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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    Shockingly eye-opening look at slavery up close. Mr. Douglass tells his incredibly painful, yet triumphant story with such clarity and openness that while reading of his experiences, anyone with a heart will not so easily forget it. It was an simple read in that there was no struggle to understand every thought, word, idea, circumstance or emotion he conveyed to paper. Those same qualities, for me, was why it was one of the most difficult things to read. It is a painful (to say the least) reminder that no matter what color we are, or whatever differences we have, we must never again let ourselves to lose sight of our primary humanity toward each other.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    I'm not sure just how a lot of private acc stories we have from slaves in first-hand written form. As far as I know Frederick Douglass' book is, if not one of the only accounts, surely a stand-out example of literature written by former slaves of the time. Without this book and books like it, the history of the horrid private abuse of slaves would be largely lost to us. So a lot of aspects of slavery I never thought about were illuminated in Frederick Douglass' fine writing. The deep emotional and moral consequences of being a black boy born to a slave-master. Being sold or whipped by your father. Or your white brothers. The concept of being taken away from your mother at birth. The corrupting and perverting result slavery had on otherwise amazing people. Being a short book, I was amazed at how much Frederick was able to cram onto every page. Countless examples and proofs of the horribleness of slavery serve to set the scene as you learn of Frederick's own private struggle and voyage. If there is still a person who thinks slavery wasn't as poor as they create it, or a person who can't see it's repercussions today, give them this book.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    Mr. Douglas suffered terribly at the hands of the a lot of slaveholders in Maryland who treated African Americans without mercy, beating them every whim of feeling superior, underfeeding them, robbing them of earned monies, separating families, forcing them into illicit relationships with the so-called Masters. What is worse is these slave holders purported to be Christians. Mr. Douglas info us in the narrative of his rtunately Mr. Frederick Douglas overcame so a lot of obstacles to learn to read and write and eventually escape to freedom. He has told his story in such vivid detail that it created me weep. How could people claiming to be Christians be so blinded by their hate. These were not real followers of r are they today. Mr. Douglas explains his thoughts on this in the book to differentiate those who claimed to be Christians and those whose truly served Christ. He refuted the former and embraced the Douglas' story is a sad indictment of this nation's treatment of the people they enslaved. It is the story of so a lot of enslaved peoples during the period.We see the results today of the blood crying out from the earth for justice with our cities in turmoil because of racial issues today.We need another Frederick Douglas to rise up and speak truth to this nation. As this generation passes away will it be worse or will people have a true spiritual awakening and turn back the division in our culture which exists today?

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    This book should be a needed read. It is short, clear, and tells a narrative that is nearly lost in our history books. Slavery is too often told from the perspective of white people. Douglass was brave to tell his story and shed light on the evils of slavery when it was still legal and largely supported by the establishment. It is well-written, simple to read, leaving really no reason to not read this book.Overall, I felt the book to be hopeful.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    These comments concern the CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform publication only. I realize that Amazon reviews often appear under the wrong title, so I wish that to be clear. Also, I would not wish this to be construed as a reflection on Douglass himself. I was happy to search his work very accessible and the future I will have to be more careful to avoid CreateSpace publications. I have several others, and I have experienced related issues with them. This, however, is the worst so far. It appears to be their goal to fill every square centimeter with print. The pages are printed from edge to edge, with not even a pencil width of margin, no zone at the head, and about one inch at the foot. There are no breaks between paragraphs, and the paragraphs are not even indented. As a effect of all that I found myself constantly losing my put while reading. My solution was to lay a bookmark across the bottom of each line as I read it. Also, as usual for CreateSpace, no title is printed on the spine of the book. In fact, they do not even have their own name anywhere in the book, only their San Bernardino address on the latest page.I do highly recommend it as a literary work, but search a various publication.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    Every single person in the globe needs to read this book. I understand that it is needed reading within some states, well, it should be needed reading everywhere. The struggles of African-American's, both as freed men and as slaves, has never been more accurately described than in this autobiography. Frederick Douglass perfectly describes each encounter with both appropriate emotion and objectiveness.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    Douglass evokes extreme contempt for the institution of slavery. He does so with truths that are both profound and relevant. When he states, "I have found that, to create a contented slave, it is important to create a thoughtless one. It is important to darken his moral and mental vision, and, as far as possible, to annihilate the power of reason. He must be able to detect no inconsistencies in slavery; he must be created to feel that slavery is right; and he can be brought to that only when he ceases to be a man." it is a truth that pertains to every form of subjugation by all men in every epoch. This book enlightens while it presents a cautionary tale. Well worth the read.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    This autobiography is so amazing I think it should be needed reading for junior high freshman AND their parents, and then a repeated needed read senior year of high school. It is that necessary for no other reason than for a vivid illustration of what motivation looks like and the benefits of said motivation. Frederick Douglass is a man of the ages and should be respected as such. His description of what happened when his young white owner was caught teaching him to read by her husband defines and personifies the evil of racism and slavery. The writing from this era puts our modern educational system to shame.

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    clash of clans []  2020-5-11 22:47

    recommend amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    Amazing historical read. My daughter had to read for 7th grade reading curriculum but enjoyed it immensely.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    This is the first book I read expressly about slavery. It is impressive in how well it was written, especially for a man who was born and raised with so small early education. His story is compelling not only because it is true, but because it is told in a private way, richly detailed and sensitive to Douglass' desire to support the public see the people and locations in his early life through his eyes and his heart, through one born and raised in a result, his story allowed me to envision how it might feel to be raised and held helplessly captive by savage, vicious, lawless, utterly dehumanizing labor, anger and violence. It also demonstrated how easily the slavery relationship could transform otherwise decent people into monsters. My most horrific realization was that probably most of us could become as brutal as the masters described in this book if we were brainwashed to adopt the mental construct of the time, that holding a slave is merely a legal contract, that it involves a high for a necessary labor source, an acceptable method to operate one's onically, slaveholders become largely dependent on their slaves for the status, wealth and security of themselves and their families. Once a society allows the ownership of other human beings to play so necessary a role in their livelihood, without any moral or legal restraint, it's no wonder these plantation owners became so blind and brutal in forcing every slave's compliance to their slightest whim. With the constant threat of non-compliance and escape casting a shadow over the livelihood of one's family, I now understand how those fears could develop into a complete disregard for the lives and conditions of their enslaved workers. The peer pressure both spoken and unspoken from family members, neighbors and business partners made slave masters who would not dare be foolish enough to present a moment of compassion. How fearful these owners must have been of the slightest sign of impertinence, envisioning how it might lead to a labor revolt within their community, and of reprisals as violent and not good as the attacks they themselves inflicted on their matter what race or nationality is in the position of master or slave, the institution of slavery had to be abolished not only due to the horrors perpetrated on the powerless, but because of how the combination of utter power and dependency encourages such limitless depravity in our human nature.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    I originally bought this book for one of my classes but once I got through the prefaces; then I couldn't place it down! I really enjoyed this book! I read almost the entire book in the first day I had it. If this is a book you must read for school, or if it is just something you are interested in, I HIGHLY RECOMMEND this book! It really paints a picture of what it was like to live as a slave back then. I was genuinely impressed by the method this man spoke. He is more eloquent in his speaking then I am. I really loved this book! I would it again without hesitation!

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    THIS IS MUST READING FOR ALL AMERICANS YOUNG AND OLD. SELDOM IF EVER, HAVE I BEEN SO MOVED BY A TRUE STORY, ABOUT SUFFERING UNDER THE THREATUROUS WHIP OF SLAVERY. BUT BEAR IN MIND, FREDERICK DOUGLASS DOES MAGNIFICENT GOOD IN WRITING FROM HIS EXPERIENCES IN SUCH A WAY THAT STIRS YOUR HEART AS WELL AS YOUR BRAIN BECAUSE HIS MOTIVATION IS TO DO GOOD AND TELL THE TRUTH IN A COMPELLING MANNER BECAUSE OF HIS ACUTE INTELLIGENCE AND HIS HEART FILLED WITH LOVE, NOT HATE, AND FAITH IN GOD, NOT EVIL HYPOCRISY AS DEMONSTRATED BY VICIOUS SLAVEOWNERS PRETENDING TO BE CHRISTIANS DOING GOD'S WORK, BUT QUITE THE IS IS NOT A BOOK ABOUT RELIGION, INSTEAD ABOUT HORRIFIC EFFECTS UPON BOTH SLAVES AND SLAVEOWNERS. THIS IS A "MUST READ." PRINT IN BOOK TOO SMALL. HENCE I RECOMMEND USE OF KINDLE INSTEAD.AN ASIDE: (IN THE END, IN MY OPINION, THE BLOODY CIVIL WAR THAT TORMENTED OUR GREATEST PRESIDENT, LINCOLN, WAS OUR MORAL DUTY TO ENGAGE IN ON DIFFERENT LEVELS, TOO LONG TO ADD HERE.)

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    Still quite a moving read more than 150 years after it was written. I am not yet 50 years old, yet I have seen in my own lifetime the unreasonable attitude that has somehow been passed down over time to this generation. Several times, I have seen my very own mates mistreated because they are black. It stems from a lack of compassion, grown out of fear or ignorance. I recommend this book as a most necessary read for our adolescent children, no matter what their racial or cultural surroundings have taught them.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    Mr. Douglas suffered terribly at the hands of the a lot of slaveholders in Maryland who treated African Americans without mercy, beating them every whim of feeling superior, underfeeding them, robbing them of earned monies, separating families, forcing them into illicit relationships with the so-called Masters. What is worse is these slave holders purported to be Christians. Mr. Douglas info us in the narrative of his rtunately Mr. Frederick Douglas overcame so a lot of obstacles to learn to read and write and eventually escape to freedom. He has told his story in such vivid detail that it created me weep. How could people claiming to be Christians be so blinded by their hate. These were not real followers of r are they today. Mr. Douglas explains his thoughts on this in the book to differentiate those who claimed to be Christians and those whose truly served Christ. He refuted the former and embraced the Douglas' story is a sad indictment of this nation's treatment of the people they enslaved. It is the story of so a lot of enslaved peoples during the period.We see the results today of the blood crying out from the earth for justice with our cities in turmoil because of racial issues today.We need another Frederick Douglas to rise up and speak truth to this nation. As this generation passes away will it be worse or will people have a true spiritual awakening and turn back the division in our culture which exists today?

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    This is the edition close to the original. Be careful as a lot of other editions are out with extra opinions by modern "interpreters". This book, from the original author, needs no added opinions or editorials.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    This is the edition close to the original. Be careful as a lot of other editions are out with extra opinions by modern "interpreters". This book, from the original author, needs no added opinions or editorials.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    THIS IS MUST READING FOR ALL AMERICANS YOUNG AND OLD. SELDOM IF EVER, HAVE I BEEN SO MOVED BY A TRUE STORY, ABOUT SUFFERING UNDER THE THREATUROUS WHIP OF SLAVERY. BUT BEAR IN MIND, FREDERICK DOUGLASS DOES MAGNIFICENT GOOD IN WRITING FROM HIS EXPERIENCES IN SUCH A WAY THAT STIRS YOUR HEART AS WELL AS YOUR BRAIN BECAUSE HIS MOTIVATION IS TO DO GOOD AND TELL THE TRUTH IN A COMPELLING MANNER BECAUSE OF HIS ACUTE INTELLIGENCE AND HIS HEART FILLED WITH LOVE, NOT HATE, AND FAITH IN GOD, NOT EVIL HYPOCRISY AS DEMONSTRATED BY VICIOUS SLAVEOWNERS PRETENDING TO BE CHRISTIANS DOING GOD'S WORK, BUT QUITE THE IS IS NOT A BOOK ABOUT RELIGION, INSTEAD ABOUT HORRIFIC EFFECTS UPON BOTH SLAVES AND SLAVEOWNERS. THIS IS A "MUST READ." PRINT IN BOOK TOO SMALL. HENCE I RECOMMEND USE OF KINDLE INSTEAD.AN ASIDE: (IN THE END, IN MY OPINION, THE BLOODY CIVIL WAR THAT TORMENTED OUR GREATEST PRESIDENT, LINCOLN, WAS OUR MORAL DUTY TO ENGAGE IN ON DIFFERENT LEVELS, TOO LONG TO ADD HERE.)

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    This autobiography was assigned to me when I was a junior in high school. Three years later, as a sophomore in college, I was asked to read the book again for my class on Black Thought and Literature. I want that I had taken the time to slow down and analyze Frederick Douglass' narrative from a literal, analytical, and figurative perspective. Had I done that the first time around—as opposed to treating the book as another needed reading that I required to speed-read through—I believe that my understanding would have been more in-depth and meaningful. The emotion and conviction with which the author writes is not only poetic and moving, but captivating as well. The imagery, combined with Douglass' views on religion's role in the enslavement of black bodies, masterfully paints a story that (in combination with other narratives) has, unfortunately, been lost throughout time. In fact, a lot of Black writers during this period refused to publish their experiences for fear that they will be caught and returned to slavery. In other cases, some writers used pen names to add some anonymity to their experiences. Nevertheless, such works should be cherished and valued; for they let us to gain a better understanding of how far our society has come, and how much more needs to be done to ensure a future where everyone is equal (in the truest sense of the word).

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    Amazing read. It took me a small less than 2 weeks to read this book. I only read it on the train to and from work so when I did [email protected]#$%! I had mixed feelings. I wanted to know more about his life once he was finally in the state. He didn't explain how he navigated through the slave states to reach his final destination. He gave his reasons. Understandable for the time which was before emancipation but I was still curious and looking forward to reading about that. Also at the end he says he sent for his wife...She wasn't mentioned throughout the entire book then she pops up. Where and when did they meet? I'm really nip picking but overall a very amazing read. I definitely took advantage of the dictionary that was available on Kindle Unlimited. This guys vocabulary was crazy also some words we just don't use in today's world. Looking for another book to obtain lost in.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    This is a very spirited story. The passion for freedom that slavery causes is very clear in these pages. Frederick Douglass improves himself more and dared far greater than I have in my life or most others I know. It is simple to take my freedom for granted, and be lackadaisical about my life and how my time is spent. But after reading this autobiography I can see the passion and fervor missing in my life. What is interesting is that slavery enslaves the slave owners even more than the slaves. It not only corrupts their moral character, but it also makes them lazy in mind and self improvement. The very qualities the slavers test to instill in the slaves to hold them bound. Once in the north, Frederick shows that all the working people without slaves are much more wealthy. Those without slaves in the south are very poor, showing that slavery also damaged even the morals of those without slaves. These same tendencies are evident with the hitech generation. The removal of work has to some degree improvised our ability to better ourselves.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    The book shows very well the difficult circumstances that slaves in America had to live under. It also shows how humans can become so mean and tyrannical when given ultimate power over someone. This is also how dictators are born in our world. When someone is given power over another that person's pride can obtain out of control. They obtain away with one thing, then another, and another. Their mates are likewise minded and tell each other that they are amazing guys, it goes to their heads. The book also shows how if you look various from another and you have the power then you can assume you are better. Racism can develop and other cruel things too. God wants us to work together. Appreciate each other, have fun the talents of everyone, we can all support our nation and globe if we throw unrestricted selfish pride to the side. A small pride isn't poor but overgrown pride is destructive. Just as the Bible says, "Pride goeth before the fall."

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    "Slavery is not good for men; but it is far more not good for women. Superadded to the burden common to all, they have wrongs, and sufferings, and mortifications peculiarly their own."On the heels of the successful movie adaptation of Solomon Northup's narrative, "Twelve Years A Slave," this created very amazing reading. I might not have read it at all but was inspired to by an perfect latest scholarly (but very readable) article: ""[No] doctor but my master": Health reform and antislavery rhetoric in Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the life of a slave girl," by Sarah L. Berry in the March 2014 problem of Jnl of Medical Humanities. Berry's article created an necessary point, which were all the more clear when reading the entire narrative: slavery and women's health were intimately related. Furthermore, the power that her master - Dr. Norcom (Dr Flint in the anonymized narrative) exerted not just as a slaveholder, but as a physician-slaveholder, is also clear. Some of the tales are heartbreaking and incredible, but real - including her seven *year* hiding in an attic. Her fear, even when seemingly safely away in the north after her escape, of the Fugitive Slave Law, is palpable. This book is extremely necessary as it is one of the few, if not only, female slave narratives written and published before the Civil War.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    Still quite a moving read more than 150 years after it was written. I am not yet 50 years old, yet I have seen in my own lifetime the unreasonable attitude that has somehow been passed down over time to this generation. Several times, I have seen my very own mates mistreated because they are black. It stems from a lack of compassion, grown out of fear or ignorance. I recommend this book as a most necessary read for our adolescent children, no matter what their racial or cultural surroundings have taught them.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    The Narrative of Frederick Douglas is a must read for all Americans to embrace OUR flawed but extraordinary history of the United States of uglas is a pillar of the unwavering spirit to withstand atrocities, hardships and pain of life to overcome and succeed as one of the greatest Americans who has ever lived. Written in his own words (when teaching slaves to read and write was topic to sadistic punishment), this autobiography itself is a testament to Douglas’ a Black parent who read this book years ago, I created it needed summer reading for my children to read once they enter middle school. The graphic brutality is apparent where anger could easily overcome your emotions, but the short read allows you to experience the triumph of Douglas towards the conclusion of the book, making contemporary racial strife child’s play in comparison to his plight and yet Douglas is is not a black story but an American story that all people on the planet could benefit for it displays how human will and a enduring spirit can change things.I recommend “Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglas and Abraham Lincoln” by John Stauffer as a amazing companion to learning about Douglas friendship and influence of Lincoln. Enjoy!

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    This autobiography was assigned to me when I was a junior in high school. Three years later, as a sophomore in college, I was asked to read the book again for my class on Black Thought and Literature. I want that I had taken the time to slow down and analyze Frederick Douglass' narrative from a literal, analytical, and figurative perspective. Had I done that the first time around—as opposed to treating the book as another needed reading that I required to speed-read through—I believe that my understanding would have been more in-depth and meaningful. The emotion and conviction with which the author writes is not only poetic and moving, but captivating as well. The imagery, combined with Douglass' views on religion's role in the enslavement of black bodies, masterfully paints a story that (in combination with other narratives) has, unfortunately, been lost throughout time. In fact, a lot of Black writers during this period refused to publish their experiences for fear that they will be caught and returned to slavery. In other cases, some writers used pen names to add some anonymity to their experiences. Nevertheless, such works should be cherished and valued; for they let us to gain a better understanding of how far our society has come, and how much more needs to be done to ensure a future where everyone is equal (in the truest sense of the word).

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    It was a very detailed story of what life in slavery was like. From dealing with lazy, entitled, white slave masters, to remaining hidden even in the north from such a dispicable family. It shines truth to the deluded mentality of southerners who believed it was acceptable to own and treat another human being like a piece of property. My favorite part was her explanation of freedom in the north. Even though a former slave could finally be from being someone else's property, they were still never from racism. And much like today, a lot of people still believe the abuse and mistreatment of black Americans is acceptable simply because it is the status quo.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    I had read this story once before. The scenes seemed familiar, but didn't recognize it until I was partway through the book. Once my memory was jogged, I decided to finish the book because I knew I'd have fun it again. Really, it's hard to imagine hiding away in a cramped zone for seven years. Obviously, the alternative was much worse. What impressed me most was seeing life from the point of view of a slave. Even when given a "good life" -- fed and housed properly, not beaten or raped -- why would a slave wish to be free? Harriet Jacobs explains. My heart fell for her when she realized the prejudice that pervaded the North. Even when free, she was not. Although we think we know slavery, we do not know it until we feel it. Harriet Jacobs helps us understand its real meaning.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    I cheaped out buying this ver of this magnificent book. After reading about 3/4 of it and wondering what the heck was going on with the vocabulary and usage of the English language, I went in find of a paper copy at my local library. Now, either all the other legit editions out there have glossed over the strange and colourful usages of language, or there is something fishy about this edition. I have to say that reading it this method gave me fresh ways to think about the content itself, but ultimately I found the usages distracting and odd enough that they didn't ring true. I would love any insight anyone might have about this edition. How did it come into being? If you are looking for an authoritative text, spend the additional ten bucks and obtain the other version.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    This book was one of the most heart rending, stirring narratives I have ever read. I now live in Frederick Douglas country close by where he was born... Frederick Douglas is a profoundly gifted writer that tells his story in a method that is poetic. This book gave me an even greater appreciation for all he endured, for all he overcame and lived through and for what he became! What an inspirational story that helps us all appreciate the life he lived and the impact he has had on millions of people! EXCELLENT read. Now I am on to the later, longer ver of his writings.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    Illuminating. Beautiful much a must read if you are interested in history, black history, slavery, 1800s, civil battle causes, etc. However overly long. Several parts are really interesting: Douglass' insights into his own experiences as a slave; his insights into the stratification of slaveholder society and the ironic "prisoner of their experience" result on the slaveholders; and his post-CW tour of the European countries and his thoughtful insights into old civilizations are foremost. His wisdom is apparent. His flaws are exposed. This is the true history that isn't taught in mainstream schools. Should be a part of home school studies. Very helpful to me. If you are trying to even partially understand slavery, I would recommend two extra books, COMPLICITY and SLAVERY BY ANOTHER NAME. Both are available on Amazon.

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    Frederick Douglass : Autobiographies : Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave / My Bondage and My Freedom / Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Library of America) []  2020-7-22 19:25

    Amazing book. One could just read the first and last. The second autobiography is really just an edited first. The third book touches on we screwed up reconstruction. Very amazing book in all.

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    Frederick Douglass : Autobiographies : Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave / My Bondage and My Freedom / Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Library of America) []  2020-7-22 19:25

    Absolutely a must read! No film i've seen has ever portrayed what this man and too a lot of others experienced during the days of American slavery. Slavery has been and always will be as long as man inhabits the earth, for man is fallen and naturally bent toward power and sin. His life story is heart wrenching, and yet enlightening. It is encouraging that the days have passed where the practice of enslaving people stolen from their own nation has passed, and yet, we've grievous morphed the word "slavery to "trafficking" and so, "slavery" continues under an less familiar word, in full force, practically unnoticed by the typical American. We may actually search (don't have the stats) that it is equal to or even more widespread than the 17-1800's slave trade. Frederick Augustus Washington Bailey (Douglas) was born into slavery in Maryland. Having read only his first book "Narrative of the Life of FD" i can't wait to finish the rest. The thought of being never left him, and he was one day able to create his thoughts a reality. His hard work and wise ways gave him the tools for escape. He self educated in any and every method possible. When free, he fearlessly became active in speaking out versus the atrocity of slavery in a time where abolitionists were fearful to speak the truth. He gives an honest and appropriate shaming of those who call themselves "Christian" and yet performed some of the most egregious atrocities on their fellow men and women. [ The Bible tells us that we were made equal, and "we are all one blood." It tells us that we are all descendants of Noah... so, from the same family!!! But mans heart is desperately wicked.] Frederick was wise enough to see the difference of the Biblical truth and freedom that Christ teaches from the pseudo christianity that so a lot of practice. Wisely he didn't allow others hold him from knowing the true Christ. Being human, all of us lower ourselves to various degrees at times when we are too far from the One who makes us whole. His writing is incredible. A character for truth. Oh that it would be read far and wide. He reached for the stars and allow no hurdle stand in the way. This is what Frederick did, and a lot of others who lived to tell their story! It's a reminder to pray for my fellow brothers/sisters who are still in bondage today! True freedom is through Christ Jesus, and then from this worlds bondage. He apparently sought and found both!

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    Frederick Douglass : Autobiographies : Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave / My Bondage and My Freedom / Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Library of America) []  2020-7-22 19:25

    The overall printing/binding of the book is very cheap, which is a small annoying, but the font is printed so little it's literally unreadable. Everything about the book seems to have been done to save on cost to the point where the book fails to function as a ill looking forward to the read, but with one of the a lot of other editions available...

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    Frederick Douglass : Autobiographies : Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave / My Bondage and My Freedom / Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Library of America) []  2020-7-22 19:25

    President Lincoln regarded Douglass as "one of the most meritorious men, if not the most meritorious man, in the United States". Douglass thought it gossly unfair that black Union units were getting less than whites. He went to the White House and managed to meet Lincoln in personal to show his argument. Lincoln agreed and told Douglass that he would sign any executive and any other documents important to assure that it would be done. They became mates and, to my knowledge, he was the first black man to be invited to the White House for a social engagement. He attended the evening celebration at the White House followng Lincoln's second uglass spent his first 20 years of life as a slave and was totally self-educated. He purchased his freedom (with some financial assistace) and wrote two best autobiographies before the age of 20. Thereafter, etited his own newspaper and gave brilliant orations in the days when amazing orators were uglass's home overlooking Washington is now an historic landmark begin to the public. As an old man he sat in his rocker on the front porch and greeted an endless string of young black men asking him how they could further the civil rights movement. His only tip was to "agitate", "agitate" and "agitate".As a child I recollect walking around with an "I Like Ike" sign. Winston Churchill was around then and was occasionally interviewd. Eleanor Roosevent was a driving force in Adlai Sevenson's presidential campaign. We children thought her voice was very strange. The only name [email protected]#$%!&?s was @#$%!&?, who lagged closely behind Jews and Catholics in the society from which I 's amazingly unbelievable how much society has changed during my own lifetime. Diversity is America. But it seems to me that 20th century historians writing about the civil rights movement are negligent, at best, by marginalizing, and even overlooking, the sublime accomplishments of Frederick Douglass, the man voted by President Lincoln as the most meritorious man in the United States.

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    Frederick Douglass : Autobiographies : Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave / My Bondage and My Freedom / Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Library of America) []  2020-7-22 19:25

    I am almost finish with this book and I must say that it is gripping! The harshness that Frederick Douglass was witness to, the struggle to be recognized as a man, to obtain an education. This is a must read if you would like to learn more about America's treatment of slaves and blacks in general. As an American veteran, this kind of history means so much to me. I am also doing lots of reading about the origins of all people who came to this country and to broaden your horizon I would invite you to do the same.

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    Frederick Douglass : Autobiographies : Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave / My Bondage and My Freedom / Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Library of America) []  2020-7-22 19:25

    Absolutely exceptional! The truly awesome life of Frederick Douglas is told through three autobiographies. Though they overlap and duplicate the telling of his early life in slavery, it was helpful to read them in sequence to see the maturing in literary competency, the fuller detail of events, and the most necessary aspects of his abolitionist activities and thinking. The included speeches and public addresses add so much more to the understanding of the man. This is history ALL Americans should know. I welcome this, another title in the Library of America series of "must read" amazing titles, expertly printed and bound, precious in the holding and so rich in thought.

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    Frederick Douglass : Autobiographies : Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave / My Bondage and My Freedom / Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Library of America) []  2020-7-22 19:25

    This is one of the most necessary autobiographies in American history. It is as relevant now as it was when it was first written. It should be read by all Americans, particularly those who need to learn that bigotry and racism are absolutely wrong.

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    Frederick Douglass : Autobiographies : Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave / My Bondage and My Freedom / Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Library of America) []  2020-7-22 19:25

    Very informative. I learned a lot about Frederick Douglass and slavery. He was a very smart person and used his talents well. He did so much to war slavery. A very unusual and full life for a person that had his beginnings. I did not know much about him until I read these books.

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    Frederick Douglass : Autobiographies : Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave / My Bondage and My Freedom / Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Library of America) []  2020-7-22 19:25

    This book should be needed reading for all schools, for all people. This is one of the most moving and mentally, spiritually, and emotionally impacting books that I have ever read. Frederick Douglass has the ability to communicate the experiences of him and other enslaved people that place you right in the time and place. He causes you to feel the very breath of the people, know the depth of their pain and humiliation, and the utter injustice and indignity of slavery. His mastery of the English language is beyond the ordinary, and in itself is a clear indication of the profundity of the lies of slavery and racism, lies Douglass refused to let to define him.

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    Frederick Douglass : Autobiographies : Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave / My Bondage and My Freedom / Life and Times of Frederick Douglass (Library of America) []  2020-7-22 19:25

    Read Frederick Douglass instead of Harriet Beecher Stowe. Though white abolitionists were clearly on the right side and were doing better than most Southerners and non-abolitionists, they were still hella so, read the better, non-caricatured ver of Sojourner Truth's popular "Ain't I A Woman?" Speech.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Illustrated) []  2020-2-12 21:10

    I bought the book "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass" from Amazon (note that you can also obtain this book for from the Gutenberg project) . It is a memoir by Frederick Douglass about life as a slave. It is classic piece of American non-fiction.

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    CliffsNotes on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave: An American Slave" - Notes []  2020-1-21 22:17

    These cliff notes helped my young mate understand better what he had read. It created a large difference.

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    CliffsNotes on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave: An American Slave" - Notes []  2020-1-21 22:17

    It did provide a summary of chapters and some focus helped to read it along with the story - NOT as a e original is more emotional and detailed.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Illustrated) []  2020-2-12 21:10

    Frederick Douglass, paints a very stark and ugly picture of slave life in the 19th century American South that I have ever nsitive readers, this narrative includes quiet a lot of racial language and violent rents should use discretion before letting kids read this book.I recommend this book to anybody who loves history and biographies.

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    CliffsNotes on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave: An American Slave" - Notes []  2020-1-21 22:17

    Very helpful

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    CliffsNotes on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave: An American Slave" - Notes []  2020-1-21 22:17

    Perfect analysis and summary (as always)

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Illustrated) []  2020-2-12 21:10

    Douglas was a pioneer and a passionate and skilled orator who used his position to expound the the horrors and injustices of slavery. Allow him not be forgotten.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Illustrated) []  2020-2-12 21:10

    Needed reading for ninth grade. My child actually liked it which is unbelievable. HALF THE PRICE OF THE SCHOOL SOLD BOOK!!!!And.......drum roll please .....Free Amazon shipping. Prime just rocks.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Illustrated) []  2020-2-12 21:10

    This is a must read for the entire nation. This is not African American history--It is AMERICAN history, that everyone needs to know about. I love this man with all my heart and appreciate how he tried to save humanity, not just the African Americans, but also the Whites from themselves. Please read this book and pass it on, regardless of race, age, gender, class, etc. It is life changing.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Illustrated) []  2020-2-12 21:10

    Frederick Douglass was a major figure in the era leading up to the Civil War, and the furious debates raging about the nature and fate of the "peculiar institution" of slavery at the time. Born a slave, brutalized and beaten down for much of his early life, Douglass ran away, educated himself, and became a major voice and major celebrity within the abolitionist movement. Eloquent, dignified, and forceful, he was an necessary personality in the growth of the abolitionist movement, and someone in our history that everyone should know about. This book was a sensation in it's time, exposing to the general population what the true conditions of slavery were, and what they entailed. It turned thousands versus slavery, and was an necessary influence on the opinions of a lot of who were ambivalent. A century and a half later, it is still a strong testament of the time, and a strong story of a man overcoming his circumstances to become something better.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Illustrated) []  2020-2-12 21:10

    It's hard to believe that this was written by a self educated ex slave. Perhaps my so favorable impression of Frederick Douglas was influenced by my awareness of the life he lived as a freeman and how humbly and generously he worked to achieve freedom for his people. It was the single goal of his life: to be a man and to achieve the same for his fellow captives, even while preferring life as a peaceful, free, citizen. Though his a lot of talents were recognized by influential and dedicated white abolitionists he remained a humble, dedicated advocate for his people.I was surprised at the erudition of his writing and his perseverance in the face of such discouraging obstacles. I found his life story an inspiration and a must read for young people everywhere, especially the oppressed. After reading of his condition of being captive I bought Harriet Beecher Stowe's seminal depiction of the tragedy that is: for a man tobelieve he can own another man.

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    CliffsNotes on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave: An American Slave" - Notes []  2020-1-21 22:17

    anyone who would actually use this cliffnotes addition better have a amazing reason, like language barrier or something. the actual narrative is quite short and accessible. this cliffnote is a waste of money.

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    CliffsNotes on Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave: An American Slave" - Notes []  2020-1-21 22:17

    Another school helper for needed reading. The things I do for my kids.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Illustrated) []  2020-2-12 21:10

    This was very well written. It's heart breaking, courageous, and honest. I can't believe I haven't read this before and I learned so much.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Illustrated) []  2020-2-12 21:10

    This is a amazing book. It's a short, fast read. It would be amazing for 4th and 5th graders. Douglass was an wonderful human.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (Illustrated) []  2020-2-12 21:10

    I read "Up from slavery" by Booker T Washington just before this and the contrast of the two is quite striking. It seems that as a effect of being freed from slavery as a kid that Washington as amazing as he was had a genuine love for his oppressors that could not be shaken. He never condemned the slave owner with the same harshness he reserved for the "ignorant and pitiful condition" of the former slave. Douglass does not keep back anything in showing the evils of slavery under the shroud of Christianity.

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    Facing Frederick: The Life of Frederick Douglass, a Monumental American Man []  2020-2-1 2:3

    I found that this book had amazing information. However, as a middle school student who has problem focusing, I found the book quite boring after the first 40 pages. It was hard to stay interested when the book was spewing facts at you not in chronological order. The visuals were very helpful when reading because you can use them while reading if you obtain confused or just wish more information. I think the reading level of this book is for 6th graders and above. As a 13-year-old student, I would not read this book again if it was not for school work. I think that this book would be a amazing resource if you are doing research of Frederick Douglass or the abolition of slavery; but otherwise, I would not recommend this book to anyone.

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    Facing Frederick: The Life of Frederick Douglass, a Monumental American Man []  2020-2-1 2:3

    This book is a historical biography and it is interesting because it is a amazing biography and is very detailed about Frederick Douglass's life. He wrote a lot of autobiographies although this isn't one of them. He was a diplomat and he loved melody which I liked because I think the melody of that time was really good. I found this book to really teach you about the person Frederick was and not just the jobs he had. He had so a lot of various professions but the book makes you feel that you learn about who he was as a person. I would recommend this book for ages 10-13 and I give this book 4 stars out of by Joshua B, age 14, Greater Los Angeles Mensa

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    Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom []  2020-1-17 22:55

    This biography of Douglass is well written stylistically and it is thorough. It will tell you what can be told about him,because Douglass's writings were political and polemical but largely avoided references to his private life, except in part in his three autobiographies, and those books were self-consciously "staged" (as most autobiographies are) and thus cannot be entirely relied upon and also avoided much of his private life. The author does his best to fill in the blanks, but there are limits to what he can e true issue of this book is that it is too long. It should be only 2/3 or 1/2 of its 760 page length (before footnotes). Why? Because Douglass' early life (which the book tells well) was an "adventure story" of the slave who escaped, educated himself, and became a major spokesman for the abolitionist movement. However, thereafter his career fell largely into that of an itinerant orator and a newspaper editor. His speeches and prose were his life. Fine enough, because his words were powerful...and they had some impact. However, the author's life narrative summarizes speech after speech after speech by Douglass over those decades, and while Douglass's narrative evolved over time in the nuances, his main themes remained the same, so in the book's extensive rehash of his speeches, one is treated to an endless repetition of the same material. Frankly, it becomes boring.On the positive side, the book a amazing acc of the failure of Reconstruction, the reimposition of Jim Crow in the South, and a portrait (as Douglass outlined) of how this nation has suffered since inception from the original sin of slavery...whose effects are still very much upon us in the 21st I'm glad for the author that his book won the Pulitzer Prize for history this year. And I'm glad we have a thorough biography of Frederick Douglass. But I did not search this book a galvanzing read. Again, I fear it was too long and repetitive.

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    Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom []  2020-1-17 22:55

    This is a very comprehensive and meticulously researched biography of an absolutely fascinating man. This book is a real joy to read for every history buff. Must-read, e author brings us an incredibly detailed analysis and thought-provoking insights into Douglass' life and times, and sadly, also shows us that some of the attitudes he struggled versus his entire life are still relevant is is by no means light reading, but it is oh so very interesting. The reader's full attention is needed to hold abreast with the a lot of people necessary to Douglass and/or the 19th century US & globe at large, not to mention all the political strife and machinations of that turbulent era.I very much enjoyed David W. Blight's writing style. He has a true bonus for the written word, sounding almost literary at times and creating clear and dramatic scenes in my mind's eye. Very much bringing home the emotional impact of certain key moments in Douglass' life. I really liked that the author doesn't shy away from Douglass' hero flaws or less sympathetic moments, not idolizing him, but painting us an objective picture of a great, though not perfect, e a lot of quotes from letters, as well as from his autobiographies, especially held my interest and I also loved that the book has so a lot of photographs in it, of Douglass, his family and 's a pity that we have so small info about Anna Murray, Douglass' first wife. More insight into Douglass' feelings for her or Julia Griffiths, Ottilie Assing or Helen Pitts for that matter, would have been unbelievable and would have helped us explore more of Douglass the man, be it as a husband or lover, rather than Douglass the public a European who only just discovered him, I have to admit that I'm left awestruck by the courageous and complex man that was Frederick Douglass.

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    Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom []  2020-1-17 22:55

    The preeminent scholar on the life and times of Douglass speaks! Blight threads together a narrative that is both accessible to one who may know very small about the man or the period, while at the same time diving into key locations where the documents leave the student of FD to speculate. It is a biography and not a text book as some seem to believe. "Have you seen Douglass?" Add "Have you read Blight?"A timely book as the nation can never seem to place the problem of race in the rear view mirror for long. This book is so good, I matched it up with the Audible version, which is masterfully narrated.

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    Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom []  2020-1-17 22:55

    While I had of course heard of Frederick Douglass before reading this book, my knowledge of him was spotty at best, consisting mostly of fuzzy, half-remembered elementary school lessons detailing how he cajoled white kids into teaching him to read as a young slave. He then went on to become a prominent abolitionist as an adult after escaping slavery. This was the beginning and the end of my knowledge of Douglass. Blight's biography brings Douglass into sharp focus, not just as a historical figure, but as a man. The regal looking figure we can see in images today was once a little boy, treated as property by the Auld family. He was heartbroken when he was emotionally rejected by his mistress, Sophia Auld, who had begun his education before her husband convinced her it was risky to educate a slave. He had a granddaughter who liked to braid his hair. His love of melody was bordering on the spiritual. He also, like all of us, had flaws. He may have been unfaithful to his wife. His emphasis on self-reliance was so extreme that it at times felt like a blind spot. He was a self-made man who pulled himself up out of slavery to become a highly influential figure and seemed at times almost disdainful of anyone who couldn't or wouldn't do the same. But that single-minded determination was perhaps his defining trait; he fought for equality quite literally up to his dying day. Douglass had a speaking arrangement scheduled for the evening of his death, before a heart attack took him unexpectedly. "Slavery is not abolished until the black man has the ballot."Blight's recounting of the life of Frederick Douglass is intensely researched and thorough. It was not quite as readable as other biographies I've read, such as Ron Chernow's Alexander Hamilton biography, but there's something to be said for valuing substance over style. Reading this was an infinitely valuable education experience, and I recommend it to anyone with an interest in American history and the beginnings of the civil rights movement.  

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    Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom []  2020-1-17 22:55

    I have not yet read the entire book, but was annoyed at the author's liberal snobbery on page XVI in the introduction. After bringing up some individuals he had seen wearing buttons that probclaimed "Frederick Douglas was a republican", he snobbishly dismisses them "as some of us scholars with, shall we say, various training and research, smiled and endured...." I guess since these people apparently didn't attend and an Ivy League school and ingest all of the liberal viewpoints they must be "endured" by the "higher level" scholars. Disgusting liberal, pseudo intellectual condescending! Why did must chop on people who have arrived at a various opinion than his? As I read further, I will surely be alert for liberal bias sure to come!

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    Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom []  2020-1-17 22:55

    This is an perfect book. Douglass’ wonderful story is well and overall fairly told. I would have given it 5/5 stars except that the author’s leftist political agenda shines through every now and then. Blight seems desperate to hold the Republican Party (the party of abolition, defeating the South, and civil rights) from laying claim to Douglass in spite of the fact that Douglass was an ardent Republican. Otherwise an perfect read.

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    Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom []  2020-1-17 22:55

    “What, to the American slave, is your 4th of July? I answer: a day that reveals to him, more than all other days in the year, the gross injustice and cruelty to which he is the constant victim. To him, your celebration is a sham; your boasted liberty, an unholy license; your national greatness, swelling vanity; your sounds of rejoicing are empty and heartless; your denunciations of tyrants, brass fronted impudence; your shouts of liberty and equality, hollow mockery; your prayers and hymns, your sermons and thanksgivings, with all your religious parade, and solemnity, are, to him, mere bombast, fraud, deception, impiety, and hypocrisy — a thin veil to cover up crimes which would disgrace a nation of savages. There is not a nation on the earth guilty of practices, more shocking and bloody, than are the people of these United States, at this very hour.”—Frederick Douglass, 1852It never fails. Every year on Fb I post Lenin's Letter to American Workers (in Revolutionary Continuity: Birth of the Communist Movement 1918-1922), or Jim Cannon's piece on the Fourth of July from Notebook of an Agitator: From the Wobblies to the War versus the Korean Battle and McCarthyism (paperback), and others post excerpts from Frederick Douglass’ 1852 speech on the Fourth of July. It sounds very radical, but it’s not the entire speech. And when Douglass spoke it, he had not completely broken with the framework of William Lloyd Garrison. Garrison’s followers did perfect propaganda versus slavery, and helped people escape on the Underground Railroad (to the extent their pacifism permitted). But by rejecting both political action and self-defense, there was no method to move uglas broke with this framework, and aligned himself with Gerrit Smith, who had a theory that the US Constitution was an anti-slavery document. (Smith managed to obtain himself elected to Congress running as an abolitionist). Now Smith's view on the Constitution was wrong, but still the constitution had genuine democratic content, and abolitionists required to base themselves on the gains of the First American Revolution in to prepare for the Second one.Within a few years there was active resistance to the Fugitive Slave Act; then Bleeding Kansas, with the need to send guns to abolitionist settlers, and for them to fight; then there was the formation of the Republican Party, not an abolitionist party to be sure, but an anti-slavery party; and then John Brown, who had first created himself known in Kansas.I much prefer the later Douglass after he had broken with Garrison (eventually even Garrison had to change his views on both political action and violence). If you don't base yourself on what's already been accomplished, you can't move has become very fashionable in liberal and “leftist” circles, who mostly vote for the Democrats, to “dis” the First American Revolution. Gerald Horne, associated with ‘Political Affairs,’ published by the Communist Party, even wrote a book entitled 'The Counter-Revolution of 1776: Slave Resistance and the Origins of the United States of America.' But it has nothing to do with Marxism!Reading genuine Marxist works on the period support one to understand Douglass in the context of his time. First there are Marx’s writings on slavery and the Civil War, some of which are collected in The Civil Battle in the United ericas Revolutionary Heritage helps to place this era into the broader context of US history, and Racism, Revolution, Reaction, 1861-1877: The Rise and Fall of Radical Reconstruction helps one to understand the downfall of Radical Reconstruction in class terms.While it isn’t correct to call Douglass after this period a “sell-out,’ he drifted to the right along with most of the middle class, which he had become part of. He rejected the one movement that could move things forward—the labor movement. The Second American Revolution was over; we saw the beginnings of US imperialism, although in the Leninist sense it wasn't quite as soon as David W. Blight thought. Both the Democrats and Republicans now represented huge business, but other than the tiny, mostly German-speaking Marxists, few were calling for a workers party. But there was a large wave of strikes. Blight writes that "Between 1880 and 1900 some 6.5 million workers participated in approximately twenty-three thousand strikes."This is a major work on a hugely necessary hero, although it becomes overly long and dull in parts. In my view the author needs to reevaluate U.S. Grant from the attacks on “corruption,” which was rampant everywhere, and still is under capitalism. Much of the focus on “corruption” and “alcoholism” came along with the rewriting of Reconstruction history by the racist Dunning School. I recommend the Ron Chernow’s Grant as a correction to that. Most of the books on the Civil Battle and Reconstruction by Eric Foner and James M. McPherson are also worth reading.And for the Black struggle today, I recommend Malcolm X, Black Liberation, and the Street to Workers Power and The Clintons' Anti-Working-Class Record (Why Washington fears working people?).

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    Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom []  2020-1-17 22:55

    A special feature of this biography of Frederick Douglass, is that the author, David W. Blight, was able to use original manuscripts from a personal collector. There is a mythology surrounding Frederick Douglass, some of it made by the three autobiographies that Douglass penned. Yet, these newly discovered manuscripts, flesh out particularly the childhood and early years of Douglass's life. Indeed, this reviewer believes his life can be viewed as a triptych of three overlapping major phases that at times intersected and at other times e first period was slavery. Frederick Bailey, Douglass's birth name, was given up by his grandmother at the tender age of six when he was left at the plantation of Aaron Anthony. His mother was "rented" out as a day laborer to another plantation and so the boy had small to no contact with her. She died by the time he was eight years old. Later, he was "given" to the brother of his master who lived in Baltimore. The author is unsparing in his descriptions of enslavement: Frederick was beaten, starved, lonely, impoverished and humiliated. A major watershed occurred when his master's wife taught the boy to read. Her furious husband forbade her from teaching him anymore and burned the prized books of the child. Nevertheless, Frederick's mind was opened to a fresh world. He was influenced by others to study particularly the Old Testament which provided him inspiration in the words of the prophets and the a lot of illusions and metaphors about slavery and freedom. Was it adolescent rebellion or his fresh found literacy that inspired Frederick to flee North? Aided by a freedwoman who later became his wife, Frederick escaped on the Underground Railroad. Fearing recapture, he changed his surname to e second phase of Douglass's life was preaching for abolition. He traveled throughout the United States, as well as Britain, Ireland Scotland and Canada. Douglass was an ardent believer in the need to all blacks. He delivered thousands of passionate orations; part religious, part personal, but always entertaining and inspiring. He similar incidents from his own enslavement and quoted frequently from the Old Testament. He became globe renowned and crossed paths with necessary figures including John Brown, who hoped Douglass would join him in the Harper's Ferry raid and Presidents Lincoln, Johnson, Grant and Hayes. Throughout the Civil War, Douglass used his fiery speeches to recruit blacks to war for the Union. (Three of his own sons fought in the War.) His speeches on "Peace time Abolition" focused on the need to give black men the vote and when that was achieved, he railed versus the rampant violence versus blacks. During Reconstruction there were wholesale lynchings and murders of blacks. His relentless travels and public speaking engagements took a toll on his family, his pocket book and his relations was the third essential factor in Douglass's life. Having had no family as a kid and unsure of the identity of his father, Douglass place a high premium on being a father and a provider. But, his long and frequent absences made amazing strain on his wife Anna and their five kids who lived into adulthood. Anna was illiterate and it remains a mystery why Douglass did not teach her to read. Douglass strived to be both father and provider, but his long absences eroded both roles. Though he claimed to be a "self-made man", Douglass relied heavily on financial assistance from abolitionists at home and abroad. He also sought the emotional, intellectual and perhaps physical help from several white women, some of whom lived for extended periods in the Douglass home. After Anna died, he married one of these white women causing further strain with his children.Blight's book is well referenced, but rather long. There are times when it is repetitive and when the author uses "grandiose" language, perhaps to mimic Douglass's style. Sadly, the author lacks the power, passion and poetry of Frederick Douglass. The author also occasionally attempts to psychoanalyze Douglass which is a bit of a stretch. Despite these flaws, this book provides a thorough examination of a man who created and is a seminal part of American history.

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    Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom []  2020-1-17 22:55

    What a man (Frederick Douglass), what a story of his life, what an insightful author (David Blight). The number of biographies which I have read go beyond counting. This is one of the three finest and, perhaps partly because of my age, (close to Douglass' at his death) the most inspiring. It is extraordinary in every leave this meticulously researched biography feeling you have lived Douglass' life alongside him., from beginning to end. You understand the challenges he has faced, the people who helped him along the way, and the people whose lives he changed. You marvel at his rhetorical and writing skills and the mind, heart and soul which drove and nurtured become deeply aware of his complexity, the challenge of his family relationships, the internal feuds and the external ones too, the depth of his providential belief, combined with his pragmatism. But above all there is his unrelenting courage and dedication to telling the truth about slavery and its legacy while never giving up hope and the demand for self reliance. It is hard to imagine anyone traveling as much at a time travel was not easy, especially for a black man and giving so a lot of talks and writing so much as Douglass did.David Blight's honest telling of Douglass' life reveals misjudgments and some petty grievances. We see Douglass as a human being, not perfect. But we see him much more as a giant, unwavering in his conviction in the demonic quality of slavery and the need to respect the dignity of every human being, regardless of color. I believe David Blight has in a method entered Douglass' mind and heart as well as another human being can. He has of course been greatly helped by Douglass' three autobiographies but he goes beyond that to reasoned but never over reaching conclusions on his state of mind, his motivations and y words have been offered by esteemed historians in praise of Blight's work. "Magisterial", "comprehensive", "incandescent", "elegantly written", "a stunning achievement", "exceeds high expectations". I embrace them all. But I would add one more, in capital letters: "INSPIRATIONAL".Inspirational in Douglass' unceasing (to the week of his death) and uncompromising call for the end of discrimination versus blacks and allowing them and everyone the Freedom that everyone cherishes and spirational, too, in the depth of caring and scholarship and sensitive and literate interpretation and narration which David Blight has brought to this work, which as he writes in the Acknowledgement, in a lot of ways represents the product of his "entire professional career".Thank you Frederick Douglass; thank you David Blight.

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    Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom []  2020-1-17 22:55

    Blight covers the life of Frederick Douglass with immense detail of the different stages from slavery, where he draws heavily from his first autobiography; to his escape to freedom; through his rise in the abolitionist movement and the development of his first newspaper, The North Star; onward to the Civil Battle and so on. Its a well documented ever, as the book trends on, the author's opinion bears louder than Douglass' words. I took the liberty of reading straight from Douglass as I read straight from Blight and found Blight losing why he named his book Prophet of Freedom. Blight is a man who has spent an inordinate amount of time studying Douglass, yet, while he underscores Douglass' love of scripture as a tool in the orator's skillful use of the jeremiad, Blight totally ignores the simplistic eternal truths that Douglass spoke. At one time in referencing Douglass' "Self-Made Men" speech, Blight opined Douglass was "wrong" about these matters. Since reading along with Blight, Douglass' three autobiographies, I found what Douglass really thought obviously better served, but now with the more historical context of happenings supplemented by Blight.Blight's analysis of Douglass' 1852 Independence Day speech on the 5th of July is scant on it's depth and the Abolitionist's view of American Constitutional Liberty. Yet, at the same time, Blight called it brilliant. It was indeed magnificent and very profound in it's delivery. Just reading the text and you hear a man who's heart was before God and the men and women he made demonstrating with amazing conviction Providence's design for all before Him.Blight misses this entirely. The more he writes, the more the frustrated that Douglass his character makes him. So, a lot of times in the book he either recreates Douglass, or, denounces current conservative views of this amazing and idealistic in the cause of liberty, but, imperfect man. At one point he even derides Clarence Thomas' view of Frederick uglass demanded real Christian charity from his countrymen who professed it. The slaveholders abused the Bible and its teachings for their selfish gain and the subjugation of Douglass' race. Teaching himself to read as he did by finding Bible scraps on the roads of Baltimore after a woman, once of real Christian charity, started him on a life of reading, prepared Him to take down such injustice in the Church. As a boy he studied with a black man, Mr Swanson, who told him "God would use him greatly." It was a pivotal moment that set the course of his discipline to truly understand himself, and for any reader to understand Douglass. Douglass was in essence first a minister of The Gospel and abolitionist second. It is why he ultimately broke from working with Garrison because he spent a year studying the American Constitution and it's Declaration of Independence uncovering the spirit and logic of the Founding Father's cause for Equality under The the abolitionist newspaper editor, Douglass notoriously called slavery, "the Slave System." To him, it "was a sin versus God before it was versus man." Douglass in his own charity forgave his former slave masters. Furthermore, he never backed down from a war for his private Liberty. The book doesn't really cover his spiritual conviction like his autobiographies really create clear. Perhaps Blight is unbelieving in them. He did search them "naive" in Douglass as he this book along with Douglass' autobiographies. Then all four books will begin up to you more clearly. Just don't expect to read Blight's book alone and obtain satisfactorily inside the heart of Frederick Douglass. And that demand may be asking too much of Blight from me the reader. It's well written and his life extremely documented. It gets a bit repetitive on suggestions about relationships that have no conclusive evidence to help such implications. Blight goes there again and again because he misses the man in the process.

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    A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass (Picture Book Biography) []  2020-2-7 19:50

    Amazing for teaching young kids our history. I loved the pics. This is maybe for a kid maybe about 4 and older. I just wanted to surround my 2 year old with the information even if he didn't obtain it yet. We have to teach our kids our history because they won't learn it anywhere else and this is a amazing put to start.

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    A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass (Picture Book Biography) []  2020-2-7 19:50

    Amazing history book

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    A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass (Picture Book Biography) []  2020-2-7 19:50

    Love Adler's books. Better for older children.

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    A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass (Picture Book Biography) []  2020-2-7 19:50

    Amazing for the children library

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    A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass (Picture Book Biography) []  2020-2-7 19:50

    My students wouldn't allow me place the book down!

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    A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass (Picture Book Biography) []  2020-2-7 19:50

    Amazing book for struggling learners to use while you read the Narrative in class.

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    A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass (Picture Book Biography) []  2020-2-7 19:50

    Well written and illutrated, it came packed perfectly and was delivered swiftly.

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    A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass (Picture Book Biography) []  2020-2-7 19:50

    Third grade granddaughter had written a report on this man in school. Loved this book that she received later as it added to her knowledge of this American hero, Frederick Douglass.

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    A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass (Picture Book Biography) []  2020-2-7 19:50

    It came on time and I think will be interesting for my 7 yr old granddaughter.

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    A Picture Book of Frederick Douglass (Picture Book Biography) []  2020-2-7 19:50

    We received this book in a more then timely fashion. This was agreat picture book for my 7 year old's project. The facts were compressed & it was simple comprehension again for a young child.

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    Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted []  2020-1-31 20:18

    Who knew that Olmsted was so a lot of things before planning Central Park? This is a easily read serious acc of his life and accomplishments. It inspired my to read his book on his travel in Texas before the Civil Battle and to read a book by Samuel Bowles who recorded the trip of the Speaker of the House across the continent after the Civil War. Read all three books, but the latest two will give you a glimpse of what life was like before and after the Civil War. Today, we take so a lot of things for granted, but in these time periods the railroad did not even go to the West Coast.

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    Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted []  2020-1-31 20:18

    Our book group read this and all loved this fascinating approach to American History. Following the life of Frederik Law Olmsted, you will know more about American history. You will also realize how a complicated and diverse career can manifest itself into a very unique legacy.Well worth reading

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    Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted []  2020-1-31 20:18

    As a Fresh Yorker, I thought I was familiar with Frederick Law Olmsted from his work on Central Park and Prospect Park. Then I read Justin Martin's gripping fresh biography -- and was stunned by the extent of Olmsted's accomplishments and the impact he had (and continues to have) not just on American landscapes but on our social and political history.Olmsted wasn't an simple man to like -- he was prickly, opinionated and didn't hesitate to inflict his gripes on others -- but Justin Martin makes his story simple to enjoy. Martin is sympathetic to his main hero without being sycophantic, and makes us sympathize with the a lot of triumphs and tragedies of Olmsted's life. He always finds the telling quote that explains why Olmsted was both celebrated and criticized.But even more, he reveals -- and helps us explore -- the thought and philosophy behind Olmsted-designed parks, no matter how huge or small. As a result, I walk through Central Park with an entirely various consciousness and appreciation of its bonuses -- and that alone is makes this book worth reading.

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    Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted []  2020-1-31 20:18

    I cannot recommend this book highly enough. Olmsted's life was sublimely interesting; he spent considerable portions of his life as a "scientific farmer," a newspaper reporter, the author of "travelogues" chronicling his journeys through the American South and England in the early 1850s, the supervisor of mining operations at the Mariposa gold mine in Bear Valley CA, the founder and head of the US Sanitary Commission during the Civil War, . . . - while along the method inventing, almost single-handedly, the profession of landscape architecture in the United States, creating a series of real masterpieces (NYC's Central, Prospect, Morningside, and Riverside Parks, Boston's "Emerald Necklace" parks, the grounds of the US Capitol, the Stanford University campus, among many, a lot of others). Martin's book is wonderfully well-constructed and he tells the story with verve, and I found it extraordinarily interesting from begin to finish and, by the end, quite moving.

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    Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted []  2020-1-31 20:18

    I am a fan of historical novels, especially those that straddle the late 19th, early 20th centuries. Living near Washington, DC, I had heard about Frederick Law Olmsted but had no knowledge about the scope of his life's work. After attempts at several other careers (most bankrolled by a loving and indulgent father), he discovered his real genius in designing parks and landscapes, becoming a pioneer in the fresh field of "landscape architecture" as his career took him throughout the US as it grew. For a man so frequently described throughout the chapters as suffering a dozens of ailments, I am also amazed that he was so productive and lived so long. This was very well written and I could only have hoped for more and longer chapters describing this man's fascinating life.

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    Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted []  2020-1-31 20:18

    An absolutely unbelievable book by a clearly talented itially, I wasn't sure how interested I'd be in Olmsted's life. All I knew about him at the begin was his involvement in Central Park. I figured I'd read the first twenty pages and see how I liked it. Well, Mr. Martin hooked me in with his deeply private narrative. I learned that there was a lot more to Olmsted than I had been aware, including his work for the Boston park system, his plan for the Capitol grounds, his design for the Biltmore estate, and his contribution to the Chicago World's Fair of 1893. Mr. Martin is clearly a first-rate historian. Kudos to him!

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    Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted []  2020-1-31 20:18

    What a remarkable man! I first heard of him in "Devil in the White City" by Eric Larson. Then I heard a review of the book on public radio. The book is so well written that the reader is awe-struck with his remarable genius and energy and eager to learn what he will obtain into next. He had fore-sight and stood his ground on what he believed in. If he lived today he would probably qualify for a disability check and he could sit home and modernize his facebook. Wouldn't that be a waste of a unbelievable talent. As a student of today he would probably be kicked out of school as a problem maker instead of having his special learning style and creative genius being recognized by most educators. He was lucky to have a father that adored him and could afford to help him until he found his niche. America benefited greatly from his efforts.

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    Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted []  2020-1-31 20:18

    Loved it!!! Fascinating man! Wonderful "genius". Intersting and so well written. Olmstead had so a lot of varied careers. He helped shaped America with its attractive parks and begin spaces. Among his a lot of accomplishments he also started what later became the Red Cross and wrote a very necessary book on slavery, the "Cotton Kingdom". A very amazing read on what could have been a dry subject.

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    Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted []  2020-1-31 20:18

    Martin's well-written, extensive biography of Olmstead is both thorough and entertaining. Unlike a lot of other biographies that are chock full of reference notes and extra comments, Martin just gives us the story of Olmstead's life, the a lot of accomplishments and numerous tragedies. We can learn of Martin's sources at the end of the book; otherwise this tome reads like a novel. Olmstead and his contemporaries are portrayed in very real, human terms. The reader gets a sense of what their lives were like, and how they are both related to ours and yet different. Of greatest interest, is learning the forces that shaped the man who would be so influential in our lives and what all those effects have been. Bravo, Mr. Martin!

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    Genius of Place: The Life of Frederick Law Olmsted []  2020-1-31 20:18

    The definitive Olmsted biography. Best known as the designer of Central Park in Fresh York, this engaging book reveals a man of extraordinary talents with the ability to envision and administer large public works over a period of more than six decades. Justin Martin uses extensive research to unfold info of awesome achievements in the context of a (difficult) life well lived. In the formative years of a young nation, Olmsted literally changed the face and hero of America with his social programs and landscape architecture.

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    A Splendid Savage: The Restless Life of Frederick Russell Burnham [Book]  2018-3-22 18:0

    Had not read much about Burnham before and did not know much about his exploits. If only half of what is reported here is true, Burnham’s life makes Indiana Jones pale by comparison. Soldier, explorer, miner, tracker and conservationist, his story is remarkable. Recommended.

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    A Splendid Savage: The Restless Life of Frederick Russell Burnham [Book]  2018-3-22 18:0

    A well-researched, highly readable life of one of the most remarkable frontiersmen of the late 19th-early 20th Century. Kemper does a nice job of fleshing out Burnham's involvement in the Tonto Basin Feud, also known as the Pleasant Valley War. Burnham's own memoir is maddeningly vague in the info and it looks like Kemper's account, while still full of dark locations and unresolved questions, is about as amazing as we're going to mper squarely takes on the controversies surrounding Burnham's part in The Shangani Patrol in the First Matabele Battle of 1893 and the targeted killing of the M'limo (a shaman) in the second battle in 1896. His assessment of different accounts is judicious and his conclusions fair and, I believe, right in the x-ring.Anyone with interest in frontier history, outdoor adventure and/or the origins of unique operations warfare will search this book a amazing read by the wood stove — and an perfect addition to their library.

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    A Splendid Savage: The Restless Life of Frederick Russell Burnham [Book]  2018-3-22 18:0

    35 years ago I asked the screen writer John Milius if he’d considered telling Burnham’s story on film. His response, “nobody would believe it.” Kemper’s Splendid Savage reminds me of the truth of John’s is book includes a wealth of info collected from previously unpublished sources and does a amazing job of filling in the gaps left begin in Burnham’s two books. Highly recommended to anyone interested in the history of the American West, the making of a Nation, the law of Unintended Consequences and certainly anything to do with the hero traits and skill set needed for Unique Forces.A couple of critical reviewers were apparently place off by Kemper’s inclusion of Burnham’s (and Churchill’s and Teddy Roosevelt’s among others) views of race, but also including an explanation that these views were not unremarkable for the time. This hardly struck me as some sort of PC garbage, but rather taking the opportunity to suggest to a reader who was unfamiliar or appalled with these common views that they were in fact common and well-reasoned based on observation at the any case, kudo’s to the author and I highly recommend the book. Mine was the Kindle version, but I’m buying a hard copy to place on my book shelf next to my original two volume set of Burnham and Richard Harding Davis’s work.

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    A Splendid Savage: The Restless Life of Frederick Russell Burnham [Book]  2018-3-22 18:0

    I chose this book because of the title. It rings with the taste of Adventure, and History. Plus the racial opinions of the main Hero are to be in the context of his time.

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    A Splendid Savage: The Restless Life of Frederick Russell Burnham [Book]  2018-3-22 18:0

    An interesting story with a LOT of details. (The author did an awesome amount of research.) You don't often read about true people who could fascinate Theodore Roosevelt! If I had any negative things to say, it would just be that the author worked so hard to be accurate that a lot of the book feels "academic". Instead of piecing together a conversation, we have references as to how it might have been. Still a amazing read - and still an awesome character.

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