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    We still have Joy []  2020-1-18 23:8

    The energy and inspiration of this collection are unequaled. Musicianship is exquisite; one laughs and cries and cannot support but fall in love with this music.

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    We still have Joy []  2020-1-18 23:8

    I love this recording. I was introduced to a Liberian Acapella Choir cassette tape through my sister years ago and was extremely satisfied to search this recording available on CD through Amazon. :-) I listen to it OFTEN. Knowing the stories of the lives of these men makes it even more special!

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    Joy Journal: Make Joy a Daily Experience []  2020-1-19 20:31

    The author of "Joy Journal" has been a business associate, accountability buddy, and private mate of mine for a lot of years. Her parents died when she was a young child, and two of her sisters committed suicide. Yet, thorugh all of the heartache she has maintained a joie de vivre that has enabled her to have a unbelievable marriage, be a terrifc mom to her three children, and be a successful entrepreneur. She made the life she wanted for herself and her family by not just saying positive affirmations - but by living them. The "Joy Journal" is her step-by-step tutorial for how to create your life everything you wish it to be. You'll learn to say "yes" more often to the delightful surprises that show themselves each day - and really explore how to focus on your goals and bring them to fruition. This book, like its author, is a true gem. It's an invaluable tutorial to tuning into the joy that's all around you!

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    Joy Journal: Make Joy a Daily Experience []  2020-1-19 20:31

    I bought the kindle ver of this because I prefer typing over writing with a pen. I have found this journal inspiring and thought provoking. I have been journaling on my own word document to follow along with the prompts in the book. It has been working fabulously!!!! I was in a rut where I was having a hard time finding my positive attitude. This book has helped me tremendously! I highly recommend. Simple to read/use!

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    Joy Journal: Make Joy a Daily Experience []  2020-1-19 20:31

    This book is amazing. Simple, clear, Powerful. If you wish to increase your joy and also become more successful by increasing your joy, this book is a MUST have. I would recommend doing this journal once a year as a joy refresher.

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    Joy Journal: Make Joy a Daily Experience []  2020-1-19 20:31

    Rebecca's joy journal is a excellent self-assessment of what you wish your life to be. If you have fun journaling or putting your thoughts in writing, this book is for you. Whether you have fun writing on paper or typing it out, this journal will support you search joy in each day. (If it weren't so personal, I'd blog about it.) Your journal will begin by having you recognize and embrace those things that already bring joy to your life. As you continue on through the book, she challenges you to test fresh things, be productive, say "yes" more often, and take care of yourself. Excellent for busy moms or anyone that might be out of touch with true meaning and joy. This book is appealing to women but is gender much as I had really hoped for a spiritual take on this book, I understand why it was written in this way. (To reach a broader audience.) I am going to customize my journal as a reflection of the Lord's joy in my life. Without Him, it is merely temporary happiness, not eternal joy. But that is what is amazing about this book. It is designed to support you explore what is truly necessary in your own life and is completely customizable to suits your own needs. Thank you, Rebecca, for helping me realize what every day is really about...finding joy in the journey.

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    Joy Journal: Make Joy a Daily Experience []  2020-1-19 20:31

    This is a sweet, delightful book that the reader can create as successful as he or she wishes. It is a journal meant to elicit and record all the moments of joy that we often overlook. It is a tutorial to remembering to be joyful and a roadmap to discovering the joy we mighty otherwise overlook. You will gain from it in proportion to what you place into it. If you wish to have joy in your life, this book will take you by the hand and lead you there step by everyday step.

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    Joy Journal: Make Joy a Daily Experience []  2020-1-19 20:31

    This is an perfect book that breaks life down into "bite-size" pieces similar to joy in your life. It is related to a Gratitude Journal but I liked the format because it was guided and focuses on one week at a time. I think a week is an perfect time period because sometimes 24 hours isn't enough time to "see" a joy. A week is enough time to process and think about the focused assignment. I think this would be a amazing book to give to someone for the holidays or those trying to create a change in their lives - a amazing book for encouragement!

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    Joy Journal: Make Joy a Daily Experience []  2020-1-19 20:31

    The kindle ver of this book to me is a teaser to the paper version, which I am now going to do. If I was more computer literate I might search that downloading this book onto my computer allows journaling on a laptop, but I personally prefer the old fashioned ver of writing.I think this makes a amazing bonus for anyone that you think could use a bit of support in focusing their energy on enjoying life, as well as a amazing bonus for yourself.

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    Joy Journal: Make Joy a Daily Experience []  2020-1-19 20:31

    Joy Journal: Create Joy a Everyday Experience (Volume 1)Reading just the stories helps obtain the brain and my everyday expectations into the right lane. Then writing in the everyday journal areas. Just scanning the book was a 'pick me up' from a long time of concentrating on the negative, instead of thinking more of what would be positive thinking and doing. I do have to be honest (it's a fault of mine!) and say that I haven't written anything in there yet, but have concentrated more of what can be positive in my life and how can I do that..and when, because of the journal ! I do plan on writing, but am very happy that this journal book has sent me into a fresh direction...write it, do it, then write what the results were. this is the book that will support me the most in doing that. The reason I gave it a four is because I'm greedy and would love more stories or suggestions to use from the journal.

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    Joy Journal: Make Joy a Daily Experience []  2020-1-19 20:31

    Everyday journaling has helped me leap into fresh locations of amazing success. Joy journal allows me to journal, focus on my boys and support me reframe thoughts and ideas th a t have held me back. I highly recommend this book. Focusing on one joy per day shifts my entire perspective!

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    Joy Journal: Make Joy a Daily Experience []  2020-1-19 20:31

    The Joy Journal, by Rebecca Kochenderfer is certainly a refreshing experience for anyone seeking peace and joy in their life. She has designed some very simple assignments that will support you obtain in touch with yourself. These are designed to support you grow into the type of person you have always wanted to be. In a globe so much in chaos, it is serendipity in action to search a book that is positive and can heal us. We have come across books such as this with The Love Dare by Stephen Kendrick that helps couples work on their marriages. Any book that can support us move out of the negative location into peace and joy is worthwhile. I highly recommend this.

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    Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love []  2020-1-23 2:23

    I skimmed the table of contents and immediately jumped to the "Accountability and Results" section. I search the author's engaging discussion about "Actual Actuals" e author describes a false economy of "fake actuals" provided by the lowest-price competitor. Furthermore, this data becomes the basis for useless "future planning." The passages here and elsewhere pass a routine smell test. Moreover, I appreciate the readability and analysis the author provides.Will this book create a difference in the modern workplace? While I am skeptical about these methods being broadly adopted in the US, this book premium differentiators for employers in service, knowledge work, and high-skill industries. Joy may bring dollars, and these dollars may bring more Joy and justification.I found this book to be a delightful reconsideration of standard workforce methods that sap Joy. I want the monolithic defense contractor where I was previously employed worked differently. Kudos.

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    Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love []  2020-1-23 2:23

    Richard Sheridan very clearly enjoys the work he does with Menlo Innovations. He is an active public speaker and on Twitter, spreading his form of Joy from Ann Arbor. And this book from 2015 tells the story of how he got there and how it huge element that I see here is the hurt that fear does to people and organizations. Even more is the belief that we aren’t operating under fear. Any time you think “I couldn’t possibly” or “they” anything. Or you are protective of “your” turf in the organization. Signs of a culture that has fear in it.I was hoping for more explicit how-to, in the book. And while it wasn’t black and white, it was there. Experiment. Learn. Grow.

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    Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love []  2020-1-23 2:23

    Inspires a healthy balance of “can do” with some inevitable cynicism of “won’t work” netting out in favor of giving it a try. I look forward to trying some of these techniques and putting one foot forward at a time on what will be an wonderful and arduous journey.

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    Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love []  2020-1-23 2:23

    For those of us who have long suspected there is a better approach to work, Rich Sheridan has now documented proof of what is possible! And it's not a fairy tail being told by some theoretical professor who hasn't had to actually create things happen in the true world. It was done by true people in the true business globe and in an industry plagued by professional burn-out and high-dollar project failures!! Personally, I can't wait to start shifting the culture of my own workplace and trying mini-Menlo experiments of our own... Even though we don't create software, I can see how these primary principles and tactics can apply to transform any workplace into one that fosters a culture of joy - and all the positive things that follow!

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    Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love []  2020-1-23 2:23

    My boss read Joy, Inc. angry was raving about it so I decided to read it as well. I have to say that I did obtain I inspired. We are going to be making some changes based on some of the principles in the book and I'm excited to see where it takes us. I did search that the book lent itself to a small "too amazing to be true". I would have enjoyed having some concrete info of dealing with issues rather than an almost afterthought chapter (and seriously-the leading issue is house keeping/dishwasher/Menlo Mom stuff?).That said-take the book for what it is. Someone wanted to have fun and have a lot of joy in their work. He set out to make that culture, in his opinion, I'd d it, and is spreading the amazing word. I think it's great. Why shouldn't you be thinking work is amazing? Even in companies with billions of dollars of revenue-sure, you're probably not going to obtain everyone shifted overnight but you could do it through teams.I'm satisfied to have read this-looking for more joy in my work already!

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    Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love []  2020-1-23 2:23

    I am the co-owner of a Lean/Agile Operations consulting firm that works primarily with developers. A lot of the practices and values behind the practices in the book are our own in some related form or another. Don't obtain me wrong; there are creative ideas in there, but if you stay abreast of different trends in agile development, you're probably not going to see a specific technique that just blows your mind (although you will probably appreciate the value of paired programming more than you do, now).For me, the power of this book is that it starts with a core of wanting to make a company to end human suffering with regards to - that contains both the usage of it and the construction of it. The practices are the results of experiments to produce this thing. As such, the book tightly weaves together a lot of things that are missing in conversations in the Lean and Agile communities, which tend to center heavily on practices, but unfortunately not so much about why someone might (or might not) adopt a given practice, or why anyone would even wish to do this in the first the author recommends, he starts with WHY. The practices and the culture emerged in the pursuit of that goal of joyful development and usage. You couldn't just drop those practices onto another dev and expect magic to happen, not without a serious re-examining of why that exists and what it is book got me inspired again about development and business in a method I haven't been for a while, and it is prompting deep conversations within my own company about our ideas and values that I am certain will alter our business model. If this book gives you a blueprint for anything, it's how to make a company around your reason for existence and your shared beliefs. It could, with some careful thought and discussions, support any business in any vertical in this e one thing you don't obtain a lot of in this particular book is a lot of info on the slogs that got them to this point. This is not completely absent from the book; it's just not the book's purpose and, therefore, you don't see a lot of it. You don't obtain a lot of narrative on the struggles Menlo went through to obtain the ship sailing or the different failed experiments along the way. The book focuses far more on the lessons reaped from those mistakes, as it should. I only point this out because I can see companies or squads within companies trying to transform themselves along lines inspired by the book and becoming discouraged when the street gets rough because the book doesn't explicitly go into those times in detail.But what the book does, it does very well. I can't imagine someone reading this book and not being inspired to approach their business is fresh ways.

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    Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love []  2020-1-23 2:23

    The practices in this book won't work for everyone, but it's a thoughtful, intriguing explanation of how to build a thriving workplace. I especially like the convincing explanation of how pair programming --- 2 developers with one computer -- can work in the true world. Thank you Rich for your courage and paving the method for workplaces where people love to work!

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    Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love []  2020-1-23 2:23

    After years of personally experiencing much of the same suffering that Rich did in his career, I was fortunate to be invited to attend a tour at MENLO Innovations in 2010. My wife's company was adopting some of the agile methodologies and one of the project managers had visited a company in Ann Arbor, Michigan using agile, that gave tours of their facility. I envisioned a cube farm filled with earphone adorned programmers pounding away at keyboards, a sight very related to what I saw each day at work as a programmer. Prior to agreeing to go along, a perusal of MENLO's web website revealed much that piqued my curiosity. There I found a recommended reading list, white papers and blog full of ideas that were contrary to much of the main stream IT management principles that I had experienced in my career. And, as a bonus, I would obtain to spend time with my wife on the ride there and back, so I agreed to was our host for the tour and when he announced that MENLO's basic goal was to make and foster a culture that focused on "the business value of Joy", I was awed. On the ride home, all I could say to my wife was "Wow!"There is a put where is made with the intention of " Ending Human Suffering As It Relates To Technology".With this book, Richard shares how he and everyone at MENLO Innovations everyday search joy in designing and creating that is truly user centric, actually delivered and widely ally, Joy at this en visit MENLO if you will probably wish to work there.I know I do.- Kevin

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    Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love []  2020-1-23 2:23

    Joy is what happened when Richard Sheridan and his “Menlonians” experimented with their workplace. His story evokes a pure manifestation of the phrase, “structure sets you free.” There is zero jargon — the words “Lean” and “Agile” are barely show — just generous detail. This gifted storyteller invites you to have fun his reimagining of Edison’s popular Menlo Park with candor and care. This is the story of a company with a mission to “end human suffering in the globe as it relates to technology.”Richard’s Back StoryThe book follows the author’s journey from “youthful joy to deep disillusionment to endless optimism.” Richard Sheridan got his first job as a computer programmer before he could drive. He knew at age thirteen that he was going to be designing because it brought him joy. “I was excited both about my own future and the world’s; the computer was going to change everything, and was the magic that created it all work.” Early in his career, his enthusiasm and talent brought him raises, promotions, stock options and the promise of amazing things to come.I was excited both about my own future and the world’s; the computer was going to change everything, and was the magic that created it all eridan thought he had it created until he realized developers were just cranking out buggy and letting the public sort it out. Everything crashed. To hold up with customer promises, programmers worked nights, weekends and sacrificed holidays. The author resolved to either abandon his career or search another method to make software. Luckily he chose the ter reading Extreme Programming by Kent Beck and watching a Nightline episode about IDEO, Sheridan had proof there was another way. He enticed his little band of engineers to test a fresh method of programming by luring them with Java — the new, hot programming language — and promising the experiment would latest only 5 days. The effect was excitement, fun, pride, productivity and lots of learning. He never looked e Myth of IntrovertsWhen people think of programmers they imagine tech geniuses staring at their screens in insulated privacy. This is upended at Menlo. The company is one huge room where everyone can see and hear each other. There are no cubicles. Most workplaces dedicate time and thought to things like: Who gets an office? Who gets the largest office, who gets the corner office? And oh yeah, where should we place the fresh hires? With offices are generally based on seniority, one classic improvement effort is to fix the resulting layouts since colleagues are spread far and e Menlo offices lack cubicles and all the computers sit on tables. They can reconfigure the zone on a dime and pull tables together when people are on the same project. Sometimes they rearrange the tables just to “shake things up.” With programmers in a wide begin space, “there was less I and a lot more we. Suddenly, when someone was in problem or stuck, support arrived without even asking.”With programmers in a wide begin space, “there was less I and a lot more we. Suddenly, when someone was in problem or stuck, support arrived without even asking.”The results of the begin zone run counter to more traditional office setups. It’s not uncommon for people to call into meetings remotely even when they are a few feet away in a cubicle. Since 80% of communication is nonverbal, that lack of interaction has an immeasurable impact on company culture. Menlo, in contrast, doesn’t even let earbuds. The human connection is sacred and part of creating “flow.” They use a technique called “High-Speed Voice Technology” — meaning they have actual conversations while looking at each ey use a technique called “High-Speed Voice Technology” — meaning they have actual conversations while looking at each t only do they not mind the noise — the sound of people working — their culture fosters innovation. Their workspace is reminiscent of MIT’s Building 20 which was known as the “Magical Incubator.” It was home to laboratories involved in some of the most groundbreaking developments in science and technology because people were to poke holes, knock down walls, talk to each other and shake things up. Menlo has made a related learning environment and the faster squads learn, the more competitive they o by TwoOne of the issues development companies face is the creation of “Towers of Knowledge.” This happens when a lone employee masters a critical technology and the company can’t survive without them. Menlo solved this issue by having programmers work in took a second to understand that pairing not only meant people always work in squads of two — it meant that two people shared one computer and only one of them accessed the keyboard at a time. It’s intensely counterintuitive and transformative. “Pairing is one of the most potent managerial tools I have ever discovered because of all the traditional issues it helps solve.”Pairing is one of the most potent managerial tools I have ever discovered because of all the traditional issues it helps anging It UpThey change pairs every week. They swap partners on the same project, and they swap people between projects. This sounds disruptive and challenging for knowledge management, but just the opposite is true. This is one of the purest forms of what thought leader Peter Senge called “The Learning Organization.” The effect is a solid competitive advantage. It solved a host of problems:Eliminates “knowledge hoarding” and losing critical expertise due to turnoverPrevents people from being “stuck” with a squad member they don’t feel compatible withPrevents cliques from forming since there’s not enough timeDispels misconceptions about others since you obtain to know everyoneCreates a safe zone to try fresh technologies togetherOffice MeetingsIf you obtain to tour the Menlo office, you might witness their everyday standup meeting. At 10:00 am every morning the entire company stands in a circle to report what they’re working on and whether or not they need help. Due to their ”High-Speed Voice Technology” this takes under 15 mins even with over 75 people. Each pair holds on to the two horns of a plastic Viking helmet as they address the group and then they pass it ndbagging and ReworkMost organizations struggle with forecasts and estimates. By definition they’re inaccurate. For a development company they’re critical. Clients need to know how long it will take and how much it will cost. Since the programmers are closest to the work, they’re the best source of estimation. At Menlo, leadership commits to supporting their estimates — they are trusted regardless of whether or not they’re nsider what happens in less-evolved cultures. If programmers underestimate, there are late deliveries, cost overruns and unhappy clients. Fear of being blamed for mistakes leads to sandbagging. But if they overestimate, the client balks at the price. Neither of these is amazing for the customer, the business or the Menlo, if the estimates are wrong, then they just relay that to the client. Either work moves up and gets done faster, or they agree it’s going to take longer and cost more — end of story. Since programmers are not penalized for wrong estimates they take total control of setting and working toward aggressive milestones without fear of retribution. Clients obtain products faster as long as they’re okay with adjusting when the numbers are nce programmers are not penalized for wrong estimates they take total control of setting and working toward aggressive milestones without fear of retribution.Driving Fear out of the Culture“Fear is one of the largest assassins of joy,” so one of Richard’s main responsibilities as leader is to drive out fear. He realized that if his employees felt safe to create mistakes then they’d be willing to take risks. In to innovate and grow, his people have to feel to test things out without waiting for permission. It seems to have worked since “one of the most common phrases you’ll hear at Menlo is ‘Let’s run the experiment.’”He realized that if his employees felt safe to create mistakes then they’d be willing to take risks. In to innovate and grow, his people have to feel to test things out without waiting for sual WorkplaceIn spite of the fact that technology is the product, the surroundings are dominated by paper, cardboard, thumb tacks and string. They conduct a “Planning Game” on a huge table where a sheet of paper represents one week of work. Customers and project managers map out what work will be done based on what literally “fits” in each week.Once the work is planned and agreed to, it goes on the Work Authorization Board. This wall displays the tasks due each day along with the pairs is responsible. Sticky dots represent status reports and a horizontal piece of string indicates the current day so observers can see whether or not they’re on track. No mystery about the work in ey also have boards on the wall representing revenue, expenses and profits. One board represents the salary and position of each employee. Other walls are decorated with hand-crafted posters that say things like, “Make Mistakes Faster.” The visuals and transparency combat the fog and inaction that effect from the more typical “out of sight, out of mind” reality of organizational information.Who Works at Menlo?For most organizations, the hiring process is a crapshoot. The main tool is the job interview but, quoting Richard Sheridan, that’s “two people in a room lying to each other for 2 hours.” The interview has never been a reliable method to search out if someone is a amazing fit. Menlo scrapped it ey designed their own activity-based process focused entirely on cultural fit. Of course, programmers need to know how to program, but since it’s truly a learning organization, people can always pick up the skills they need. The effect resembles “high-speed dating” but with proctors and evaluations. They bring about 50 job candidates in as a group. They pair them up with each other and assign each pair a Menlo ey designed their own activity-based process focused entirely on cultural fit. Of course, programmers need to know how to program, but since it’s truly a learning organization, people can always pick up the skills they irs are given one pencil, one sheet of paper and a issue to solve while observers sit and watch what happens. Observers watch their assigned pairs while asking themselves a series of questions:“Would I like to pair with this person for a week?”“Would I feel supported if I were struggling?”“Would I be able to help them and would they listen if I did?”“Would I learn something from this person?”“Would they support me grow?”They pair off the candidates 3 times, always with a fresh observer. After they leave, the observers discuss the group. This leads to a vote on who gets invited back for Round 2. It all hinges on whether the potential hiree would play well with others, share and be respectful. Do they have amazing “kindergarten skills?” Beyond that they’re just looking for “able learners with curiosity” since teaching them skills is the simple part.High-Tech AnthropologistsMenlo works with their clients, but they also venture into the globe to better understand the end users. They dedicate an entire role to this process called the “High-Tech Anthropologist.” This group watches people use and interact with and prototypes. Their one one guideline — “observation without interruption.” In one case they saw a user wearing rubber gloves while handling a prototype due to their proximity to toxins. The intended touch screen would not work with gloves. Without this discovery, the client would have for the development of useless re Customer InteractionIn addition to spending time with end-users, Menlo hosts a weekly show-and-tell session with their client sponsors. In a reversal, it’s the customers who “show” the staff how they use the software. Programmers sit and watch as the clients demonstrate and “tell” them how it feels. Once again, “Menlonians” observe and learn.LeadershipThere is no discernable hierarchy at Menlo. They have no formal reporting relationships, but they encourage people to become leaders. They search that those who are “gentle, empathetic, and trusting teachers” naturally grow into leaders. Another extension of this organic approach is that it’s up to the employees to award raises and promotions. Employees are judged by their utine and DisciplineBeneath the organic leadership, the “high-speed voice technology,” the viking helmet and the focus on joy, there are clearly defined, rigorous systems. What might seem like anarchy to some has a deceptively powerful set of rules. The paired programming, the lack of walls, the weekly estimates and the Work Authorization Board are non-negotiable. And those who create it through their speed-date end up working harder than they ever have in their lives.“Humans are wired to work on things bigger than themselves, to be in community with one another. It’s why we join squads and companies, and work very hard and long to achieve a difficult and elusive shared goal.”Learning From MenloThis is an extraordinary culture to read about. Even for those not in the development industry it’s instructive and aspirational. But, just as you cannot simply copy the Lean culture of Toyota, you cannot copy what Menlo has done. But — you can obtain a lot of amazing ideas and experiment! The amazing news for everyone is that this masterful storyteller is writing another book titled, Chief Joy Officer: How Amazing Leaders Elevate Human Energy and Eliminate Fear. Watch for it on November 13, 2018.

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    Joy, Inc.: How We Built a Workplace People Love []  2020-1-23 2:23

    Joy in the workplace is truly possible.. and Rich tells you how. I had the amazing fortune to visit Menlo and was amazed by what I saw. The culture he describes here is true and happens every day in Ann Arbor, MI at Menlo. Even when I pulled developers aside and said, "really? this works for you?" it was clear that they were not only answering honestly, but passionately. One after another they repeated "they'd never been happier." I've applied a lot of of the concepts of this book in my own development squad and it's changed how my company works.If this book doesn't leave you energized and motivated to change your team's culture... you should probably look for another line of work.

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    We Could Make It Easy If We Try []  2020-5-4 18:59

    Mighty Sparrow / We Could Create It Simple If We TryYear: 1990Track Title1. We Could Create It Simple If We Try2. Gie We More3. Precious4. Abu Bakr5. Carnival Kidnappers6. I Owe No Apology7. Par Quiea Mweh (Don't Call Me)8. All The Method To Italy9. Allow The Melody Play10. Yvonne

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    Joy []  2020-1-16 23:29

    Yes! It is a Christmas-themed CD, but it is full of melody that I will have fun all year. The harmonies create it excellent for background melody or singing along. The used CD was in mint condition, but the case was cracked. Since I don't hold my CDs in their cases, that is not an problem for me.

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    Joy []  2020-1-16 23:29

    Best Christmas CD I've ever heard. Want they'd do a 2nd one. Been WAY TOO LONG.

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    Joy []  2020-1-16 23:29

    This album ranks 2nd on my all-time favorite Christmas albums, right after "Behold the Lamb of God: The Real Tall Tale of the Coming of Christ" by Andrew Peterson et al. "Joy" came out in the late 90s and this fact is reflected in a couple of the arrangements. "Joy to the World", for example, seems a small dated at this point by the drummer's choices. Nevertheless, even "Joy to the World" is refreshing because it's so various both from the traditional arrangements *and* from the typical attempts at departure from tradition. Where "Joy" ventures into familiar territory, it *never* does so in routine or weary ways. The initial track is a case in point. The three voices, Ed Cash, Allen Levi, and Bebo Norman, sing the song in three-part close harmony, but since all three men are high baritones or tenors, and since the timbre of the three voices is so complementary without being identical, the textures made are is ver of "O Holy Night" is downright awesome. The acoustic guitar stylings throughout the album are great, and this is a particularly amazing moment. When Ed Money is given reign for his three-finger style fingerpicking, he's gold (as you can hear on "Born to Bleed"). The Gospel- and blues-inspired renditions of "Jesus, O What a Unbelievable Child" and "Go Tell It on the Mountain" are fantastic, particularly when Allen Levi takes a verse. Bebo Norman's "Mary's Prayer," which has reappeared on Norman's latest Christmas album, is a tremendous and emotional fact, if there's one word that absolutely captures what makes this such an awesome album, it's the word "Passionate." These guys sing and play their HEARTS out on this e weakest tracks here are "Little Drummer Boy" (borderline cheesy, but the jazzy instrumental breaks are downright fun) and "It Came Upon the Midnight Clear" (too predictable - they play it straight through with harmony).On the other hand, if you're thinking of selectively purchasing songs from the album, your *best* bets are "Mary's Prayer," "Born to Bleed," "Jesus, O What a Unbelievable Child," "Go Tell It on the Mountain," and "O Holy Night." Frankly, this ver of "Mary's Prayer," probably recorded and mixed at Ed Cash's house or something, without all the options and production possibilities now available to Norman, is superior to the ver on "Christmas... from the Realms of Glory." It usually turns out that method - there's something you can never recapture when you go back to something later. You can see this same fact elsewhere in Norman's catalog. Three of the songs from his indie debut, "The Fabric of Verse," turned up on his first major label outing, "Ten Thousand Days," and every one of them was better the first time.A final warning to Bebo Norman fans: This is his original sound. Straight 90s acoustic folk. Nothing popsy about it. But that's what created him great.

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    Joy []  2020-1-16 23:29

    This is a really unbelievable Christmas disc with new takes on the classic carols. The harmonies are wonderful. I am really satisfied that I found this for this Christmas season. Highly recommended.

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    Joy []  2020-1-16 23:29

    Best Christmas album,full of attractive harmonies in acoustics. Love love love!

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    The Happy Hours: How We Brought Joy to My Husband's Final Days (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-15 21:48

    This is one of the most touching stories I have ever read. I love the atmosphere that you made in your home and your determination to insert some normalcy into daily life. It had to do wonders for your husband’s mental health to relax in that type of an atmosphere rather than a bedroom that resembled a hospital room. It is a excellent solution for family and mates who wish to stop in but never know when a amazing time is or don’t wish to disturb any latest memorable moments between the core family members. Some people just don’t know what to say and don’t wish to create the other person feel poor due to their own inability to carry on a conversation in sad situations. So they avoid the individual entirely which makes them feel lonely and discarded. This is why “Happy Hour” is so successful; it gives an atmosphere they are more comfortable in with refreshments to temporarily focus on or fill in the silences if necessary. It also allows people to chop away after a short time if their emotions obtain the best of them. There were so a lot of small things that the author thought of to let her husband to maintain his dignity, independence, and privacy. This really is a amazing concept if loved ones are able to devote the time to planning and caring for the individual in this way. Thank you for sharing some of your Satisfied Hours with us!*I received this book through Goodreads Giveaways. The format was Amazon Kindle.

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    The Happy Hours: How We Brought Joy to My Husband's Final Days (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-15 21:48

    After reading The Satisfied Hours, I became inspired by the brilliant idea of satisfied hour and how socialization is necessary to a caregiver and caregiver. After a lot of years of my mother being a caregiver to my father and my sister with unique needs, the role is reversed as my mother has become the care ri the caregiver Weeks after being diagnosed with that god poor c word, cancer, my globe as hers as well was rocked into a direction that neither one has expected. We are now going through the phase of feeling isolated, with a few phone calls from mates and family rather than direct and physical contact with them. This book has given me hope of having or own satisfied hours in the days to come. Thanks Kathryn for providing your heartfelt and private journey with Geoff. God Bless you for writing this A lot of people will be blessed as I have from this book/

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    Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things []  2019-12-17 21:6

    Finally, I've found the book that speaks simply and eloquently about the issues I've felt no one is addressing -- the ROOTS of the issues we are now facing, namely, lack of smart design and forethought. Studying to be a scientist in college, I remember being so frustrated with some science publications -- they were virtually unreadable! -- and thinking it's a issue of the system and of the author, who does not consider why he is writing what he is writing. He should be writing to communicate information, in a easy method that could be available to a huge audience. Instead, it seemed that people were writing to obtain published to obtain grants to produce more research that they continued to miscommunicate in more impossible-to-read publications. And I've felt similarly about the method our whole human-made globe runs -- we've forgotten what the point is, which is to live and have fun and have our children continue to do the same. And it's simple to foget when one has a reductionist approach, when one specializes in something and never looks up to see what's around. This book should be taught in all schools as part of the curriculum. It's a breath of new air of thinking globally and holistically in a globe that is largely reductionist in reasoning. It is very encouraging to see such amazing work come from such an interdisciplinary partnership. And I love the fact that this book is a polymer!

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    Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things []  2019-12-17 21:6

    Arrived quickly and safely. Book came in the condition it was described as. I love buying used and felt even better when it arrived in a minimal packaging envelope.I've read segments of this book, excited to finally read it in its entirety. This book is a staple of sustainability literature, especially for product designers. Give it a read!

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    The Happy Hours: How We Brought Joy to My Husband's Final Days (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-15 21:48

    This Kindle Single info how actress/author Kathryn Leigh Scott and her terminally ill husband, Los Angeles magazine founder Geoff Miller, developed a novel approach to normalizing, and in fact finding joy and connection in Geoff's latest days. Eschewing the usual awkward visits where mates and family members come to sit silently at what feels like a death vigil, Kathryn reimagined Geoff's sick room as a comfortable bistro, warmly inviting mates into their home to have fun a traditional "happy hour" with drinks and light food, creating a celebratory atmosphere for everyone.And although it reads as a narrative, The Satisfied Hours is also a practical how-to tutorial for other caretakers, conveying all the info Kathryn attended to, from room setup to drink selections. I know that if my end is to come the method Geoff's did, after a slow and protracted illness, I'm going to hand my partner this book and say, "I wish this!"I received a completed copy of this Kindle Single courtesy of Grand Harbor Press via Goodreads Giveaways, in return for my unbiased review.

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    The Happy Hours: How We Brought Joy to My Husband's Final Days (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-15 21:48

    I received my copy from Goodreads is story of how Kathryn Leigh Scott, the author, cared for her husband during his struggle with Progressive Supranuclear Palsy, PSP, is truly touching. Kathryn encouraged their mates and even family to come and sit with her husband during a time in which she called "happy hour". She created sure that everyone was comfortable; she even knew when to give her husband and mates their privacy as stories of old were shared. She brings to light the importance of keeping the patient active mentally as well as physically with the things and people that they are used to enjoying - whether it is meeting with their mates and family, music, art, and even outside nature adventures when possible. I found the short story encouraging, motivating, and uplifting. I love her ideas and I can imagine that her husband, Geoff Miller, was satisfied even at the end. I hope to remember her words.

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    The Happy Hours: How We Brought Joy to My Husband's Final Days (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-15 21:48

    Once again, Kathryn Leigh Scott has invited us in as honored guests to share in her caregiving experiences. Whether caring for her husband, Geoff, who was diagnosed with PSP (Progressive Supranuclear Palsy) or coming to terms with her strong, independent yet aging mother, Ms Scott shares all the scenarios that create us nod our heads in recognition while marveling at her strength and drive. The sheer creativity of "The Satisfied Hours".......... illustrates how embracing mates and fun along with meal and drinks is vital to the quality of life for both sides of the caregiving. With her apt descriptions and warm frankness (with a wry twinkle), Ms Scott has a bonus of bringing her voice to her experiences and making a private connection with the reader.

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    The Happy Hours: How We Brought Joy to My Husband's Final Days (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-15 21:48

    This reader was drawn to Satisfied Hours because I was a Dark Shadows fanatic, making Scott a favorite actress of my childhood. It is only because they're acknowledged that I see this isn't her first written t chronicles her dilemma as caregiver for husband due to his decline, suffering from a neurological disease, and the reluctance of longtime mates and colleagues to visit. She comes up with the idea of calling visits “Happy Hour”, not entirely alien to husband's mates and associates, short contacts lubricated by meal and drink, rather than depressing visit to is brief book is a “must read” for anyone who could become a caregiver—anyone with a relationship—and also for those who are hesitant about visiting the sick. Any prospective guest could suggest coming by with drinks and meal for a “Happy Hour”, but too often we treat such visits as an unpleasant t's care for her husband was informed by what Geoff himself had shared about caring for his deceased previous wife, and also by her own experiences as caregiver for her e reader may conclude this book will become repetitive or boring. Worry not, as it is short.

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    The Happy Hours: How We Brought Joy to My Husband's Final Days (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-15 21:48

    The Satisfied Hours maintains a positive tone while conveying the brutally honest challenges of caregivers. Her thoughts on keeping her husband socially engaged while also keeping her own marital bond is thought provoking. I especially appreciated that she found a method to provide a comfortable environment for company to visit, truly have fun each other, and to say goodbye. I recommend this book for anyone who is a caregiver or has a loved one or mate with a terminal illness. I gave this book five stars because it redefines end of life as a moment to be filled with memories, joy and expressed love rather than a slow excruciating slide from life. It is a fast read well worth the hour.

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    The Happy Hours: How We Brought Joy to My Husband's Final Days (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-15 21:48

    Kathryn has a method of hitting home with me. I am going through PSP with my dear husband. I love how compassionate she treated her husband. Thankfully this is the first caretaking "job". My husband contracted PSP at a young age, 55. This after we got married after not seeing each other for 42 years. Yes, that is us, we trump all ya'll...we started 1st grade together. I don't like looking ahead at the what disease will do, I like to stay in the show and with what brings us that day. That method I can still keep on to hope. Kathryn's books have been very helpful to me to search a dialog to inform family and mates about my husband's "short-comings" and that his mind is fine, she helps me hold a smile on my face and appreciate everyday...every minute! We now have satisfied hour weekly!

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    The Happy Hours: How We Brought Joy to My Husband's Final Days (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-15 21:48

    After reading the first few pages this morning, I place on some Artie Shaw in tribute to "set the scene", as Geoff would say. I took my coffee out to the patio and settled in to read. This is not a long book, and having read 'Last Dance at the Savoy', I am familiar with the story. Kathryn has a attractive method of writing which makes you feel as if you are there. I reflected back to my own mother's terminal illness, and want we would have done more Satisfied Hours together as a method to connect in a meaningful method with mates and family in the comfort of her own home. What a amazing idea! How Kathryn and Geoff handled his diagnosis, though difficult at times, is an inspiration to all, whether you are dealing with an illness, being a caregiver for a loved one, or just living your life . We will all encounter illness in some form in our lives, to quote Geoff again in one of my favorite lines, " Look, this is life. We all obtain something. No one gets out alive." To be followed by how Kathryn ends the book, quoting her friend, "We eke out of life all we can while we can" reminding us all to "enjoy every precious moment and create the most of the time we have together". Thanks to Kathryn for sharing their journey though the amazing and bad, and I am sure it will support a lot of others who read it.

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    The Happy Hours: How We Brought Joy to My Husband's Final Days (Kindle Single) []  2020-1-15 21:48

    A heart-warming story about a wife’s tactic to improve her husband’s final days by encouraging, and setting the stage, for visitors to drop by the house and visit with her e also gives examples of how others have improved their family member’s final days by facilitating socialization for them.A unbelievable reminder that both the ill and the care givers need to actually see their mates and have fun conversation, tell anecdotes and simply have fun being together for a while.

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    Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things []  2019-12-17 21:6

    I love this book, the history it imparts, the analysis of our current method of thinking and doing, and the presentation of an approach (already in practice in some places) that can stop the wasteful use of limited resources and transform our economy to be both productive and sustainable.

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    Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things []  2019-12-17 21:6

    With all the talk these days about Global warming this is a amazing book to r many, in my opinion including myself, educated in related thought processes dating back to beginnings of the industrial revolution has made a lot of of the problems, as a world, we now face. The two authors test to break down these barriers and describe ways in which we can all treat the planet with a small more respect and develop fresh ways of thinking. The idea as they write,"throwing that away." Where are you throwing it away to? It basically ends up in someone else's back yard polluting their environment while delaying the inevitable pollution of your local environment. I hope this book motivates at least a few individuals enough where they do become active or lead them down a path where they develop ways to decrease individuals carbon foot eas written about in this book reflects the Sundance Channels: The Green, Bid Ideas for a Little Planet, shows about individuals trying to create an a more sustainable environment. Some of the documentaries similar to this series shows locations that have been so heavily polluted and groups trying to remedy them. It was quite alarming to see locations such as ain, a amazing book with a lot of fresh ideas and ways to look at things

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    Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things []  2019-12-17 21:6

    Cradle to Cradle describes the harmful environmental impact caused by the manufacture and packaging of goods. While we may calculate the cost of raw materials to create a product, we do not contain the "cost"/harm to the environment. We do not choose environmentally friendly materials to create products. We do not factor in the permanent loss of those materials when the products are down cycled and end up in landfills. We ignore the wasteful and impactful packaging of products as well. Cradle to Cradle challenges us to consider all costs and impacts involved when designing, manufacturing and packaging e authors walk the talk by using a non-paper substance for the book's pages that outlast the pages of paper books and can be recycled into other books (not down cycled or discarded). Take this book to the beach; it's waterproof!The authors create for a strong partnership William McDonough brings his chemistry background to the subject. Of the tens of thousands of chemicals available, which ones are environmentally friendly? Which ones can be reclaimed and used over and over with minimum down cycling? Michael Braungart is an architect. In The Respond to How is Yes author Peter Block suggests that leaders should pattern themselves after architects (not engineers or economists) who must balance artistic beauty and true globe constraints (engineering and financial) in their work. The artistic element keeps the engineer and bean counter from dominating the process, causing unbridled harm. Following the tip of their book, we could start to use products that were truly elegant - products that would evade birth to death cycles by being suitable for birth to rebirth adle to Cradle is an necessary book which condemns current practices while stimulating one's imagination and hope for the future.--Jack Bender, author of Disregarded: Transforming the School and Workplace Through Deep Respect and Courage[ASIN:0977827275]

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    Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things []  2019-12-17 21:6

    This is not some ideological rant about how the authors wish the globe to be of pollution, with no plan to carry that out. Both men, not only collaborated on this book, but have formed a business partnership, to design some of the most cutting edge, 'green' manufacturing facilities in the world, e.g., Herman Miller's fresh building, and Ford's redesigned assembly plant. The authors take a look at the most common so-called environmentally friendly ideas as, recycling, and allow me know, that it should be renamed, downcycling, and was only delaying the inevitable trip to the landfill. Thus, allowing us to feel amazing about doing "someting", but in reality accomplishing nothing that would SOLVE the issue in the first place. Meaning, that industry needs to truly recycle, which means taking back used products, and reusing the material again to produce a similar, and/or better product, thus grossly reducing, and/or eliminating industrial waste.

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    Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things []  2019-12-17 21:6

    This is a five star book. It's not a recyclable book, it's a reusable book. The cradle to cradle thought process is intended to replace the previously considered to be thoughtful cradle to grave process. The end of a product should be the beginning of another. Reuse. That's the e practice is that this book can't be turned into any other book. No one is making further books with this synthetic (and superior and cradle to cradle planned) paper. And over the years the only product that ordinary folks ever use that is certified as cradle to cradle are the postal service's priority mail boxes. It's not a success across the board, just here and there. The practice of cradle to cradle has been a failure. Sorry! [email protected]#$%! weren't the case, but it ybe someday we'll say, now everything is created cradle to cradle, can you imagine that it took so long to catch on?

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    Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things []  2019-12-17 21:6

    An eye-opening historical documentary on the progress of technology, and how we underestimated its impact on the environment. This author not only takes you on a journey back to how a lot of pollution and waste problems arose, but also tutorials us to how to be better consumers and run our businesses with the environment in mind. These are easy, logical solutions that benefit us as individuals as well as support the environmental issues.

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    Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things []  2019-12-17 21:6

    The book is a well-argued manifesto on why and how we need to change our core philosophy of how we design e first thing you message is that this book is rather massive compared to normal books its size. This is explained by the authors trying to live their philosophy by creating a book out of a material that can be truly recycled as opposed to current paper which, while it can be reused, requires several unattractive processes and is not endlessly e book makes a lot of other decent arguments for why we should think of products as temporary services rather than things we own and therefore dispose of when we are done. The book makes a case for current recycling (or down-cycling as they call it) measures as being okay - as long as it is thought of as no more than a temporary stop-gap measure to be used while we pursue real technical and regular nutrient e only improvement I would like to see is more in-depth examples of how this process has been applied to commercial processes. They kept going back to the same one or two examples and I think there are more out there and I suspect by the time this book in republished there could be even more worthy examples.

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    Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things []  2019-12-17 21:6

    A unbelievable book of ideas regarding design (not design ideas lol).I'm an aspiring architect & really appreciate how the author explains everything. I read this in a library in 2 visits & am buying a copy for my private library. The ideas shared in this book are invaluable for anyone in every facey of design (from clothing to cars). 100% recommend to anyone.

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    The Minimalist Way: Minimalism Strategies to Declutter Your Life and Make Room for Joy []  2020-1-11 18:50

    Until now, when I heard the word “minimalist” I pictured someone with a trimmed-down wardrobe, a clean garage, and very modest spending habits. Although that may be part of the picture, this book presents a wide panorama of habits and practices that can create life simpler, easier to navigate, and — oh, yes — joyful. I found myself taking lots of notes on commitments I will create to myself and others. I’m already very organized, but Erica Layne has taught me several fresh tricks.

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    The Minimalist Way: Minimalism Strategies to Declutter Your Life and Make Room for Joy []  2020-1-11 18:50

    I have been diligently paring down over the past few years and have gotten to the layers of "harder stuff," I continue to read blogs and books to hold motivated. Erica lays out a easy plan, identify what your real values are are maximize your behaviors to align with these. I say simple, because it is simple to identify your top three values, but editing your possessions, your commitments, your relationships and your thoughts to align with these values is where the true work begins. Erica goes beyond editing your home possessions, helping you to identify positive changes you can create in all aspects of your life.

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    The Minimalist Way: Minimalism Strategies to Declutter Your Life and Make Room for Joy []  2020-1-11 18:50

    I was totally surprised when I learned about Marie Kondo. Not because I thought that Minimalism was such a novel movement, but because I was surprised that people seemed to think her approach was so noteworthy, novel and unique. Coming from Europe, minimalism has not only been a lifestyle, but also a design movement off and on for quite some time and so I have always been amazed by how much items people accumulate in the US. I am glad to see that others in the US are picking up on the minimalist lifestyle. Erica Layne's Minimalist approach can be divided into three components:Minimalist philosophyMinimalist lifestyleReal solution to support the reader in achieving a balanced lifestyle that makes for a more conscious life.I really enjoyed this book and believe that it provides sound tip for people that wish to declutter their life to have fun it more and more time.I received a book from the publisher.

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    The Minimalist Way: Minimalism Strategies to Declutter Your Life and Make Room for Joy []  2020-1-11 18:50

    This is a well written book that I think a beginning minimalist will enjoy. I didn’t search anything’new’ for myself but still enjoyed it.

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    The Minimalist Way: Minimalism Strategies to Declutter Your Life and Make Room for Joy []  2020-1-11 18:50

    I follow this author on Ig and thought I would read her book. Unfortunately, the info is not interesting, uplifting or encouraging. This book is very primary and could have been in a blog post. My weekend emails from another Minimalist Author packs so much valuable and encouraging info in one email! I expected more from this book. Anyone looking to adopt or continually improve their Minimalist Journey should stay away from this book. There are plenty of YouTube videos, podcasts and more in-depth Minimalism and Declutter books.

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    The Minimalist Way: Minimalism Strategies to Declutter Your Life and Make Room for Joy []  2020-1-11 18:50

    This is a fabulous method to obtain into (or obtain MORE into) making changes and taking your life back and create it how you wish it. The exercises & questions inspire true change and support shape your vision to the life you’ve always wanted. It’s simple to read and makes everything seem possible! Highly recommended.

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    The Minimalist Way: Minimalism Strategies to Declutter Your Life and Make Room for Joy []  2020-1-11 18:50

    I’m not really a book reader but this was so well written and an simple read with encouraging content. Erica’s take on minimalism is so refreshing, her book has small to do with stuff. She talks about family life, time management, finances and relationships. She really helps you dig deep to figure out what’s necessary to you. This was definitely my kind of book!If anything else, just the book to obtain a glimpse in her closet- It’s inspiring!

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    The Minimalist Way: Minimalism Strategies to Declutter Your Life and Make Room for Joy []  2020-1-11 18:50

    I would say that I dabble in 'minimalism.' Parts of the whole movement seem too intense for me, but this book was wonderful at looking at parts of minimalism that have to go with ALL the aspects of your life, not just your stuff. Its a amazing short read with dozens of take aways and exercises to begin right now! I am feeling motivated to re-evaluate my life in lots of various aspects that I hadn't considered before! Love this book! It is going to be one of my go-to's for sure!

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    The Minimalist Way: Minimalism Strategies to Declutter Your Life and Make Room for Joy []  2020-1-11 18:50

    This book is a bit various then most other minimalist books. The author doesn’t just tell you how to obtain rid of “stuff” but walks you through the effort required to declutter your heart and mind; the more subtle obstacles we face in the minimalist process. Well worth the read!

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    The Minimalist Way: Minimalism Strategies to Declutter Your Life and Make Room for Joy []  2020-1-11 18:50

    What I really appreciated from the very begin of the book is the approach to the topic. I was fully expecting the author to tell me to obtain rid of all my belongings! Instead, she amazing insights, useful tools, and a amazing attitude (no 'holier-than-thou' or 'what's-wrong-with-you-if-you-can't-do-this' vibes at all). Very inspirational in that this really seems do-able, starting off small, and first changing the mindset. Provides amazing tools to obtain you started on this path, and mentions what stumbling blocks people can face. I started this book with amazing skepticism ('no method am I throwing out my Stuff'), to really rethinking goals in life and how too much crap can really be a drain on your life. This is a nice, simple read that doesn't obtain your defenses up or stress out the inner hoarder too much.

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    First, We Make the Beast Beautiful: A New Journey Through Anxiety [Book]  2018-6-5 18:0

    Love this book. If you have anxiety, you will search out how not-alone you are!! Beautiful.

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    First, We Make the Beast Beautiful: A New Journey Through Anxiety [Book]  2018-6-5 18:0

    Living with anxiety, panic attacks, sjogren's syndrome, and gut health problems for the better part of my 28 years on earth, its like Ms. Wilson has answered the question that I (and apparently she) have always been asking...How can I search peace in this often painful existence? Well, first, we create the beast beautiful.

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    We Make the Road by Walking: Conversations on Education and Social Change []  2020-1-8 19:46

    We Create the Street by Walking, is the story of two leading critical pedagogues of the 20th century. The week-long conversation between Myles Horton and Paulo Freire captures key philosophical underpinnings that tutorial the two pedagogues work. Furthermore, the conversation is one of resiliency and persistence. That is, the book explores how both Freire and Horton continue to advocate their life work in the face of threats from their governments. As the two men reflect on their lives and life-works, they articulate that the main motive for their pedagogy was to make a more just and equitable society. Both men responded to the challenges of their day and leave readers searching for ways to apply their practical wisdom to contemporary times. Along the way, the reader learns ways to practice resiliency in pursuing social, economic, and political justice.

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    We Make the Road by Walking: Conversations on Education and Social Change []  2020-1-8 19:46

    I'm a huge fan of Paulo Freire and his work with the Theatre of the Oppressed. A professor in my doctoral program suggested this text, and it has been another eye opener. Highly recommend.

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    We Make the Road by Walking: Conversations on Education and Social Change []  2020-1-8 19:46

    This book is particularly amazing for understanding the relationships between the organizer/facilitator and the grass roots community activists, for understanding what can be done during down times when social movements are least active, and for understanding the role of education in the transformation of society.

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    We Make Change: Community Organizers Talk About What They Do--and Why []  2020-1-16 17:48

    Community organizers spend a lot of time getting people to speak for themselves about community issues. This book turns this around. The authors obtain community organizers to speak about the work they do. It is a valuable method of understanding the everyday questions that community organizers face.

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    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-31 5:31

    I bought this book and thought it would be totally lame. Turns out it's actually really interesting. The social aspects that go into a lawn culture extend far outside the boundaries of the green grass and are extremely intriguing. Definitely worth a read.

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    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-31 7:9

    This is an accessible but theoretically sophisticated study of American lawns, and the reasons why people who are anxious about the effects of lawn chemicals on themselves, their kids and their pets (including a woman who place booties on her dog when its paws bled after it walked on a chemically-treated lawn, rather than stopping the chemical treatment!) continue to use lawn chemicals and obsess over having a monocultured turfgrass lawn. Robbins writes with a minimum of jargon and name-dropping -- any undergraduate could easily follow his arguments without much difficulty -- but also quietly engages with actor-network theory, Foucauldian and Gramscian notions of power, hegemony and topic formation, as well as putting ecology into political ecology. It's a book which could sit equally well on an undergraduate or graduate syllabus, which speaks both to its clarity and the sophistication of its analysis. Highly recommended.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-31 7:9

    I bought this book and thought it would be totally lame. Turns out it's actually really interesting. The social aspects that go into a lawn culture extend far outside the boundaries of the green grass and are extremely intriguing. Definitely worth a read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-2-1 16:9

    Ever feel a small vain about your home design? That's normal, but are your home maintenance strategies... well... realistic? Lawns- the fake boobs of american homes. Marketing to the insecure or exploitive toward caring community members? Lawns cost a lot and hurt their prior natural environments through destruction, weed assassins and fertilizers... in a trickle down manner. A read that reminds you why sociology is a source of educational entertainment. Like watching a documentary about death and stuff. The writing reminded me of freakenomics in numerous ways.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-2-1 16:9

    Really simple to read and interesting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-2-1 20:12

    Interesting read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman []  2020-1-20 1:21

    OK read but he gets a bit long winded during some of his explanations. He's very passionate on the topic but in end not exactly what I thought it would be about. More ethereal theory than actual wood working.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman []  2020-1-20 1:21

    It's a memoir about finding happiness in your work and also showing the struggles of following what you love. Korn writes very well, charting his growth from unskilled carpenter, to fine furniture creator, and finally to builder of his own woodworking school. The book is highly private and very relatable to anyone who has questioned how they create their living and what kind of legacy they wish to leave behind. Though explicitly about woodworking and the skills involved, it is more broadly applicable to any craft.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-4-20 18:58

    This is an accessible but theoretically sophisticated study of American lawns, and the reasons why people who are anxious about the effects of lawn chemicals on themselves, their kids and their pets (including a woman who place booties on her dog when its paws bled after it walked on a chemically-treated lawn, rather than stopping the chemical treatment!) continue to use lawn chemicals and obsess over having a monocultured turfgrass lawn. Robbins writes with a minimum of jargon and name-dropping -- any undergraduate could easily follow his arguments without much difficulty -- but also quietly engages with actor-network theory, Foucauldian and Gramscian notions of power, hegemony and topic formation, as well as putting ecology into political ecology. It's a book which could sit equally well on an undergraduate or graduate syllabus, which speaks both to its clarity and the sophistication of its analysis. Highly recommended.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-4-20 18:58

    I bought this book and thought it would be totally lame. Turns out it's actually really interesting. The social aspects that go into a lawn culture extend far outside the boundaries of the green grass and are extremely intriguing. Definitely worth a read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-4-20 18:58

    Really simple to read and interesting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-22 1:28

    Ever feel a small vain about your home design? That's normal, but are your home maintenance strategies... well... realistic? Lawns- the fake boobs of american homes. Marketing to the insecure or exploitive toward caring community members? Lawns cost a lot and hurt their prior natural environments through destruction, weed assassins and fertilizers... in a trickle down manner. A read that reminds you why sociology is a source of educational entertainment. Like watching a documentary about death and stuff. The writing reminded me of freakenomics in numerous ways.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-22 1:28

    Robbins argues that the lawn itself has influenced its caretakers into being a certain type of person, and so lawn people may not actually have a choice when it comes to the use of chemicals in lawn care. He draws upon the social constructs made by our culture that guide, if not coerce, us into making such contradictory decisions as using chemicals while knowing they are potentially harmful; constructs such as the importance of public photo and the interplay between industry/advertising/producers and consumers. Overall, Robbins does an perfect job of bringing up an entirely fresh perspective on the American Lawn, reversing the previous belief that it is an expression of the people, but rather we are an expression of the lawn. The book contained sufficient evidence to help the author’s position, but I would have liked for Robbins to discuss things like lake eutrophication or fertilizer similar diseases in slightly greater depth.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    First, We Make the Beast Beautiful: A New Journey Through Anxiety [Book]  2018-6-5 18:0

    This book is the best book I've read on anxiety. It is thoroughly researched and contemporary, and Sarah's humour, warmth and self-deprecation create it a refreshing read on an zone of mental health often misunderstood and stigmatised. Would (and do as a mental health professional) recommend this book to anyone suffering anxiety. I felt like I was getting everything we know on anxiety, from one book. Exceptionally well-written.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    We Make the Road by Walking: Conversations on Education and Social Change []  2020-1-8 19:46

    Needed reading.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-22 1:28

    I bought this book and thought it would be totally lame. Turns out it's actually really interesting. The social aspects that go into a lawn culture extend far outside the boundaries of the green grass and are extremely intriguing. Definitely worth a read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-22 1:28

    Interesting read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman []  2020-1-20 1:21

    If you are buying this book because of the title, don't bother. If you wish to know what he eats for breakfast, how a lot of various buildings he bought, his romantic breakups, his divorce and a number of other private things that have nothing to do with craftsmanship then the book and be ready to have things discussed with no what so ever. I thought the idea of chapters was to aggregate happenings or thoughts but apparently in this book the chapters were there merely as locations to me people will have fun this book and that's fine because various people expect various things. But while I read and enjoyed The Craftsman by Richard Sennett and Store Class as Soulcraft by Matthew Crawford, which were entirely various from one another, struggled with this one to understand what point he was trying to make. Reading it each day, as I like to finish books that I start, was d Luck

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman []  2020-1-20 1:21

    I enjoyed reading Peter Korn's book. His coming of age after college working on houses then on to pursue furniture making intrigued and gave me pause in my own idealism. To hear his experiences of sacrifice and changes to obtain to a put of making a live able earning while finding satisfaction in his craft, I admire his confession through writing of how this journey has been worthwhile.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-2-1 16:9

    Robbins argues that the lawn itself has influenced its caretakers into being a certain type of person, and so lawn people may not actually have a choice when it comes to the use of chemicals in lawn care. He draws upon the social constructs made by our culture that guide, if not coerce, us into making such contradictory decisions as using chemicals while knowing they are potentially harmful; constructs such as the importance of public photo and the interplay between industry/advertising/producers and consumers. Overall, Robbins does an perfect job of bringing up an entirely fresh perspective on the American Lawn, reversing the previous belief that it is an expression of the people, but rather we are an expression of the lawn. The book contained sufficient evidence to help the author’s position, but I would have liked for Robbins to discuss things like lake eutrophication or fertilizer similar diseases in slightly greater depth.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-2-1 20:12

    Ever feel a small vain about your home design? That's normal, but are your home maintenance strategies... well... realistic? Lawns- the fake boobs of american homes. Marketing to the insecure or exploitive toward caring community members? Lawns cost a lot and hurt their prior natural environments through destruction, weed assassins and fertilizers... in a trickle down manner. A read that reminds you why sociology is a source of educational entertainment. Like watching a documentary about death and stuff. The writing reminded me of freakenomics in numerous ways.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-2-1 20:12

    I think this book is great. Although, I wanted my mom to read it, but this book doesn't let loaning on kindle, so I recommend buying a paper back.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-31 5:31

    Really simple to read and interesting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-31 5:31

    Robbins argues that the lawn itself has influenced its caretakers into being a certain type of person, and so lawn people may not actually have a choice when it comes to the use of chemicals in lawn care. He draws upon the social constructs made by our culture that guide, if not coerce, us into making such contradictory decisions as using chemicals while knowing they are potentially harmful; constructs such as the importance of public photo and the interplay between industry/advertising/producers and consumers. Overall, Robbins does an perfect job of bringing up an entirely fresh perspective on the American Lawn, reversing the previous belief that it is an expression of the people, but rather we are an expression of the lawn. The book contained sufficient evidence to help the author’s position, but I would have liked for Robbins to discuss things like lake eutrophication or fertilizer similar diseases in slightly greater depth.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-31 7:9

    I think this book is great. Although, I wanted my mom to read it, but this book doesn't let loaning on kindle, so I recommend buying a paper back.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    First, We Make the Beast Beautiful: A New Journey Through Anxiety [Book]  2018-6-5 18:0

    I plan to reread this in the near future because it was so packed with wisdom yet such a pageturner. Sarah a special perspective on a perceived human flaw. Growth comes from just sitting in it and facing your uncomfortable thoughts and emotions. The unbelievable locations our anxiety can take us!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    First, We Make the Beast Beautiful: A New Journey Through Anxiety [Book]  2018-6-5 18:0

    I loved this book! Truly, the best book on anxiety I have read. Sarah deeply understands how anxiety feels and its frustrations and nuances. She her own story, research, stories and thoughts of others, and practical ways to support move forward with anxiety. My favorite part is her premise that we must create the beast beautiful; rather than fighting to "cure" anxiety, we lovingly support this part of ourselves and search ways to create anxiety work for us rather than versus us. I will definitely be rereading.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    We Make the Road by Walking: Conversations on Education and Social Change []  2020-1-8 19:46

    This book was recommended to me by a faculty member of the university where I work, and I have since recommended it to anyone in higher education or who have an interest in education for social change. Beautifully written and inspiring conversations between Freire and Horton. As an Adult Education graduate student, I have and will continue to use this book throughout my program and beyond.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    We Make the Road by Walking: Conversations on Education and Social Change []  2020-1-8 19:46

    This is a very interesting work capturing the essence of two icons of contemporary adult education. It is well done and begins to provide those looking into an agrological (learner driven and empowering) approach to education, a amazing foundation.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    We Make Change: Community Organizers Talk About What They Do--and Why []  2020-1-16 17:48

    We Create a Change is a special book about organizers from all around the United States. I can't remember how a lot of interviews were conducted to produce the book but I must say, I am grateful to everyone who participated in the creation from begin to finish. I found myself not wanting to place this book down because I knew that I wasn't reading a book about simply the fluff of organizing. The interviewees were very candid and straightforward about what goes into organizing and the hardships that come with the location as well as the victories, even if they are sometimes little or few and far between.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman []  2020-1-20 1:21

    Interesting topic. The book started out powerful with very amazing observations about craft and the people that create it up. Towards the middle it was getting method too philosophical for me. Korn seemed to obtain bogged down in semantics more and more as the chapters progressed. The liberal dosing of thesaurus words added too much fluff .... "like this1 and this2 and this3"; doesn't take 3 repetitive words to create a point.I started losing interest and barely created it to the end. Honestly couldn't tell you what the latest few chapters were about as my eyes glazed over.I think with some judicious editing of all the fluff, it'd be an easier and more enjoyable read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Why We Make Things and Why It Matters: The Education of a Craftsman []  2020-1-20 1:21

    A thoughtful and interesting acc of his private journey as a craftsman and the humanistic underpinnings of that process. He relates it to private transformation which I think a lot of makers experience. He is also honest about the pitfalls. If you are a maker, it is an insight into what perhaps drives you. I similar to it because I am a maker and have often wondered why I went to such lengths to learn to do things in glass and fiber.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-22 1:28

    This is an accessible but theoretically sophisticated study of American lawns, and the reasons why people who are anxious about the effects of lawn chemicals on themselves, their kids and their pets (including a woman who place booties on her dog when its paws bled after it walked on a chemically-treated lawn, rather than stopping the chemical treatment!) continue to use lawn chemicals and obsess over having a monocultured turfgrass lawn. Robbins writes with a minimum of jargon and name-dropping -- any undergraduate could easily follow his arguments without much difficulty -- but also quietly engages with actor-network theory, Foucauldian and Gramscian notions of power, hegemony and topic formation, as well as putting ecology into political ecology. It's a book which could sit equally well on an undergraduate or graduate syllabus, which speaks both to its clarity and the sophistication of its analysis. Highly recommended.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-31 5:31

    Interesting read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-31 7:9

    Ever feel a small vain about your home design? That's normal, but are your home maintenance strategies... well... realistic? Lawns- the fake boobs of american homes. Marketing to the insecure or exploitive toward caring community members? Lawns cost a lot and hurt their prior natural environments through destruction, weed assassins and fertilizers... in a trickle down manner. A read that reminds you why sociology is a source of educational entertainment. Like watching a documentary about death and stuff. The writing reminded me of freakenomics in numerous ways.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lawn People: How [email protected]#$%!&, Weeds, and Chemicals Make Us Who We Are []  2020-1-31 7:9

    Robbins argues that the lawn itself has influenced its caretakers into being a certain type of person, and so lawn people may not actually have a choice when it comes to the use of chemicals in lawn care. He draws upon the social constructs made by our culture that guide, if not coerce, us into making such contradictory decisions as using chemicals while knowing they are potentially harmful; constructs such as the importance of public photo and the interplay between industry/advertising/producers and consumers. Overall, Robbins does an perfect job of bringing up an entirely fresh perspective on the American Lawn, reversing the previous belief that it is an expression of the people, but rather we are an expression of the lawn. The book contained sufficient evidence to help the author’s position, but I would have liked for Robbins to discuss things like lake eutrophication or fertilizer similar diseases in slightly greater depth.

    0  



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