.

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    Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down review []  2019-12-23 20:23

    I want Gordon was my Strength of Material Professor. His grasp of the topic is only exceeded by his writing minds me of Richard Feynman in his knowledge and his ability to teach a complex topic..BTW this is on the recommended book list of Elon Musk. That's a nice endorsement.

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    Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down review []  2019-12-23 20:23

    What this book does very well is demonstrate the scientific process from a practical and engineering perspective. The book is written sort of like a narrative, and the historical descriptions take on a nearly first-person feel to it. It's almost like 'you' can experience the evolution of thought and understanding of structural 's as close to a representation of how science is actually done as I've seen. Very though, the guy tends to obtain a bit verbose and it sometimes feels like words were added to create his stream of consciousness writing create sense to others, but not enough words were taken away later.

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    Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down review []  2019-12-23 20:23

    I thought this would be a bit dry, but it's geared toward the layperson, and it's informative and entertaining.

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    Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down review []  2019-12-23 20:23

    Written by an Englishman with dry wit, this is a textbook that lay persons such as I can read smoothly and enjoyably. There are 24 image plates in the middle, and stick drawings on almost every page. Mathematical formulas abound, but if you don't like math, you can skip the formulas and continue reading with pleasure.

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    Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down review []  2019-12-23 20:23

    I just finished reading this, and it's been such an enjoyable and enlightening experience that I plan to reread it again soon. It's suitable for almost anyone, and the writing style just carried me along effortlessly.I was surprised to gain an necessary bit of understanding from this, that as our level of technology advances, the production of engineering materials becomes increasingly energy-intensive, and the economy does as this; it's fun, and you'll gain a fresh appreciation of all kinds of things you see every day.

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    Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down review []  2019-12-23 20:23

    This classic book was a amazing read, especially the dramatic stories told with humor of old technology in ships and bridges when they failed. I read it due to Elon Musk's recommendation in his list of "must read" books. I learned here the basics of structural engineering, at least ever, I didn't like the not good job done turning this into an ebook. A lot of of the scanned illustrations were of not good quality and the text had a lot of mistakes caused by not good optical hero recognition (OCR) and not good proofreading. Luckily the author's intent was usually clear, even though the OCR errors were plentiful.

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    Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down review []  2019-12-23 20:23

    I read about 20 books/year, This book is literally one of the best books i have ever read in my life. Math is very minimum some complicated items but very rare and a must read for every Mechanical/Civil engineer.

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    Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down review []  2019-12-23 20:23

    Amazing book! I’m a chemical engineer but have worked on a lot of mechanical things and always has an interest in mechanics of materials and structures in particular. Gordon gives a lot of foundational insights which aren’t taught in typical engineering courses.

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    Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down review []  2019-12-23 20:23

    I'm an architect and am familiar with structural concepts, systems, technical documents and how these apply to every day life, especially buildings . I could imagine for the lay person, this would be very boring reading and likely misses the tag on several counts for someone to gain understanding. This book covers a wide range of structural problems including the structural stresses and strains and evolution of the human body. It's an "OK" book, but don't read every word. It gets into the weeds for the average person to understand.

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    Mechanics of Aircraft Structures review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    This is the worst textbook I have ever attempted to utilize during my college career, and that says a lot about how useless this textbook is. It is extremely inefficient and offers zero explanations and presents everything in the most useless and overcomplicated manner than will confuse the experienced reader. There is practically nothing to "learn" from this book unless you are a professional engineer and have previously mastered everything this book attempts to present. If you are a student, I can without a doubt say that purchasing this textbook is not worth your cash and certainly not worth the amount of time you will waste trying to learn the basics in it. I sincerely hope that the author and publisher of this book will consider marketing it as a professional reference material and NOT a textbook. This 2-star rated book sincerely sucks. A zero-star rating would more accurately reflect this book.What a waste.

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    Mechanics of Aircraft Structures review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    I am an aerospace engineering student who had to purchase this book for a structures class. The book is relatively short, which is fine, and covers what needs to be e issue is that it's layout is hard to follow and a lot of of the derivations are one-offs with small relation to the rest of the material. A better layout would derive everything in a principled manner and then present how, for example, Bernoulli Euler and Timoshenko beam theory are merely easy versions of general beam theory based on your assumptions. That would really support us understand what assumptions are being made, why they are being made, and we have the tools to tackle whatever by starting from the general equations.I highly recommend Kosmatka's structures notes from UCSD in put of CT Sun. If it ever is published go for that instead.

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    Mechanics of Aircraft Structures review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    Worst class of all time. The book is basically just a bunch of equations. Not much explanation. Clearly written for someone who is already an expert, not someone who is trying to learn.

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    Mechanics of Aircraft Structures review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    Not a poor book—used for school

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    Mechanics of Aircraft Structures review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    I purchased this book, knowing the negative comments about it, but I was needed to do so. I'm trying to do homework, and the book assumes you know every single thing from mechanics and strength of materials. There's no reference formulas, no examples whatsoever. Maybe it's possible to use this text as a reference, not $100+ textbook to learn from. Looks like the author wrote this book to supplement his own class with a reference, but the globe is bigger than his class. Please, whoever bought this book, scan the pages into pdf and distribute it to the internet for free, because this book isn't worth any money. I'm not learning anything, just doing Mechanics of Materials over again under a various name.If you wish to learn aircraft structures, you need to do a research and search texts, where true engineers discuss real-life problems.

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    Mechanics of Aircraft Structures review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    This is the needed book for my graduate class on structures. Its best if you already have a familiarity with the primary concepts of stress and strain, torsion, bending, etc. It has amazing examples, though, and the issues at the end of the chapter are not too hard (tho, they do needed a lot of algebra and plug-and-chug). There are not selected answers in the back.If you're looking for a amazing primary book on structures, this one probably isn't for so, they don't actually talk a whole lot about applications to aircraft structures. What the book DOES do is cover the primary theories that one would need to begin to analyze aircraft structures. It does not cover design of aircraft structures.

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    Mechanics of Aircraft Structures review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    I won't go into much detail about the frustrating and inadequate nature of this book, as a lot of others have already done so. Basically, all you need to know about this book is that it is a waste of time. The author rarely explains anything with sufficient detail and seems to expect you to already know an wonderful amount about aircraft structures. My TA even told us that we had better come to class every day, because the textbook is beautiful much worthless. I wondered why anyone would force students to waste cash on a book that is cleary insufficient, but then I recognized the author's name. It seems the only reason why I am forced to buy this book is because the author is a professor at my school. Just stay away from this book if you can.

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    Mechanics of Aircraft Structures review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    I do not like this book. I am able to read and comprehend the material, but it is difficult to do. The derivations are very math intensive, and there aren't enough words explaining the steps during the derivations. The steps laying out the derivation are complete at the beginning of the derivation, but they diminish as the derivation is worked out. The book isn't terrible, but I prefer my instructors notes over the book. I only begin this book when I can't piece together my notes taken in class.

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    Mechanics of Aircraft Structures review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    I haven't utilized this book much, but I was needed to purchase it for my class. I've used it for homework assignments from the questions in the text, but for nothing else. The notes I've gotten in class have been sufficient, and the few times I've turned to the book or further clarification, it hasn't provided any. Not very detailed in any particular subject. Not overly helpful for deeper study.

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    Mechanics of Aircraft Structures review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    Great.

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    Fatigue of Structures and Materials review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    I search this book is helpful and full of info on Fatigue. Schijve has an simple to read writing style. I first learned this from his paper, "Fatigue of Structures and Materials in the 20th Century and the State of the Art." This paper is practially a introduction to a lot of of the chapters in the book. This book is worth having to mark-up and take notes.If you are interested in the additional materials, you can download them here:then enter the ISBN: 978-1-4020-6807-2

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    Fatigue of Structures and Materials review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    This book is exactly what I was looking for because it lays amazing foundation for understanding fatigue failures, both macro and though I am still reading it, each chapter is a revelation. After conducting numerous failure investigations,I've realized that failure initiation and understanding it in amazing detail is key in developing a root my opinion, this book offers greater detail than most when describing what transpires in a material thatis under fatigue loading. Concepts in this book can support strengthen your knowledge on crack initiation as applicableto all failures, not just fatigue.

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    Fatigue of Structures and Materials review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    Amazing reference book.

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    Fatigue of Structures and Materials review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    Perfect for a clear understanding the fatigue phenomenon, the growth of cracks, the influences of surface condition and metallographic structure, and how to design to minimise fatigue.

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    Fatigue of Structures and Materials review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    better than expected.

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    Fatigue of Structures and Materials review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    On the preface of this second edition, it clearly mentions a CD-rom included, but I received the book without the CD, so I requested a replacement. To my surprise, the second one still doesn’t contain a CD. Anyone received the book with the CD?

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    Fatigue of Structures and Materials review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    Jaap is well know in the fatigue community and this book is a amazing reference for all that work with fatigue.

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    Fatigue of Structures and Materials review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    I have been working for two years as structural engineer, and the knowledge of fatigue by most people was always suspicious for me. Unfortunately, I was dependant on peoples knowledge to get mine and, by looking for a lot of books and papers on internet, all I found about fatigue were precise formulas with no physical explanation of the though I was not a fatigue specialist, I had always the conviction that this thema was much more experimental and microscophical-depandant then mathematical. This book proved to me all of that, and gave me a amazing insight of fatigue. Fatigue has became a very interesting subject for me since this e writing style of the author is also very pleasant, and we can read the book as if it was a romance.I got a job at large aerospace company for fatigue because of this book.I hope you have fun it.

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    Fatigue of Structures and Materials review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    Amazing reference! This is the book we used for my Fatigue and Hurt Tolerance course.I read it before the class and it gave me a amazing insight on is book offers a lot of practical examples and beautifully written explanations of the Fatigue phenomena. Although it is not a fracture mechanics book, it does cover some fracture mechancis concepts as st have for all Stress Engineers.

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    Fatigue of Structures and Materials review []  2019-12-24 20:6

    hi I want to buy this book before that i wish to know whether it is has CD r not. Some one who has puchased this can allow me abt itthnx

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    Community: The Structure of Belonging review []  2020-1-6 18:34

    I'm a pastor who has been realizing that a huge part of my role is fostering locations where community can form. This book has framed that task for me. It has refreshed my understanding of the pastor's role in the community in a time when more and more people are disengaged with religion and the church. I appreciate the freedom and tools it has given me. I recommend it to anyone who is engaged in local government, education, health care, community/non-profit work, or the church.

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    Community: The Structure of Belonging review []  2020-1-6 18:34

    Community: the structure of belonging is a amazing resource for organizations interested in building community. A sense of community is the core of a powerful organization. In a day and age where overload is the norm, time and commitment is rare and valuable. Individuals will not give of their time and commitment easily. The sense of belonging is key to engaging organizational members. This is particularly real of organizations that rely on engaged and active members to meet their goals, fulfill their purpose and grow their membership. This book is an essential resource for organizational survival and thriving. The book I ordered was a hard bound edition that was advertised as good. I just fact this edition was in near fresh condition. That is amazing because I plan on using this book as street map in building our organization. The hard bound edition will latest longer and take more use/abuse. The price for this used edition was lower than a fresh paper bound version. This was a amazing value.

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