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    clash of clans []  2020-5-11 22:47

    recommend amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing

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    guns of glory []  2020-5-21 22:34
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    Just played Guns of Glory on a phone application via mistplay reviews. Played this one with amazing interest as on the mobile you got the impression of controlling your characters on the ground level, helping catch pick pockets etc etc. Like all mobile ads this was misleading. Don't obtain me wrong the android game itself was addictive and you can spend hours playing (If you play via mistplay you can earn a fair few Amazon vouchers), but yeah false advertising? Really? Unfortunately this is a huge pitfall a lot of android games like these fall into. For example you can expect a nice create your kitchen safe android game but instead you obtain something quite various (garden scapes see add for application and play game)

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    On the Outside Looking in []  2020-7-5 19:55

    I had to obtain this because it is a must have for the collection. Someone stole my original

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    On the Outside Looking in []  2020-7-5 19:55

    Amazing condition.

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    On the Outside Looking in []  2020-7-5 19:55

    This is the 8th group album of theirs I own, and perhaps their best (close with "On Top of The World" and I don't own "Coming Out Hard" yet). Like most people tend to think, I also like their earlier works better, the ones on Suave house, they have that southern funk feel and sound to them, but don't obtain me wrong, their newer albums are amazing as well, the earlier ones were just amazing albums. This is a short one, only 11 songs, and each member has a solo. Of the 11 songs, 1 is a classic, 2 are almost classic, 2 are ok, the other 6 arer amazing songs. Guests are only on 2 songs rapping and 1 soing the hook. Production is amazing throught the whole album, not one wack beat on here. A must have album for fans of hip-hop.#2 - 8.5#3 - 9#4 - 10 (CLASSIC)#5 - 9.5 (f/ MC Breed)#6 - 9 (f/ Rodeny Ellis)#7 - 8.5#8 - 8.5#9 - 9.5 (Eightball solo)#10 - 8.5 (MJG solo)#11 - 7.5#12 - 7.5 (f/ Crime Boss & Thorough)EIGHTBALL -- Premro Smith -- b. ~1971 -- Memphis, TNMJG -- Marlon Jermaine Goodwin -- b. 1/9/72 -- Memphis, TNcheck all my reviews

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    On the Outside Looking in []  2020-7-5 19:55

    👍

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    On the Outside Looking in []  2020-7-5 19:55

    good

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    On the Outside Looking in []  2020-7-5 19:55

    Eightball & MJG's first album "Commin' Out Hard" was awesome. I didn't think they would be able to come out with an album even better. Well, they did. And this album - "On the Outside Lookin' In" is one of those rare albums that introduce us to something new, one of those albums that take rap to another level. And that's what this album is all about. The squad continues to lace us with nothing but straight game. Comming out of Orange Mound, Memphis, these two young rappers are some of the realest ones there is and some of the most talented as well. All over the album we obtain stories about road life, the rap industry, pimpin' or just having a amazing time. Eightball and MJG both have unique voices and deliveries and you just cannot decide which one is better. Another thing that makes this album so special is the production. It's amazing, on a lot of parts is not just amazing beats - it's music! Complicated beats with a lot of instruments and changing melodies. They did a hell of a job there. That's a classic gangsta rap album.

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    On the Outside Looking in []  2020-7-5 19:55

    Awesome!

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    On the Outside Looking in []  2020-7-5 19:55

    Amazing album for the right considering that this album is getting rare and hard to search in amazing condition

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    On the Outside Looking in []  2020-7-5 19:55

    This album is classic southern rap at it's best. Lay it down Lay it down!!!The best Eightball and MJG album right next to Comin Out Hard.

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    On the Outside Looking in []  2020-7-5 19:55

    Old classic

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    Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of Its Enemies []  2020-1-19 22:28

    Buruma and Margalit suggest that the hostility to "the West" that exists in much of "the East" is hardly a phenomenon that arises from the peculiar cultural characteristics of the latter. To the contrary, they have much in common with different intellectual movements in the West itself, and indeed, are often direct intellectual descendants thereof. To its opponents, "the West" is a caricature, of intellectual rationalism, political liberalism, markets, cosmopolitanism, and consumerism--basically, the Enlightenment West--and a lot of in the West itself has risen up versus it, most notably in form of 19th century Romanticism. The authors suggest that it is not unexpected that Germany and Russia went further than their Western neighbors in the extremes of romantic nationalism in 19th and 20th centuries, for, to them, "the West" often represented ideas from France or England, which were, somehow, "foreign" to the Germans and Russians. A lot of ideas of German Romantic nationalists, however, did go on to directly shape the views of the "West" among nationalist/nativist intellectuals among the Russians, the Japanese, the Indians, the Arabs, and the others. Particularly analyzing the intellectual roots of militant Japanese nationalism during Globe Battle II (Buruma's specialty as a historian of Japan), the authors present that a lot of of its tenets were in fact completely at odds with traditional Japanese beliefs, while had much in common with the extreme versions of the 19th century German Romantic nationalism, with a few concepts exchanged for supposedly Japanese symbols--Shintoism, the emperor, etc. Indeed, a lot of advocates of the fresh Japan were themselves students of German ideas and twisted traditional Japanese ideas, concepts, and symbols to fit what they had learned. In other words, Occidentalism, to a huge degree, was very much created in the Occident. unless, perhaps, one were to define Asia as starting at the Rhine--as the authors suggest Adenauer once quipped--but that would seem a bit e abstract notion of "the West," as embodying the Enlightenment ideas, is hardly a reflection of the "real" West, of course. Revolts versus this abstract "West" has been much more common within the West itself, going well beyond the Romantics of the 19th century. Hofstadter famously wrote of the streak of "anti-intellectualism," very much directed versus the notion of the "West" as laid out by Buruma and Margalit, as a recurrent theme in American politics. Even during the French Revolution, the French countryside did rise up versus the "Western" notions that the revolutionaries stood for--the Vendee. Ironically, "anti-Western" sentiments, insofar as the "West" might be defined as Buruma and Margalit do, is sweeping across both North America and Europe and increasingly shaping the politics of much the West at the beginning of the 21st century. It is interesting, given how sharp an observer Buruma normally is, that the book makes no note of how so a lot of in the West are speaking in the same tone versus the same abstract "West" as their presumed adversaries in the East, even though the trend was already starting to unfold by the time the book was published.

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    Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of Its Enemies []  2020-1-19 22:28

    The attacks of September 11th have spawned a plethora of books about Islam and the Middle East, all trying to explain to the bewildered Westerner how those planes came crashing out of the skies on that bright and fateful autumn day. Occidentalism is one of these books, the authors taking the opportunity of the hightened attention to write a book that, although not officially positioned as such, is an attempt to form a response to the late Palestinian intellectual Edward Said's popular 1978 work: Orientalism.I read this book largely because I enjoyed another book by Ian Buruma about the history of Japan. Unfortunately, Occidentalism is a far cry from the eloquent and gracious Inventing Japan. Buruma and Margalit succeed in combining their knowledge into one book that does not read as if it was written by two authors, but fail in making a clear and coherent argument to explain Occidentalism (i.e. the method the East views the West). Although they test to bring together the a lot of cultures and nations of the Occident, including Asian history, their analysis is most meaningful only when they write about Islam, which I suspect was what they set out to explain in the first place.Buruma and Margalit start by listing the main differences between the West and East, as these are perceived in the eyes of the East: the West is urban - the East is rural; the West is capitalist (see the picture on the book cover) - the East values social values; the West is materialistic - the East is spiritual; and, of course, the West is always evil, out to destroy or at least defeat and subdue the East. Then they set out to present that most of the (mis)conceptions of the East about the West - i.e. Occidentalism - is nothing but a product of the West's (or, more precisely, European) influence and ideas. So basically the East is using Western thought and philosophy and adapt it to its needs, turning versus those they perceive as evil, the ere are a few issues with this argument. First, the Orient cannot all be lumped into one basket. Arguing that Japanese nationalism, German nazism and Muslim fundamentalism all come from the same roots and share the same view of the West is stretching it a bit. Second, the Occident itself is not homogeneous. For example, the authours bring Jewish Zionism as an example of the "evil West", providing a very simplistic view of Zionism as "Jews buying land with from Arabs". Third, the authors seem to ignore the widespread ties between West and East - e.g. the US-Japan relationship, or the backing of the Gulf states by the US - as these ties would blow holes into the neat Occident-Orient divide they test to spite its flaws, Occidentalism is a amazing read (and it's a short book), as long as one approaches it as one would approach an essay or a commentary column in the newspaper, not a book that purports to explain the issue of "the West in the eyes of its enemies".

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    Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of Its Enemies []  2020-1-19 22:28

    I absolutely adored this book as a powerful defense of Orientalism! My only want is that it could be longer, although the authors did a unbelievable job of making their arguments concise and clear. Still, it would have been amazing to have more history and context of the Israeli occupation, for example, but Buruma & Margalit still give a fair analysis. In addition, they cover a lot of grounds—Russia, Japan, France, Iran—with thorough research and history.I wish to share one of my favorite parts from Chapter 5 (all of which was amazing):“The Islamist revolutionary movement that currently stalks the world, from Kabul to Java, would not have existed without the harsh secularism of Reza Shah Pahlavi or the failed experiments in state socialism in Egypt, Syria, and Algeria. This is why it was such a misfortune, in a lot of ways, for the Middle East to have encountered the modern West for the first time through echoes of the French Revolution. Robespierre and the Jacobins were inspiring heroes for Arab radicals: progressive, egalitarian, and opposed to the Christian church. Later models for Arab progress-Mussolini's Italy, Nazi Germany, and the Soviet Union-were even more disastrous. But to see the upheavals of the twentieth century as a pendulum, swinging from Western rationalism to Oriental religious zeal, would be a mistake, for the two extremes are dangerously entangled.” (Buruma & Margalit 143).I highly recommend giving Occidentalism a read, as it will give you an unbiased review of historic and contemporary national movements and their consequences. This will create you question normative criticism of the East!

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    Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of Its Enemies []  2020-1-19 22:28

    In Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of Its Enemies, Ian Buruma and Avishai Margalit trace the intellectual history of “the dehumanizing picture of the West painted by its enemies.” In the authors’ view, major elements of this picture, though not necessarily the whole, are shared by ISIS, Al Qaeda, Hezbollah, the Muslim Brotherhood, nineteenth-century Russian [email protected]#$%!&ler’s Nazis, Mao’s revolutionaries, extreme Hindu nationalists, and the Japanese militarists who plunged their country into Globe Battle II. In a lot of of its manifestations, they assert, Occidentalism gives rise to a death cult, rating “honor higher than morality” and glorifying death as the noblest response to the violation of amazing e they overreaching? Perhaps. To encompass so a lot of diverse historical movements under one umbrella is ambitious, at best. But Buruma and Margalit are exceedingly well read and adept with philosophical concepts. If their book is a stretch too far, the path they take to arrive at their conclusion is nonetheless rich with insight and well worth following.What’s wrong with Western values?In a sense, Occidentalism is anti-Semitism writ large, as hatred for Jews suffuses most of its forms, but Anti-Americanism looms even larger. Though it’s not the same as anti-Americanism, the Occidentalist vision of “a machinelike society without a human soul” is most closely associated with the United States in today’s world: “the idea of America itself, as a rootless, cosmopolitan, superficial, trivial, materialistic, racially mixed, fashion-addicted civilization.” From an historical perspective, Occidentalism derives from the ancient clash between Town and Country — an ongoing conflict between rural and urban values. Ironically, though, “[t]he West in general, and America in particular, provokes envy and resentment more among those who consume its images, and its goods, than among those who can barely imagine what the West is like.”A response to OrientalismThe phenomenon Buruma and Margalit call Occidentalism is the counterpoint to Orientalism, a term popularized by the Palestinian philosopher Edward Said to characterize what he perceived as a patronizing Western attitude towards Eastern societies that is used to justify Western imperialism. The authors contend that the distrust, even hatred, of the West that is so widespread in the Global South actually originated in Europe. They trace the intellectual source of Occidentalism to the emergence in Europe of modern anti-Semitism following the French Revolution and nineteenth-century German Romantic philosophy. Outside Europe, with the growth of European empires, the clash of fresh ideas from the West with traditional values gave rise to a “split between nativists and Westernizers. The former dream of going back to the purity of an imaginary past: Japan under the divine emperor, the Caliphate united under Islam, China as a community of peasants. . . The struggle of East and West is a Manichaean struggle between the idolatrous worshipers of earthly matter and real worshipers of the godly spirit.”About the authorsThe authors of Occidentalism are both academics. The Dutch writer and historian Ian Buruma teaches human rights and journalism at Bard College. He has written 22 books. Avishai Margalit, now emeritus, taught philosophy at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. He has written or edited nine books and innumerable articles.

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    Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of Its Enemies []  2020-1-19 22:28

    It may sound as though I am damning this book with faint praise, but I believe that with a topic as complicated as anti-western feeling there are few better locations to start than with a amazing conversation opener.Written in clear non-academic language, Buruma and Margalit have written a book-length essay which further elaborates on the article which they published several years ago in the Fresh York Review of Books. The point of the project is to posit a hypothesis on the roots of anti-western feeling and use that to draw begin the discussion as to how the gap can be repaired.I message that the original article sparked much less disappointment than the book. There is something about the translation to book form which implies a level of completion or comprehensiveness that an essay by itself cannot achieve. You will search that most reviewers (myself included) had a list of things that we missed in their overview. These omissions felt serious to me, but I message that the lists have very small in common. It is truly not possible to please everyone or contain everything, so perhaps it is just as well that they did not try.If you already have an adament point of view in this discussion, then this book may well irritate you. Buruma and Margalit clearly do their best to be as objective as possible, given their own cultural bias. If, however, you are like me and mostly have a clear view about your own lack of answers then you will probably search this a valuable reading experience. Since reading it, I lent the book to a amazing mate (sorry, publishers!) and we have not been able to stop discussing the points that it raised. Quite an accomplishment, in my opinion, for a self-described short history.

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    Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of Its Enemies []  2020-1-19 22:28

    Great, quick and in amazing shape -- lot's of smileys on the package, too :)

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    Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of Its Enemies []  2020-1-19 22:28

    I required to &read this book for a class that I took. I looked for a while because I wanted to save obviously. This was the cheapest seller, cheaper than the book store. I did is used but it was well taken care of, practically new. No one would message that it was used.On 1-5 scaleProduct condition Review:4Seller Review:5Book Content Review:2The book itself was not a book that I personally liked. Occidentalism talks versus Americans/the western society. Some say its biased others say its irrelevant. I think the book does well in giving the Easterners/Orientals a voice, but historically it is not a very amazing book, considering there are very minimal sources used and at parts the authors jump around from though to thought it can be hard to follow or understand what one even/group of people have to do with the other.Overall i recomend People check it out just to "educate" themselves about other points of view besides an American one.

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    Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of Its Enemies []  2020-1-19 22:28

    Beautiful interesting. Well written. Probably a small more in-depth than most casual readers care to go, but if you're interested in this or doing a project on the subject, absolutely give it a chance. To that purpose, it's also quite short.

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    Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of Its Enemies []  2020-1-19 22:28

    This uses history to explain ''Occidentalism'' - the hatred for the West. Clearly shows this hatred is primarily drawn from the intellectual west, especially the German e rise of shop economics along with the Protestant reformation, broke the uniform European culture. The French enlightenment wanted to reimpose a 'scientific' unity. Reason, intellect, calculation, judgement would replace tradition, faith, devotion and feelings. No group identity - in fact no groups at all! Freedom!Napoleon conquered Europe with this plan. The Germans lost to Napoleon's guns. They won the battle of the spirit. ''There is a amazing of truth in Isaiah Berlin's view that the German Romantic movement and its Romantic nationalism were 'a product of wounded national sensibility, of dreadful national humiliation.' '' (77)Gottfried von Herder (1744-1803) detested universalism. Each language, national group are organic wholes, special and special. ''Compared with cold rational Europe, nature's kids were better off, purer, more authentic. It was an arrogant mistake to think all men should be free, since our supposed freedoms led only to inhumanity and sterile materialism.'' (38)Contents -War Versus the WestThe Occidental CityHeroes and MerchantsMind of the WestThe Wrath of GodSeeds of Revolution''Was there a method to update without letting in Christianity and other forms of spiritual pollution? . . . The appeal of socialism . . .is not at all surprising. Marxism is egalitarian, and indisputably modern. It came from the west, and like Christianity it has universal claims. But it's promise to liberate mankind is ''scientific'', not cultural or religious. This was tried Egypt, Iraq, North Korea, Ethiopia, Cuba, China, Vietnam and a lot of other places. And it failed.'' (40)Note these groups imported a (deeply) western ideology - Marxist socialism. (Numerous scholars believe Marxism is a secularized ver of the Judeo/Christian "Messianic'' promise. George Steiner identifies Marx as 'the latest Jewish prophet'.) Marxism destroyed much and - all for nothing. ''The most violent forms of occidentalism, of nativist yearnings for purity and destructive loathing of the west, were born from this failure.'' (40) Fascinating!''Of all third globe revolutions, Chairman Mao's was the most inspiring model of Occidentalist dreams. . . . But what created him original , compared with Stalin, was his battle versus the city. . . . Shanghai, in particular, was seen as the symbol of western imperialism, capitalist corruption, degenerate urban luxury, cultural artificially, and moral decadence. . . . The fact that one of the most ferocious apostles of Maoism, Mao's own wife, was once a Shanghai film starlet and good-time girl only goes to present that violent hatred and deep longing can be closely related.'' (42)Authors connect the cruelty of the Taliban to the viscous Khmer Rouge. ''Phnom Penh had western architecture, French restaurants, Chinese merchants, and a relatively modern economy. . . . And they had been told by their masters that educated town people, meaning anyone who had been to school, spoke French, or simply had hands and wore glasses, were opponents of the people. Vietnamese or Chinese. Who had lived and traded in the cities for centuries, just as Jews had in Germany, had to be chop out if the fresh society like cancerous cells.'' (43)Pol Pot was educated in Paris, influenced by Frantz Fallon and Sartre.''Through systematic mass murder, and by smashing the wicked city, the Khmer Rouge would restore purity and virtue to the ancient land.'' (44)Another example of western suicide - ''Nikola Koljevic was a Shakespeare scholar from Sarajevo. He spent time in London and the United States. He was a citizen of the most cosmopolitan town in the Balkans, a secular town of Bosnians, Serbs, Jews, and Croats, a town popular for its libraries, universities, and cafés, a town of learning and trade. Yet there he was, watching his town burn from the surrounding hills. The orders to shell Sarajevo had been signed by Nikola Koljevic, Shakespeare scholar.'' (45)This short work includes outstanding explanation of the hatred for markets. This is part, although not all, of the motives for opposition to the West.''Liberal societies also give people the to have exceptional achievements. But these are individual achievements. Individuals are rewarded for their exceptional talents with and fame. . . . This cannot satisfy those who want to heroism and glory as parts of a collective, and thus often vicarious, enterprise. Fascism appealed precisely to mediocre men, because it gave them a glimpse of glory by association. . . . Choosing to die a violent death becomes a heroic act of human will. In totalitarian systems it might be the only act an individual is to choose.'' (72)Material satisfaction differs from spiritual needs.''It is a threat because its promises of material comfort, individual freedom, and the dignity of unexceptional lives deflate all utopian pretensions. The anti-heroic, anti-utopian nature of Western liberalism is the greatest opponent of religious radicals, priest-kings, and collective seekers after purity and heroic salvation.'' (72)(See also, ''Propaganda: The Formation of Men's Attitudes; by Jacques Ellul)

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    Occidentalism: The West in the Eyes of Its Enemies []  2020-1-19 22:28

    We need to see how others look at the U.S. in to clear our own self photo long enough to listen to others.

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    The Art of Looking Up []  2020-1-22 23:45

    I received "The Art of Looking Up" specifically to write a review. That said, I test to be honest and begin in all my reviews.(Please see the enclosed pictures.)This is an amazing, large, and lavishly illustrated e entire premise of the book is that a lot of ceilings made over the millennium are works of art in an of ere are some obvious ones in the book, like the Sistine Chapel, but there are 39 in total, most of which I was totally unaware e book divides the awesome ceilings into four categories: Religion, Culture, Power, and you see from the included pictures, the book shows the full color picture of the ceiling, describes some of the special aspects of it (including things like time to create, fresh art forms used), how the ceiling relates to the subject of the section, and finally small tidbits about the ceiling that you would not otherwise know l in all this is both a attractive and a delightful book. It is eminently gift-able, but this copy is not leaving my home!

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    The Art of Looking Up []  2020-1-22 23:45

    Whether you're an art enthusiast, an armchair traveler, or just looking for a striking "coffee table book", this gorgeously photographed work would create a attractive addition to anyone's collection. The product page description and sample images don't do this book justice; you need to have it in your hands to appreciate just how impressive it truly e product page mentions that the book explores 40 buildings, so I didn't realize quite how thick this hardcover would be -- it's 240 pages in total. There are multiple images and views of each place, along with some accompanying text. (It's enough written content to give you an appreciation for the history and background of each location, but the emphasis is predominantly on the images.)Many of the images take up a full page, others span a two-page spread, and a select few are featured in fold-outs that are four pages wide. The Sistine Chapel ceiling is among those that obtain this unique treatment, and it's even more impressive than seeing that legendary room in person. (They don't let visitors to take images inside the Sistine Chapel, and it's difficult to truly appreciate the detail in those paintings from floor level with your head thrown back and your eyes angled upward.) With Catherine McCormack's "The Art of Looking Up" in hand, you can linger over these stunning interiors as long as you like without being jostled by tourist ffice it to say that I absolutely loved this book, and I search myself picking it up again and again to gaze at the sumptuous photos. I've really enjoyed seeing some of the locations I've previously visited from an interesting, new, up-close perspective, and I've added several more destinations to my ever-growing bucket list as a effect of discovering them in McCormack's book. Very highly recommended!

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    The Art of Looking Up []  2020-1-22 23:45

    This book, The Art of Looking Up, by art history expert Catherine McCormack, was offered to me in my Amazon Vine selection. I have been interested in art ever since I was asked to be a “picture parent” at my kids’ elementary school. I would create a monthly art presentation about an artist and his/her paintings/creations, then have the children create a similar craft. One fun activity followed a presentation on Michelangelo’s Sistine Chapel ceiling. (What an awesome feat of artistry that ceiling was!) I had the students lay under their desks and attempt to color on a piece of paper taped to the underside of their desk. They really enjoyed e Art of Looking Up consists of 240 pages showcasing some of the world’s most impressive ceilings in full color. Page after page features stunning masterpieces from around the world, including two from the United States. The book is divided into 4 social theme sections: Religion, Culture, Power and Politics. Included in each section is a 4-page foldout of a remarkable ceiling: the Sistine Chapel (Italy), Strahov Monastery (Czech Republic), Topkapi Palace (Turkey), and Museum of the Revolution (Cuba); see addition to the spectacular photographs, McCormack goes into some detail about the history of the featured artworks, including their conception and execution. It is interesting how artists create political, religious or cultural statements similar to their times. As I learned during my time as a picture parent, there is often hidden meaning in artwork, which can be conveyed by such methods as colors, shading/lighting, and symbolism. There is so much more than meets the eye when it comes to art.Each of the creations in this book took an wonderful amount of time, talent and effort to complete. It would be unbelievable to have the opportunity to “look up” and see some of these creations in person, but for most of us, that is not possible. Therefore, I am glad I had the opportunity to keep this book so I can at least have fun them from home.

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    The Art of Looking Up []  2020-1-22 23:45

    The Art of Looking Up by Catherine McCormack is that rare book that far exceeded the lofty expectations I had for it. This is so much more than just a attractive coffee table book, though it excels as rst, what I was expecting. Attractive photography of stunning art on huge canvases, namely ceilings. Along with those photographs I expected a brief summary of who, when, and where for each. I would probably have been happy with the unbelievable photographs and a primary overview about each ceiling.I did obtain the astonishing pictures I expected, both wide angle to take in the full result and some close ups to appreciate the details. These alone create this a unbelievable coffee table book and if you never read the accompanying text you will likely be content with the e text, however, is what really sets this book apart. McCormack does a phenomenal job of explaining the art and the cultures surrounding each work without being either too shallow or too deep. In fact, the stunning part of the writing is that she actually goes fairly deep without getting bogged down in jargon and while maintaining the reader's interest.I think that the text alone makes this a valuable book, especially for those like myself who have very small education in art history beyond first year survey courses and some private deep diving in locations of interest. McCormack discusses the iconography for each location, what it meant for the time and put within which it was created, and the history of the ceiling/building until show day. I found each entry fascinating and a few served a an entry point for me to do some online research to learn more. Maybe what the original ceiling looked like, maybe some other info about what was taking put at the time. In other words, this book engaged my eyes and my mind.I would highly recommend this as a coffee table book, as a huge art history/cultural studies book, or both. If you know anyone who has traveled to some of these locations, or who has always wanted to, this would create a unbelievable bonus as ed from a copy created available by the publisher via NetGalley.

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    The Art of Looking Up []  2020-1-22 23:45

    It's going to take a few days to read it, but the first reaction is what awesome attractive pictures. This is a full-spread coffee table NISHED READING IT - Takes about 4 to 6 hours, but don't do it all at once. Too much beauty!Beautifully illustrated book. I didn't know about all the various types of ceiling decoration - from painted fresco to beetle wings. The book is split into four section - Religion, Culture, Power, and Politics. Most people are familiar with the Religious decorations covering the ceilings of our temples and churches. Cultural contain the Louvre Museum and theaters. Power is dynastic lines like the Topkapi Palace of the Ottoman Empire and Badal Mahal in India. Politics are government bragging or creating a cultural photo after a change in structure like the Capitol Building in the USA and Town Hall in Barcelona Spain.Each ceiling has four to six pages dedicated to it - with several full spreads including fold-out pages. The text describes why the piece was commissioned or explains the cultural atmosphere lending to its meaning. Personally, I would prefer a "how-to", especially for the Ottoman tile-work, but that isn't this e excellent coffee table book giving touches of culture from around the globe and through the centuries. For the 4th century to modern time, and pieces from Europe, the Americas, and Africa. A lot of of these pieces are things which aren't shown in art books - those concentrate on paintings, not ceilings - so you are sure to see something fresh in this member to look up - the sky, even inside, is amazing.

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    The Art of Looking Up []  2020-1-22 23:45

    This book was a massive read--both literally and figuratively! At first I wasn't sure if I would like it. It seemed when I began to read it that the author possibly had a thing versus organized religions by calling them sky-god cults (p. 13). I wasn't looking forward to editorial comments, just factual content. Thankfully, this wasn't a running theme, and even if it had, much of the content is not religiously-based, e size of the book did create it difficult for me to read it. That being said, I appreciated the size of the photography when reading about the works, since it allowed viewing better detail of the artwork. There were a lot of times, however, when I wished there were numbered diagrams corresponding with explanations that were in the text, because individual features within the ceilings that the author was focusing on could be hard to e only artist's work I have seen in person is a traveling Chihuly exhibit. This book really helps you feel like giant masterpieces are being placed right in your hands for careful observation and appreciation.I did see a noticeable error on p. 91 (a few words of duplicated text from p. 87). But it is truly a beautifully created book. The one piece of constructive criticism I can give is that I was genuinely disappointed when I saw that the cover art only exists on the dust jacket. It seems a true shame for a book about attractive artwork to simply have a plain white cover.

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    The Art of Looking Up []  2020-1-22 23:45

    I do not like buying art books sight unseen. I have been disappointed too a lot of times.I LOVE THIS BOOK!!!! It has far exceeded my expectations. Kudos to Ms. McCormack for a book well done.I took art and art history classes for my electives all throughout my schooling. I will never be an artist, but I will always be a lover of art and architecture. I have always been fascinated by ceilings, frescos, and epic scaled works of ART TRAVEL ADVICE EVER...when a fellow art loving mate found out I was getting to take my bucket list art immersion trip to Italy, she said bring a big, MIRROR and take it everywhere you go. Brilliant! I packed it in a padded mailer in my backpack. It allowed me to gaze at ceilings for hours with nary a crick in my neck. I was able to see into roped off rooms in houses, chapels and palaces. Being able to spend an hour soaking in the magnificent info of the myriad ceilings was pure gift. Being able to look at all of the furnishings, woodwork, carpets, etc in room after stunning room was pure gift. I have now added one of those long armed, flexible mechanic mirrors to my travel ck to the book. I am savoring every single page. i am loving not just the imagery but the accompanying text. There are ceilings I have never heard of, with art in styles i do not care for (Blenheim Palace, I am talking to you!). Even these ceilings and texts I am enjoying. This is how I am spending my balmy autumn mornings...out on my lanai with a amazing pot of coffee, my puppy and this fine book. Life is GOOD!For thise of us without a travel budget to physically visit these attractive works, I highly recommend this book.P.s. my favorite, and such an unexpected, ceiling so far is the “Heaven of Delight” work by Jan Fabre (a man whose works I search disturbing) in the Royal Palace in Brussels, Belgium. It is one of the most attractive things I have ever seen and I so want I could see it in person. The ceiling is covered with millions of insects—opalescent jeweled scarab beetle wing cases to be specific. The concept, design and execution are mind-boggling. The phot is unable to capture what I know must be a mind blowing sight of those iridescent shells arranged with the shapes animal parts within (leg of giraffe, wing of bird, etc)

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    The Art of Looking Up []  2020-1-22 23:45

    I don’t know if “coffee table book” is still a thing or not, but that’s where this is going in my house so anybody who comes in can pick it up & take a trip...It’s attractive & full of not only photos, but interesting info shared by an expert & art ere’s full page images as well as fold outs where the ceiling is literally spread across 4 pages on your lap. The author takes a screen grab of certain ceilings & zooms in to the spread pages. It’s e only downside I noticed is the lack of crispness in some photos. I realize that some of these old areas are muted & aged, but some images don’t have clarity where I know there is some, having visited several of at aside, it’s a amazing idea turned into a gorgeous book!

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    The Art of Looking Up []  2020-1-22 23:45

    At first glance this appears like a 'coffee table book' as in a sense it is, though a stunningly fine ver of one: It's full of large, stunning photographs in a huge (roughly 9.5" wide and 11.5" tall) thick, massive book (very high quality paper) written by someone who has taught at both Sotheby's and University College, rst and foremost, the photography seems amazingly well done. What's more, the production quality of the book is such that the a lot of images that span two pages display about as seamlessly as possible. Further, there are four instances in which there are fold-out pages such that one photograph spans 4 physical pages. While the four selected ceilings were not all those I've had selected, they are very striking and capture the detail in a method smaller images could of the ways in which this is not a coffee table book it's not just about the photos. As simple as it is to obtain caught up in them, the author writes about each one very interestingly, not about the photography but about the context: For instance, when writing about the Museum of the Revolution, in Cuba, she discusses the history of revolution in Cuba and locations the ceiling and what it's showing in historical perspective. Another example is when discussing the Topkapi Palace in Turkey, there's a genuinely interesting technical disscussion of Islamic ceramic techniques and how they were used to let much finer detail work than would otherwise have been ere is also a wide breadth of type of locations. From the Sistene Chapel, which appears early on (and is one of the 4-page fold outs), to the glass-flower ceiling at the Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas.I expected to have fun the images of this book, and started out flipping through it admiring the images. Then I stopped to read something about one and I was hooked.

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    The Art of Looking Up []  2020-1-22 23:45

    Wow. Just... awesome as these images looked on my phone, they must be all the more wonderful within the confines of a hardback copy, and breathtaking in person (I've only been to one of the locations featured in this work). This is a near-immeasurably useful aid in assigning context/appreciation to these ceilings, a lot of of which have so a lot of various stories to tell--speaking of which, the brief history descriptions that accompany the images are very well done, as they take up minimal area, stay massively informative, and shed light on why they're in the vering a lot of buildings across the categories of religion, culture, politics, and power, you're treated to at least one jaw-dropping photo per entry. I'd be curious to know if there were some visits that didn't create the final chop for whatever ere's no telling how a lot of times you could flip through these pages and search something fresh to appreciate; furthermore, with the benefit of McCormack's work, you can calmly survey the paintings for yourself, examining the details, as I'm sure a lot of of the opportunities to tour these websites would show their own issues (neck cramps, time constraints, strained eyesight).I really can't praise this enough. Simply put: What a cool book. It provides the reader the opportunity to seriously have fun some art they otherwise wouldn't obtain a close-up y thanks to NetGalley, Quarto Publishing Group, and White Lion Publishing for the advance read.

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    Eyes of the Eagle: F Company LRPs in Vietnam, 1968 []  2020-2-1 1:21

    This was a very interesting and amazing Book. The Author really was a brave man during the wars he endured in Vietnam. LRPS are definitely braver than most in the Army. I enjoyed this book very much. Would have liked to read about the latest six months of the Authors tour of duty.

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    Eyes of the Eagle: F Company LRPs in Vietnam, 1968 []  2020-2-1 1:21

    Told from the heart from one who was there. Serious items woven into an exhilarating story, with reality and humor.

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    The Eyes of Ara [App]  2019-5-23 13:0

    Such a polished and well thought-out android device game. A surprisingly smooth transition from PC to Android. I highly recommend it.

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    The Eyes Of Darkness [App]  2020-3-29 14:56

    Perfect book ever.

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    The Eyes Of Darkness [App]  2020-3-29 14:56

    Excellent,more books to read..👍👍👍

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    The Eyes of Darkness []  2020-4-3 19:7

    Not my normal genre but I had to read it as a effect of it being 2020 and we are the middle of the Corona virus. How did the author know?? I may be tempted to read more novels by Dean Koontz

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    The Eyes of Darkness []  2020-4-3 19:7

    Just to clarify, I bought this book when it came out in 1981, so I don't need to it again on Amazon.Koontz was from 2021 when he went back to 1980, then began writing this book for publishing in 1981. He seen what was going to happen next year as this virus spreads and mutates. He is trying to save mankind. If he created this book non-fiction then officials around the globe would have captured him and hidden his story. He got support from Bill, Ted, Marty, and Doc Brown (look them up, they have worked in time travel research). Here's an photo of the time machine. Hurry, this book before it's taken off the market.

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    Eyes of the Emperor []  2020-1-29 10:35

    I recommend this to anyone interested in WW II stories, and particularly people from Hawaii, or of Asian ancestry.A thoroughly engaging book. I live in Hawaii, and I know lots of people just like the men described seems laughable now that smart people once thought that Asians smelled various that Caucasians, but here's the story, folks.

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    Eyes of the Eagle: F Company LRPs in Vietnam, 1968 []  2020-2-1 1:21

    The author recounts his first six months in Vietnam. It's an action packed, quick paced adventure. Clearly the man has met moment. You go with him as he advances from a scared kid to a cool calculating killer. The 's writing style is a pleasure to read. The on!y negative is the frequent ode of profanity.

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    Eyes of the Eagle: F Company LRPs in Vietnam, 1968 []  2020-2-1 1:21

    This is a amazing read. I highly recommend it to anyone who is interested in reading about the exploits of "special forces" soldiers in Vietnam. These are not the Green Beret forces, but Long Range Patrol troops working "behind the lines." A really amazing read that moves along very quickly, especially when you consider it is a private history.

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    Eyes of the Eagle: F Company LRPs in Vietnam, 1968 []  2020-2-1 1:21

    Amazing read could not place it down

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    The Eyes Of Darkness [App]  2020-3-29 14:56

    Its very useful

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    Eyes of the Emperor []  2020-1-29 10:35

    About a third of my method through but felt confident that my review would be valid. Very well written bringing out the essence of people's thoughts and feelings in that timeframe.

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    Eyes of the Emperor []  2020-1-29 10:35

    This is a amazing book however it starts getting boring towards the end at least in my opinion

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    The Eyes of Darkness []  2020-4-3 19:7

    The current global happenings create this book, written in 1981, paricularly disturbing and ould create us think about mankind's potential self made extinction

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    The Eyes of Darkness []  2020-4-3 19:7

    The Eyes of Darkness (TEOD) is a revamped ver of a much earlier book by Koontz, writing under the pseudonym Leigh Nichols, from 1981. I was still in high school and had never heard of the book, nor Leigh Nichols, nor Dean Koontz. It was 1987 when I discovered Watchers and scrambled to search anything he had written previously. Like a lot of others, I also became a fan. According to TEOD's afterward, this is the latest of five books he has reissued (writing under the Nichols' name) that has been updated and slightly edited to be more relevant in the 21st century.TEOD is an utter treat. While a few locations stumbled here and there, the narrative, protagonists, antagonists, the minor characters, settings, dialogue, were all interesting without being overly wordy. This was the Koontz I remembered from 1987 onward. Not the current dreck he seems to spit out about twice a year. I found paragraphs in TEOD that ranged from 2 sentences to a whole page, with descriptions of everything from the cold, short winter days to the smells of a small-town diner to the evergreens on a snow-capped mountaintop. You actually felt like you stepped into the globe his imagination had made for you.And while TEOD's plot involved a cold war-era meme reminiscent of the '70s and passed on into the early '80s, he was able to modernize the book to create it seem more relevant for today's times. You could feel the mother's anguish, confusion, and eventual anger: She was the Ripley from Aliens before we had a Ripley from Aliens.But don't allow the cold-war sub-plot place you off. Koontz ties up that theme where it's within one's reach of believability. Just imagine the feeling you obtain when you watch a 007 film from the early '80s and giggle over how silly those plots were (compared to the latest Bond movies with Daniel Craig). TEOD might give you that feeling of déjà vu, sans the chuckling.Even though I know how his other book, Strangers, ends as well as the underlying plot, reading TEOD created me wish to go out and search a used ver of that book, or maybe Lightning, or The Poor Place. That's the other déjà vu you get. Wow, what a amazing writer Koontz was. The latest book I read by him before TEOD was What the Night Knows: A Novel. Though not reviewed yet by me, I'd give that one 2.5 stars. It's probably one of the few books in the latest decade that I enjoyed, until it went off the rails and into the supernatural. The closest Koontz comes to the supernatural are his Odd Thomas books, a blatant knockoff of The Sixth Sense (Collector's Edition Series), in my humble opinion.I also just finished another re-issue of an earlier book, The Voice of the Night, he wrote under another pen name in 1979 that was pure simplicity and sheer joy. Like TEOD, there was no preaching, no wearing one's faith on one's sleeve, no pandering to the reader, no silly dialogue just for the sake of having dialogue. Everything had a purpose, every sentence had a meaning, every hero relatable, and when not, their actions understandable.I give TEOD 4.5 stars but Amazon doesn't do half stars for some reason. I highly recommend this book. It's a classic Koontz thriller and you won't be disappointed.

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    Eyes of the Eagle: F Company LRPs in Vietnam, 1968 []  2020-2-1 1:21

    This book reminded me of a lot of happenings while I was in country. It created me reflect on those days gone by. I enjoyed the writer's chronological how he wrote this book. I'm sure he used letters sent home to place together all his experiences. I admire these LRP's that served in Vietnam. They were a breed that showed their dedication to serve even if it meant the ultimate sacrifice.

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    Eyes of the Eagle: F Company LRPs in Vietnam, 1968 []  2020-2-1 1:21

    Mr. Linderer's memoirs are the best Vietnam reads for myself. Seems authentic rather than some of the 'war-porn' others reads can turn into. LRP/LRRP is the forerunner to the Rangers, so for those into military history, you'll have fun this author.

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    The Eyes of Darkness []  2020-4-3 19:7

    Very gripping book that you'll not one to place down but tried and finished it income sitting. The love of a mother won't stopped at anything to look for her lost 's actually wasn't a prediction of a global danger. When he wrote the book in 1981.. plus there was no mention of the virus being Coronavirus. Just the word. WUHAN-400.. Because it was brought out from the town of Wuhan by chinese scientists defected to the US.He developed it an all was recorded in the diskettes and he brought along when he defected to the US. And then carried out the try on the group of students and 2 adults while they accidentally stumbled in .. And then carried out the try on the group of students while they were on their method to scout camp up in the High Sierra mountain area. They got abducted and created try specimens..only 1 boy.. Danny survived the try .He have psychic power.. while he was so what imprisoned by the poor guys . He tried to contact his mother using his psychic power .. telekinesis ..in her dream and weird gripping event at home, even her working place..

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    The Eyes of Darkness []  2020-4-3 19:7

    "The Eyes of Darkness" is a fairly well written science fiction / thriller story. It is set in Nevada in contemporary America. The language is in modern conversational [email protected]#$%!&? is of medium length. I listened to an audiobook rather than read the actual book. I was able to follow most of it although I had to re listen to parts of the story where there is a lot of describing of scenery. The narration is of professional us far I have only read three Dean Koontz novels. Those three are "Funhouse", " Whispers", and now "The Eyes of Darkness". I did not really care for either of the previous two novels. They are various than this one as they involved more savage criminality and more abject darkness. This novel is more of a science fiction / thriller novel, and although at times dark, there are also moments of lightness and some romance.I do need to mention that this novel was called to my attention at this time, due to the mention within it of a virus and a particular zone in China. I found that that is only an incremental part of this story and although a strange coincidence, not really what the story is about. I have an aversion to writing anything to spoil anyone's reading experience. I only state this in case one wishes to read this story at this time for that reason.I am only beginning to study Dean Koontz novels. This is easily my favorite thus far. I can sense his maturation as an author. Except for the purposes of comparing and contrasting, I consider the previous two that I have read to be forgettable. I am glad to have found a Dean Koontz novel that I actually liked as he was born and raised in my home state of Pennsylvania and I have fun studying authors from Pennsylvania. Thank You...

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    Eyes of the Emperor []  2020-1-29 10:35

    I loved this book, especially how Salisbury captures the "Americaness" of the young protagonist. The section in which he allows himself to be used as bait in a horrible K-( experiment was hard to read, but worth it.His use of Island patois among the characters is a convincing hero a side note, some of it's readers might have fun Barstow Bones, in which an Asian-American college student hides out in a post-Pearl Harbor Barstow film theater while a while a gang of white teen-age thugs, pursue him. When newsreel footage of a Japanese Zero being shot down present s on the screen, Tommy cheers along with the rest of the audience. He is, like the young protagonist of Eyes of the Emperor, first of all an American.

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    Eyes of the Emperor []  2020-1-29 10:35

    Amazing quality. Quick Shipping

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    Eyes of the Emperor []  2020-1-29 10:35

    Very interesting.

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    The Eyes Of Darkness [App]  2020-3-29 14:56

    How to I can the Original application please support me

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    The Eyes of Darkness []  2020-4-3 19:7

    Came across this on Fb today and I cannot wait to read this book now! How cool is it that he even got the city!

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    Eyes of the Eagle: F Company LRPs in Vietnam, 1968 []  2020-2-1 1:21

    Perfect writing. I felt as if I was in the jungle during the stories. I will be purchasing all this authors books to add to my library.

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    Eyes of the Eagle: F Company LRPs in Vietnam, 1968 []  2020-2-1 1:21

    I am in awe of the duty these men performed. They are real superheros. I have a digital library full of private accounts, stories, and memories of the brave and honorable men who served in Vietnam. I enjoyed Mr. Linderer's book.

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    Eyes of the Eagle: F Company LRPs in Vietnam, 1968 []  2020-2-1 1:21

    A amazing overview of what can happen when amazing soldiers are placed in harms method by useless and self serving politicians who are busy lining their own pockets

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    Looking Out, Looking In []  2020-1-8 19:43

    For what I need is enough, it was used but in amazing conditions and best price

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    Looking Out, Looking In []  2020-1-8 19:43

    Book is amazing but no instruction for return was sent with the book as amazon advertise...

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    Eyes of the Emperor []  2020-1-29 10:35

    Eyes of the Emperor by Graham Salisbury is the novelized ver of WWII dog try trials that used young Japanese men as "bait", believing that the Japanese exuded a various scent than Americans. These trials were authorized by President Roosevelt. Although this book was a YA adult book (I read in less than 3 hours), it was interesting enough to hold me glued to the pages! 5 stars

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    Eyes of the Emperor []  2020-1-29 10:35

    amazing book

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    Eyes of the Emperor []  2020-1-29 10:35

    I have always been interested in Globe Battle II. Reading of the sacrifices the people created and the suffering they went through and reading of their determination and bravery is an inspiration to me. I would recommend this book to all as we need to learn of others strength in trials that we may be able to withstand our trials also and those that may come our way.

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    Eyes of the Emperor []  2020-1-29 10:35

    Interesting. I was expecting more.

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    The Eyes of Darkness []  2020-4-3 19:7

    So riveting can place it down when you begin reading. It is about mummy's love for her son. Chapter 39 is so prophetic I really can't believe it. The author must have a vision for the future, it can't be coincidental!

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    The Eyes of Darkness []  2020-4-3 19:7

    I thought I had read everything Dean Koontz had written. Having just finished reading his recent release in The Jane Hawke series and having searched through my Kindle library to choose a book to re-read and realized I'd read everything written by Dean Koontz at least twice I decided to go to the Kindle shop on the off possibility I'd search something new. I found this title. The Eyes of Darkness had me from page one. I was not disappointed. My only want is that there was indeed a method to obtain this author's books from page to screen with his stories intact and real to his intentions. I can't pretend to understand the wonderful agony Mr Koontz endured trying to obtain this story from page to screen. But I do understand the frustration he endured. Hold writing Mr Koontz! You are an awesome author!!!

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    The Eyes of Darkness []  2020-4-3 19:7

    Awesome reading - quite terrifying that this was written in 1981 and more or less predicted what is event now!

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    The Eyes Of Darkness [App]  2020-3-29 14:56

    Worst

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    Looking Out, Looking In []  2020-1-8 19:43

    Worked perfect!!

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    Looking Out, Looking In []  2020-1-8 19:43

    Purchased for school. Affordable and came on time.

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    Looking Out, Looking In []  2020-1-8 19:43

    It's a textbook so I cant say I love it lol. It was in amazing shape and I only used it once or twice for my class.

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    Looking Out, Looking In []  2020-1-8 19:43

    amazing condition with a amazing price.

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    Looking Out, Looking In []  2020-1-8 19:43

    delivered before time and as described

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    Looking Out, Looking In []  2020-1-8 19:43

    What Ineeded for a class I am taking.

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    Looking Out, Looking In []  2020-1-8 19:43

    Best and I find everywhere.

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    Looking Out, Looking In []  2020-1-8 19:43

    ok

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    The Book of Barkley: Love and Life Through the Eyes of a Labrador Retriever [Book]  2018-2-2 18:2

    L.B. Johnson shares her life with a companion having four paws, an intimidating bark, and the largest heart and soul found in a black, furry package. Her snapshots-in-time deliver an awesome story woven of loss, love, and soul-searching with a excellent seasoning of humor "...and he sounds like Johnny Cash!" I laughed and cried, have re-read this twice (so far!) and shared snippets with powerful encouragement to mates to obtain their own copy so they can experience Barkley and L.B., too.

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    The Book of Barkley: Love and Life Through the Eyes of a Labrador Retriever [Book]  2018-2-2 18:2

    The Book of Barkley: Love and Life Through the Eyes of a Labrador Retriever, by L.B. Johnson, is a memoir that tells the tale of her experiences raising a puppy and letting it become her companion and protector. The story Mrs. Johnson tells is at various times funny, introspective, and sad. From the adventures of teaching a labrador puppy manners and housebreaking him, to the final trip to the vet that all pet owners dread, but know will happen someday, this book gives us a window in to the love and trust between a woman and her best s. Johnson is an outstanding writer, and the amount of thought that went into this work really shows. When she describes a scene, such as when Barkley chases a miscreant away from her yard, I could see it playing out in my mind’s eye. Her descriptions of environments and people are excellent, and her writing evokes emotions on every page. To be honest, I laughed out loud at a lot of this book, and I shed tears at times. I can’t say that about most things I ever, while this book was not difficult to read, it is not a quick read. Cover to cover, it took me two weeks to [email protected]#$%!. This was due to a need to set it down and give myself time to ruminate over the chapter or two that I had just finished. Like I said, the author is a master at setting a stage and transporting you to a time and put she wants to describe. After doing that for a while, I required to think about what she was trying to say and the notice she was trying to of the best things I can say about any book is that I plan to read it again and that I plan on giving it to my kids to read. The Book of Barkley has found a permanent home on my bookshelf, and once Girlie Bear and her brothers have found a zone in their school reading lists, they are going to be encouraged to experience Mrs. Johnson’s other words, this is a book in which I think everyone will search something that will touch them. If you’ve ever had that unique pet that was your constant companion, you will connect with this story, and I heartily recommend it.

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    The Book of Barkley: Love and Life Through the Eyes of a Labrador Retriever [Book]  2018-2-2 18:2

    This telling of a love found and allowing one's heart to be vulnerable to damage again is wonderfully written with both poignant verse and outright humor. L.B. Johnson is a delight to read. Want I could write 1/4 as well---I know, I know, some say I do.If you've ever given your heart to a fur baby and felt the sting of loss, then this book could support you with perspective.I highly recommend it, if for no other reason than to float in the words so elegantly strung together that you'll laugh, you'll cry and you will come away refreshed with hope.

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    The Book of Barkley: Love and Life Through the Eyes of a Labrador Retriever [Book]  2018-2-2 18:2

    The Book of Barkley by L.B. Johnson was eagerly welcomed by thousands of us who have read her short stories online or in magazines and marvel at her literary excellence, profound depth of private character, impish hilarity, courage, and superlative grace under fire. Johnson loves life. As a Federal agent and the daughter of a patriotic American family, she also defends life and liberty as her chosen profession.What you will search in this beautifully written book are two things. It's the life story of a dog, and an intimate portrait of an exceptional person who cherished and required a stalwart companion. As a pup, Barkley gave her the joy of innocence. In adulthood, he was a constant source of amusement and a faithful companion, capable of defending and soothing a tired, lonely street fighter who often had nightmarish duties to forget when she came home from work. Barkley was the cheerful antidote. His illness and death gave his owner another bonus of love -- wholly unexpected, deemed impossible, but as right as Barkley's infinite loyalty and spontaneous eagerness for the best of life's grand adventure.If it were only the story of a dog, I'd smile and say nothing. But The Book of Barkley is much more. It belongs on my bookshelf next to F. Scott Fitzgerald and Gene Rhodes, purely on literary merit. Turning the first twenty pages at random, her prose sparkles with rare gems: "the soul's needle that rips the bindings" ... "words that turn and twist in the shade of an ancient tree" ... "the wreckage of duty crashing on the ears of those who are left." Johnson is exceptionally gifted. Her themes and use of language are unborrowed. Those of us who read her published work are stuck like addicts to this brazenly candid and attractive woman of letters.

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    The Book of Barkley: Love and Life Through the Eyes of a Labrador Retriever [Book]  2018-2-2 18:2

    I must admit that when I began reading this book, the writer's style caught me a small by surprise. I felt as if I was holding L. B. Johnson's own personal journal, or diary, in my hands. Then, the more I read, the more I felt comfortable with this journal-style of writing by the author. Given the book's title and the topic matter, what better method to let reader's to experience Johnson's and Barkley's life together than to leave her personal journal laying around for people to pick it up and read of the pair's adventures and life's ere's no mistaking the author's wry sense of humor and her compassion for her best friend, Barkley. Readers will search themselves chuckling at the dog's antics; at the author and her canine companion sparring together as they test to outwit each other; and then lazing back with the couple on their days off as they relish the wonders of nature at work in their own is is a book everyone should read. For pet owners, especially dog lovers, you'll search yourself nodding in understanding as you recall your pet playing the same android games with you, fighting for your attention, and giving so much unconditional love in return for your time and caring. And for those of us who have loved and lost animal friends, you'll shed a tear here and there between the t yourself a copy of The Book of Barkley .... better still, obtain several copies and hand them out as bonuses to your animal-loving friends!

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    The Book of Barkley: Love and Life Through the Eyes of a Labrador Retriever [Book]  2018-2-2 18:2

    " I simply loved it! I would read a few pages in the morning, or the evening then set it aside as it was something I had to look forward to, like a unique piece of chocolate given by a friend. Admittedly, this past week as I neared the end, I was dragging my feet as I knew I was going to have to cry as it reopened so a lot of losses of my own, which of course it did, but that's OK because the process of losing our fury kids is never over. Never. There is always comfort in knowing someone else who understands the depth of love our non human kids give reading this heart's journey it is refreshing to meet someone who is not afraid to live outside the box and who for having done so, has evolved to be a remarkably insightful human being. A human being who has been given the bonus of being able to beautifully articulate that insight via the written word. I will read the book again. There are so a lot of paragraphs that I simply adore."

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    Through Your Eyes: A story of enduring love and the strength of the human spirit []  2020-1-22 21:42

    At a young age Lizzy develops a bit of a crush on Jones, an older boy she meets under desperate circumstances. Over the next few months, they develop a special bond. A bond of secrets and lies Lizzy struggles to hold hidden from the rest of the world. When he moves away, Lizzy knows he’s gone forever and so she goes on with her life the best she can while keeping her dark truth tucked away.Eventually she meets Peter and falls hard for him. Lizzy puts on a facade that hides her dark secrets, making Peter think all is normal, but that could not be farther from the truth. As Lizzy struggles to hold her secrets hidden, she finds herself falling in love with not one, but two guys. All she wants is to search a love that will heal her soul but instead finds herself in a war to save more than just her is was a quick and heartbreaking story, I was not expecting this story to go the method it did... Some parts were difficult to obtain through and I felt for Lizzy so much, she'll capture your heart for sure!I won Through Your Eyes by Mae East from the Goodreads Giveaway in exchange for my honest review

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    The Book of Barkley: Love and Life Through the Eyes of a Labrador Retriever [Book]  2018-2-2 18:2

    Between two photos—one a black-haired puppy and the other an older dog, the hair turned gray—is a story, a love story of a woman and her dog, Barkley. Those of us dog lovers (dog parents) know this story all too well and yet it can never be told enough for in the reading a joy is rekindled of what it is to adopt a puppy and share our lives with them as they grow and forever steal our hearts. But this is no ordinary dog story about the love of a dog, it is a soul-searching journey on the depth of passion brought to Johnson’s life from Barkley, where the light shines brightly and reflection begins to create fresh sense. Flashbacks of the author’s past are interspersed throughout the story to give depth to Johnson’s relationship with Barkley: as he picked her to own him, when he discovers that doggie perfume does not spray out of skunks, his first bath and swim in a pond, singing along on a vehicle ride, his fast-eating-and-barfing presents, wily antics to steal pancakes, and so much more. This is a dog the reader will fall in love with. This is also an author the reader will fall in love with as we obtain to know her, as she opens her heart, and pours out her soul. “I talk to my dog,” she writes, and one can only imagine that these are some of her best conversations with her beloved friend, Barkley, the mate who brought her to her destiny—the man she was to marry. This exceedingly well-written story, commendable for a first book, will leave you wanting to hug Barkley. And, his best friend, L. B. Johnson

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    Through Your Eyes: A story of enduring love and the strength of the human spirit []  2020-1-22 21:42

    O won my copy through Goodreads GiveawaysYou will instant love Lizzy. She has been through items some can't even fathom. This book realistically follows Lizzy from a young kid through becoming a young lady. Mae East does a amazing job of providing enough detail to hold you hooked and turning the pages. She achieves this wonderfully without dragging it out to much of boring the reader with fluff. Mae East created me feel a part of the book, I felt Lizzy's fears, pain, hope, achievements and downfalls. This book brought me front and center to a heartwarming subject in a method I couldn't quit reading.I have nothing but praise for the subject, approach and captivating writing. The only drawback was the errors. They did distract but only slightly. Even with those I still never came so distraction or lost that a re-read of a sentence didn't clarify for me. I didn't deduct for this since often even huge name publishing companies miss these several times in a book.

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    The Book of Barkley: Love and Life Through the Eyes of a Labrador Retriever [Book]  2018-2-2 18:2

    This is THE book for anyone who has loved a dog. LB Johnson writes with skill and a flair for humor, and Barkley provided her with ample opportunities to engage the reader with his antics. Though the story touches on a lot of aspects of growing up in 1960's-70's America, a life and time that resonates with a lot of of us, the story concentrates on how one dog changes one woman's life, for the better.I read this book after having lost my own beloved Charlie. I found the book brought back a lot of fond memories of my dog, which created the reading more intense and memorable. I hope LB Johnson has a lot of more stories to tell, for I will be quite satisfied to read them!

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    The Book of Barkley: Love and Life Through the Eyes of a Labrador Retriever [Book]  2018-2-2 18:2

    Warning...this book is a tear-jerker...but the tears are so worth while. The author has expressed her thoughts and the thoughts of so a lot of others in attractive prose. After I read this book I immediately read it again...it is that good!!

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    The Book of Barkley: Love and Life Through the Eyes of a Labrador Retriever [Book]  2018-2-2 18:2

    This is without a doubt one of the most attractive pieces of writing it has been my pleasure to read. I hope my grandkids obtain half of the lessons it can give. Read it and you can't support but feel amazing but you will look at life a small different.

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    Through Your Eyes: A story of enduring love and the strength of the human spirit []  2020-1-22 21:42

    Amazing honest raw look into a life of abuse ,what it does to Liz and her mom, story of hope,when Liz has the courage to break the chain of abuse that so a lot of are unable to , story of love and forgiveness ..

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    In The Name Of Love []  2020-7-25 20:14

    Always a fan of cl 2ne1

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    Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass []  2020-7-18 18:53

    My daughter loves this book. Real to the Disney movie.

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    Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass []  2020-7-18 18:53

    She loves this story.

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    Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass []  2020-7-18 18:53

    Amazing book to go along with a amazing film but I recommend you read this book after you have watched the movie. I like Hatter the best of all. :)

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    Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass []  2020-7-18 18:53

    like it

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    Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass []  2020-7-18 18:53

    Cannot wait for the movie - a must have for any Tim Burton Fans!

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    Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass []  2020-7-18 18:53

    kids

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    Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass []  2020-7-18 18:53

    If your like me and can't wait for the film to come out you will love this book!! Amazing book to add to your Alice collection 🐇

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    Alice in Wonderland: Through the Looking Glass []  2020-7-18 18:53

    she loves it

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