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    Many Roads to Home []  2021-4-6 23:33

    I enjoyed this one. There was amazing chemistry between the two characters from various walks of life. I appreciate that the story was about their own problems and hang ups rather than some kind of social commentary. This is a good, pleasing romance with a small bit of emotional tension to add to the storyline.

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    Many Roads to Home []  2021-4-6 23:33

    This is a well done story. The author, Kaya LaSalle , does a very nice job with the dialogue. She presents a story about goals and directions in life. Sometimes you think you know where you're heading but life has a method of turning things all around. Well done!

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    Many Roads to Home []  2021-4-6 23:33

    I loved this book. The age gap scenario was set up perfectly but what created this book so amazing were the characters. Brooke who purchased the old house and was in method over her head. Riley the “Jane” of all trades who does construction but is currently looking for work. Riley down to her latest few bucks, over hears some folks in a diner talking about a house that was recently purchased in city but needs major renovations. Riley finds out from the local feed where the house is and goes to see if she can obtain hired to do some work. When she gets to the property, what comes out to search out who is on her land, is the most attractive woman she has ever seen. Brooke takes in Riley’s looks and body and knows she is young but really needs some help. Taking her to look at the house and realizing they have the same ideas about the renovations, Brooke hires her and gives her room and board with her pay. As they work side by side and obtain to know each other, what develops is a respect and adoration and ultimately love. This along with the towns folk who become involved in their lives, brings a humility to the story. I really want there was a few more chapters to at least see how Riley and Brooke continue and move forward down the line. Have not read anything from this writer, and this was so amazing that I need to check her out.

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    Many Roads to Home []  2021-4-6 23:33

    This is the very first book I have read by this author and I absolutely loved it, and everything about it. It drew me in from the start. It’s everything you need rolled in one...Exciting, entertaining, y, gritty, and heartbreaking. Gotta love a book that evokes so a lot of emotions. I will definitely be looking into reading more from this author.

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    Many Roads to Home []  2021-4-6 23:33

    I was looking for a amazing f/f book; and I sure found it. I took while longer to read this, as per the weather Texas has been having the latest few days. But, things are looking up. This is a amazing story. Thank you for your hard work.

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    Many Roads to Home []  2021-4-6 23:33

    I read this book with very few stops, late into the night. There are only a few characters in it so it is not a challenge to read and the two main characters are well developed. You will have fun this read if you're looking for a romantic tale. I would have liked more about the secondary characters.

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    Many Roads to Home []  2021-4-6 23:33

    I really liked this book. Riley had never had much in her life and moved from job to job. Brooke had worked her method up in the globe and was a top-notch attorney. Brooke just required a temporary helper for her remodel of an old farm house and Riley fit the bill. Neither had ever had a really loving relationship and were only expecting a 6 month do-over for the rambling house. Boy, were they in for a surprise. Could a town girl fall in love with living in the country. Could a "rover" ever settle down? That is the rest of the story. I liked how their personalities were brought to life and I really liked how the age gap wasn't a huge issue. This was a most enjoyable read and I would totally recommend it. It was a heart warmer! Thank you to the author for sharing her words.

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    Many Roads to Home []  2021-4-6 23:33

    I absolutely loved this book, a trifecta of my favorite elements that create a really amazing read — restoring a neglected turn-of-the-century farmhouse, rescued dog, and sweet love story albeit with a brief bit of angst thrown in. Gift points for the peaceful rural setting and those who befriended the two protagonists.

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    Many Roads to Home []  2021-4-6 23:33

    Sorry, but just too much items I couldn't buy. No one that well educated is so naive to buy property like that and then have no clue how to pound a nail? Uh uh. No one! Nice descriptive writing and the dialogue is well done. Even hero development is OK, at least as far as I was able to read. It's just the main premise - totally lacking!

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    Many Roads to Home []  2021-4-6 23:33

    Enjoyed the story very much. The main characters were genuine and the story line was well developed. The help each of the characters gave to each other and the interactions with the city people was heart warming. y hot scenes were luscious! I was left feeling yummy by the end of the story. I will look forward to reading more this author's works!

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    So Many Roads to Choose (Oregon Trail Dreamin' Book 4) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    This story of Smittty and Lynn is full of love and heartache. Lynn has been mothering orphans for several years. After losing both her husband and orphan son on the Oregon Trail, Smitty becomes a mate to Lynn and her adopted children. Their story held my interest from beginning to end. Katherine Ball is a gifted storyteller. Readers of historical romance will have fun this unique love story.

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    So Many Roads to Choose (Oregon Trail Dreamin' Book 4) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    I really enjoyed reading this book in this series. I liked the interactions between all of the characters. I would recommend this book to anyone, who enjoys romance books with a western flair.

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    So Many Roads to Choose (Oregon Trail Dreamin' Book 4) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    LOVEHONORBAD MARRIAGELOSSRESCUEORPHANSBIDG QUESTION: Does SMITTY really deserve love??Could be epilogue to OREGAN TRAIL DREAMIN’ andPrologue to THE SETTLERS

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    So Many Roads to Choose (Oregon Trail Dreamin' Book 4) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    Another amazing read. Again the early West has been depicted quite realistic. Easy but meaningfull gifts, ornate boxes for future brides and lovingly crafted wedding bonuses abound! Hard life lived but full of hope and memories. Thanks again Kathleen.

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    So Many Roads to Choose (Oregon Trail Dreamin' Book 4) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    A unbelievable book it was so hard to place down!! I loved the characters and the method Kathleen writes takes you right in the story, you feel as if you were there in the middle of the adventure. A tender romance filled with lots of learning and growing in the relationship, This book is a must read a truly enjoyable book. Kathleen is a gifted holds your attention from the first page to the end! I loved how Kathleen took you back to Co.and I truly loved reading about old characters you got to know in the other books.

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    So Many Roads to Choose (Oregon Trail Dreamin' Book 4) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    This book was a very amazing book. Just like the first ones before this book I didn't wish to place it down. Smithy and Lynn sounded like they were created for each other. Lynn had to have a very huge heart to take in all of those children. I wanted to tie old Edgar Page to the tree and beat him like he did Lynn. Smithy should have beat him half to death after he picked Lynnn up out of the snow, and stitched up her back where he whipped her. Amazing book.....you really need to read.

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    So Many Roads to Choose (Oregon Trail Dreamin' Book 4) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    I have enjoyed this series from the very beginning and this forth book in the series didn't disappoint. Well written characters and a very amazing storyline. Looking forward to the spin-off series, The Settlers! JudyE

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    So Many Roads to Choose (Oregon Trail Dreamin' Book 4) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    I loved the first 3 books in this series but, this is by far my favorite. It was so well written. The book description gives enough information of Smitty and Lynn’s story. There were enough twists and turns to hold me turning the pages. It was a very interesting and heartfelt story. I dipped into the tissue box often! This is a unbelievable series, one I plan on reading again? IT’S ONE I HIGHLY RECOMMEND,

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    So Many Roads to Choose (Oregon Trail Dreamin' Book 4) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    I've read all four books in this series. I was slightly disappointed with this fourth book. I felt it was a small rushed. It just seemed odd that Lynn would only wait a month and in that time she not only found a man that wanted marriage, wrote him letters and got a response back and created arrangements to move the whole family to marry him!! She came across in the previous books as an smart women.

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    So Many Roads to Choose (Oregon Trail Dreamin' Book 4) []  2020-2-6 20:19

    I've been waiting for this book for awhile. Smittu was an intricate hero in this series. There are sad pparts that broke my heart but what a finally.

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    So Many Roads []  2020-11-10 19:4

    I am binge listening to this cd. I had the album a lot of years ago but it got so much play that I had to replace it with a cd. Every chop is special and well constructed by Hammond's accompanying musicians. Hammond is truly a one of a kind artist. You can feel his passion for the blues in his voice and handling of the amazing blues chords and riffs he manages to empower with his signature style.Just obtain this cd and have fun its easy timeless sound. It makes me want I lived in the south when the blues was raw and emanating from the juke joints of that era. Hammond's tireless commitment to the blues has created me a long time fan. He should be respected for keeping this genre alive and relevant in an age when most melody today is garbage and has no historical context or staying power.

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    So Many Roads []  2020-11-10 19:4

    An perfect set, with hard, under/stated playing by future members of the BAND. Highly recommended.

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    So Many Roads []  2020-11-10 19:4

    Unfortunately, I can't yet comment on the quality of the melody on this 1993 reissue--there is so much crackling and distortion throughout EVERY SINGLE song that the entire CD is totally unlistenable. And I bought it new! I'm not someone who nitpicks a whole lot about quiet or flat or "old" remasters, but the faults with this edition are overwhelming. I couldn't even create it through, the distortion was too overbearing and distracting. What were they thinking allowing this to reach the shelves of stores? I immediately returned my copy to , and luckily received my cash , as to a reissue that is actually listenable, I sampled a few of the songs on iTunes and they sounded fine; it's still the same label (Vanguard) but the release date is 2005. I haven't yet purchased the 2005 reissue from Amazon yet, but will be sure to comment when I do. Unfortunately this review will probably present on both due to Amazon's dim-witted review system AI. Whatever you do, don't buy the slightly cheaper 1993 issue!

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    So Many Roads []  2020-11-10 19:4

    Fabulous.

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    So Many Roads []  2020-11-10 19:4

    I came for Robbie's playing and wasn't disappointed.

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    So Many Roads []  2020-11-10 19:4

    Amazing history here. I learned about this album during my read of Guitar King bio of Micheal Bloomfield. This is a historic 1964 NY session featuring Hammond backed by pre-Band members Robbie Robertson, Levon Helm, and Garth Hudson. Also featuring Bloomfield on piano. Excellent!!

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    So Many Roads []  2020-11-10 19:4

    This album should properly be considered the first super-group, since it includes half of The Band plus Jimmy Lewis, Charley Musselwhite and Mike Bloomfield from Chicago. It may also be the origin of Dylan's employment of the Band, since he and Hammond knew one another well (Hammond's father, the legendary John Hammond of Columbia Records, hired Dylan for Columbia). A small rough in locations and therefore much more faithful to the Chicago blues sound, it is a stand out album. Hammond is one of the few able to slide easily between acoustic and electric blues, and is still performing 45 years later. Hammond plays primarily slide electric and leads are taken by Bloomfield and Robbie Robertson with Charley Musselwhite on harp. I've owned different iterations of this album since it was released and am glad to have the b Boyter

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    So Many Roads []  2020-11-10 19:4

    Amazing recording, backed by The Band, this is a enjoyable journey with John Hammond in his formative years. His singing style is powerful and less guitar work than you can have fun from him today, but the backing along with greats such as Charlie Musselwhite, Levon Helm, Robbie Robertson, etc. really pulls this performance together. You will also search Mike Bloomfield on piano!

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    So Many Roads []  2020-11-10 19:4

    Amazing example of John's early recordings with some very amazing back-up artist in the studio. (back-up artist??) Very amazing items on this recording.

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    So Many Roads []  2020-11-10 19:4

    listening to it right now! a gifted artist. - speedy delivery - very happy

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    The Many Roads to Baja: A Motorcycle Adventure into the Heart and Heat of Baja California []  2020-8-13 19:8

    A really amazing fun and simple to read book.

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    The Many Roads to Baja: A Motorcycle Adventure into the Heart and Heat of Baja California []  2020-8-13 19:8

    The author brought me along on his trip from Canada to the Baja peninsula. An enjoyable read that was over method too soon!

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    The Many Roads to Baja: A Motorcycle Adventure into the Heart and Heat of Baja California []  2020-8-13 19:8

    Amazing story. Writer uses a few too a lot of clichés at first but overall an enjoyable book.

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    The Many Roads to Baja: A Motorcycle Adventure into the Heart and Heat of Baja California []  2020-8-13 19:8

    This would have been a 5* review if this book had been more than just a tease. I was really getting into it when it so abruptly ended. This guy can write! Just want he had written more.

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    The Many Roads to Baja: A Motorcycle Adventure into the Heart and Heat of Baja California []  2020-8-13 19:8

    Brought back so a lot of memories of trips on my own motorcycle to ja truly is a state of mind that captures you forever..

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    The Many Roads to Baja: A Motorcycle Adventure into the Heart and Heat of Baja California []  2020-8-13 19:8

    The book is ok. Amazing writting.

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    fake prescription joke birthday

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    Roads to Berlin []  2020-7-12 19:8

    I have a political science mate whose field of study was East Berlin. He visited a lot of times before the wall fell. When it did, he felt as if his field of study had been wiped out. Of course, he soon found reunification a suitable field of oteboom had no such issue since his subject is all of Germany, but he doents the ambiguity a lot of West Germans felt about reunification. The East had small to offer but much to gain from the West, and West Germans had small idea of what reunification would cost them. I was disappointed that Nootebnoom did not discover the subject as much as I wished, but that is my problem.He does give us a contemporary view of Germany, that is Post WWII, at times seeming to be a travel writer and at other times an astute political scientist. I found the first two thirds or more of the book valuable and readable, but the final part seemed a hodge podge or articles or speeches that the author must have used at the urging of his

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    Roads to Berlin []  2020-7-12 19:8

    Streets To Berlin by Cees Nooteboom is an unusual and highly acclaimed novel/travel book by a leading European travel writer. He combines riddles with detours into history and descriptions of sights in Germany, rebuilt and reborn after the fall of the Berlin Wall. The town which was bombed to destruction to end Globe Battle II in the European Theater, has been unbelievably rebuilt and combines the historical structures rebuilt exactly as before in as much as humanly possible, with the ultra modern buildings interspersed to make a thriving town of determined citizens who cherish their freedom from the horrors of HItler's regime. The book is cleverly written as a history and travel tutorial which reads like a novel, a unique, one-of-a-kind armchair travel experience you will search fascinating. It has been translated into English with extreme care to create the book as charming and accurate as it is in the original Dutch by Laura Watkinson and illustrated by Simone Sassen. The book shows the method Berlin and Germany grew physicalyl and culturally and amazed the globe with its successful struggle through reunification and the magnificent re-built, re-birthed city. A most interesting, informative read that will delight any history or travel buff.

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    Roads to Berlin []  2020-7-12 19:8

    Streets to Berlin by Cees Nooteboom is a travel book, history, and astute observation of modern day Germany and its progression from Globe Battle II to the Wall coming down in 1989 through the difficulties of Reunification, to the rebuilding of a attractive country and town with the preservation of its most attractive history through meticulous re-building. The author is an award-winning perfect travel writer, poet, and novelist who lives in The Hague. He brings his expertise and keen sense of observation as a traveler as well as his strong sense of history and research ability and combines these with his impressive word crafting using his poetic ability and his vivid imagination to make this attractive and fascinating book. You will love traveling through the years and through the country with this perfect writer who draws you in quickly and inspires you to the latest page.

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    Roads to Berlin []  2020-7-12 19:8

    A world-wearied observer from a neighboring country, the Netherlands, provides his thoughts on Germany, especially Berlin, as the Wall fell and then over the years afterwards, as the fractures between the old West and East began the process of healing.Cees Nooteboom is a fine writer and this book, although somewhat stitched together, provides evidence of his talents. His childhood saw the German invasion of his country and most of his adult life was lived during the Cold War. The culture, politics, and people of the once divided Germany are of intense interest to Mr. Nooteboom and this interest is powerfully conveyed to the reader of this e translator, Ms. Watkinson, appears to me to have done a amazing job. (Although why not write for an English language audience "Brandenburg Gate" instead of "Brandenburger Tor"?)The photographer, Simonne Sassen, provides superb work to enhance the narrative.

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    Roads to Berlin []  2020-7-12 19:8

    I regret buying and trying to read this poor book, which is not primarily about Germany or Berlin, but simply about the mind-wanderings of a hazy-brained narcissist "poet" who has managed somehow to pass himself off as a credible witness to political events. The first duty of a journalist covering East Germany should be to obtain to know people there and to interview them to solicit their own views and opinions. But this introspective author is so interested in his own feelings and vague meanderings that he fails to connect with people in the street. This becomes, after pages and pages, very dull and frustrating. His "insights" are not insightful and are generally just about himself instead of East or West Germany. Speaking as a traveler who visited both Germanys a lot of times before and after the building of the Wall, and one who has had a number of private mates there, I must say that this book is a large disappointment.

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    Roads to Berlin []  2020-7-12 19:8

    After the first hundred (100) pages surrounding the Fall of the Wall and the disruptions of November 1989, Nooteboom’s “Roads to Berlin” becomes a tedious, personalized abstraction by a fine writer who seemingly ignores the first component of publishing; readability. The telling images by his companion, Simone Sassen, are at times the only guidance what the author means or where he is.

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    Roads to Berlin []  2020-7-12 19:8

    Berlin just after the wall was built, Berlin during the cold battle with the wall between east block and west block and Berlin after the Mauerfall (as the German calls it). Super cool book, mostly because I live here and I know what he is talking o appena prima e appena dopo la costruzione del muro, Berlino durante il muro come posto diviso tra il blocco occidentale e quello orientale e Berlino dopo la caduta del muro. Libro figo, soprattutto perché vivo qui e so di cosa parla l'autore.

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    Roads to Berlin []  2020-7-12 19:8

    Worth the read

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    Roads to Berlin []  2020-7-12 19:8

    The work is mainly about the fall of the Berlin Wall. Dispassionate but also with feeling. The author was there and the writing was contemporaneous. Nooteboom deserves a bigger English audience.

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    Roads to Berlin []  2020-7-12 19:8

    I picked this up after having read the reviews in the Fresh York Review of Books and a short blurb in the Fresh Yorker. Even if you don't think you're that interested in German culture and history since the fall of the Wall, it's an engaging read. It isn't so much a traditional travel narrative as reflections over three decades of living in Germany--like a look inside this writer's journals. Nooteboom has unbelievable turns of phrases, whether describing an East German Communist conference, visiting a zoo, or the decay of leaves in the fall. Yes, the book is about contemporary Germany, but it's also about memory (specifically how the invasion of the Netherlands by the Nazis changed Nooteboom's childhood and life), writing, art, exile. If it's easiest to categorize this as a "travel book", it is also a journey towards understanding--one's self and one's world--a genre of travel writing that seems not that common these days. While I give the book five stars, the final quarter of it or so struck me as less developed and polished than the rest--very brief chapters, some just transcripts of speeches that Nooteboom gave at the openings of different museum exhibitions.

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    Take Me Home, Country Roads []  2021-1-17 19:14

    No complaints. This song played on my clock radio for weeks, so I could obtain ready for work. I was always on time.

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    Take Me Home, Country Roads []  2021-1-17 19:14

    It's the original version, very amazing my 12 year old grandson listening to it.😊

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    Take Me Home, Country Roads []  2021-1-17 19:14

    A classic song that won't really obtain old.

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    Take Me Home, Country Roads []  2021-1-17 19:14

    This ver is a his best ver of Country Roads, it is smooth and mellow. The other just doesn't sound right.

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    Take Me Home, Country Roads []  2021-1-17 19:14

    What a bright light he was! Everytime I hear this it makes me smile.

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    Take Me Home, Country Roads []  2021-1-17 19:14

    This is the Iconic ver --- the one we all know and love ..... JD at his best.

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    Take Me Home, Country Roads []  2021-1-17 19:14

    Never had a digital copy. Sounds great!

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    Take Me Home, Country Roads []  2021-1-17 19:14

    Melody won't Download!!!!!!!!I'm going to another company to Download music!!!!!!!!!!

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    Take Me Home, Country Roads []  2021-1-17 19:14

    The recording engineer did a amazing job on this iteration. All of the vocals and instruments are well-defined with a expansive soundfield. The sound quality is begin and airy without the over-compression found on some downloads. The acoustic guitar is huge and bright sounding, lending much to the listening enjoyment. John Denver's lead vocal is wonderfully captured; full and warm sounding, not restrained or hidden in the mix. When Bill and Taffy Danoff's harmonies come in it goes into sonic bliss, really amazing sounding, Denver fans can rejoice in this one, highly recommended.

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    Take Me Home, Country Roads []  2021-1-17 19:14

    I hated it. Too hot.

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    Three Roads to Quantum Gravity []  2020-1-31 1:52

    Lee Smolin indeed accomplishes the tasks of explaining the thermodynamics of the universe to the layman. This is something that I have only seen in this book. All other authors do not like to obtain entangled in the intrincacies of thermodynamics, even though thermodynamics is actually the science that allows to relate the macro and the micro. In this book you will obtain a much better idea of how thermodynamics plays such an necessary role in our universe.But Lee Smolin does not stops there. This is a book that also teaches us how the concepts of philosophy and social sciences, and the concepts of pure hard science are so closely related. In the wonderfully laymans vocabulary of physics, mathematics, thermodynamics and philosophy, Lee Smolin tells us about Plato and about Hawkins in the same context.We come to understand how the newtonian concept of the universe took us too far from the understanding of social sciences, and how after a journey through Einstein, science is slowly coming back to be closely similar to the social sciences.We used to think that an observer should be independent, and we created every effort to accomplish that. However, to understand the universe, we can not be independent observers. We are inside!!! It is the same as in sociology or any other social science. We can not be independent observers and we have to accept it.We learn to understand that our universe is not a thing but a story that has to be told. The universe can only be explained by the logic of plurality; the logic of a lot of logics. The logic of a lot of dependent observers added together. We understand that nothing is absolute and everything is relational just as should be in social e view that Lee Smolin gives us about the task ahead for scientists searching for the unified theory of the Cosmos is a view that may finally eliminate the division of hard science and social sciences. It may also support develop fresh points of view in our view of our the end, as wonderful as it may seem, we are back to square one, we are somehow back to Plato's philosophy, but with the added value of a story of the Cosmos that Plato never dreamt ve Stars to this book that obtain us a step closer to understanding ourselves and our environment.

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    Three Roads to Quantum Gravity []  2020-1-31 1:52

    I approached this book with amazing enthusiasm, hoping for a pedestrian treatment of loop quantum gravity (LQG). To be fair, most of this book is beautiful good. Smolin writes beautiful well, especially about relational quantum mechanics and how it relates to quantum gravity and cosmology. In addition, Smolin clearly points out why a lot of relativists have problem with string/m-theory's lack of background independence.I was, however, mildly disappointed in his discussion of the physical meaning of spin networks and loops and in his exposition of a possible synthesis of M-theory and LQG. Perhaps I overlooked it, but this book doesn't directly point out how you go from spin networks and spin foams to spacetime. But, you can figure it out... if you know enough general relativity and quantum field e appendix of this book is excellent! It provides a lot of useful references to the l things considered though, this book is worth a read, especially to learn about the connection between spacetime, gravity, and quantum mechanics.I originally rated this three stars. I recently reread the book and now wish to give it four stars.

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    All Roads Lead to Lawrence []  2020-7-18 19:2

    More Rod Serling meets John Wooden with a pinch of Dalai Lama.I forgot how much I missed these characters! Zeke and his people continue to walk a tightrope between perceived earthly realities, and the inter-dimensional truths of existence, that ultimately free our minds from inauthentic constraints. Craig Leener peppers this unusual story of basketball and love with complicated concepts, that read like a light breeze.Warning: This is heavier and much more emotional ride than latest book...I cried several times...and also laughed out loud several times.

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    All Roads Lead to Lawrence []  2020-7-18 19:2

    Craig Leener's novel All Streets Lead to Lawrence is the exciting sequel to his debut novel, This Was Never About Basketball. And this story was just as fun and riveting as the first. With all the references to KU, this was a amazing read as a Jayhawk fan. Lawrence is a quick paced read about finding your put in the globe while dealing with tragedy. It is about resilience and our ability to survive when we think we may fall apart.

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    All Roads Lead to Lawrence []  2020-7-18 19:2

    Science fiction meets high school basketball in Craig Leener's sequel to "This Was Never About Basketball." Like "Catcher in the Rye," these books remind me of my own peaks and valleys as a teen and young adult — the angst, confusion, and wonderment of searching for meaning in my relationships and apparent identity.

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    All Roads Lead to Lawrence []  2020-7-18 19:2

    As amazing as his first r anyone who enjoys basketball

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    Three Roads to Quantum Gravity []  2020-1-31 1:52

    Along with Brian Greene's The Elegant Universe and Smolin's earlier Life of the Cosmos, Three Streets to Quantum Gravity gives the interested layperson insights into the developing theories that attempt to search the chimerical "theory of everything." Smolin and his colleagues are very intelligent folks, and these books are unbelievable reads as we share the struggle, if not the mathematical skills, to discern the how and why of our universe. Unlike after-the-fact histories, such as James Watson's fascinating The Double Helix, which recounted the race to unblock the structure of DNA, the Green and Smolin books give us the developments as they happen. Smolin's recent is intriguing and well-written.

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    Three Roads to Quantum Gravity []  2020-1-31 1:52

    Professor Lee Smolin's small compact book delivers amazing load of info about puzzles, anomalies, dilemmas and inconsistencies residing within cutting edge of theoretical is was probably most difficult but enjoyable reading for me, since author writes about particles and Universe from the depth of the little Planck's space.I have studied several famous books about spacetime, yet this one still managed to present a lot of fresh ways that one can use looking at intricacies of modern cosmological science.I recommend "Three Streets to Quantum Gravity" to advanced and committed learner who wants to search how quantum gravity may possibly become an experimental vice: "Black Holes and Time Warps" by Kip Thorne is a very amazing put to begin education about gravity.

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    Home Is Where My People Are: The Roads That Lead Us to Where We Belong [Book]  2017-10-13 21:17

    Of what I read in January, this one is by far the champion and best I read. Sophie writes the blog, Boomama, and it is one of the blogs that I have been reading for just forever. Her funny style of writing is some of my very favorite, and when her first book, A Small Salty to Chop the Sweet came out a couple years ago I promptly read it, sighed deeply with amazing joy when I finished it, and then turned around and read it again. I compared her sweet stories about her family as reminiscent of my beloved Mitford series by Jan Karon and if that isn't one of the highest complements I can bestow on a book, I don't know what is. : ) This book is no different, but instead of spending most of the time sharing about the unbelievable relationship she has with her family, she talks about her relationships with mates she has had over the years and this book struck such a large cord with me on the importance of community and friendship. I also resonated so deeply with her stories of her walk with the Lord. She also has some deep and honest comments about her stint with stirrup pants in the 80's that could have been written about me. (If you are a kid of the 80s there are so a lot of references that will have you rolling. All the laughing aloud was really quite disturbing to my kids.) I really can't recommend this book highly enough. I'm already looking forward to my reread, but I'm trying to pace myself. : )

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    Three Roads to Quantum Gravity []  2020-1-31 1:52

    Smolin's presentation of the three theories was so thought provoking for me that I realized that I wanted to learn more. I had majored in Physics 35 years ago so I had QM and SR under my belt but nothing more modern. One thing that I particualry liked about Smolin's presentation of the three theories currently being worked on - superstring theory, quantum loop theory and blackhole thermodynamics - was the balanced method he kept saying how all three undoubtedly would contribute to the ongoing progress rather than trying to say one has to be right to the exclusion of the other two - it's simply too early to tell. I've spent 2 years (with a tutor) studying QFT in order, hopefully, to be able to at least approach the mathematics behind these theories. I've just ordered a "First Course in String Theory" and realized that I had never written a review of Smolen's book to so-to-speak thank him so I now fill that gap.

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    Three Roads to Quantum Gravity []  2020-1-31 1:52

    A small deep for me. This will take some time toread but I like the information.

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    All Roads Lead to Lawrence []  2020-7-18 19:2

    I really enjoyed This Was Never About Basketball, which was a fun, unpredictable, well-paced story, and I was so excited to see its sequel is out! Without giving away any spoilers, this story shows a slightly older and mature Zeke Archer dealing with challenges of life off and on the basketball court, including a tough tragedy and some otherworldly characters. It’s a truly original story, very funny at times and profoundly moving at others, especially at the end. One of the chapters is appropriately titled “This is bigger than basketball,” which rings real throughout the novel. I could go on and on, but as Zeke is told near the end of the story, “There is so much more to tell you, but our time has run short.” Highly recommended!

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    All Roads Lead to Lawrence []  2020-7-18 19:2

    Craig has made a thought provoking sequel to his original novel. The characters are so well drawn and distinctive and the story just glides along with some interesting and surprising plot twists. Craig writing style in my mind is reminiscent of Twain and Steinbeck. It is clear and concise and just flows. I loved the interplay among all the characters and love the underlying philosophy that permeates the story. I highly recommend it. These two books would create a excellent streaming series. Bravo Mr. Leener!!!

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    Home Is Where My People Are: The Roads That Lead Us to Where We Belong [Book]  2017-10-13 21:17

    I am a fan of Sophie. I like that she is talking about nothing and yet driving a point all the method home. I always appreciate the fact that she isn't trying to impress me with her amazing knowledge or holy wisdom. She just tells what God is teaching her with all the humility she can muster. I like it. Send me the straight shooters.I read this book when it came out and I liked it, but for some reason I decided to buy the audio at the end of summer. I think I had just created one too a lot of longs trip with three children and the thought of driving four hours home almost took me out. I wanted to listen to somebody talk to me, somebody that sounded like family. It worked. I think it was divinely inspired because my four hour trip turned into over six hours and I arrived home no worse for the wear. It was like riding around with an old friend.I actually liked the book more the second time around. I think I required to hear it more. I required to be reminded of the importance of certain things. I was dog tired, worn bone thin, and hurting. So, I listened. I grieved. I went on. I loved hearing her inflections. It was soothing. Sometimes you wish that person around you to remind you to love and be loved and the spot is empty. So, for this window, she was my person.I loved following her moves and life changes and hurts. Her story of encountering the Holy Spirit at a Christian school she got a job at was fantastic. She said, "These people were serious." I laughed so much. She talks about raising her son, troubles in marriage, and finding her put in the world. It was amazing for my soul to stop and hear her story.I listened to this in my suv, on my John Deere, and painting our three story house.We kept company and it was grand. I loved it so much, Sophie. Thank you.

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    Home Is Where My People Are: The Roads That Lead Us to Where We Belong [Book]  2017-10-13 21:17

    Sophie has managed to write a memoir about her life experience which is so relatable and ordinary that it screams profundity. She shares her life's journey and hurts and the process of maturation with a attractive and sweet and hilarious parate line required for this: She just makes me laugh so much!Sophie writes in such a method that I feel like I am not alone in this world. Someone understands, and someone has been where I am and created it out with some semblance of understanding and wisdom.If you need to know that it's okay and normal to have a very intense experience of normal life, and if you need to be reassured that your daily info matter to the Creator of the universe and your destiny, this book is the method to go. Or if you just need a lighter heart and a bit of a laugh, this book is the method to go.I just wish to hug you, Sophie, if you ever read this! Let's be friends. Sorry I'm not good at writing book reviews.

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    Three Roads to Quantum Gravity []  2020-1-31 1:52

    As a layperson (and closet science geek), I really appreciated the author's straightforward and mostly non-mathematical approach to a difficult and incomplete fresh theory about quantum gravity. It covers three approaches which contain super strings and M theory and black hole thermodynamics, both of which I hadn't really looked into before. It was amazing fun and I really enjoyed reading this book!I found this work to be brilliant and very thought-provoking and would highly recommend it to anyone who may not be a physicist, but has some primary knowledge of science and would like to learn more about a fascinating subject!

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    Three Roads to Quantum Gravity []  2020-1-31 1:52

    Lee Smolin has again made an perfect non-mathematical book that has his distinctive style and clearly that explains his view point on how we obtain to a theory of everything. Lee presents a partial history of the various approaches used by the Physics community to solve solve the issues of creating a theory of everything. His approach is heavly vested in the Quantun Gravity history and development. This is only natural in that his life has been spent primarly in this zone of development. However, he does a very adaquite job of explaining the history and problems with string theory. Lee does a perfect job in this book to show a possible direction for the science community to persue. I only hope that our science community will take Lee's approaces seriously.

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    All Roads Lead to Lawrence []  2020-7-18 19:2

    Reading Craig Leener's first book "This Was Never About Basketball" was a true treat. For someone who grew up living and loving basketball the book brought back unbelievable memories. The story was engaging and all the references to basketball history and the rivalry between the Lakers and Celtics were amazing definitely was not planned but "All Streets Lead to Lawrence" came to the top of my reading pile on Veteran's Day Weekend and I finished the book on Veteran's Day. It was particularly moving to read the book on that particular weekend with the necessary plot line about Zeke and his brother Wade. This part of the book created me realize just how a lot of families in the USA are impacted by the never-ending Middle East Wars. It also reminded me of my own uncles who were severely impacted by their service in the Vietnam War.What I enjoyed the most about this second book was simply that it is a beautiful, sweet story that communicates necessary values without the hard edge of so a lot of other books full of violence and gratuitous .With so a lot of broken and troubled families in the country I think they would search hope and comfort in reading Craig's books.I know people like me are enjoying these books and I suspect there are a lot of of my generation that see high school, college and pro sports so commercialized and professionalized that we don't have much hope for sports teaching values and giving useful life lessons these days. I do not see very much "sportsmanship" in the high school and college happenings I ybe Craig's books are one possible antidote.I look forward to Craig's next installment in Zeke's journey.

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    All Roads Lead to Lawrence []  2020-7-18 19:2

    I really love this book. It was a excellent sequel. I would definitely recommend this book to Readers of all ages. Goes to present you’re never too old to learn a amazing lesson.

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    Home Is Where My People Are: The Roads That Lead Us to Where We Belong [Book]  2017-10-13 21:17

    I have been reading Boo Mama nearly as long as she has been blogging. The day I stumbled upon her blog feels like one of the happiest days of my life. When I first discovered the globe of blogging I went willy nilly all around the internet reading and discovering blogs by the dozens. Because of obligations like a family who likes to eat, and an employer who pays me to work those blog reading times have been greatly reduced. Actually I am now down to two blogs that I MUST read everyday without fail, no matter what else is going on, is piling up or tugging on my shirtsleeve. Boo Mama is one. From the moment I read her first words to this time when I hang on every word she writes I have felt like she was a very real, very private BFF that was just like me. She doesn't ever come across as holier than me, more together than me, more unique than me. She writes as she is - just a really attractive southern gal who loves her family, her God and every bit of pop stage info there is. Her take on home and on family - wherever you are- was so touching and created me think back to my various homes in different corners of the globe and the FAMILY that I created in each of those locations who touch the deepest core of my heart when I remember them and am profoundly grateful for the part they played in making me who I am today. You will laugh, you will likely tear up, you will place the book down and pray words of thanksgiving for your blessings and you will be tempted to email her and ask when the next book is coming out and will she please create it longer and longer. Don't wait - buy the book. If you have already bought the book, buy it again and give it away. Spread the blessing that is Sophie Hudson!

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    Home Is Where My People Are: The Roads That Lead Us to Where We Belong [Book]  2017-10-13 21:17

    Sophie Hudson’s fresh book Home is Where My People Are: The Streets that Lead Us to Where We Belong is funny, touching, and unexpectedly soul-stirring. Sophie takes the reader on a journey from a Mississippi childhood to adult life in Birmingham, Alabama. With a truly Southern flair, this memoir chronicles not just life’s eventful moments but highlights the people who walked the journey with her.I loved this book for several reasons. First, I laughed – a lot! Sophie’s discussion of not good clothing choices sent me into giggles. As a 20-something in the 90’s, I can recall having every appalling outfit she describes in my closet. Even better is when Sophie shares stories of her first years as a teacher and the chaos and uncertainty she faced every day. O how I related!One of my favorite chapters is “Seventeen Helpful Terms for the Formerly Wayward and/or Semi-prodigal Who Decides to Go to Church Again.” Those of us who have grown-up in church will so relate to these churchisms that the fresh Christian doesn’t really get. Her definitions of “hedge of protection,” “small group,” and “season” had me rolling my eyes and laughing in idst the chuckles, there were several moments when I requested another tissue from my stylist. The book brims with tucked away sentences that bring the huge truths of life into focus. The reality of each one brings to mind how that truth is evident in your own life. I’ve moved around a amazing bit (much like Sophie did) and left “my people” behind in another state. When she speaks of being vividly aware “of a profound feeling of familiarity – a confidence in being known by the people who belong to a place,” the tears flowed. I was overcome with an urge to pick up the phone and call those who truly “know” me yet still love e ultimate tear-fest came when Sophie tells of the tragedy that befalls her tight-knit group of college friends. My heart damage as if I was a part of those women. She has such a unbelievable method of pulling you in a making you love “her people” too. The Kleenex will need to be your companion during this chapter.Overall, Home is Where My People Are brought me joy. Its Southern style (there’s a million ya’lls) created me feel right at home. So grab yourself a sweet tea and have fun a few moments meeting Sophie’s people and remembering your own. Satisfied reading, ya’ll!

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    Home Is Where My People Are: The Roads That Lead Us to Where We Belong [Book]  2017-10-13 21:17

    I am becoming a bigger and bigger fan of Sophie Hudson, especially after listening to her podcasts with Melanie Shankle. I have read her blog, off and on, for a few years. She really seems like a lovely person and I think that comes through in this book. (Note, I have not yet read her first book, but it is on deck!) "Home is where my people are" is Sophie's acc of who she is, where she came from and where she's been. It is comfortable, funny and interesting, much like she seems to be. It's a fast read and definitely left me wanting to read her first book. I am a born and bred Yankee, and I confess to feeling a small jealous about Sophie being raised as a southern girl. Southern women have a charm that just can't be matched by anyone else! If you know Sophie via her blog or podcasts, you will like this book. If you have no idea who she is, you will like this book.

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    Home Is Where My People Are: The Roads That Lead Us to Where We Belong [Book]  2017-10-13 21:17

    With each of Sophie's books, I feel like we are getting to know her more and more. Which I am sure scares her to death. This book was even better than her first one. I almost felt like she was describing my life a bit, minus a few less 80's styles and a bit more 90's. I laughed a ton and cried a amazing bit, but it was cathartic. I read through this book faster than I have any other since I've had children (where reading time for Mama is limited) and am so thankful to have finished it so quickly. I simply could NOT place it pecially, if you live in the South, you can relate to this book on so a lot of levels. Even if you aren't in the South, you will appreciate Sophie's elegant method with words, and parentheses!You will NOT be disappointed!

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    All Roads Lead to Lawrence []  2020-7-18 19:2

    Most of the time when you hear about a sequel, it never reaches the heights or surpasses the premiere effort. However, Craig Leener’s follow-up to “This Was Never About Basketball” was to book sequels — shall I go as far to say — as Godfather II was to film sequels. Beautiful high praise, but starting with the first few pages, you can see Leener’s growth as an author in his fresh book, “All Streets Lead to Lawrence.” ARLTL is like Doug Moe’s 1980s Denver Nuggets: non-stop action with a who-knows-what’s-going-to-happen finish. Leener’s first is a must read before you dive into ARLTL, as the story IS a continuation of the trial and tribulations of main hero Ezekiel Archer and his supporting cast. Check it out and keep onto your Slick Watts headband, because this is one roller coaster ride you’ll never wish to end. Rumor is there’s another one in the works to complete the trifecta — I really hope that’s true.

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    All Roads Lead to Lawrence []  2020-7-18 19:2

    This book has depth, spirit, sways of emotion, tension, resolution and vibrancy. Truly the work of a amazing writer.I didn’t mention humor - like this line: “I didn’t know rock bottom had a basement.”All Streets isn’t perfect. I had to lean heavily on a suspension of disbelief at times, but there’s an undeniable joy that comes from reading e pacing at the end really sends this book off with a excellent goodbye.Highly recommend!

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    Three Roads to Quantum Gravity []  2020-1-31 1:52

    Lee Smolin highlights string theory as being the best theory for quantum ever, loop quantum gravity theory is better, especially since it does not needmultiple dimensions--nor a fixed framework. Smolin does show a very cohesiveand lengthy explanation of string theory, which is why the title is somewhat misleading.

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    Three Roads to Quantum Gravity []  2020-1-31 1:52

    Considering the experimental status of theories of quantum gravity, it is remarkable that research in this zone has progressed to the level in which it has in the latest few decades. If one examines the history of science it is readily apparent that laboratory and observational data drove the most successful scientific theories. By reading this book and by perusing some of the extensive literature on quantum gravity, it seems justified to view research in quantum gravity as being driven more by internal consistency requirements and reasons of aesthetics. The author gives an interesting overview of this research, and targets the "popular audience" for its readership. The author expresses amazing optimism that a successful theory of quantum gravity will be attained within the next decade. Considering the current difficulties in this research, this is indeed a refreshing attitude. All of the approaches to the quantization of gravity rely on mathematical tools that are quite sophisticated, and competence in the use of these tools requires years of study and concentration. Due to the targeted audience, the author does not discuss these in detail, but he does give interesting and intuitive insights into the nature of the mathematical constructions that are used in quantum gravity. One of these, `noncommutative geometry', is quite recent, while the other, `topos theory', has been around for quite some time, albeit in several disguises. If one is to reconcile the two main approaches to quantum gravity, namely the loop approach and string theory, one will need to understand in detail the mathematics behind both of these theories. This will be a formidable undertaking, and it will take disciplined and focused individuals to carry it out. Unfortunately, and the author addresses this in the book, academic and funding pressures discourage such undertakings. This is either an argument for changing the nature of the academy (which will be very difficult) or doing this research outside the academy. But doing research outside the academy runs the risk of it being viewed as low quality, especially by those in the academy, and so this alternative carries high risk also. In either case, research in quantum gravity is difficult not only because of the nature of the topic matter, but also because of the societal and political pressures that create it a very dangerous endeavor. The author, and a few others, came to quantum gravity when it was still a relatively young field, and, as he describes in the book, managed to survive in the academic environment. Their zeal is admirable, considering the roller-coast ride of confidence and depression they no doubt felt during their research efforts. There is no doubt now that quantum gravity is considered to be a respectable field of physics, and has attracted some of the best minds that have ever existed on this planet. The manner in which the author presents the ideas on quantum gravity will no doubt motivate a few bright young people to take up the gauntlet and enter the field. He definitely prefers the loop approach to quantum gravity, being one of the individuals responsible for its development, but he is fair in giving string theory its due. Even professional physicists or mathematicians though who are curious about quantum gravity could gain a lot from a perusal of the book. There are some surprises in shop for those who are used to thinking about zone and time from a global point of view. This is especially real in the discussion of topos theory and the manner in which it is used in some approaches to quantum gravity. These approaches require that observers always view their put in the globe as being one where they must reason using incomplete information. Two or more individuals though who have enough info to decide whether something is real or false will always create the same decision. This `local' view of descriptions, decision-making, and info gathering will be immediately appreciated by the mathematician reader who is acquainted with the concept of a `sheaf'. The only possible irritation in the book (depending on the reader's theological views) is the discussion on the `weak' and `strong' anthropic principle and its play on very huge (and very small) numbers. Those readers (such as this reviewer) who are not troubled by the magnitudes of these numbers will search the discussion somewhat superfluous. Some theologians have been delighted with the ramifications of some of the discussion on the anthropic principle and fine-tuning in latest years, particularly in the use of the "God of The Gap" arguments in cosmology. This will be no doubt continue, due to the need of these theologians to grab at every straw to establish their positions on origins, extremely fragile as they are.Another one of the virtues of the book is the author's willingness to discuss the social and political context in which research in quantum gravity is done. He describes the string and loop-gravity theorists as effectively being at battle with other, but that the degree of cooperation between them has (thankfully) increased in latest years. The contention between these two groups is no doubt partly due to financial pressures from funding agencies and also private insecurities among the researchers themselves, the latter resulting in sometimes maniacal obsessions for recognition among peers as being the first to arrive at a particular result. Some say this contention is healthy for science, while others say it is a complete waste of time and has no constructive purpose. It is the opinion of this reviewer that the second holds.

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    Home Is Where My People Are: The Roads That Lead Us to Where We Belong [Book]  2017-10-13 21:17

    OH. MY. WORD. I LOVED this book so much!!! As a kid of the 70s I found myself on nearly every page (never mind the fact I grew up in Oklahoma and not Mississippi. Close enough). And I laughed so often. I was trying to read the book in bed while my husband slept beside me. I was trying not to laugh out loud but that meant that I was holding my hand over my mouth while trying to control the snorting that was coming from my nose and my shoulders were shaking so hard I was shaking the bed. I loved everything about this book, and I want that Sophie would become my fresh best friend. I want we could hang out on a super accessorized porch and drink sweet tea, discuss fried chicken, and laugh. Since that probably isn't going to happen, I'm so satisfied she was willing to share herself and her stories in this book and remind me that the most necessary things in my life are the people God has graced my life with.

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    Home Is Where My People Are: The Roads That Lead Us to Where We Belong [Book]  2017-10-13 21:17

    Sophie has done it again! I didn't think she could top her first book, A Small Salty to Chop the Sweet, but she exceeded my expectations by miles! This book will leave you simultaneously laughing and crying. It has wonderful, beautifully written short stories as chapters that share as only a Southerner can the info of Sophie's childhood and journey into adulthood.I'm not a Southerner (I'm a Midwestern girl, through and through), but the stories delighted me and spoke to me in a true way. Her blend of faith, family, and fun is excellent and hits all the right is book is a excellent bonus for all the women in your life who love amazing story-telling and a true life faith journey. Run, don't walk! Buy this book!

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    Home Is Where My People Are: The Roads That Lead Us to Where We Belong [Book]  2017-10-13 21:17

    I truly loved this book. It was my first time to read anything by Sophie Hudson and it had me immediately reaching for her other book and blog when I finished. It was hilarious, and so very relatable. I can really hear Sophie's voice in my head as I read it, and the Mississippi twang is unmistakeable and positively beautiful. This woman's love for her mates and family is evident, and I really appreciated the method she pointed the reader to the Lord again and again. She place my very own thoughts on the page "Are we REALLY going to be Baptist!?", and shared more wisdom than I could possibly have. I was very encouraged by this book and have told several mates about it. Thanks for writing it, Sophie! It was the encouragement this tired girl needed! xo

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    Three Roads To Quantum Gravity (Science Masters) []  2020-1-19 20:13

    Lee Smolin highlights string theory as being the best theory for quantum ever, loop quantum gravity theory is better, especially since it does not needmultiple dimensions--nor a fixed framework. Smolin does show a very cohesiveand lengthy explanation of string theory, which is why the title is somewhat misleading.

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    Three Roads To Quantum Gravity (Science Masters) []  2020-1-19 20:13

    Lee Smolin indeed accomplishes the tasks of explaining the thermodynamics of the universe to the layman. This is something that I have only seen in this book. All other authors do not like to obtain entangled in the intrincacies of thermodynamics, even though thermodynamics is actually the science that allows to relate the macro and the micro. In this book you will obtain a much better idea of how thermodynamics plays such an necessary role in our universe.But Lee Smolin does not stops there. This is a book that also teaches us how the concepts of philosophy and social sciences, and the concepts of pure hard science are so closely related. In the wonderfully laymans vocabulary of physics, mathematics, thermodynamics and philosophy, Lee Smolin tells us about Plato and about Hawkins in the same context.We come to understand how the newtonian concept of the universe took us too far from the understanding of social sciences, and how after a journey through Einstein, science is slowly coming back to be closely similar to the social sciences.We used to think that an observer should be independent, and we created every effort to accomplish that. However, to understand the universe, we can not be independent observers. We are inside!!! It is the same as in sociology or any other social science. We can not be independent observers and we have to accept it.We learn to understand that our universe is not a thing but a story that has to be told. The universe can only be explained by the logic of plurality; the logic of a lot of logics. The logic of a lot of dependent observers added together. We understand that nothing is absolute and everything is relational just as should be in social e view that Lee Smolin gives us about the task ahead for scientists searching for the unified theory of the Cosmos is a view that may finally eliminate the division of hard science and social sciences. It may also support develop fresh points of view in our view of our the end, as wonderful as it may seem, we are back to square one, we are somehow back to Plato's philosophy, but with the added value of a story of the Cosmos that Plato never dreamt ve Stars to this book that obtain us a step closer to understanding ourselves and our environment.

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    Three Roads To Quantum Gravity (Science Masters) []  2020-1-19 20:13

    Lee Smolin has again made an perfect non-mathematical book that has his distinctive style and clearly that explains his view point on how we obtain to a theory of everything. Lee presents a partial history of the various approaches used by the Physics community to solve solve the issues of creating a theory of everything. His approach is heavly vested in the Quantun Gravity history and development. This is only natural in that his life has been spent primarly in this zone of development. However, he does a very adaquite job of explaining the history and problems with string theory. Lee does a perfect job in this book to show a possible direction for the science community to persue. I only hope that our science community will take Lee's approaces seriously.

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    Three Roads To Quantum Gravity (Science masters) []  2020-7-15 18:45

    Perspective is useful even when issues and problems occur. Physics requires deep math and some mathematicians are physicists. Physics also requires direct observation and testing the role of the observer. The work to bring together concepts of math with concepts of physics and a few formula, then theories can be recognized. Every person who reads interacts with concepts all the time. Some people can read more and faster some people read as small as possible. In physics concepts seem to be universal and the grasp of those concepts varies from physicist to physicist this is an example of holographic principle. Observation of holographic principle is based on coherence of communicated physics. In math concepts are self organized out of innate characteristics of formula and data. The data is only as amazing as perception.

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    Three Roads To Quantum Gravity (Science masters) []  2020-7-15 18:45

    Professor Lee Smolin's small compact book delivers amazing load of info about puzzles, anomalies, dilemmas and inconsistencies residing within cutting edge of theoretical is was probably most difficult but enjoyable reading for me, since author writes about particles and Universe from the depth of the little Planck's space.I have studied several famous books about spacetime, yet this one still managed to present a lot of fresh ways that one can use looking at intricacies of modern cosmological science.I recommend "Three Streets to Quantum Gravity" to advanced and committed learner who wants to search how quantum gravity may possibly become an experimental vice: "Black Holes and Time Warps" by Kip Thorne is a very amazing put to begin education about gravity.

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    Ancient Roads From Christ to Constantine []  2020-7-13 20:59

    Professor Jonathan Phillips of Royal Holloway, University of London, takes us in the footsteps of Christ, the Apostles, martyrs and Romans in a journey of three hundred years, from the birth of Christ to the acceptance of the persecuted Method of Christianity as the Roman ong the method we see the spots familiar from the Bible from Jerusalem to Patmos in the Aegean, especially locations visited by Saul/Paul. Some are ruined, others are still thriving centers. Since "church architecture" as such did not exist, we see locations like a cave near Antioch where Paul and Barnabas may have worshiped. And we see the oldest dated extant bit of Scripture . . . in Manchester. All essor Phillips approach is refreshing, in that he takes the history of the Fresh Testament uncritically as he goes from Jerusalem to Rome and further. While the series endorses no religion, it's a useful tool, I've found, in teaching Sunday School and augmenting my own Scriptural knowledge by actually seeing the locations he visits. On the other hand, the series' sole issue is that Professor Phillips uses the same open-mindedness he brings to history to showing us locations like "the grotto where Jesus was born" (places which at best can be nothing more than a guess but are probably pious frauds). It also has the major flaw of most such doentaries (especially those by Michael Wood, James Burke, etc.) which goes on the assumption that no put is so magnificent it can't be bettered by having the narrator standing in front of it, blocking half of essor Phillips is a pleasant tour guide, very likeable. All he needs is a touch of humor and the occasional twinkle in his eye. But probably due to the touchiness of his topic matter, he eschews humor and gives it to us straight.

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    Ancient Roads From Christ to Constantine []  2020-7-13 20:59

    A unbelievable journey. It covers the main players in the drama but doesn't ignore sects and individuals who played supporting roles. I am interested in the gnostics, a small understood sect but one with amazing influence I think, and the program gives an honest appraisal of this group without making it out to be irrelevant and unworthy of much notice. Other individuals like Tertullian are explored in some depth. It would be impossible to please everybody in any movie about the history of a globe religion, but this doentary probably comes close to doing that. The script stays close to the Biblical sources without leaning too heavily on the academic, but also brings in some of the interesting and necessary tales and traditions spawned by the movement. The viewer comes away with a broader understanding of the early history of Christianity. The cinematography is amazing too though at times the melody may overpower the words a small bit making it hard to understand.

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    Roads to Quoz: An American Mosey []  2020-8-24 19:12

    If you have never read William Least-Heat Moon, begin with Blue Highways, then read River Horse, then read this one. The first chapter alone is worth the wait. It's wonderful!

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    Roads to Quoz: An American Mosey []  2020-8-24 19:12

    I have read and enjoyed all of the other Least Heat - Moon books, so I was looking forward to this one. It has not allow me down. It is various from Blue Highways in that it addresses the authors observations in greater detail. Anyone can write, but the style and choice of the written word has a method of leaving an impressions in the readers minds eye. Mr. Heat - Moon has found a very favorable method of doing exactly this task. He allowes you to have fun what he is saying and at the same time foster a need to read more. It flows. It has style. It is informative and entertaining. I will look forward to his next book, whatever the subject (he tips at some possible projects - any of which would work with his quest to follow a lead and tell an entertaining story). I'm glad that he didn't spend his whole life in a dull classroom. Cirtances often have a method of bringing out the best in us. I don't always agree with his politics, but I respect them.

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    The Roads to Rome: A Cookbook []  2021-1-7 19:33

    The Streets to Rome is a attractive book written by Jarrett Wrisley, a meal writer and Paolo Vitaletti, a native Italian and Chef. These two men came together to begin a restaurant together but before they did they wanted to experience, discover and immerse themselves in the cuisines of Rome and the surrounding countryside.I received a free advance copy of this book in exchange for a free unbiased review from Clarkson Potter. And although this book was sent to me, I immediately felt swept away to Italy through the stories, recipes and attractive my opinion there is no better method to learn about a culture and the history of people than through a country's food. This book takes us on an exploration through village towns such as Norci, the home of butchery tradition and onwards to Tuscany and is is real Italian cuisine and unlike what we as Americans think of as just pasta...dishes that are cooked with anchovies, artichokes, lamb, pecorino cheese, ricotta and ragus, also hearty meat dishes. I'm most looking forward to trying to cook Spaghetti Con Le Telline( Spaghetti with Wild Clams), Eggplant Parmesan and Cavatelli with Lamb Ragu. There are a lot of easy dishes that sound and look divine too like Sheep's ricotta with Honey and Carmelized Figs, Pollo Con I Peperoni( Chicken Smothered with Peppers) and Fava Pecorino Romano( Fava Beans and Pecorino Cheese). There are also desserts! And I'm most excited to test the Almond is is a book to read and savor- something that I hold by my bedside and dream of a day when we can all travel again...I know my next trip will be to Italy and I look forward to taking a lot of notes from this book!Thanks for the free book Clarkson Potter!

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    Three Roads To Quantum Gravity (Science masters) []  2020-7-15 18:45

    Considering the experimental status of theories of quantum gravity, it is remarkable that research in this zone has progressed to the level in which it has in the latest few decades. If one examines the history of science it is readily apparent that laboratory and observational data drove the most successful scientific theories. By reading this book and by perusing some of the extensive literature on quantum gravity, it seems justified to view research in quantum gravity as being driven more by internal consistency requirements and reasons of aesthetics. The author gives an interesting overview of this research, and targets the "popular audience" for its readership. The author expresses amazing optimism that a successful theory of quantum gravity will be attained within the next decade. Considering the current difficulties in this research, this is indeed a refreshing attitude. All of the approaches to the quantization of gravity rely on mathematical tools that are quite sophisticated, and competence in the use of these tools requires years of study and concentration. Due to the targeted audience, the author does not discuss these in detail, but he does give interesting and intuitive insights into the nature of the mathematical constructions that are used in quantum gravity. One of these, `noncommutative geometry', is quite recent, while the other, `topos theory', has been around for quite some time, albeit in several disguises. If one is to reconcile the two main approaches to quantum gravity, namely the loop approach and string theory, one will need to understand in detail the mathematics behind both of these theories. This will be a formidable undertaking, and it will take disciplined and focused individuals to carry it out. Unfortunately, and the author addresses this in the book, academic and funding pressures discourage such undertakings. This is either an argument for changing the nature of the academy (which will be very difficult) or doing this research outside the academy. But doing research outside the academy runs the risk of it being viewed as low quality, especially by those in the academy, and so this alternative carries high risk also. In either case, research in quantum gravity is difficult not only because of the nature of the topic matter, but also because of the societal and political pressures that create it a very dangerous endeavor. The author, and a few others, came to quantum gravity when it was still a relatively young field, and, as he describes in the book, managed to survive in the academic environment. Their zeal is admirable, considering the roller-coast ride of confidence and depression they no doubt felt during their research efforts. There is no doubt now that quantum gravity is considered to be a respectable field of physics, and has attracted some of the best minds that have ever existed on this planet. The manner in which the author presents the ideas on quantum gravity will no doubt motivate a few bright young people to take up the gauntlet and enter the field. He definitely prefers the loop approach to quantum gravity, being one of the individuals responsible for its development, but he is fair in giving string theory its due. Even professional physicists or mathematicians though who are curious about quantum gravity could gain a lot from a perusal of the book. There are some surprises in shop for those who are used to thinking about zone and time from a global point of view. This is especially real in the discussion of topos theory and the manner in which it is used in some approaches to quantum gravity. These approaches require that observers always view their put in the globe as being one where they must reason using incomplete information. Two or more individuals though who have enough info to decide whether something is real or false will always create the same decision. This `local' view of descriptions, decision-making, and info gathering will be immediately appreciated by the mathematician reader who is acquainted with the concept of a `sheaf'. The only possible irritation in the book (depending on the reader's theological views) is the discussion on the `weak' and `strong' anthropic principle and its play on very huge (and very small) numbers. Those readers (such as this reviewer) who are not troubled by the magnitudes of these numbers will search the discussion somewhat superfluous. Some theologians have been delighted with the ramifications of some of the discussion on the anthropic principle and fine-tuning in latest years, particularly in the use of the "God of The Gap" arguments in cosmology. This will be no doubt continue, due to the need of these theologians to grab at every straw to establish their positions on origins, extremely fragile as they are.Another one of the virtues of the book is the author's willingness to discuss the social and political context in which research in quantum gravity is done. He describes the string and loop-gravity theorists as effectively being at battle with other, but that the degree of cooperation between them has (thankfully) increased in latest years. The contention between these two groups is no doubt partly due to financial pressures from funding agencies and also private insecurities among the researchers themselves, the latter resulting in sometimes maniacal obsessions for recognition among peers as being the first to arrive at a particular result. Some say this contention is healthy for science, while others say it is a complete waste of time and has no constructive purpose. It is the opinion of this reviewer that the second holds.

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    Ancient Roads From Christ to Constantine []  2020-7-13 20:59

    This is a very interesting history of Christianity by someone who actually knows something about it from a religious perspective. I first saw it on a Christmas eve marathon on PBS latest year. The production has been out since 2015. It covers Jesus time as well as the subsequent time through Constantine, the roman emperor that legalized the fresh religion. The narator is the author and takes you through the holy land and the roman empire to bring the story and the history to life.

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    Three Roads To Quantum Gravity (Science Masters) []  2020-1-19 20:13

    Considering the experimental status of theories of quantum gravity, it is remarkable that research in this zone has progressed to the level in which it has in the latest few decades. If one examines the history of science it is readily apparent that laboratory and observational data drove the most successful scientific theories. By reading this book and by perusing some of the extensive literature on quantum gravity, it seems justified to view research in quantum gravity as being driven more by internal consistency requirements and reasons of aesthetics. The author gives an interesting overview of this research, and targets the "popular audience" for its readership. The author expresses amazing optimism that a successful theory of quantum gravity will be attained within the next decade. Considering the current difficulties in this research, this is indeed a refreshing attitude. All of the approaches to the quantization of gravity rely on mathematical tools that are quite sophisticated, and competence in the use of these tools requires years of study and concentration. Due to the targeted audience, the author does not discuss these in detail, but he does give interesting and intuitive insights into the nature of the mathematical constructions that are used in quantum gravity. One of these, `noncommutative geometry', is quite recent, while the other, `topos theory', has been around for quite some time, albeit in several disguises. If one is to reconcile the two main approaches to quantum gravity, namely the loop approach and string theory, one will need to understand in detail the mathematics behind both of these theories. This will be a formidable undertaking, and it will take disciplined and focused individuals to carry it out. Unfortunately, and the author addresses this in the book, academic and funding pressures discourage such undertakings. This is either an argument for changing the nature of the academy (which will be very difficult) or doing this research outside the academy. But doing research outside the academy runs the risk of it being viewed as low quality, especially by those in the academy, and so this alternative carries high risk also. In either case, research in quantum gravity is difficult not only because of the nature of the topic matter, but also because of the societal and political pressures that create it a very dangerous endeavor. The author, and a few others, came to quantum gravity when it was still a relatively young field, and, as he describes in the book, managed to survive in the academic environment. Their zeal is admirable, considering the roller-coast ride of confidence and depression they no doubt felt during their research efforts. There is no doubt now that quantum gravity is considered to be a respectable field of physics, and has attracted some of the best minds that have ever existed on this planet. The manner in which the author presents the ideas on quantum gravity will no doubt motivate a few bright young people to take up the gauntlet and enter the field. He definitely prefers the loop approach to quantum gravity, being one of the individuals responsible for its development, but he is fair in giving string theory its due. Even professional physicists or mathematicians though who are curious about quantum gravity could gain a lot from a perusal of the book. There are some surprises in shop for those who are used to thinking about zone and time from a global point of view. This is especially real in the discussion of topos theory and the manner in which it is used in some approaches to quantum gravity. These approaches require that observers always view their put in the globe as being one where they must reason using incomplete information. Two or more individuals though who have enough info to decide whether something is real or false will always create the same decision. This `local' view of descriptions, decision-making, and info gathering will be immediately appreciated by the mathematician reader who is acquainted with the concept of a `sheaf'. The only possible irritation in the book (depending on the reader's theological views) is the discussion on the `weak' and `strong' anthropic principle and its play on very huge (and very small) numbers. Those readers (such as this reviewer) who are not troubled by the magnitudes of these numbers will search the discussion somewhat superfluous. Some theologians have been delighted with the ramifications of some of the discussion on the anthropic principle and fine-tuning in latest years, particularly in the use of the "God of The Gap" arguments in cosmology. This will be no doubt continue, due to the need of these theologians to grab at every straw to establish their positions on origins, extremely fragile as they are.Another one of the virtues of the book is the author's willingness to discuss the social and political context in which research in quantum gravity is done. He describes the string and loop-gravity theorists as effectively being at battle with other, but that the degree of cooperation between them has (thankfully) increased in latest years. The contention between these two groups is no doubt partly due to financial pressures from funding agencies and also private insecurities among the researchers themselves, the latter resulting in sometimes maniacal obsessions for recognition among peers as being the first to arrive at a particular result. Some say this contention is healthy for science, while others say it is a complete waste of time and has no constructive purpose. It is the opinion of this reviewer that the second holds.

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