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    The Interrupted Journey review [Movie]  2017-10-13 21:51

    20 Killed, 31 Injured! The Interrupted Journey is directed by Daniel Birt and written by Michael Pertwee. It stars Richard Todd, Valerie Hobson, Tom Walls and Ralph Truman. Melody is by Stanley Black and cinematography by Erwin Hillier. To Stop Train In Case Of Emergency Pull Down The Chain. Penalty For Improper Use £5. That's a woman in a million. Very tidy Brit noir this one. The story is a bit hokey as it enters Twilight Location territories, but the twists, turns and mystery quotient hold it lively to keep the attention. The low budget is never a issue for Birt, who aided by the perfect Hillier, brings a feverish realm to the story by method of canted angles, shadow play and hazes, while certain photos (shapes of doorways etc) are cunningly teasing the audience about what is going on. Cast are very powerful to round this out as more than worth the time of the Brit noir movie fan. 7/10

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    The Bands of Mourning review []  2020-1-5 18:32

    This is the third book in a four book series, and although it has its own plot arc, its story is a continuation of a greater plot arc - if you haven't read Let of Law or Shadows of Self, you really need to read those in order to follow the story. Also realize that there is still one more book in the series that Brandon hasn't even started writing yet, so although there is some closure for some things at the end of this book, it is not THE IS is, however, what I was expecting when I first read the first Wax & Wayne novel, Alloy of Law. Although I enjoyed it, I asked, why would Scadrial, a globe with powerful, remarkable magic, develop the exact same technologies that Earth did? Trains, steam power, electricity... Shouldn't the magic have some impact on industrialization? Finally, we see not only a continuation and further development of Wax's quest that was introduced in the first book, along with the humor and plot twists you expect from Brandon's novels, but also special technological advances that specifically relate to the magic powers of the globe - with fascinating implications for the e book is a satisfying and enjoyable continuation of the adventures of Wax and Wayne, along with several secondary characters they've picked up along the way. As with all of Brandon's books, it's a character-centric story, and you really obtain pulled into their plights and struggles. I laughed, I cried, I worried, I celebrated, and I didn't place the book down until I had finished. And now the long wait for the finale.

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    The Bands of Mourning review []  2020-1-5 18:32

    “The Bands of Mourning” is the sixth book in the Mistborn series, and the final book in the later trilogy. I enjoyed this book a lot because Sanderson provides more backstory on Wax and his sister Teslin, and he attempts to provide an respond to why a god will allow people suffer. Of course, we also obtain a satisfying conclusion to the war between Wax and his ter the happenings in the second book, Wax is upset with his god Harmony, and he chooses to search his own method despite Harmony’s efforts to tutorial his path. It took until the end of the book, but we finally obtain a dialogue surrounding the “Why” questions that fuel Wax’s resentment toward his god. Theologically, Harmony is a bit underpowered compared to the real God and creator of the Universe (i.e., Yahweh, Jehovah), but I thought Sanderson did a decent job of explaining why a god would choose to let suffering in the globe even if it means not good things happen. The respond was a bit lacking in regards to the Christian faith with its hope for eternal life and ultimate justice in the world, but perhaps Sanderson’s respond will gives readers something to think about in regards to their own beliefs about God.I don’t wish to overplay the religious aspect of the story --- this book still contains the fun banter between Wax and Wayne, lots of adventures and shootouts, and even some romance along the way. The religious aspect is minor, but I think an necessary part to understand why things happened the method they did in regards to Wax and his lost love Lessie.I look forward to reading more stories in the Mistborn universe!

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    The Bands of Mourning review []  2020-1-5 18:32

    3.5 StarsI just finished the book and I have so a lot of mixed emotions. Throughout reading this book I thought it would be one of, if not, the best books he's ever written. It's amazing seeing Sandersons writing grow, and it really showed in this book with the characters. I liked The Alloy of Law, but some of the characters personalities (especially Wayne) felt a bit forced. I have felt this method about some of the characters in his other books as well, but they were never TOO bad. In Shadows of Self they got better, but the plot and twists was more of the highlight of that book, and not so much the side characters like Wayne, Marasi, and Steris. In this book however I found all the characters wonderful, but the plot......not so much. All the characters (especially Steris) were delightful to read and I must have laughed out loud at least 10 times while reading this. Their chemistry just worked so well together and I think this is the best Sanderson book to date e plot itself though just never captured me. It was ultimately the characters and their interactions with each other than created me read this book so quick and not wish to place it down. The plot was just.....boring and compared to Sandersons other books, which have spoiled me with their twists and explosive endings, it fell flat. -- SPOILERS FROM HERE ON OUT --It's probably my fault a small bit that it fell flat for me, because seeing some of the early reviews got me REALLY excited. People talked about the cosmere getting tied together, about alien forces invading Scadrial, and all around just created it's scope seem huge and epic. Well....none of that really happened. The plot was just a primary treasure hunt with a few obvious and meh twists (Wax's sister and the Spear) and a weak ending. Shadows of Self teased us with Trell and this book just teased more and never really answered much. I was also super excited to figure out what the void eyed demons were and then they just turned out to be people with masks from far away on Scadrial. I mean come on, I'm sure everyone who's read Stormlight got all excited like me and thought they would be some sort of minion of Odium, it turned out to be SUCH a allow l in all i give this book 5 stars for the characters, and 3 stars for the plot. Another terrific book by Sanderson, but ultimately a small bit disappointing

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    The Bands of Mourning review []  2020-1-5 18:32

    Reader thoughts:This book delivered all I expected and more. There were a couple things I guessed early (just a few pages before the characters, a certain betrayal and a certain hiding place), and there were a couple things I did not like (ahem, no killing named characters). It was still a amazing ride.I've loved Steris from the begin (she's dull but earnest and studious, so much like me), so I loved that amazing things happened to her. :)The masked ones were great! Technology that enhances allomancy? Opens so a lot of possibilities. I saw Rothfuss's one culture in them in the method they signal emotions with their hands. Love that idea.Wax and Wayne are excellent together as always. The banter is seriously ROFL priceless. Spoiled ain, there was slight inuendo (maybe 3 lines? A reference to balls?) which I thought unnecessary. I prefer Stormlight, Alcatraz, or Reckoners for that reason primarily.Wayne has to have some command over connection, though it's through his hats, which doesn't create sense, because they aren't metal. Or maybe he's just talented.Writer thoughts:Sanderson's pacing is great, like always, and his characters are so well developed (Steris reading a book on the train and listing all the things that can possibly go wrong). The globe is somehow growing but still consistent (how does he obtain that to work?).He balances various story aspects very well too. There's humor (the stage with the innkeeper watching the group interact so weirdly). There's sorrow (masks on the walls). There's invention (telephones and cubes). There are fresh cultures (not telling). It's not just the amount of each of these that's important, it's the timing too. Sanderson's chapters play them out in the right order.

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    The Bands of Mourning review []  2020-1-5 18:32

    This is the third of the Steampunk-ish trilogy on this complex planet in Sanderson's wonderfully complex Mistborn fantasy universe, and it does not disappoint. A number of twists and turns and it reads like suspense but plenty of humor because Sanderson creates amazing characters - human and non-human. He knows what motivates people and the range of what people can be. The very reasonably logical yet fantastical powers the Mistborn possess and too fun to describe. You wish to read the Mistborn series IN ORDER, please, so you understand the full depth of what is event and what has happened on this very unusual globe as well as its theology. The Mistborn humans can use the powers of different metals by metabolizing them, and each one gives a special ability for as long as you have a shop of the metal inside "to burn." Test anything by Brandon Sanderson. He never disappoints in fantasy writing!! PS - If you're the kind who read the Silmarillion when you read LOTR, or you play D&D, then you'll wish to read the appendices in which he explains why the fantastical happens in this universe, in a very logical but complex way.

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    The Bands of Mourning review []  2020-1-5 18:32

    I just finished the bands of mourning by Brandon Sanderson. I am a large fan of Wax and Wane and this book certainly didn't disappoint. I really liked how the development between wax and Steris happened, and I very much enjoyed the political Intrigue and interwoven politics that took put in this one. It certainly gave a various tone to the first book, and it created the greeter even more invested in the series than they were before. I cannot wait to read the final book from Brandon Sanderson although it will be with a massive heart that I pick up that novel. In this book I enjoyed very much the reveal of the secret society as it were through suits and the set and I also enjoyed the different various challenges and tryouts wax had to go through in order to persevere. All of the characters in this novel had their own stories to tell, and I can't wait to read more.

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    The Bands of Mourning review []  2020-1-5 18:32

    I originally purchased Bands of Mourning thinking that it was going to be the huge finale for the 2nd Era in the Mistborn Saga, and spent the entire book wondering how Sanderson was going to top the huge reveal in the second book. I won’t spoil either surprise, but just when you think you begin to understand all the possible tangents of Allomantic and Feruchemical powers, Sanderson drops in a characteristic twist that you never saw coming! The largest announcement of all comes at the end when you search that there is going to be a fourth book in the series, The Lost Metal, coming out sometime after the next Stormlight book wraps is book continues to flesh out the history of Wax, and why he chose to escape out to the Roughs. It starts with an interesting insight into his childhood, and provides insight into his strained relationship he has with his Terris heritage. Throughout the rest of the story, you start to learn more about his history with his sister, all while maintaining a breakneck pace into one conundrum after another, in ways only Wax and Wayne could search themselves falling into.I loved the extra characters and the realizations that they bring with them near the end of the book. You can see where Sanderson was laying some marvelous groundwork for the next books, and I can’t wait to see how far the story will expanding now with whole fresh worlds coming into the mix.

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    The Bands of Mourning review []  2020-1-5 18:32

    I started reading Sanderson since he was brought on to complete the Wheel of Time series and he doesn't disappoint. After becoming thoroughly immersed in the globe of Kelsier and Vin, the transition to The Let of Law was a bit rough for me. However, as the series progressed I became exciting with the escapades of Wax and s of Mourning - just like the previous two books - does a amazing job in providing readers with its own story line not completely dependent on the other books while satisfying those readers - who have read the others - with links to the rest of the series as well as to the original Mistborn stories. Now I just have to bide my time with the Stormlight Archive until the final installation of Mistborn is released!

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    The Bands of Mourning review []  2020-1-5 18:32

    Unbelievable story as usual from Sanderson. If you're already a fan then there isn't really any need for a redundant review telling you why this book is great. It's in the same vein as his other allomancer stories and the main hero is far more likeable than Vin. More like a Kessler except a small more sane, a small more globe weary. If that's possible as Kessler was locked in a God forsaken pit and left to ory is quick paced. Define ty a page turner. Finished it in two days and was sad when there was no more left. Didn't think I wanted another metal bender book, been rereading the storm light series but this is a small lighter and... While not MORE fun, a various kind of simple fun with a amazing story, interesting characters, you won't ever be sorry you picked up a book by Sanderson. Unless it's a children book, the alcatraz series. While I can appreciate those for what they are it's akin to reading Harry Potter for a slightly younger audience. And I wasn't ever a fan of the Harry Potter series.

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    The Bands of Mourning review []  2020-1-5 18:32

    Can't go wrong with the Mistborn series from Brandon Sanderson. I was a bit disappointed by the limited scope of this branch (the Wax novels) compared to the original Mistborn series. I mean, who cares if he's a coinshot when he could have been Mistborn? Anyway, as much as I was disappointed by the Alloy Of Law novel, the Bands of Mourning redeemed the series. Not only do Wax and Wayne's stories come to a satisfactory conclusion, but we also learn more about the original characters from the original Mistborn novels. As usual, awesome storytelling from a talented author. Extremely complex characters that sound authentic, like actual people that might step out of the pages and exist in true life. Sanderson contains some funny moments with all the action and suspense, something he has a bonus for. If you have fun fantasy, suspense, mysteries, or even old Westerns, I think you'll love this book!

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    Victorian Mourning Jewelry review []  2020-1-21 23:3

    Not really a book but more of an introductory pamphlet. If you had never heard off mourning jewelry this is an amazing intro but am the author did was pull together a few sentences.

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    October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard review []  2020-1-14 19:36

    I wish to thank Lauren S. for this unbelievable bonus to our library and with it her tip that it is a must read for young adults. I wholeheartedly concur; in 68 poems in this spare, yet piercing novel in verse, the author was scheduled to speak at Matthew Shepard's college and found out just before about the savage beating this young man received. Leslea Newman kept her keynote engagement and spoke and wept at the sheer horror of this hate crime toward an innocent victim who succumbs to death 5 days later. Newman has taken a lot of elements of Matthew Shepard's latest hours and imagined what may have been; the road, the fence he was lashed to, the biker, the murderers, the pistol, the deer and so much more. This book is a tribute to Matthew Shepard who died as a effect of a hate crime at the hands of gay haters. This book is also a history lesson that every child, young adult and reader needs to discover because in the reading of this book, you will be changed. This book needs to be read by everyone.I especially gained even more knowledge through the author's introduction, her epilogue, her afterword, notes, explanation of poetic forms and resources. Newman brings sympathy, anger, sorrow, and compassion to each and every word in this book. Highly recommended.

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    October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard review []  2020-1-14 19:36

    I love this one. I am a visual artist and do not express myself with words very well. That's one of the reasons I have fun reading is finding beauty in words and the storytelling. The foreshadowing and mood setting with word choice. This is a various but attractive art form. Poetry with iambic pentameter and rhyme schemes that I cannot figure out create it hard for me to obtain the beauty of the roll, the stops of the word. Concrete poems I understand, dual voice poems check, Haikus gotcha. But when it is necessary to a verse novel for me to understand the rhyming pattern and the emphasis of words, I feel like I lose some of the beauty reading gives me since I miss out on emphasis that I can later going back understand was foreshadowing to set the is book uses multiple types of poetry to tell basically a single paige point of view of someone or something that was show of affected by this hate crime. And while some do have the elements I don't like, the author has given an index of the poems numbered and described how the poem works in its put and what kind of poem it is. I recommend waiting till the end to look for ones you don't understand. It might breakup the thoughts and flows between , this verse novel gives the happenings of a tragic murder of a gay boy named Matthew Shepard. I begins before he is killed, what he is thinking about in the club, when he is beaten and tied to a fencepost and ultimately dies. Multiple viewpoints are given throughout the book. What the stars saw, what the mothers of others felt for their sons. The fence that so sadly had to keep him up... And the mourning and fall out from a murder of hate. The sentencing, the hate-groups that agree...It's deeply moving. interweaving various stories like yarn into a coherent begin to finish book of what happened that night to the aftermath for the boy, his family, his killers, the community, and the LGBTQ community.

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    October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard review []  2020-1-14 19:36

    Newman's diary of poems runs up and down the dial of viewpoints and emotions telling the feeling of a lot of people -- and some other beings and non-beings as well -- surrounding the torture and murder of Matthew Shepard, the young gay student. But here's the deal: These poem spring out of horror, and I would never have purchased the book had I not had the opportunity to look through it first (a friend's copy). One finishes the collection (which can also be read piecemeal) feeling more encouraged and empowered than horrified. Bravo to Newman for accomplishing the impossible and demonstrating how something attractive can come out of something unspeakable.

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    October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard review []  2020-1-14 19:36

    This book was a unbelievable book, it is written from a lot of various points of view. It is a quick read but is so sad. Brough me to tears reading it. Would recommend this book to 13 y/o and up.

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    October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard review []  2020-1-14 19:36

    Wow. I almost want I was still teaching so I could use this book during Poetry Month. Not only has Newman written some attractive poems, but she also used a wide dozens of poetic forms and styles. Wow. This book was so amazingly excellent. I'm undecided about whether I should donate this book so others can share in it, or if I should just hold it under my pillow.

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    October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard review []  2020-1-14 19:36

    I haven't had a possibility to read the book, but Leslea Newman visited my college and did a reading from this book. I was lucky enough to have her sign my copy. It was a very moving book and the imagery is incredible. I highly recommend the book.

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    October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard review []  2020-1-14 19:36

    As someone who does not regularly have fun poetry outside the kinds of Shel Silverstein, I was hesitant to read October Mourning. However, after reading just the first entry I was blown away. Needless to say I finished it in one sitting and since have returned time and time again to re-examine my favorite poems. Newman does an wonderful job taking on various perspectives and it raises the book to another level of creativity and effectiveness. As someone who was very young at the time of Matthew Shepard's death after reading October Mourning I was ashamed I had never heard of him. Everyone needs to read this book, whether you like poetry or not, and especially if you do not know Matthew Shepard's story- it is a must!!!

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    October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard review []  2020-1-14 19:36

    This is so hard to read. The poetry is wonderful. It is very well written and edited, but the emotion that surrounds Mr. Shepherd's death is so powerful that it can only be read a few pages at a time. One must have tissues show to read!

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    October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard review []  2020-1-14 19:36

    I bought this product for a theatre project and it one of the greatest books I've ever read similar to LGBT issues. It's thoughful, artistic, and lists it's resources in full so the reader can do plenty of independent study.

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    October Mourning: A Song for Matthew Shepard review []  2020-1-14 19:36

    Beautifully written words on such a tragic event.

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    A Lucky Life Interrupted: A Memoir of Hope review []  2020-1-21 21:23

    Let's obtain this out of the method first; I also have Multiple Myeloma. I'm a young patient, not "typical" for MM, female, and I work in healthcare as a Registered Nurse. I read this partly because I've long respected his work, plus I went to college in South Dakota, so I'm familiar with a lot of the same locations in the midwest that he is. This book was disappointing. Why? I felt it lacked depth, authenticity and true vulnerability. Is the writing good? Yes, but I wanted more from a person who is facing the reality of death. This book disappointed me because 80% of the book felt like a shrine to himself - he spent method too a lot of pages bragging about how amazing his life is, name-dropped constantly, and created sure we were clear that he cant believe this happened to HIM. Well I know exactly how that feels.What does Tom not know? He doesnt know what it feels like to be the basic breadwinner and be diagnosed with this disease in your 40s. He doesnt know what it's like to constantly worry about the side effects of chemo & how much work you'll miss & whether you'll be able to hold your job - knowing you cant realistically obtain another. He doesnt know what it feels like to wonder if you'll see your kids graduate high school, much less if you can hang on to the house throughout treatment. He doesnt know what it feels like to be denied disability insurance (not SSDI). He didnt have to rely on GoFundMe because his sick and vacation time ran out the first two weeks of treatment, and getting a transplant would mean missing 3-4 months of work. He didnt have to worry about whether he'd be able to return to work after a transplant working long shifts with chemo-brain. He also probably didnt spend months pouring over PubMed articles himself, hoping he was interpreting the data correctly, trying to decipher what really is the best course of treatment. I could name about a million things that created me realize that the only thing I have in common with Tom is the disease. So go ahead and read this book if you wish to know what it feels like to be rich and sick. He'll tell you - well then you fly to professionals all around the country because you can, and you ask them related questions and compare their answers - which I'm sure they loved, but I obtain it. You should ask questions. Some of the items created me laugh it was so out-of-touch with what most of us in middle-class will face when/if we obtain cancer. He devoted a whole 2-3 sentences to prayer - enough to basically say, he was never really into it. Speaking for myself only, if getting diagnosed with an "incurable cancer" doesnt create you question your beliefs and turn to God for help, what will? So go ahead and read the book if you wish to learn about all kinds of options 99% of us dont have. For anyone in my shoes, here's my advice: Seek out a Multiple Myeloma Specialist - not a general Hematologist/Oncologist. This is a very patient-specific disease, and you NEED a specialist. Search a way. Have them consult with your Dr if you arent as lucky as me and dont live near a MM specialist. ADVOCATE for yourself. Talk to your team. Be vigilant about doing what you can to support yourself and dont expect your squad to do everything for you. Obtain help through family/friends - you're going to need it. This is not a time to be isolated. Hope they catch it early like they did for me - that is often the difference - I was lucky. I was only scene 1.I have grown to love my team, and trust them, but that didnt happen overnight. I am not naive about the challenges in healthcare. Hope you have really amazing insurance. One thing that my Dr also told me recently was helpful - even though I went through hell during parts of my treatment, I quickly got better physically. The mental/psychological challenges were, and are, harder. My Dr said that's because I'm a younger patient. For older patients - the ones who usually obtain MM - the physical challenges are harder. I'm very thankful to be doing really well now. I've got a lot of credit card debt I didnt have before, but I'm alive!

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    A Lucky Life Interrupted: A Memoir of Hope review []  2020-1-21 21:23

    As a Multiple Myeloma patient, I bought this book, not to learn of the condition, but how Mr Brokaw handled his diagnosis.. He spends most of the book telling us about his hobbies and dropping lots of huge names. A chapter onNelson Mandella. How is that similar to his condition. His diagnosis doesn't seemed to have affected him. He doesn't detail his treatment accept that it will interfere with his skiing trips. He created lite of Multiple Myeloma. There are a lot of people out there including myself that are really suffering through this cancer. Those that don't have Myeloma or know very small about it will think this cancer is nothing. His readers will think that this condition parallels a diabetes diagnosis. I wasted cash on this book. Could I obtain a refund?

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    A Lucky Life Interrupted: A Memoir of Hope review []  2020-1-21 21:23

    I also have the cancer Multiple Myeloma that Tom Brokaw has. I do not have the popular name or cash so I was interested in his story. I have gone through more than Mr. Brokaw in my treatment which I would not want on anyone. I was diagnosed in July 2011 and had a Stem Celled Transport in Dec. 2011. Mr. Brokaw did not have a Stem Celled Transplant he was able to control his blood cancer with chemo. I would not want a Stem Celled Transplant on anyone but I am very glad I did this.

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    A Lucky Life Interrupted: A Memoir of Hope review []  2020-1-21 21:23

    I am a myeloma patient, who was diagnosed just six months following Tom Brokaw's unfortunate encounter with the same cancer. His book was not only enlightening and encouraging to me, but very interesting in the method he interwove the narrative with familiar historical events. This is a book that will certainly appeal to anyone dealing with MM, or with cancer of any kind. I recommend this book for anyone really. It is very uplifting.

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    A Lucky Life Interrupted: A Memoir of Hope review []  2020-1-21 21:23

    Tom Brokaw is a fascinating and as he accurately puts it lucky guy: he has a attractive wife with whom he's shared half a century of togetherness and a career filled with innumerable accomplishments and well-deserved awards. But then the glow on his life dims unexpectedly by the diagnoses of a dreadful disease: multiple myeloma, a rare cancer of the blood. Is his charmed life over? In A Lucky Life Interrupted, Brokaw takes us from the debilitating back pain that ultimately leads to the diagnosis of MM and through the a lot of setbacks during a rigorous treatment that in the end will give him the news his cancer is in remission. As a multiple myeloma patient myself, I can't recommend this book highly enough. Brokaw prose is straightforward and candid--he puts his journalistic skills to amazing use. And although he experiences some dark moments during his treatment, self-pity never encroaches his narrative. Perhaps the note that most resonated with me was his frustration when he felt his medical squad was not communicating with each other at crucial moments. This is endemic not only to this disease but every serious disease as well. Doctors tend to concentrate on their zone of expertise and go MIA at times when their knowledge might support other doctors who are looking at a patient from a various prism of knowledge. Thanks to a cadre of doctors I was able to place together outside the squad of professionals in charge of my treatment--a powerful recommendation by Brokaw to other MM patients--I was a able to interpret the info delivered in confusing medical terms and question how one doctor's findings influenced another' recommendation. Brokaw has been in remission for three years. For me it has been five. And like him I'm claiming my life back, and experiencing some of the "old self" showing through the veil that was once cancer. Thank you Mr. Brokaw for putting a face to this not good disease.

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    A Lucky Life Interrupted: A Memoir of Hope review []  2020-1-21 21:23

    Reading it right now. From the very beginning it is, to me, just about the finest, every- wa,coverage ofall aspects of the disease. To me....vividly describing the human settings, personalities of the manyhuman beings, situations, emotions, suffering,of victims and their families, and the list e descriptions of those in the medical field - specialists and non-professional but skilled and sovalued, are impressive and so simple to relate to. Brokaw's wordage is my kind.....without the NebulousNuances (credit Red Norvo for that tune) anywhere found in this man's writing. While posted at FortBelvoir, Virginia in the 1960's a lot of history happened. Cuban/Soviet/U.S A Confrontation. PresidentKennedy. Detroit rioting and on fire. Troops drilling in riot control and assigned to do so in places.Felix Grant every night on the radio = WMAL. Was early and found Senate Office Building frontporch steps to observe the procession from Capital Hill rear entrance to Pennsylvania is makes relating to the author's description of all things here in those times is ankful to have this book.

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    A Lucky Life Interrupted: A Memoir of Hope review []  2020-1-21 21:23

    Tom Brokow is one of the best exemplars of Midwestern hero that I've encountered in my 80 decades in this country. His remarkable success, his wealth, his "connections," in no method detract from or define his approach to life as a person suffering (and learning from) cancer and its treatment. My wife and I wanted to read this book as a method to understand more fully what a close mate of ours is experiencing as a person who received the same diagnosis as Brokow. The book proved to be very helpful in this regard. Our mate has none of the wealth, none of the influence, none of the medical connections, of Tom Brokow -- but then Brokow's wealth and connections did not create a decisive difference in his level of suffering, his prospects, or the need to pursue his own research into alternative treatment modalities. Brokow's one true ace in the deck is his family. The help from his unbelievable wife and children, including a physician daughter who was well placed to be an advocate and interpreter on his behalf, seems to have been more crucial than any other factor. This is a fine memoir, a helpful guidebook for cancer sufferers and friends, and a very amazing read.

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    A Lucky Life Interrupted: A Memoir of Hope review []  2020-1-21 21:23

    As someone also dealing with a rare, "incurable but treatable" form of cancer there was much I could relate to. Tom Brokaw is absolutely on point when he talks about how cancer can take over your life and the extraordinary cost of treatment. I often think of how incredibly fortunate I've been to have insurance (Medicare and a supplement) that covers most of my costs. At least I don't have to worry about going broke an losing my home, unlike a lot of stricken by this disease. The stress of the illness, its symptoms, and different treatment options are enough to think about. One medication I was on for 7-8 months cost approximately $22,000 a MONTH when I took it. The one company that produced it was bought by another pharmaceutical company and the price has more than doubled. Had it not been for unusual side effects which resulted in having to obtain off the prescription, it would have been a lifelong medication. The only choice for a lot of people would have been to lose their life savings -- and then die! Brokaw recognizes the horrendous inequity of our system of care and I hope he becomes a voice to bring about meaningful and lasting change.

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    A Lucky Life Interrupted: A Memoir of Hope review []  2020-1-21 21:23

    After watching the unique televised program latest week, I was eager to read Mr. Brokaw's book, not because of his fame as a newscaster and journalist, but because he is another human being like myself who has cancer. What struck me most were not the things that we don't have in common, but the a lot of reflections he created that mirror my ose were familiar words when he spoke of how cancer is an abstract idea. You really don't obtain "IT" until you obtain it. And that is the easy e book is well written. I felt empathy as he struggled to adapt to his "new normal."I highly recommend this book if you yourself, or someone close to you is dealing with cancer.Dixie Theriault- Author of Tales from the Teal Warrior:A Memoir

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    A Lucky Life Interrupted: A Memoir of Hope review []  2020-1-21 21:23

    First off, I want Tom all the best in his recovery. Cancer is like whack a mole, always waiting to see what the next recurrence will bring and that is first hand experience with having cancer myself & having my son experience this same anxiety with cancer's unknown progression. I admire anyone for putting themselves out there & laying out their private & agonizing experience with this disease. However, as constructive criticism, given the connections, the wealth & the power to do more with having gone through this experience, I was left disappointed that his experience did not lead him to do more for the cancer community, especially the not good without resources to help in the navigation of medical, housing & meal nutrition costs associated with cancer. I was especially affronted by Tom's depiction of the not good being more likely to be obese or on drugs, etc. I sincerely hope that Tom somewhere down the street becomes not just an observer of the not good and downtrodden, but actually an advocate for their plight as he has with our veterans and the greatest generation in bringing their stories to life. Bringing the stories of people suffering from cancer without resources would be a truly eye opening awareness that would hopefully, someday, provide the not good or the 99% the ability to leave their doctor's office with not only a diagnosis, but a roadmap of how to manage, function & survive going forward.

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    Davenport House 4: Heiress Interrupted review []  2020-1-21 22:28

    I was thrilled that Book Four was out and read it in a few hours!! It totally had me enthralled during the time on the ship! I almost went to the end of the book to search out what happened! I held back though and loved the method everything came together for all the key players in the former books, plus a few nice surprises - I love a satisfied ending....Now awaiting Book 5 in the fall. Marie does a amazing job of portraying historical fiction with romance and depth.

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    Davenport House 4: Heiress Interrupted review []  2020-1-21 22:28

    What is it that hold us connected to our "friends" inside this story. No a question, really, just an observation on my own behalf. The trusts and turns of the convoluted relations. Surprise after surprise. Should there be any more characters, I'll have to take notes. A marvelous story of the eras rules of friendship, coupling, inheritance and generations.

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    Davenport House 4: Heiress Interrupted review []  2020-1-21 22:28

    Love following this family and learning all the happenings that take put in their lives. The marriages that bring such joy the deaths that bring such sorrow, the babies that are still to come.. Can hardly wait to see what happens in the next book !

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    Davenport House 4: Heiress Interrupted review []  2020-1-21 22:28

    Wow loved these series. Lot of ups and downs for this family, secret glory me, they just hold coming, twist and turn, hold your eyes begin or you will miss the tip from the author. Soon as I finish one book i go a buy the next one. The best writing skills, I admire.

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    Davenport House 4: Heiress Interrupted review []  2020-1-21 22:28

    The Lusitania, WW1, Catholic and Protestant, servants and upper class....love, honor, respect, tragedy and triumph!!! It is all within these pages set in 1915!A fun summer historical read!!!

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    Davenport House 4: Heiress Interrupted review []  2020-1-21 22:28

    I've actually finished the series of 6 books and I'm experiencing withdrawal, getting impatient and grumpy. I can't wait for the promised prequel. I loved book 4 as I have loved every delicious adventure of these heiresses, their staff, neighbors and friends. The story moves along quickly and purposefully. It's great.

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    Davenport House 4: Heiress Interrupted review []  2020-1-21 22:28

    The multigenerational series is like an American "Downton Abbey". As family secrets are uncovered and the lives of everyone in the story change we can all remember where we were when various happenings shaped our lives.

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    Davenport House 4: Heiress Interrupted review []  2020-1-21 22:28

    Marie Silk has done a amazing job keeping the saga going on all the characters in her books. Explains how each of the characters met and what has happened for them to be in the situation or position they search themselves in at the time.

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    Davenport House 4: Heiress Interrupted review []  2020-1-21 22:28

    It is hard to place down. I had to obtain #5 to see what was going on next.

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    Davenport House 4: Heiress Interrupted review []  2020-1-21 22:28

    There was only one thing I disliked about Book 4 - Book 5 doesn't come our until this fall. Amazing series, amazing characters, and amazing plots. Very enjoyable reading.

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    Murder, Interrupted (James Patterson's Murder is Forever) review [Book]  2018-1-6 18:0

    Reading this was a waste of time.

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    Interrupted EntrepreneurshipTM: Embracing Change In The Family Business review [Book]  2018-6-14 18:0

    Dr. Ramez Baassiri’s Book Interrupted Entrepreneurship (I.E) touches on numerous challenges family businesses encounter .The Author coins the term (IE), and so elaborately explains how they impact the continuity of companies .Offering his own private insights / family stories and other established family businesses and clans (Rockerfellers, Quandts); sharing those experiences that can support tutorial modern day family offices to becoming resilient entities that can be prepared for a lot of of these problems that might ch experiences included highlighting the importance of corporate governance, embracing innovation / technological advancements and Connecting with the concept of competitive advantage for the family e author also gives hundreds of examples of how old family businesses reconfigure and regroup to survive the modern age and stay relevant in tough e book is a must read for anyone seeking a well descriptive, inside story of how family businesses grow, tackle and navigate ever changing business environments

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    Interrupted EntrepreneurshipTM: Embracing Change In The Family Business review [Book]  2018-6-14 18:0

    Perfect read, Ramez does a amazing job in sharing wisdom and experience from a successful, multigeneration family business - amazing book for entrepreneurs and family business owners.

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    Interrupted EntrepreneurshipTM: Embracing Change In The Family Business review [Book]  2018-6-14 18:0

    Very interesting read. The author demonstrates knowledge in the tricky management of family business and provides valuable advice. Thank you!

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    Interrupted EntrepreneurshipTM: Embracing Change In The Family Business review [Book]  2018-6-14 18:0

    Superb book. Found it to be very helpful. A must read

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    Interrupted EntrepreneurshipTM: Embracing Change In The Family Business review [Book]  2018-6-14 18:0

    Amazing book.....

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    Interrupted EntrepreneurshipTM: Embracing Change In The Family Business review [Book]  2018-6-14 18:0

    Ramez Baasiri’s book “Interrupted Entrepreneurship” is a tapestry of well-researched insights into what it really means to be part of a remarkable family, with multi-generational businesses. The Genesis of the book is that the nature of Family Businesses is often defined, not in the smooth and continuous flow of business activity, but in the “interruptions” that every business and family experiences, some of which are traumatic, and which can either serve to destroy, or if the “garden” has been well tended to, become and opportunity to learn, adapt and ultimately thrive.Ramez Baasiri weaves private experiences with historic examples of how other necessary families and their businesses dealt with these Interruptions. He casts a net that captures the immigrant families of the Levant, Europe, and Asia and their expansions around the globe, their successes mostly but also failures. Through his examples Interrupted Entrepreneurship presents practical advice, anchored in deeply private is is a special book, Ramez Baasiri’s humanity shines through every page, in the points he makes and in the examples he choses. Most importantly what emerges from the books pages is the ethical backbone of the family business leader he is, and what can only serve as an example to others who want to sustain successful multi-generational businesses.

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    Interrupted EntrepreneurshipTM: Embracing Change In The Family Business review [Book]  2018-6-14 18:0

    Just read the book and Ramez does a amazing job in highlighting the pitfalls of family business in surviving succession. Amazing read and very educational.

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    Interrupted EntrepreneurshipTM: Embracing Change In The Family Business review [Book]  2018-6-14 18:0

    Interrupted Business successfully navigated through emotional intelligence!Excellent Practical reading with vast historical knowledge of family business.

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    Interrupted EntrepreneurshipTM: Embracing Change In The Family Business review [Book]  2018-6-14 18:0

    A amazing learning for family business, especially in complicated environment. What a amazing sharing!

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    Interrupted EntrepreneurshipTM: Embracing Change In The Family Business review [Book]  2018-6-14 18:0

    Perfect book! A must read for every individual involved in a family business.

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    Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right review []  2019-12-20 18:38

    A lot of liberals search it baffling that so a lot of of the people most likely to be seriously damage by the policies of the Republican Party are among its most enthusiastic supporters. Respected sociologist Arlie Russell Hochschild calls this the “Great Paradox” and sets out to solve the mystery. She travels to Louisiana bayou country, one of America’s reddest regions and a Tea Party stronghold, to obtain to know and understand the people. She listens to them with respect, attention, and compassion in an effort to provide insight and understanding to those on the other side of the “empathy wall.” An explanation of the “Great Paradox” does in fact emerge from these journeys - and it is not comforting.Hochschild begins with the devastating effects of chemical dumping and other forms of pollution on the environment. Incredibly, Louisiana loses a patch of wetland the size of a football field every hour. Hochschild tells story after story of environmental catastrophe. For example, there was the Bayou Corne the summer of 2012 people started noticing little clusters of bubbles on the water surface. This was accompanied by a powerful smell of oil. Then the ground began to shake: incredibly, an earthquake had hit Louisiana. One man found a crack in the concrete beneath his living room carpet snaking its method across the e bayou began breaking apart. A large gaping hole opened at the bottom and swallowed trees and shrubs and grassland. An oily sheen covered the water surface. In put of the disappearing forest the bayou regurgitated a polluted oily sludge, which expanded to threaten the drinking water supply. The sinkhole grew to over thirty-seven e guilty party was a drilling company called Texas Brine. In total disregard of regulations it began drilling underneath the bayou for concentrated salt deposits used for fracking. The drilling caused underground structures to collapse, creating the en there is the picturesque story of the “Rubberized Horse,” as told by a retired schoolteacher about when he was a young boy growing up in the 1950’s: “'I was riding my palomino horse, Ted,' he recalls. 'Normally Ted cleared ditches five feet across just fine. But this time the horse fell back into the water and sank down. He tried to climb up but couldn’t. We tried to pull his reins, but couldn’t obtain him up. Finally my uncle hauled him out with a tractor. But when Ted finally scrambled back out, he was coated all over with a strange film. I hosed him off but that only hardened the movie on him. It was like a not good glued­-on wet suit. It was like rubber. The vet tried but couldn’t save him, and Ted died two days later.' The ditch was downstream from a Firestone polymers plant” (p. 163).In a lot of parts of bayou country other types of industrial carelessness have resulted in undrinkable water, inedible fish, and increasing cancer rates. People would test to minimize their chances of being poisoned by cutting out and throwing away the fatty parts of the fish, where toxins tended to concentrate. An entire culture of fishing suffered severe damage. Nevertheless, voters in this region have repeatedly elected politicians committed to deregulation and dismantling the EPA. To them no villain is worse than “big government,” even at the expense of their e antipathy towards “big government” is especially ironic, since Louisiana is one of the states that receives more from the federal government than it sends in taxes. In fact, 44% of the Louisiana state budget comes from the federal government. Yet Louisianans tend to oppose big-government “meddling” and regulating everything. This is why industrial interests like to locate in red states, putting their environments at risk. They have a much easier time getting away with abusing the environment than they would in blue states where community opposition is likely to be vertheless, huge government is the enemy, and the reasons are revealing. Of course one huge reason is taxes. Nobody likes taxes, even if your state gets back a disproportionate share of them. But there are more compelling, deeply emotional reasons for this anti-government attitude, which ultimately provide the solution to the “Great Paradox.” The federal government is perceived to be the ally of people whom this working-class white population deeply a lot of of these people federal taxes represent both insult and injury. It’s poor enough that people have to pay them; what’s even worse is that the cash goes to welfare beneficiaries who “laze around days and party at night.” Hochschild found this to be a very common sentiment: "As one man explains, 'A lot of us have done okay, but we don’t wish to lose what we’ve got, see it given away.' When I ask him what he saw as being 'given away,' it was not public waters given to dumpers, or clean air given to smoke stacks. It was not health or years of life. It was not lost public sector jobs. What he felt was being given away was tax cash to non­working, non­deserving people - and not just tax money, but honor too" (p. 60).As one continues hearing these sentiments, one cannot support noticing how race so often plays a role in them. “'I don’t like the government paying unwed mothers to have a lot of kids, and I don’t go for affirmative action. I met this one black guy who complained he couldn’t obtain a job. Come to search out he’d been to personal school. I went to a local public school like everyone else I know. No one should be getting a job to fill some mandated racial quota or getting state cash not to work'” (p. 92).Sometimes, as above, one might hear race explicitly mentioned. More often it was not. The acceptable phrase, which Hochschild heard over and over, was “line cutter.” The true issue with this country is the “line cutters,” people who jump their put in line for the American Dream, while those in the not good white working class have been patiently waiting their turn for years. The “big government” that oppresses them gives unfair advantages to the line cutters, in the form of welfare payments, affirmative action, and recognition of unique status. People who have worked hard all their lives with small to present for it must witness the undeserving “line cutters” moving ahead of them, and we all know who those are: blacks, foreigners, and anyone who receives government handouts. This even contains Medicaid: there is a widespread but mistaken belief that people on Medicaid do not work, even though it is documented that most Medicaid recipients do work (and of course a lot of are children, or are too old, sick, or disabled - especially the nursing home population). So if Republicans wish to do away with Medicaid, don’t expect much outcry here: allow everybody work for what they obtain instead of leeching off the public Hochschild describes it, this resentment of the line jumpers has been simmering for years: "The 1960s and 1970s set off a series of social movements, which, to some degree, shuffled the order of those “waiting in line” and laid down a simmering fire of resentment which was to flame up years later as the Tea Party. During this era a long parade of the underprivileged came forward to talk of their mistreatment - blacks who had fled a Jim Crow South, underpaid Latino field workers, Japanese internment camp victims, ill-­treated Native Americans, immigrants from all over. Then came the women’s movement. Overburdened at home, restricted to clerical or teaching jobs in the workplace, unsafe from harassment, women renewed their claim to a put in line for the American Dream. Then gays and lesbians spoke out versus their oppression. Environmentalists argued the cause of forest animals without forests. The endangered brown pelican, flapping its long, oily wings, had now taken its put in line" (p. 211).It seems that every group favored by liberal Democrats has offended these people in some method - including the pelican. But there is more. This simmering resentment has acquired the power of an erupting volcano because of a seismic demographic shift: "All these social movements left one group standing in line: the older, white male, especially if such a man worked in a field that didn’t particularly support the planet. He was - or was soon becoming - a minority too" (p. 212).We could hardly have expected the country to experience such a transformation without political consequences. So after eight years of a black President it is hardly surprising to see instead a regime seemingly sympathetic to white supremacy. Some interviewees compared the show situation to the Civil War: that too was an example of an overbearing Northern government with far too much power dictating to people how they should live. "Whatever their family’s view or their own, however much sympathy they may have personally felt for blacks at the time, the public narrative was that the North had to come to the South, as it had with soldiers in the 1860s and during Reconstruction in the 1870s, to tell Southern whites to change their method of life" (p. 213). "Culturally speaking, the entire North had 'cut in' and seemed to move the South to the back of the line, even as - and this was forgotten - federal dollars had steadily moved from North to South" (p. 215).Overthrowing the liberal black President was a long overdue swipe at the is explains why arguments that Republican policies exploit the not good in favor of the rich, and that these policies increase income inequality, have no persuasive power. The people whom these policies victimize have it coming. "Liberals were asking them to feel compassion for the downtrodden in the back of the line, the “slaves” of society. They didn’t wish to; they felt downtrodden themselves and wanted only to look “up” to the elite. What was wrong with aspiring high? That was the bigger virtue, they thought. Liberals were asking them to direct their indignation at the ill-­gotten gains of the overly rich, the “planters”; the right wanted to aim their indignation down at the not good slackers, some of whom were jumping the line" (p. 219).To Hochschild’s credit, these observations came to light through her efforts to listen sympathetically and test to understand people with whom she did not agree. Her success in drawing them out makes this book an necessary contribution to understanding the anomalies of our current political nclusion: White Resentment and the Rise of TrumpIn my own debates with Trump supporters (and I’ve gotten into more of those than I probably should have), I’ve been struck by something odd. Appeals to moral principles that I believed we shared had absolutely no effect. So my conversation partners had no response to the immorality of throwing millions of people off health insurance in order to create rich people even richer, or to tearing apart the families of undocumented immigrants who have committed no offenses and who fled to this country seeking asylum. And they didn’t care that they had no response. This baffled me, until reading this book helped me finally understand how to resolve the “Great Paradox.“So a lot of of us who tried to fathom the outcome of this bizarre election had no clue about an necessary dynamic that drove the result. In light of Hochschild’s research, the outcome now seems to have been almost inevitable. "Looking back at my previous research, I see that the stage had been set for Trump’s rise, like kindling before a match is lit. Three elements had come together. Since 1980, virtually all those I talked with felt on shaky economic ground, a fact that created them brace at the very idea of 'redistribution.' They also felt culturally marginalized: their views about abortion, gay marriage, gender roles, race, guns, and the Confederate flag all were held up to ridicule in the national media as backward. And they felt part of a demographic decline; 'there are fewer and fewer white Christians like us'” (p. 221).Donald Trump read this mindset better than any other candidate. And being the amazing salesman that he is, he won by selling a product, a very potent one, more strong even than this country’s sense of morality, tradition, and decency. Trump won by selling is is why behavior that under normal circumstances would have disqualified any other candidate only seemed to create Trump’s candidacy stronger. The apparent sympathy with white supremacists, the overt appeals to racism, the misogyny and the hatred of immigrants and Muslims, all resonated with a huge segment of the voting public. If Trump insulted Obama with his birther lie, insulted blacks by insinuating that all black neighborhoods are hotbeds of crime, insulted women by bragging about how he could freely abuse them, or repeatedly expressed hatred of Latinos and Muslims, it did not delegitimize him. It strengthened his appeal. "In other speeches Trump said, in reference to a protestor, 'I’d like to punch him in the face' (February 23, 2016). 'In the amazing old days they’d have ripped him out of that seat so fast' (February 27, 2016). 'Knock the crap out of him, would you? Seriously . . . I promise you I will pay for the legal fees. I promise. I promise'” (p. 224).What other presidential candidate in modern history could have gotten away with speaking like this? And yet not only did enough voters search this acceptable, it energized and inspired them. Trump hated all the people they hate. It was about ump’s cruelty did not count versus him; instead it was considered a virtue. "Trump jovially imitated a disabled journalist by physically shaking his arm in imitation of palsy - all deeply derogatory actions in the eyes of Trump’s detractors but liberating to those who had felt constrained to pretend sympathy. Trump allowed them both to feel like a amazing moral American and to feel superior to those they considered 'other' or beneath them" (p. 228).Trump gave people permission to feel sorry for themselves instead of for others who might need support but who are not like them. So not only could he obtain away with his outrageous statements and behavior, it was just what his voters naïve Michelle Obama’s words now seem: “When they go low, we go high.” How did that work out for the Democrats? The voters who gave us Donald Trump did not wish to go high. Going high had no attraction for them. They wanted low and Trump gave it to them, while astonished Democrats watched and wondered why Trump’s excesses did not destroy him. In retrospect the reason is rhaps the deepest irony of this entire phenomenon is that the resentment that blew Trump into office was tragically misplaced. It is not the fault of black people or of Mexicans that manufacturing jobs no longer exist in abundance. The globe is changing, and either one adapts or gets swept away. Scapegoating, taking it out on others is always self-destructive. And so it will be again. The Republicans’ anti-environment and financially predatory policies will damage most the not good white voters who looked to them for salvation.We are now left with the incalculable hurt this election has done. Internationally, we have placated our opponents and alienated our friends. Our standing in the globe has plummeted, and hatred of the “ugly American” has no doubt risen dramatically. We have gone on record as the only industrialized nation not to care about the state in which we leave this planet for future generations, but to care only about ourselves. “[email protected]#$%!&st,” no matter the cost to anyone else. Domestically, we are pursuing policies that punish the most frail and vulnerable members of our society. Republicans, who have succeeded in demonizing a health care program that actually works if given a possibility (and if Republicans do not sabotage it), are pushing their own “health” bill that is nothing of the kind. It is not about health care, but rather about seeing how a lot of services for poorer Americans they can obtain away with cutting. Meanwhile the honor and prestige of the Presidency have been torn to shreds by a President who would rather spend his time composing adolescent tweets and watching himself on TV than actually studying policy and attending to governance. One amazing horror in all this is that we may actually come to accept it as the fresh normal.Whenever policy is driven by resentment, the effect is self-destructive. The people who elected Trump bear an ethical stain. Too a lot of of them have allowed resentment to drive their policy. Everybody knew what Trump was. He created no attempt to hide his dark side; in fact, he flaunted it. And that is what people voted for. They voted for someone who was clearly inexperienced, emotionally immature, consistently dishonest, and with a mean streak deep as a chasm. And they voted for him not in spite of that but because of it.Hochschild’s is perhaps the deepest of a lot of efforts people have created to understand Trump voters, to sympathize with their plight, and to record their grievances. I have not seen even one comparable attempt created by the other side. The Republicans won both houses of Congress and the Presidency, and now even the Supreme Court, yet somehow only those who lost the election and who feel devastated by that loss have an obligation to understand and sympathize with the other side. That moral inequivalence speaks volumes. But as we have seen, versus resentment morality may be ly, it is undeniable that racism played a significant role in Trump’s victory. People who harbor ill feelings towards other races or ethnic groups always have reasons for feeling the method they do, and there are always things we can test to “understand.” In this case the predominant rationalization is that members of the disliked groups, and their black President himself, are “line cutters” who are reaching beyond what they deserve, and we need to understand why not good working whites may feel that way. The term “line cutters” is code. It suggests a hierarchy of privilege, that people should know their put and stay in it, and clearly has racial overtones. Is this supposed to elicit our sympathy?In the end racism is either justifiable or it is wrong. And as we hold witnessing the destructive consequences of this administration’s policies and values, it will not do to cast those who brought us here as victims of a changing globe whom we should feel sorry for. People are responsible for the choices they create and for the ethical consequences of those choices, no matter how much they may believe they have suffered in comparison to others. It is not just everybody else who has a duty to “understand” those who bear powerful feelings versus other races and ethnicities; it is the duty of those who entertain such sentiments to examine them and correct them. Only then can we achieve a healthy society that works for a huge extent this election was a repudiation of eight years of a nonwhite President by a group that feels threatened because its numbers and power are shrinking. It is hard to understand in any other method the intense and unprecedented hatred thrown at Obama since the very first day of his administration. Republicans shamelessly declared that their highest priority was not to work together to improve American lives, but to thwart him at every turn and create him a one-term President. Likewise the unceasing efforts to demonize and create unworkable a health care bill whose greatest sin is to bear the name of a black Democratic President. But I believe that the growing diversity in this country is actually a amazing strength. Hopefully the turmoil of this election is a temporary phase this country must work through as it learns to accept this diversity. Hochschild has laid bare the underlying dynamic of the resistance aganst it. We just need the willingness to confront the meaning of these findings.

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    Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right review []  2019-12-20 18:38

    Arlie R Hochschild is a sociology professor at UC Berkley. In this book she has compiled an interesting story of how people think on the right. She was concerned about the “increasingly hostile split in our nation between two political camps.” To do this, she spent about five years in Louisiana talking with people on the other side of her “empathy wall” as she calls it. The empathy wall is defined as an obstacle that prevents a deep understanding with another person. It can create us feel hostile or indifferent to the beliefs of others. The book is divided into four main parts: The Amazing Paradox, The Social Terrain, the Deep Story and the People in It, and, finally, Going e picked Louisiana because it presented an extreme example of what she called the “great paradox.” Statistics present that this state ranks very low in “human development.” - it ranks 49th. In overall health, it ranked last, it ranked 48th in eight-grade reading, 49th out of 50 in eight-grade math, and 49th in kid well-being. Yet these same people will spurn most federal help. Even so, 44 percent of the state’s budget comes from the federal government. As Alec MacGillis of the NY Times stated, “People in red states who need Medicaid and meal stamps welcome them but don’t vote…while those a small higher on the class ladder, white conservatives, don’t need them and do vote – versus public dollars for the poor.” When it comes to the significant pollution from the petrochemical industry, the logic is “the more oil, the more jobs. The more jobs, the more prosperity, and the less need for government … the better off they will be.”In the subsequent chapters of Part II, the author enters the “social terrain” of the people to investigate how the primary institutions of industry, state government, church, and the press influenced their feelings about life. The author has a lot of conversations with the people living there and relates the narratives for us. We obtain a firsthand look at just how the people think, and what influences their Part III, the author discuss the “deep story” of the people. She defines this as the story feelings tell in the language of symbols, removing judgement and fact. It allows both sides to “explore the subjective prism through which the party on the other side sees the world.” It represents, in metaphorical form, “the hopes, fears, pride, shame, resentment, and anxiety in the lives” of those she talked to. We see how racism, discrimination, sexism, oppression, gender issues, class, and immigration play into their the final section, the author provides a contrast between the 1860s and the 1960s before delving into something called “collective effervescence,” referring to the “state of emotional excitation felt by those who join with others they take to be fellow members of a moral biological tribe.” In her travels, Hochschild was humbled by the complexity and height of the empathy wall, but felt that the people she met in Louisiana showed that the wall could easily come down, and that there is a chance for practical e book concludes with three appendixes. Appendix A describes the research, Appendix B talks about the relationship of politics and pollution, and Appendix C covers fact-checking.

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    Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right review []  2019-12-20 18:38

    I have been fortunate to become familiar with the locations and people of Louisiana described in this book and I can't start to express how grateful I am to the author for delving into explaining "the amazing paradox". I am Californian born and raised and originally traveled to southwest Louisiana to pick up an accordion created by Tag Savoy in Eunice LA. I hold returning because the people I met, and mates I made, are as kind, gentle, begin and smart as the folks described here. But, test as I might to reconcile the differences in our social/political views I failed....until I read this book! Thank-you Arlie Russell Hochschild for offering this bridge between the right and the left. Fellow MSNBC watchers, after reading this book I urge you to visit southwest Louisiana yourself - you will never view "the South" or Southerners, the same.

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    Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right review []  2019-12-20 18:38

    I must agree with Carol's review "disappointing" in that this is really a series of stories about the people in Louisiana that she studies and befriends. As a piece intended to invoke empathy amongst liberal Americans, I think it does its job well. But that those she meets are basically "good people" is to be expected; Vance does a better job describing some of the influences, albeit in a novelistic way. One can see the earmarks of George Lakoff's 'frameworks' everywhere, and the latest chapters, in which she lays out the position that both liberal and conservative are trapped in their own frameworks, are the most analytically satisfying of the book. More disturbing, however, is the "deep story" of her subjects/friends - the externalization of others lower down on the economic scale as "line-cutters", denying them their put in the queue to enter the American Dream, and the sense that the government for years has abetted the line-cutters, accelerating through the Obama years. As a person from Southern roots myself who was raised on the liberal coasts but who kept close ties with his family, I see in this not a little whiff of all the -isms that are pinned on Red Staters - code for the same ways of thought about class, place, and race that never have been faced up to in this country. At the end of the book, I came away even more depressed that America is twain, given, and unhealable, because we simply don't see the same facts. In this sense, I found Vance to be more illuminating; Hochschild, in admirably giving her subject/friends the respect of a forum for their - in a lot of cases justifiable - grievances, ultimately leaves one hanging by a shred of analysis, and never truly explains the Deep Paradox.Another reviewer of "Hillbilly Elegy" said it best: all these books are inartculate attempts to describe the real stage that that now been revealed to us. We don't know how to talk about this; we don't know how to talk to each other. One day we may stumble into a lexicon and a tactic for solution, but the method forward for now is to first learn to listen to each other and reflect upon our own distorting frames.

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    Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right review []  2019-12-20 18:38

    This book purports to provide insight into the political / social / economic attitudes of ultra-conservative Tea Party members, and by extension to 2016 Trump voters, by extended and follow-up interviews with about 40 Tea Party adherents in oil-rich (and petro-chemical plant-dense) southwestern Louisiana. The book's anecdotal focus makes for interesting reading, as compared to the usual dry social science surveys, but it's unclear to me how "generalizable" are the results of what amounts to extended private and focus group interviews with just 40 folks from a specific locale and with a distinctive history. It should be noted in the author's defense, however, that after her interviews she correlated her respondents' attitudes with a number of national social science surveys (see Appendix A); and anyway, for better or worse, anecdotal accounts resonate more than statistics for the average person. In addition, the author, a liberal sociologist from UCBerkeley, is to be commended for her attempt to break the "empathy barrier" by trying to reveal Tea Party members' attitudes in an understanding seemed to me that the author began her quest to reveal and understand Tea Party attitudes during Obama's first term, and then after her research was largely completed, her publisher (or she) tried to connect these attitudes to the Trump voter of 2016 and his unforeseen win in that election. There is not a one-to-one overlap between Tea Party attitudes and Trump voter attitudes, although obviously there is significant correspondence. Perhaps right-wing attitudes are more fluid than expected, but the Tea Party got its impetus from Obama's perceived "socialism" as his administration reacted to the financial crisis in his first years in office. The Tea Party exhibited an anti-tax, libertarian bent that seemed very much a successor, albeit an extreme successor, to Reaganism. Reagan and the conservative Republicans of his time emphasized, among other things: (1) free trade, (2) begin borders, (3) limited government, and (4) a powerful foreign policy. In contrast, Trump attracted his voters by threatening trade wars, promising to seriously restrict immigration, promising a $1 trillion (!!) infrastructure program, and threatening to exit our post-WW II alliances. Did the author's Tea Party interviewees vote for Trump for those reasons? Did they vote for him because they wanted a "territorial" system, rather than a "worldwide" system, for taxation of multinational corporations (which they got late latest year)? Or did they just vote for him because his name was not Hillary Clinton? Full Disclosure: I'm a center-left voter who finds much silliness, political correctness, identity politics, and fiscal irresponsibility on the (far) left as I search fiscal irresponsibility, anger and resentment, elements of nascent tribalism, and narrowed empathy on the ere are two fascinating aspects of Tea Party attitudes that are fleshed out by the author in her interviews: (1) Her respondents love the outdoors, and like to fish and hunt on Louisiana's bayous, but the extreme pollution from nearby petro-chemical plants prevents them from doing this safely (not to mention providing Louisiana with the highest cancer rate in the US), but they still criticize environmental regulations as an interference of free enterprise and a reflection of intrusive government. They rationalize this by either asserting that their loyalty must remain with the anti-regulation, anti-government party, or that living on God's earth requires some sacrifice, or that human striving requires an element of risk, (2) The respondents whose religious faith is very necessary to them often remarked that much of the ills of the nation stem from "unchurched" people. A lot of of these are evangelicals whose economic individualism can be hard to square with the Gospels, particularly the Book of Luke. Some also described their resentment from their perception that media sources were implicitly requiring their empathy for hard-luck cases around the globe including not good black kids and foreign refugees. The author notes that some of these Tea Party adherents have shown generosity to local folks (you could say: people like us), but it appears to me that their "net of empathy" is more restricted and less extensive than some other folks. And what can we create of a poll during the Obama years that indicated that 25% of the poll that identified themselves as Republicans thought President Obama was the "Antichrist"?!!In the final analysis my view is that the author treats her interviewees a small more sympathetically than I do. She makes much of the fact that 90% of Americans have experienced zero growth in true income with the implication that economic anxiety has largely shaped their rigid attitudes, anti-government bias, and anger and resentment. She knows her interviewees far more than I do, but an authoritative study of Trump voters by UPenn political scientist Diana Mutz showed they were more oriented to "status" politics than "interest" politics, i.e., potential job loss or perceived lessening of economic opportunity were less necessary drivers of Trump voter behavior than cultural displacement by "others." Richard Hofstadter back in the 1950s-60s in his "The Paranoid Style in American Politics" showed the same thing, that is, that "status" politics was a stronger motivator than "interest" politics in animating McCarthyites, and later Goldwaterites. It seemed to me that the interviewees in this book were less concerned about people unfairly jumping ahead of them in line (toward the "American Dream") but were simply anxious in sharing this nation with others too "unlike" them. Finally, left-wing writers like the author often emphasize "interest" politics as motivating factors for working class and conservative voters as a means of broadening progressive coalitions, but it seems to me (and I hope I'm wrong) that offering these voters higher minimum wages, "fair trade" policies, higher taxes on the wealthy, and the like, will never resonate with them as much as cultural factors, e.g., gun rights, pro-life policies, man-woman marriage, that will hold a lot of of them (most?) firmly conservative.

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    Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right review []  2019-12-20 18:38

    The most interesting thing I learned from this book is that both liberals and conservatives wish the same thing out of society -- an honest day's pay for an honest day's work, and a possibility to earn a living through hard work. The differences pointed out with the mindset of the people interviewed for this book is that they've apparently learned to constantly vote versus their own best interests, living by a strange set of rules that seem counter-productive to anyone more inclined to the "left." This voting versus one's own best interests is referred to in the book as the Amazing st of the interviewees sounded to me, as a reader, as if they've been very heavily influenced by Fox News. Their explanations for supporting policy choices come across like Fox sound bytes. Oddly enough, a lot of of them are well aware that the chemical and petrol companies have fouled their waters and polluted their ground so terribly that a lot of of them are ill and live on utterly worthless property, yet they still believe that if there were government-enforced environmental regulations of these companies, or if they were sued to pay for the hurt they have done, there would be no jobs for them, and having jobs in a free shop requires having risks to health and environment. Making this even worse is the fact that in this area, the highest paying jobs go to out of state people brought in because they are better educated; most the infrastructure building is done by foreign temp workers brought in as cheap labor; and as a effect only a little amount of mediocre-paying jobs go to Louisianians, all of whom agree that it is the "way of business" and the price they pay for believing in a free market, that their employers should be allowed to fire them or lay them off the moment the company shareholders demand more returns. And it is true: the oil, gas, and chemical industries provide only 3% of the jobs in Louisiana. The state's biggest employer is is also revealed why the people in this book are supporters of Donald Trump. Trump articulated their common rages; their belief that social spending, affirmative action, etc., allows people who don't deserve it to chop in line ahead of them in their pursuit of the American Dream. They detest political correctness and want to call people they method they see them. They feel rejected and condescended to by the progressive society in America; they don't wish to feel sorry for minorities, immigrants, or Syrian refugees. Trump spoke directly to that.Anyone would have nothing but respect and admiration for the work ethic of the people in this book, and they are all amazing neighbors, friendly, charming, and respectable people who lead amazing lives. And yet they hold voting versus things that would benefit them greatly, out of some deeply-rooted mistrust of government, as well as shame in taking any assistance from it. The people in this book all scorn those on welfare or meal stamps, but when it's revealed relatives are on meal stamps or assistance, they say "well the programs are there, you might as well use them." You basically obtain a bottomless pit of rationalizations like that in this book.

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    Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right review []  2019-12-20 18:38

    This book is probably the best method to obtain acquainted with the conservative, non-elite mainstream for those not familiar with it. It appears to be a textbook confirmation bias and Dunning-Kruger Result (where the more ignorant you are, the more confident you are in what you believe). Nevertheless, it’s probably not atypical for America today. One of the more striking and illustrative metaphors used in the book is waiting in line for ones turn to obtain ahead, and how strongly the Tea Party resents minorities and perceived unique interest groups in result cutting the line ahead of them. The sad side of this is that they were under the illusion that the line was moving in the first place. This book shows that the white lower and lower-middle class has evolved into their own “interest group”, analogous to those already established under the Democratic Party umbrella. Another aspect brought out in the book is that states with the strongest Tea Party help tend to be the ones with the greatest dependence on the Federal government; it’s clear that several of the individuals profiled in the book depend on or benefit from government spending. This makes me wonder if the concept of “honor” could have been further developed. That is, because of a high dependence on the Federal government, but which conflicts with their self photo and therefore can’t be admitted, they must be versus it, much like how southern honor was used in the Antebellum south with regard to slavery.

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    Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right review []  2019-12-20 18:38

    I took a particular interest in this book because I am actually from Lake Charles and grew up there, until leaving at 17 to join the Navy. I felt the author did a fair job in setting the scene. At first she created it sound like a primitive back-woods kind of place, but eased into a more flattering depiction once she was talking to some of the local people. That's what makes South La amazing anyway, the people. The book offers several interesting paradoxes: the main paradox of why people are so right-leaning, huge government hating in a state that relies so heavily on federal subsidies, and also the juxtaposition of people needing huge industry for their livelihoods, but also hating that they have to live with its pollution and corruption within the state government. She uses a lot of statistics and facts to create her points, and for the most part, I found it's an objective analysis of the state and explaining it's political leaning.

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    Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right review []  2019-12-20 18:38

    Ms. Hochschild's book is an empathetic journey to understand but not judge the Right, especially Tea Party supporters. The author mentions three previous works she had read that I also happened to have studied. The books are 'What's the Matter With Kansas' by Thomas Frank, 'The Righteous Mind: Why Amazing People Are Divided by Politics and Religion' by Jonathan Haidt, and 'American Nations: A History of the Eleven Rival Regional Cultures of North America' by Colin Woodard. All three works mentioned are interesting reads and I highly recommend them. However, Ms. Hochschild felt as a sociologist that the works were valuable but incomplete. Therefore, she spent five years researching Tea Party supporters who she found as perplexing as I do. Ms. Hochschild chose Louisiana residents as her case study due to their powerful conservative culture and laws which attract huge industries to locate there but cause horrific environmental hurt as well as abnormally high cancer rates because of it. Louisiana is in second put as the most polluted state in our nation. Man oh man, toxicity is one of Louisiana’s four major meal groups.Oddly enough, I live in Maine which could be viewed as the flip side of Louisiana. I grew up in Northern Maine within a powerful Franco-Acadian culture related to the Louisianans Ms. Hochschild observes. Industries such as paper and textiles have left our state for more accommodating locations when it comes to dispersing lower paying jobs and lax environmental standards. The psychological scars of the Civil Battle are still very much part of the Southern identity today, passed down from generation to generation. It cannot be stressed enough that the author's work is not a condemnation or condescending of the conservative mindset as much as trying to understand their disconnect between cause-and-effect as well as their willingness to endure obvious injustices. She addresses such aspects as mass movements. (A more detailed dissection of mass movements can be found in the late Eric Hoffer's 'The Real Believer: Thoughts on the Nature of Mass Movements' which was published in 1951 but is very much relevant today.) Ms. Hochschild discovered key components into the Southern mindset in locations such as industry, government, church, environment, and the press. Technology has also now contributed in ways to let believers to live within a conservative bubble of ideological reinforcement while ignoring technology's impact on jobs through such things as automation. Unsurprisingly, sexism, racism, religion, an ever-widening gap between the rich and the poor, as well as a cultural inferiority complex are shown to be ingredients in their worldview.‘Strangers in Their Own Land’ is a gentle book. Ms. Hochschild is a liberal, Berkeley, sociology professor who has come to view a lot of of her Louisiana case studies as friends. Even after the publication of the hardcover, they still hold in touch. The people she wrote about also feel she accurately captured their feelings and beliefs. I found the work to be enlightening and helped me to obtain a clearer picture of these types of conservatives. Works such as Ms. Hochschild's 'Strangers in Their Own Land' are efforts at trying to bridge the gap between highly polarized sides. We don't have to agree on everything but, believe it or not, there are quite a few common complaints by both the right and the left. I finished the book with more insight and a small less anger towards supporters of President Foghorn Leghorn. I'm still dispirited about the current cultural environment but less inclined to froth at the mouth at the mere mention of Trump's followers. That's a amazing thing.

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    Strangers in Their Own Land: Anger and Mourning on the American Right review []  2019-12-20 18:38

    Hi. Educated liberal elite here, and just had to chime in to say this is one of the most condescending tour tutorials of the “other side” that I could possibly imagine. If you need a book like this to break the “empathy wall” and give you insight into why we have a twittering reality star representing us on the globe stage, that’s your first clue as to how he got there.

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    When Your Pet Dies: A Guide to Mourning, Remembering and Healing review []  2019-12-28 18:45

    I bought three various pet loss books after we had to place our almost 14-year old labrador to sleep in August, and this is the book I kept. I liked it so well that I ordered a copy for each of my young adult kids. This is a short book, with chapters on mourning, remembering, and healing. Each chapter addresses the very true grief that we experience when a pet dies, and the author is so unbelievable about acknowledging how necessary our pets are to us, and that our grief is real, just like when a person dies. The book contains small stories from others whose pets have died and also touches on the feelings we have when we have to place a pet to sleep, when a pet dies in an accident, etc. And, there is a section where you can write your memories of the pet. Our dog's death was (and still is...) heartbreaking, but this book has helped. I hold it on my bedside table, and reread sections when I need a small comfort.

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    When Your Pet Dies: A Guide to Mourning, Remembering and Healing review []  2019-12-28 18:45

    EXCELLENT book!!! It was recommended to me when my cat died. Probably the most necessary thing I came away with is the notion that mourning a pet is just as profound as mourning a person. Sometimes more so. As the author points out, we spend more quality (touching, cuddling, etc.) time with our companion animals than we do in our basic relationships with other humans. I felt it gave me "permission" to experience my feelings.

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    When Your Pet Dies: A Guide to Mourning, Remembering and Healing review []  2019-12-28 18:45

    Have really enjoyed this book, not only for the deep love of my own pets but that how necessary they are in our lives AND how we DEEPLY grieve the loss of what was a Family Member. I like the parts where you are asked to write your thought as it brings you through the process of losing that highly loved pet. We usually ignore the part that our pets will only be with us for a Season. We love them and they love back as if they will be with us forever. We need to live life as they did while they lived with us..... live each day to the fullest.....as if it's your last! Our pets have MORE to teach us than we could ever

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    When Your Pet Dies: A Guide to Mourning, Remembering and Healing review []  2019-12-28 18:45

    After losing a much loved pet, my wife and I read this book and even bought a additional copy for my daughter. It's a clear, well written, simple to understand and very helpful book in understanding and coping with the grief associated with the loss of a four footed family member. My wife and I both highly recommend it.

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    When Your Pet Dies: A Guide to Mourning, Remembering and Healing review []  2019-12-28 18:45

    The book definitely helped me as I grieved the loss of my precious small girl. It was nice to read and know that all the sadness and different other emotions and thoughts were not just mine and a lot of like myself had gone through this and this was normal to feel. I didn't use the sections where you're supposed to write because I couldn't do it without sobbing but I plan on doing it eventually. I recommend this book. Very short and well thought out and the stories of other people and their precious furry mates are heartwarming.

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    When Your Pet Dies: A Guide to Mourning, Remembering and Healing review []  2019-12-28 18:45

    This is a amazing small book. If you are grieving & having a extremely hard time like I am. You must obtain this book.I can't say enough about it.....

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    When Your Pet Dies: A Guide to Mourning, Remembering and Healing review []  2019-12-28 18:45

    Nothing in this globe could have prepared me for the unexpected death of my pet. One morning, I found my beloved Choly dead. I remained in a state of shock for a lot of days. I perceived neither hunger nor sleepiness, neither a need for coffee nor a need for water."When Your Pet Dies" offered me invaluable insight into the grieving process. What I also liked about this book were the exercises it provided us with: it asked us to write about our first encounter with our pet, our most treasured moments with our pet, and other things we wanted to share. I spent many, a lot of hours writing about my experiences. I also spent a lot of hours reading and re-reading necessary paragraphs in the book that I had highlighted during my first read. Needless to say, I spent hours and hours shedding tears of grief.What type of pain is worth acknowledging? This book will reassure you that the respond is entirely up to you. No one in your life is entitled to tell you that you cannot grieve your deceased pet or that you cannot let yourself to celebrate and remember your pet's life. This book offered me tremendous comfort. I felt proud that I was allowed to privately, intimately, and painfully mourn Choly's sudden death.Until this day, I still choke up when someone asks me how Choly and his littermate are doing. I hope he did not suffer during the hours preceding his death. I understand that every variation of pain is various for each individual. If you have difficulty connecting with someone who understands pet loss or if you simply feel the need to grieve privately (as was my case), I would recommend this book to you.

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    When Your Pet Dies: A Guide to Mourning, Remembering and Healing review []  2019-12-28 18:45

    This is a concise tutorial to grieving, mourning and healing after pet loss. My grief is new as my husband and I unexpectedly lost our best-ever cat, Headley, five days ago. We've lost a lot of pets in our lifetime (we counted nine in just the latest nine years), so we're quite experienced with the situation, unfortunately.I took this to bed and read it in one sitting. Much of it is the same tip and guidance I've heard and read over the years on pet loss and bereavement. However, perhaps because it is so brief and there's no fluff, it was helpful. I never consciously realized there is a distinction between grieving and mourning. He lists helpful www services in the back and I've visited some previously but it's nice to have them listed in one place.I wish and need something a bit deeper and this was not e book is only 96 pages, so it's a fast read.

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    When Your Pet Dies: A Guide to Mourning, Remembering and Healing review []  2019-12-28 18:45

    This book is a amazing book for, if nothing else, giving pet owners permission to grieve deeply for their lost pets. A lot of people don't understand, so a lot of pet owners hold the grief to themselves. This book offers understanding, info and most necessary of all permission about grieving the death of a pet. We used it with a few mates for a few months helping each other grieve the loss of our pets.

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    When Your Pet Dies: A Guide to Mourning, Remembering and Healing review []  2019-12-28 18:45

    This is probably the most helpful book I've read. And he doesn't ask trite, silly questions like, "What would your fur baby wish you to do?" .

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    Boosting Achievement: Reaching Students with Interrupted or Minimal Education review []  2019-12-23 19:33

    As a secondary el teacher I was looking forward to this book. While helpful, I was looking for more ideas and lesson to support with teaching my refugee students. Not as a lot of hints and tricks as I thought. Over all an simple read, but lacking.

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    Boosting Achievement: Reaching Students with Interrupted or Minimal Education review []  2019-12-23 19:33

    Boosting Achievement is an excellent, and very needed, resource for teachers who work with English Learners who have experienced limited or interrupted schooling. The book is beautifully presented with easily accessible info describing Carol Salva's experiences teaching SIFE students. The author's suggestions and ideas are humble and honest based on what she learned firsthand working with her SIFE population and teachers across the world are reading and loving this book! This is a highly valuable resource!

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    Boosting Achievement: Reaching Students with Interrupted or Minimal Education review []  2019-12-23 19:33

    What a strong fresh book, don't miss this gem! Really appreciated seeing so a lot of authentic examples and student portraits. The book is reader-friendly, to the point and very informative!

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    Boosting Achievement: Reaching Students with Interrupted or Minimal Education review []  2019-12-23 19:33

    Practical, yet packed with so much passion and joy! So a lot of useful ideas to use with your SIFE students right away. Included video links and and resources are incredibly helpful.

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    Boosting Achievement: Reaching Students with Interrupted or Minimal Education review []  2019-12-23 19:33

    Amazing fresh book on working with SIFE students. Lots of amazing ideas and very simple to read.

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    Boosting Achievement: Reaching Students with Interrupted or Minimal Education review []  2019-12-23 19:33

    Amazing book with lots of useful info and ideas!

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    Boosting Achievement: Reaching Students with Interrupted or Minimal Education review []  2019-12-23 19:33

    Carol Salva’s book provides amazing insight and perspective on teaching Students with Interrupted Formal Education. Our schools are getting more students who fall into this category and not much is written about how to effectively instruct them. Much of Carol’s work is about teacher mindset and using what we know to motivate students and make a learning environment where they can thrive. Highly recommended!

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    Leadership Interrupted: daily inspiration to become the leader you were meant to be review []  2019-12-24 20:35

    I have been subscribing to Kevin DeShazo’s everyday Culture Wins Championships email for several years now and reading it has become a staple of my morning routine. Each day I can count on a relevant, thought-provoking and valuable thought for the day.Leadership Interrupted is a compilation of the best of these and this book should be needed reading for anyone who is (or strives to be) a e linchpin of Kevin’s leadership is intentionality. You will not obtain better at anything until you build a system and discipline yourself toward specific outcomes. It’s about taking a long proverbial look in the mirror and understanding what you’re doing and how it’s being perceived by your peers, co-workers and employees.Each day you’ll obtain a amazing leadership thought for the day. These are not just flowery motivational quotes either. Each page challenges the reader to grab leadership by the horns and obtain dirty. The solutions are not easy, but what worthwhile is?If you spend the time and do the work, this book will support you become the leader you wish to be.

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    Leadership Interrupted: daily inspiration to become the leader you were meant to be review []  2019-12-24 20:35

    I have been subscribing to Kevin DeShazo’s everyday Culture Wins Championships email for several years now and reading it has become a staple of my morning routine. Each day I can count on a relevant, thought-provoking and valuable thought for the day.Leadership Interrupted is a compilation of the best of these and this book should be needed reading for anyone who is (or strives to be) a e linchpin of Kevin’s leadership is intentionality. You will not obtain better at anything until you build a system and discipline yourself toward specific outcomes. It’s about taking a long proverbial look in the mirror and understanding what you’re doing and how it’s being perceived by your peers, co-workers and employees.Each day you’ll obtain a amazing leadership thought for the day. These are not just flowery motivational quotes either. Each page challenges the reader to grab leadership by the horns and obtain dirty. The solutions are not easy, but what worthwhile is?If you spend the time and do the work, this book will support you become the leader you wish to be.

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    Leadership Interrupted: daily inspiration to become the leader you were meant to be review []  2019-12-24 20:35

    I have religiously followed the everyday tip and updates of the author since they began. Culture in your workplace is very necessary and the tip provided helps in countless ways.Having worked at locations with both positive and negative cultures, this is a must-read for all in any type of work. There isn't a day that goes by that I don't read the tip and think - that can definitely apply to what I am doing professionally. Or, I WISH that was being done where I work professionally! Whether you are a CEO type or an administrative part of the staff, there are things you can pick up from this read. I highly recommend it!

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    Leadership Interrupted: daily inspiration to become the leader you were meant to be review []  2019-12-24 20:35

    I've had the pleasure of following Kevin's growth of both his business and his leadership acumen via a social media connection through our mutual addiction to Oklahoma State sports.I follow his regular posts about leadership, but I would also point out that his social media posts, and the info in this book, go far beyond just leadership, delving into how we process the everyday fabric of life.I often post via Twitter (@RobertWhetsell) regarding #leadership and #mindfulness, and have found that the two are intimately related. Kevin's effort with Leadership Interrupted captures that relationship wonderfully, and in a format that provides just enough depth to drive the ideas home, but not so much that items is lost in translation.Leadership Interrupted is not only on my "electronic" shelf, but has also been shared with my squad at work. It is a MUST read.

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    Leadership Interrupted: daily inspiration to become the leader you were meant to be review []  2019-12-24 20:35

    When accepting a fresh job as boys varsity basketball coach I was asked by the school to add a quote to my business card. I didn't need to look very far. I have been following Kevin Deshazo for a long time now and knew that he would have the right notice that I wanted to convey as a vin's words are thought provoking and create you reexamine how you are leading your young men, young women, your classroom, or your business. Leadership Interrupted calls us up to lead at a higher more positive level. If you wish to obtain the most out of your squad and support them achieve on and off the playing field/court this is a must read. Thank you, Kevin, for the accountability and reminding us that we are in our positions to empower those around us!

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    Leadership Interrupted: daily inspiration to become the leader you were meant to be review []  2019-12-24 20:35

    As leaders and people who wish to create an impact, we have to sometimes be reminded to take a step back and remember that it's the small things that lead to huge happenings. By taking time out of your day to read this book by Kevin, and I recommend it be the method you begin your morning, his insightful messages remind leaders and how to truly lead. Leaders can no longer be about just making huge $$, they have to be about the people they work with and the culture they develop. Leadership Interrupted is that everyday reminder we all need. This is a "win" for anyone who wants to develop into a amazing leader and a "win" for those leaders that wish to continue to grow themselves and those around them! A definite must-have!

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    Leadership Interrupted: daily inspiration to become the leader you were meant to be review []  2019-12-24 20:35

    Kevin is a leader worth following. He lives in the intersection of people and possibilities. If you buy this book he will everyday support you to bring your best. Easy things (smile, don't criticize, etc.) that are easily forgotten in the tyranny of the urgent. Buy it! You won't be disappointed ... unless you're that type that complains about lots of things ... then buy it and ship it overnight and obtain started! Your family and squad need you to bring your best self every day!

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    Leadership Interrupted: daily inspiration to become the leader you were meant to be review []  2019-12-24 20:35

    Whether you're a squad leader, CEO, rising in the ranks in your company, raising a family, or striving for your own private best ... if you're teachable and apply these everyday gems, you'll see the results you want. There's a years worth of solid info. Use it! Apply it! See where it will take you a year from now!

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    Leadership Interrupted: daily inspiration to become the leader you were meant to be review []  2019-12-24 20:35

    Wow! Amazing work by the author! The everyday messages that I keep in my inbox every morning have been a blessing to me and have really helped me to think about the method I lead within my organization. I couldn't place the book down! I absolutely love the tip provided in the book, and I glad that the author included everyday challenges. Some key takeaways for me was that leadership is intentional. He reminds us that we have to be patient and continue to work on the locations in which we need to grow. Don't take my word for it! Read the book and be inspired!

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    Leadership Interrupted: daily inspiration to become the leader you were meant to be review []  2019-12-24 20:35

    I've known Kevin DeShazo for several years, and have watched his leadership style blossom along the way. This book is exactly how he lives his life of leadership and service -- putting into practice what he teachers others leaders, student-athletes, college coaches and administrators, and anyone who follows him on social media.If culture is necessary to your organization -- and it should be -- this is a handbook for getting there. These aren't just ideas for a few to consider. There are terrific thoughts and insight here for everyone -- no matter what role you play in that organization.

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    Winter's Mourn (Winter Black Series Book 1) review []  2020-1-5 18:0

    Having read Winter's Origin I knew I had to follow Winter as an FBI agent who had an objective in mind--to search the murderer of her parents and the abductor of her younger brother. She had very unusual abilities ever since she woke out of the coma from that fateful night. When the color red appears she knows she has found a suspect in which ever case she is e is paired with another rookie and sent to the city where it all happened. It seems that a body has been found--and then more bodies and more bodies! All but one are very young children--Agent Black and her too handsome partner are bound and determined to obtain to the bottom of it all--even though the local police are not very helpful--at least not at the ere was a deep dark secret in this town--and it took all Winter's ingenuity and unique abilities to ferret out the truth and save her old friend--and a young anwhile the person who had murdered her family was watching and dropping notes--actually stalking Winter--When you obtain to the end of this psychological thriller most but not all will be revealed. I read it in one sitting-I could not place it down! I will definitely be reading more of this series--Mary Stone knows how to write a thriller!

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    Winter's Mourn (Winter Black Series Book 1) review []  2020-1-5 18:0

    Mystery was amazing in the whole series, the language was poor in every book!

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    Winter's Mourn (Winter Black Series Book 1) review []  2020-1-5 18:0

    Loved this book but I have to agree with a few other viewers on the unnecessary profanity. However this seems to have become a trend with authors today. The seem to think for some reason the average person salts their conversations with this foul mouthed trash. I don't know of anyone who communicates like this and I have a lot of associates and friends. Why do they have to demean an otherwise marvelous book with that type language? Anyway I have learned to skip over he obscenities and read for the stories and this one kept my attention from page one. I do recommend going to Mary Stones web page and downloading the "winters origin" first for the back story. Just skip the profanity please. No need for all those F bombs. I'd hate to hang out with her mates and family if they talk that way.

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    Winter's Mourn (Winter Black Series Book 1) review []  2020-1-5 18:0

    I’m not one to purchase books...I just obtain them from the library. But after reading the prequel, I had to read Winter’s Mourn. This book was quick paced and kept me thinking about what would happen next. The author introduced the characters well and evenly throughout the story. Even though there was a bit of a cliff hanger, the primary story was complete I look forward to reading the next book and follow Winter’s activities in the FBI.

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    Winter's Mourn (Winter Black Series Book 1) review []  2020-1-5 18:0

    I could not have fun the interesting, but eerie plot of this book because of the extensive (over 200) swear words. I did feel sorry for the protagonist Winter because of her traumatic past experiences I respected her extensive training and her perseverance. I did appreciate the few characters that pursued amazing projects and those who changed for the cause I had told the author that I would read and review Winter’s Mourn, I completed reading the novel. I then deleted it from my device. I will not read any others in the series, even though the story of Winter and her small brother Justin didn’t [email protected]#$%!&’s a cliffhanger book.

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    Winter's Mourn (Winter Black Series Book 1) review []  2020-1-5 18:0

    I loved trying to solve Winter's first case as an FBI agent along with her and her partner, Noah. Crimes versus kids are involved so be warned. It seems that this case may have ties to Winter's past, but they just don't know. What Winter knows, though, is The Preacher - the man who killed her family and stole her small brother - is still around, taunting her. Why did he do it?I'm enjoying the whole plot of this book that deals with broken minds, greed, and psychos (hopefully, eventually) getting caught and shut down for good! I recommend this series to crime/mystery/thriller fans and will definitely continue reading them myself.

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    Winter's Mourn (Winter Black Series Book 1) review []  2020-1-5 18:0

    I liked the relationship between Winter and Noah and their first case. It was well presented and quite intriguing as well as e blackouts and insights gave Winter such uniqueness that she became a true FBI agent really quickly.I liked the style and storytelling very much.

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    Winter's Mourn (Winter Black Series Book 1) review []  2020-1-5 18:0

    I love it when I search an author of a series that I obtain quickly hooked on. This is the begin of that type of series. I read for an hour before bed, or in this case, a couple hours until I fall asleep with the kindle on my lap. This author has just the right blend of a teeny bit of believable freakiness mixed with perfect hero development, and just a tip of romance. Winter is a amazing hero as are her fellow agents, Noah and The head of the Behavior Analysis Unit. I have already bought all the rest of the books in the series because.....that's how I roll :) Enjoy!

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    Winter's Mourn (Winter Black Series Book 1) review []  2020-1-5 18:0

    Winter is !oo!omg for he family's killer. As a roo!is agent with the FBI, she and her partner are given a case in the city where she grew up and the put of murder. She and Noah are amazing team. She opens up some to Noah so he understands Winter the person . A MUST reac

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    Winter's Mourn (Winter Black Series Book 1) review []  2020-1-5 18:0

    Winter Black Created it into the Fbi to obtain a possibility to look for her familys killer. A body is found is the woods of her old home city and she and her coworker Noel are assigned to the case. Lots of twists and turns to the story. Can't wait for the next episode of Winter Black story.

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