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    Freedom Song: The Story of Henry "Box" Brown []  2020-9-8 18:53

    Love this book

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    Freedom Song: The Story of Henry "Box" Brown []  2020-9-8 18:53

    Henry Brown was born to slave parents on a plantation in Virginia. He worked in the cotton fields as a kid and he was allowed to grow-up with his sic was an necessary part of Henry's childhood and he always had a song in his heart and on his lips. He was afraid to voice his "freedom song", but it was always in his heart and mind.When Henry was almost grown, he was sent to work in a tobacco factory in Richmond. He met a young slave woman named Nancy and they were allowed to obtain married. Henry and Nancy had kids and they lived together in a slave cabin. Henry was very satisfied and continued to sing songs to his wife and day Henry learned that his family had been sold and would be sent far away. He was desperate to save them but he couldn't hold the family together. Henry was determined to escape to the North where he would be free.With the support of several men who "knew the method of the Underground Railroad", Henry planned his escape. He built a wooden box that was just huge enough to keep him. He got in the box and his mate shipped him to Pennsylvania.His journey was very difficult and he almost died along the way. When he arrived at his destination, he was released from the box and lived as a free man for the rest of his life. No one knows whether he was ever reunited with Nancy or their children.Henry "Box" Brown was a true person who escaped slavery very much like it was described in this story. The story is doented by a letter that was written in 1849 by the man who received the box and set Henry free. This letter is now housed in a unique collection at the Fresh York Historical is is an perfect resource to supplement social studies and history curriculum in the elementary grades. The topic of slavery is not always simple to explain to children, but this book provides an perfect method to present kids how slaves lived, worked and were treated by their e illustrations are perfect and add a amazing deal of value to the story. I highly recommend this book as an honest look at the American culture and history during the 1800s.

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    Freedom Song: The Story of Henry "Box" Brown []  2020-9-8 18:53

    A lyrical take on the fascinating real story of Henry "Box" Brown, who created his escape from slavery by sending himself in the mail to Philadelphia. I loved this line: "Henry was papa proud when his first kid was born." The book is appended with a bit of historical information, as well as the text from a letter from an abolitionist detailing the remarkable escape.

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    Freedom Song: The Story of Henry "Box" Brown []  2020-9-8 18:53

    Can you imagine wanting to escape your old life and wanting to begin a fresh one? What if you thought the easiest method to do that was to mail yourself to a fresh place! Henry Box Brown did just that! He was a slave and wanted to be free. He mailed himself to Pennsylvania, a free is is excellent book to use when learning about slavery. Henry was a brave man that place his trust in God and was able to break free and create a fresh life for himself and his family.

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    Freedom Song: The Story of Henry "Box" Brown []  2020-9-8 18:53

    Perfect explanation for grade school age.

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    Freedom Song: The Story of Henry "Box" Brown []  2020-9-8 18:53

    Love this book

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    Freedom Song: The Story of Henry "Box" Brown []  2020-9-8 18:53

    I can't support but feel that this is a white, religious woman's reinterpretation of black history more than anything else. I honestly mean this as respectfully as I can, that, regardless of her intentions, I think she projected her own (strong) views onto this story. I am aware that slaves sang and were religious, and that these were ways to cope with slavery and a generally crappy life, but their usage felt like whitewashing. A lot of of the illustrations felt warm and cozy, even fantasy-like (the first spread with Henry's dad holding him high up in the sky when he was born is reminiscent of "The Lion King"). There's text like "Mama's cooking grew Henry tall. Papa's stories grew Henry smart. The whole family's love grew Henry strong. Even though they were slaves on Master's plantation." Seriously? That didn't go down well for me, or ring true. Just look up a list of what physicians -- supposedly bright, well-trained, scientific-minded people -- of the time used to think were " diseases." They weren't. They were the effect of malnutrition and not good living conditions. Sorry, but your family cannot "love" your leprosy deed, the first several spreads created it seem like slavery was barely even a thing: present, but on the periphery of consciousness. So when the book suddenly talks about Henry's "freedom song," without context (as I assume young kids may not have, if this is their first introduction to the topic of slavery), it's not entirely clear what the huge deal is. Other normalization is a bit more subtle: The book mentions Henry having a "neighbor," which to me brings to mind the people living next door with whom you might gossip over your white picket fence. I'm guessing that's not the case here. I wouldn't call slaves crammed into the same building, or even living in adjacent structures, "neighbors."Words like "freedom-land" (to be fair, I have no idea if this is accurate speech or not, but I'm going to go with "no") felt like talking down, especially alongside all the cutesy "lift, tote, toss-the-sack" and "twist, snap, pick-a-pea" descriptions of Henry's songs. As for the whole song thing, the author acknowledges that she took artistic liberties with Henry's life and changed his self-injury way of choice from acid to tobacco chopping because it better fit the rhyming structure of her text. I... don't think this is okay. Slaves were a group of people who had their histories constantly rewritten by their owners. If you're going to say that you're telling a story about them for the purposes of honoring them and educating other people, then you can't topic them to further indignities and rewrite their history some more. And Henry Brown isn't a well-known enough figure that it's okay to begin taking liberties with his story, and have readers still know that's what's going on without reading the footnotes.I did appreciate inclusion of McKim's letter to the Anti-Slavery Office detailing Henry's escape in the back of the a children's book, it is fine, but given the topic matter, it could never be "just" a children's book. It will always spark discussions of American history and slavery, and consequently, of what is or is not a responsible portrayal of it. It is also often worthwhile to have multiple perspectives on a given subject, but if I had to choose just one, I would go instead with "Henry's Freedom Box," which tells the same story, but from an entirely various angle. Not only does it chop to the chase about how slaves were not allowed to know their own birthdays (think about how necessary celebrating birthdays often is to us; the inclusion of this one detail conveys far more about the harsh realities of being a slave than the entirety of this book "Freedom Song" does) and the uncertainty of their lives (a master who treats you well one day may not last, especially when you're sold), but uses far more realistic illustrations that won't ever lull you into thinking it's some sort of fantastical and lyrical story. Yes, "Freedom Song" focuses more on the human spirit triumphing over adversity, but I already think there is a amazing children's book about Henry Brown, and I would prefer not to talk ad nauseum with a kid about the same 3 people in a discussion about slavery.

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    Freedom Song: The Story of Henry "Box" Brown []  2020-9-8 18:53

    The story is very well done, emphasizing Henry's adult life without losing its appeal for young readers. We hear the joy of songs in young Henry's life, the happiness with his wife and kids, and the devastation when his family was sold away from him. The full page, full color, yet sedate illustrations complement the tone of the story to engage readers to appreciate the hardship of Henry's journey. An Author's Note (mostly for adults) is quite interesting, and references a letter written by James McKim, the man who received Henry's box at the Philadelphia Anti-Slavery Office. This letter still survives in the Fresh York Historical Society's Salvery Collection, and is reprinted here.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    Douglass evokes extreme contempt for the institution of slavery. He does so with truths that are both profound and relevant. When he states, "I have found that, to create a contented slave, it is important to create a thoughtless one. It is important to darken his moral and mental vision, and, as far as possible, to annihilate the power of reason. He must be able to detect no inconsistencies in slavery; he must be created to feel that slavery is right; and he can be brought to that only when he ceases to be a man." it is a truth that pertains to every form of subjugation by all men in every epoch. This book enlightens while it presents a cautionary tale. Well worth the read.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    This autobiography is so amazing I think it should be needed reading for junior high freshman AND their parents, and then a repeated needed read senior year of high school. It is that necessary for no other reason than for a vivid illustration of what motivation looks like and the benefits of said motivation. Frederick Douglass is a man of the ages and should be respected as such. His description of what happened when his young white owner was caught teaching him to read by her husband defines and personifies the evil of racism and slavery. The writing from this era puts our modern educational system to shame.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    Shockingly eye-opening look at slavery up close. Mr. Douglass tells his incredibly painful, yet triumphant story with such clarity and openness that while reading of his experiences, anyone with a heart will not so easily forget it. It was an simple read in that there was no struggle to understand every thought, word, idea, cirtance or emotion he conveyed to paper. Those same qualities, for me, was why it was one of the most difficult things to read. It is a painful (to say the least) reminder that no matter what color we are, or whatever differences we have, we must never again let ourselves to lose sight of our primary humanity toward each other.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    I'm not sure just how a lot of private acc stories we have from slaves in first-hand written form. As far as I know Frederick Douglass' book is, if not one of the only accounts, surely a stand-out example of literature written by former slaves of the time. Without this book and books like it, the history of the horrid private abuse of slaves would be largely lost to us. So a lot of aspects of slavery I never thought about were illuminated in Frederick Douglass' fine writing. The deep emotional and moral consequences of being a black boy born to a slave-master. Being sold or whipped by your father. Or your white brothers. The concept of being taken away from your mother at birth. The corrupting and perverting result slavery had on otherwise amazing people. Being a short book, I was amazed at how much Frederick was able to cram onto every page. Countless examples and proofs of the horribleness of slavery serve to set the scene as you learn of Frederick's own private struggle and voyage. If there is still a person who thinks slavery wasn't as poor as they create it, or a person who can't see it's repercussions today, give them this book.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    Mr. Douglas suffered terribly at the hands of the a lot of slaveholders in Maryland who treated African Americans without mercy, beating them every whim of feeling superior, underfeeding them, robbing them of earned monies, separating families, forcing them into illicit relationships with the so-called Masters. What is worse is these slave holders purported to be Christians. Mr. Douglas info us in the narrative of his rtunately Mr. Frederick Douglas overcame so a lot of obstacles to learn to read and write and eventually escape to freedom. He has told his story in such vivid detail that it created me weep. How could people claiming to be Christians be so blinded by their hate. These were not real followers of r are they today. Mr. Douglas explains his thoughts on this in the book to differentiate those who claimed to be Christians and those whose truly served Christ. He refuted the former and embraced the Douglas' story is a sad indictment of this nation's treatment of the people they enslaved. It is the story of so a lot of enslaved peoples during the period.We see the results today of the blood crying out from the earth for justice with our cities in turmoil because of racial issues today.We need another Frederick Douglas to rise up and speak truth to this nation. As this generation passes away will it be worse or will people have a true spiritual awakening and turn back the division in our culture which exists today?

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    This book should be a needed read. It is short, clear, and tells a narrative that is nearly lost in our history books. Slavery is too often told from the perspective of white people. Douglass was brave to tell his story and shed light on the evils of slavery when it was still legal and largely supported by the establishment. It is well-written, simple to read, leaving really no reason to not read this book.Overall, I felt the book to be hopeful.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    These comments concern the CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform publication only. I realize that Amazon reviews often appear under the wrong title, so I wish that to be clear. Also, I would not wish this to be construed as a reflection on Douglass himself. I was happy to search his work very accessible and the future I will have to be more careful to avoid CreateSpace publications. I have several others, and I have experienced related issues with them. This, however, is the worst so far. It appears to be their goal to fill every square centimeter with print. The pages are printed from edge to edge, with not even a pencil width of margin, no zone at the head, and about one inch at the foot. There are no breaks between paragraphs, and the paragraphs are not even indented. As a effect of all that I found myself constantly losing my put while reading. My solution was to lay a bookmark across the bottom of each line as I read it. Also, as usual for CreateSpace, no title is printed on the spine of the book. In fact, they do not even have their own name anywhere in the book, only their San Bernardino address on the latest page.I do highly recommend it as a literary work, but search a various publication.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    Every single person in the globe needs to read this book. I understand that it is needed reading within some states, well, it should be needed reading everywhere. The struggles of African-American's, both as freed men and as slaves, has never been more accurately described than in this autobiography. Frederick Douglass perfectly describes each encounter with both appropriate emotion and objectiveness.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    Amazing historical read. My daughter had to read for 7th grade reading curriculum but enjoyed it immensely.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass []  2020-1-16 5:16

    This is the first book I read expressly about slavery. It is impressive in how well it was written, especially for a man who was born and raised with so small early education. His story is compelling not only because it is true, but because it is told in a private way, richly detailed and sensitive to Douglass' desire to support the public see the people and locations in his early life through his eyes and his heart, through one born and raised in a result, his story allowed me to envision how it might feel to be raised and held helplessly captive by savage, vicious, lawless, utterly dehumanizing labor, anger and violence. It also demonstrated how easily the slavery relationship could transform otherwise decent people into monsters. My most horrific realization was that probably most of us could become as brutal as the masters described in this book if we were brainwashed to adopt the mental construct of the time, that holding a slave is merely a legal contract, that it involves a high price paid for a necessary labor source, an acceptable method to operate one's onically, slaveholders become largely dependent on their slaves for the status, wealth and security of themselves and their families. Once a society allows the ownership of other human beings to play so necessary a role in their livelihood, without any moral or legal restraint, it's no wonder these plantation owners became so blind and brutal in forcing every slave's compliance to their slightest whim. With the constant threat of non-compliance and escape casting a shadow over the livelihood of one's family, I now understand how those fears could develop into a complete disregard for the lives and conditions of their enslaved workers. The peer pressure both spoken and unspoken from family members, neighbors and business partners made slave masters who would not dare be foolish enough to present a moment of compassion. How fearful these owners must have been of the slightest sign of impertinence, envisioning how it might lead to a labor revolt within their community, and of reprisals as violent and not good as the attacks they themselves inflicted on their matter what race or nationality is in the position of master or slave, the institution of slavery had to be abolished not only due to the horrors perpetrated on the powerless, but because of how the combination of utter power and dependency encourages such limitless depravity in our human nature.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    The book shows very well the difficult cirtances that slaves in America had to live under. It also shows how humans can become so mean and tyrannical when given ultimate power over someone. This is also how dictators are born in our world. When someone is given power over another that person's pride can obtain out of control. They obtain away with one thing, then another, and another. Their mates are likewise minded and tell each other that they are amazing guys, it goes to their heads. The book also shows how if you look various from another and you have the power then you can assume you are better. Racism can develop and other cruel things too. God wants us to work together. Appreciate each other, have fun the talents of everyone, we can all support our nation and globe if we throw unrestricted selfish pride to the side. A small pride isn't poor but overgrown pride is destructive. Just as the Bible says, "Pride goeth before the fall."

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    "Slavery is not good for men; but it is far more not good for women. Superadded to the burden common to all, they have wrongs, and sufferings, and mortifications peculiarly their own."On the heels of the successful movie adaptation of Solomon Northup's narrative, "Twelve Years A Slave," this created very amazing reading. I might not have read it at all but was inspired to by an perfect latest scholarly (but very readable) article: ""[No] doctor but my master": Health reform and antislavery rhetoric in Harriet Jacobs's Incidents in the life of a slave girl," by Sarah L. Berry in the March 2014 problem of Jnl of Medical Humanities. Berry's article created an necessary point, which were all the more clear when reading the entire narrative: slavery and women's health were intimately related. Furthermore, the power that her master - Dr. Norcom (Dr Flint in the anonymized narrative) exerted not just as a slaveholder, but as a physician-slaveholder, is also clear. Some of the tales are heartbreaking and incredible, but real - including her seven *year* hiding in an attic. Her fear, even when seemingly safely away in the north after her escape, of the Fugitive Slave Law, is palpable. This book is extremely necessary as it is one of the few, if not only, female slave narratives written and published before the Civil War.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    Still quite a moving read more than 150 years after it was written. I am not yet 50 years old, yet I have seen in my own lifetime the unreasonable attitude that has somehow been passed down over time to this generation. Several times, I have seen my very own mates mistreated because they are black. It stems from a lack of compassion, grown out of fear or ignorance. I recommend this book as a most necessary read for our adolescent children, no matter what their racial or cultural surroundings have taught them.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    The Narrative of Frederick Douglas is a must read for all Americans to embrace OUR flawed but extraordinary history of the United States of uglas is a ar of the unwavering spirit to withstand atrocities, hardships and pain of life to overcome and succeed as one of the greatest Americans who has ever lived. Written in his own words (when teaching slaves to read and write was topic to sadistic punishment), this autobiography itself is a testament to Douglas’ a Black parent who read this book years ago, I created it needed summer reading for my children to read once they enter middle school. The graphic brutality is apparent where anger could easily overcome your emotions, but the short read allows you to experience the triumph of Douglas towards the conclusion of the book, making contemporary racial strife child’s play in comparison to his plight and yet Douglas is is not a black story but an American story that all people on the planet could benefit for it displays how human will and a enduring spirit can change things.I recommend “Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglas and Abraham Lincoln” by John Stauffer as a amazing companion to learning about Douglas friendship and influence of Lincoln. Enjoy!

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Signet Classics) []  2020-12-1 20:1

    The Narrative of Frederick Douglas is a must read for all Americans to embrace OUR flawed but extraordinary history of the United States of uglas is a ar of the unwavering spirit to withstand atrocities, hardships and pain of life to overcome and succeed as one of the greatest Americans who has ever lived. Written in his own words (when teaching slaves to read and write was topic to sadistic punishment), this autobiography itself is a testament to Douglas’ a Black parent who read this book years ago, I created it needed summer reading for my children to read once they enter middle school. The graphic brutality is apparent where anger could easily overcome your emotions, but the short read allows you to experience the triumph of Douglas towards the conclusion of the book, making contemporary racial strife child’s play in comparison to his plight and yet Douglas is is not a black story but an American story that all people on the planet could benefit for it displays how human will and a enduring spirit can change things.I recommend “Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglas and Abraham Lincoln” by John Stauffer as a amazing companion to learning about Douglas friendship and influence of Lincoln. Enjoy!

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Signet Classics) []  2020-12-1 20:1

    This is a very spirited story. The passion for freedom that slavery causes is very clear in these pages. Frederick Douglass improves himself more and dared far greater than I have in my life or most others I know. It is simple to take my freedom for granted, and be lackadaisical about my life and how my time is spent. But after reading this autobiography I can see the passion and fervor missing in my life. What is interesting is that slavery enslaves the slave owners even more than the slaves. It not only corrupts their moral character, but it also makes them lazy in mind and self improvement. The very qualities the slavers test to instill in the slaves to hold them bound. Once in the north, Frederick shows that all the working people without slaves are much more wealthy. Those without slaves in the south are very poor, showing that slavery also damaged even the morals of those without slaves. These same tendencies are evident with the hitech generation. The removal of work has to some degree improvised our ability to better ourselves.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    I originally bought this book for one of my classes but once I got through the prefaces; then I couldn't place it down! I really enjoyed this book! I read almost the entire book in the first day I had it. If this is a book you must read for school, or if it is just something you are interested in, I HIGHLY RECOMMEND this book! It really paints a picture of what it was like to live as a slave back then. I was genuinely impressed by the method this man spoke. He is more eloquent in his speaking then I am. I really loved this book! I would buy it again without hesitation!

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    THIS IS MUST READING FOR ALL AMERICANS YOUNG AND OLD. SELDOM IF EVER, HAVE I BEEN SO MOVED BY A TRUE STORY, ABOUT SUFFERING UNDER THE THREATUROUS WHIP OF SLAVERY. BUT BEAR IN MIND, FREDERICK DOUGLASS DOES MAGNIFICENT GOOD IN WRITING FROM HIS EXPERIENCES IN SUCH A WAY THAT STIRS YOUR HEART AS WELL AS YOUR BRAIN BECAUSE HIS MOTIVATION IS TO DO GOOD AND TELL THE TRUTH IN A COMPELLING MANNER BECAUSE OF HIS ACUTE INTELLIGENCE AND HIS HEART FILLED WITH LOVE, NOT HATE, AND FAITH IN GOD, NOT EVIL HYPOCRISY AS DEMONSTRATED BY VICIOUS SLAVEOWNERS PRETENDING TO BE CHRISTIANS DOING GOD'S WORK, BUT QUITE THE IS IS NOT A BOOK ABOUT RELIGION, INSTEAD ABOUT HORRIFIC EFFECTS UPON BOTH SLAVES AND SLAVEOWNERS. THIS IS A "MUST READ." PRINT IN BOOK TOO SMALL. HENCE I RECOMMEND USE OF KINDLE INSTEAD.AN ASIDE: (IN THE END, IN MY OPINION, THE BLOODY CIVIL WAR THAT TORMENTED OUR GREATEST PRESIDENT, LINCOLN, WAS OUR MORAL DUTY TO ENGAGE IN ON DIFFERENT LEVELS, TOO LONG TO ADD HERE.)

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Signet Classics) []  2020-12-1 20:1

    Still quite a moving read more than 150 years after it was written. I am not yet 50 years old, yet I have seen in my own lifetime the unreasonable attitude that has somehow been passed down over time to this generation. Several times, I have seen my very own mates mistreated because they are black. It stems from a lack of compassion, grown out of fear or ignorance. I recommend this book as a most necessary read for our adolescent children, no matter what their racial or cultural surroundings have taught them.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    Still quite a moving read more than 150 years after it was written. I am not yet 50 years old, yet I have seen in my own lifetime the unreasonable attitude that has somehow been passed down over time to this generation. Several times, I have seen my very own mates mistreated because they are black. It stems from a lack of compassion, grown out of fear or ignorance. I recommend this book as a most necessary read for our adolescent children, no matter what their racial or cultural surroundings have taught them.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    Mr. Douglas suffered terribly at the hands of the a lot of slaveholders in Maryland who treated African Americans without mercy, beating them every whim of feeling superior, underfeeding them, robbing them of earned monies, separating families, forcing them into illicit relationships with the so-called Masters. What is worse is these slave holders purported to be Christians. Mr. Douglas info us in the narrative of his rtunately Mr. Frederick Douglas overcame so a lot of obstacles to learn to read and write and eventually escape to freedom. He has told his story in such vivid detail that it created me weep. How could people claiming to be Christians be so blinded by their hate. These were not real followers of r are they today. Mr. Douglas explains his thoughts on this in the book to differentiate those who claimed to be Christians and those whose truly served Christ. He refuted the former and embraced the Douglas' story is a sad indictment of this nation's treatment of the people they enslaved. It is the story of so a lot of enslaved peoples during the period.We see the results today of the blood crying out from the earth for justice with our cities in turmoil because of racial issues today.We need another Frederick Douglas to rise up and speak truth to this nation. As this generation passes away will it be worse or will people have a true spiritual awakening and turn back the division in our culture which exists today?

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    This is the edition close to the original. Be careful as a lot of other editions are out with extra opinions by modern "interpreters". This book, from the original author, needs no added opinions or editorials.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Signet Classics) []  2020-12-1 20:1

    I cheaped out buying this ver of this magnificent book. After reading about 3/4 of it and wondering what the heck was going on with the vocabulary and usage of the English language, I went in find of a paper copy at my local library. Now, either all the other legit editions out there have glossed over the strange and colourful usages of language, or there is something fishy about this edition. I have to say that reading it this method gave me fresh ways to think about the content itself, but ultimately I found the usages distracting and odd enough that they didn't ring true. I would love any insight anyone might have about this edition. How did it come into being? If you are looking for an authoritative text, spend the additional ten bucks and obtain the other version.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Signet Classics) []  2020-12-1 20:1

    This ver of Douglass's autobiography includes some strange language. For example, it begins, "I turned into born in Tuckahoe," while other editions of the book begin, "I was born in Tuckahoe." This ver includes a lot of other strange phrases. Examples are "My first grasp's call was Anthony" instead of "My first master’s name was Anthony" and "If a slave changed into convicted of any high misdemeanor . . . ." instead of "If a slave was convicted of any high misdemeanor . . . ." I searched in vain to see whether the book had gone through different editions that would explain these differences. But I do note that the odd phrasing doesn't fit with contemporary reviews praising the book as clear and literate. Two librarians thought the odd language might be due to electronic file corruption. If you're thinking of buying Douglass's narrative, check the first sentence of the narrative (not the introduction), and see if it says 'I was born . . . " That would be an edition you want. This one is nearly unreadable.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    This is the edition close to the original. Be careful as a lot of other editions are out with extra opinions by modern "interpreters". This book, from the original author, needs no added opinions or editorials.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    THIS IS MUST READING FOR ALL AMERICANS YOUNG AND OLD. SELDOM IF EVER, HAVE I BEEN SO MOVED BY A TRUE STORY, ABOUT SUFFERING UNDER THE THREATUROUS WHIP OF SLAVERY. BUT BEAR IN MIND, FREDERICK DOUGLASS DOES MAGNIFICENT GOOD IN WRITING FROM HIS EXPERIENCES IN SUCH A WAY THAT STIRS YOUR HEART AS WELL AS YOUR BRAIN BECAUSE HIS MOTIVATION IS TO DO GOOD AND TELL THE TRUTH IN A COMPELLING MANNER BECAUSE OF HIS ACUTE INTELLIGENCE AND HIS HEART FILLED WITH LOVE, NOT HATE, AND FAITH IN GOD, NOT EVIL HYPOCRISY AS DEMONSTRATED BY VICIOUS SLAVEOWNERS PRETENDING TO BE CHRISTIANS DOING GOD'S WORK, BUT QUITE THE IS IS NOT A BOOK ABOUT RELIGION, INSTEAD ABOUT HORRIFIC EFFECTS UPON BOTH SLAVES AND SLAVEOWNERS. THIS IS A "MUST READ." PRINT IN BOOK TOO SMALL. HENCE I RECOMMEND USE OF KINDLE INSTEAD.AN ASIDE: (IN THE END, IN MY OPINION, THE BLOODY CIVIL WAR THAT TORMENTED OUR GREATEST PRESIDENT, LINCOLN, WAS OUR MORAL DUTY TO ENGAGE IN ON DIFFERENT LEVELS, TOO LONG TO ADD HERE.)

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    This autobiography was assigned to me when I was a junior in high school. Three years later, as a sophomore in college, I was asked to read the book again for my class on Black Thought and Literature. I want that I had taken the time to slow down and yze Frederick Douglass' narrative from a literal, ytical, and figurative perspective. Had I done that the first time around—as opposed to treating the book as another needed reading that I required to speed-read through—I believe that my understanding would have been more in-depth and meaningful. The emotion and conviction with which the author writes is not only poetic and moving, but captivating as well. The imagery, combined with Douglass' views on religion's role in the enslavement of black bodies, masterfully paints a story that (in combination with other narratives) has, unfortunately, been lost throughout time. In fact, a lot of Black writers during this period refused to publish their experiences for fear that they will be caught and returned to slavery. In other cases, some writers used pen names to add some anonymity to their experiences. Nevertheless, such works should be cherished and valued; for they let us to gain a better understanding of how far our society has come, and how much more needs to be done to ensure a future where everyone is equal (in the truest sense of the word).

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    Amazing read. It took me a small less than 2 weeks to read this book. I only read it on the train to and from work so when I did [email protected]#$%! I had mixed feelings. I wanted to know more about his life once he was finally in the free state. He didn't explain how he navigated through the slave states to reach his final destination. He gave his reasons. Understandable for the time which was before emancipation but I was still curious and looking forward to reading about that. Also at the end he says he sent for his wife...She wasn't mentioned throughout the entire book then she pops up. Where and when did they meet? I'm really nip picking but overall a very amazing read. I definitely took advantage of the dictionary that was available on Kindle Unlimited. This guys vocabulary was crazy also some words we just don't use in today's world. Looking for another book to obtain lost in.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    This is a very spirited story. The passion for freedom that slavery causes is very clear in these pages. Frederick Douglass improves himself more and dared far greater than I have in my life or most others I know. It is simple to take my freedom for granted, and be lackadaisical about my life and how my time is spent. But after reading this autobiography I can see the passion and fervor missing in my life. What is interesting is that slavery enslaves the slave owners even more than the slaves. It not only corrupts their moral character, but it also makes them lazy in mind and self improvement. The very qualities the slavers test to instill in the slaves to hold them bound. Once in the north, Frederick shows that all the working people without slaves are much more wealthy. Those without slaves in the south are very poor, showing that slavery also damaged even the morals of those without slaves. These same tendencies are evident with the hitech generation. The removal of work has to some degree improvised our ability to better ourselves.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Signet Classics) []  2020-12-1 20:1

    THIS IS MUST READING FOR ALL AMERICANS YOUNG AND OLD. SELDOM IF EVER, HAVE I BEEN SO MOVED BY A TRUE STORY, ABOUT SUFFERING UNDER THE THREATUROUS WHIP OF SLAVERY. BUT BEAR IN MIND, FREDERICK DOUGLASS DOES MAGNIFICENT GOOD IN WRITING FROM HIS EXPERIENCES IN SUCH A WAY THAT STIRS YOUR HEART AS WELL AS YOUR BRAIN BECAUSE HIS MOTIVATION IS TO DO GOOD AND TELL THE TRUTH IN A COMPELLING MANNER BECAUSE OF HIS ACUTE INTELLIGENCE AND HIS HEART FILLED WITH LOVE, NOT HATE, AND FAITH IN GOD, NOT EVIL HYPOCRISY AS DEMONSTRATED BY VICIOUS SLAVEOWNERS PRETENDING TO BE CHRISTIANS DOING GOD'S WORK, BUT QUITE THE IS IS NOT A BOOK ABOUT RELIGION, INSTEAD ABOUT HORRIFIC EFFECTS UPON BOTH SLAVES AND SLAVEOWNERS. THIS IS A "MUST READ." PRINT IN BOOK TOO SMALL. HENCE I RECOMMEND USE OF KINDLE INSTEAD.AN ASIDE: (IN THE END, IN MY OPINION, THE BLOODY CIVIL WAR THAT TORMENTED OUR GREATEST PRESIDENT, LINCOLN, WAS OUR MORAL DUTY TO ENGAGE IN ON DIFFERENT LEVELS, TOO LONG TO ADD HERE.)

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Signet Classics) []  2020-12-1 20:1

    I’m starting this review before I’ve finished the book. I’m only like thirty pages in, really. But I feel grateful to be able to read more of what Douglass has to say. I believe that he is telling his truth and that makes for beautiful, if heartbreaking, reading. For the record (and the persistent Hypothetical Reader), it is almost 3:00 AM on January 18, 2020. It’s fitting that I’m turning to a book now. To support calm me down and obtain me to sleep. Douglass’ prose is complicated, so I know eventually I’ll be exhausted to sleep. And though I am generally grateful to books, this autobiography is the one I am reading at the moment, and, therefore, the one I am going to credit.I just took 2 Tyelenol PM It’s 3:45 AM. (Does anyone search this interesting? (That’s rhetorical.)) January 28, 2020. Fredrick Douglass’s writing is too compelling and my mind is racing too quickly from the emotional evening I’ve had. I am determined to read the same paragraph again and again until I understand it without my mind wandering. It took me like 10 tries. Each time I caught myself obsessing over phrases or questions to respond or books to write. I restarted the paragraph. I reminded myself that it is alright to think about it; that doesn’t create me a person who is incapable of loving and being loved; it just means that I have thoughts and emotions; but I’m trying to sleep. And then, when I realize I’m lost in ruminations, I’d begin reading the paragraph over again because my mind had wandered. Don’t worry, not all my reviews will be this minutely autobiographical. I just feel compelled to bottle lightening or whatever magic it was that left me a bawling mess of emotions earlier this (last?) evening. But then I remind myself that these are just thoughts and these sentences are just words. And that doesn’t create them amazing or bad--by extension, that doesn’t create me amazing or bad--it just means they are words. (I have to stop using the word “just”; and also stop commenting about punctuation and word usage and grammar.) But those are just thoughts, too, and just more words to think about excising later. Because right now, I’m going to smile myself to sleep and hold reading that same paragraph again and again until I drift off or understand (or at least create some conscious semblance of sense from) what is being latest thing to mention. This should be parenthetical, but it’s not. Let’s not obtain caught in the weeds here. I wish to mention mental health. I dedicated my latest book reviews to those in my life who encouraged my reading; I dedicate this book to those who have encouraged and walked alongside me and allowed me to walk alongside of them in their mental health and (I’ll even go so far as to say) spiritual journeys. Goodnight my beloved people and words and books. I hope when I wake up, I’ll be awake.(Sometimes it just doesn’t matter if it’s true or not, fact or fiction. I can just experience the things I’m experiencing right now: Freedom.) That’s not a concept with which Frederick Douglass or any slave was familiar. Or, I mean, Douglass was able to see through the veneer of other people’s impositions to see his (and other slaves’ and masters’) true humanity and to be bold enough to share it. His writing is honest and therefore incredible. I believe what he writes and what he is ’s January 26, now. I’ve finally been able to finish the book and create it through a hectic week. Frederick Douglass’ autobiographical narrative has been a friendly, somehow comforting, companion. Of course, history has proven that there are inaccuracies and mistakes and exaggerations for literary impact. This does not diminish from the wonderful doent which so clearly traces Douglass’ subjective experience through slavery to I read I underlined and commented in the margins. Here are a few observations and quotes:“Slaves sing most when they are most unhappy. The songs of the slave represent the sorrows of his heart; and he is relieved by them, only as an aching heart is relieved by its tears” (9). I had never considered this interpretation uglass’ is repulsed by slaveowners who profess Christianity and yet own and abuse slaves. Commenting on one of his masters, Douglass writes: “Prior to his conversion, he relied upon his own depravity to shield and sustain him in his savage barbarity; but after his conversation, he found religious sanction and help for his slaveholding cruelty” (32). This hypocrisy personally offensive to the author, though I could not easily discern from this book whether he would identify as a Christian apter IX is a gut punch and ought to be needed reading (fortunately for me, this is the chapter I read again and again as I tried to quell my manic thoughts and obtain to sleep). This chapter explores the ingrained evil that was simply viewed as convention by slave owners. Douglass verbally eviscerates his cruel masters and insightful comments on their hypocrisy and twisted character. He tells the story of not good abuse even toward physically disabled slaves. Also of note, Douglass is careful to assert that these are facts rather than easy feelings or his intellect developed, Douglass’ slavery grew more galling. After standing up to yet another abusive master, Douglass writes, “I now resolved that, however long I might remain a slave in form, the day had passed forever when I could be a slave in fact” (43).Douglass uncovers a number of subtle (and not so subtle) manipulation strategies used by slave owners to hold their slaves properly cowed and powerless. Douglass’ insight is astounding and nuanced and devastating as the truth of his firsthand experience rings out in every e book concludes immediately after Douglass seizes his freedom, telling us nothing of his ongoing ascendance. Written in his late 20’s, one must look to Douglass’ other two autobiographies to hear more of the story. Though at times, he may be a huge self-indulgent and strongly opiniated, who can blame him for taking such liberties? This book is worth reading, pondering, and feeling as the oppression of slavery is explored and the indominability of Frederick Douglass is created evident.A-

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    This autobiography was assigned to me when I was a junior in high school. Three years later, as a sophomore in college, I was asked to read the book again for my class on Black Thought and Literature. I want that I had taken the time to slow down and yze Frederick Douglass' narrative from a literal, ytical, and figurative perspective. Had I done that the first time around—as opposed to treating the book as another needed reading that I required to speed-read through—I believe that my understanding would have been more in-depth and meaningful. The emotion and conviction with which the author writes is not only poetic and moving, but captivating as well. The imagery, combined with Douglass' views on religion's role in the enslavement of black bodies, masterfully paints a story that (in combination with other narratives) has, unfortunately, been lost throughout time. In fact, a lot of Black writers during this period refused to publish their experiences for fear that they will be caught and returned to slavery. In other cases, some writers used pen names to add some anonymity to their experiences. Nevertheless, such works should be cherished and valued; for they let us to gain a better understanding of how far our society has come, and how much more needs to be done to ensure a future where everyone is equal (in the truest sense of the word).

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    It was a very detailed story of what life in slavery was like. From dealing with lazy, entitled, white slave masters, to remaining hidden even in the north from such a dispicable family. It shines truth to the deluded mentality of southerners who believed it was acceptable to own and treat another human being like a piece of property. My favorite part was her explanation of freedom in the north. Even though a former slave could finally be free from being someone else's property, they were still never free from racism. And much like today, a lot of people still believe the abuse and mistreatment of black Americans is acceptable simply because it is the status quo.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave [Book]  2018-6-30 18:0

    I had read this story once before. The scenes seemed familiar, but didn't recognize it until I was partway through the book. Once my memory was jogged, I decided to finish the book because I knew I'd have fun it again. Really, it's hard to imagine hiding away in a cramped zone for seven years. Obviously, the alternative was much worse. What impressed me most was seeing life from the point of view of a slave. Even when given a "good life" -- fed and housed properly, not beaten or raped -- why would a slave wish to be free? Harriet Jacobs explains. My heart fell for her when she realized the prejudice that pervaded the North. Even when free, she was not. Although we think we know slavery, we do not know it until we feel it. Harriet Jacobs helps us understand its real meaning.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    I cheaped out buying this ver of this magnificent book. After reading about 3/4 of it and wondering what the heck was going on with the vocabulary and usage of the English language, I went in find of a paper copy at my local library. Now, either all the other legit editions out there have glossed over the strange and colourful usages of language, or there is something fishy about this edition. I have to say that reading it this method gave me fresh ways to think about the content itself, but ultimately I found the usages distracting and odd enough that they didn't ring true. I would love any insight anyone might have about this edition. How did it come into being? If you are looking for an authoritative text, spend the additional ten bucks and obtain the other version.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    This book was one of the most heart rending, stirring narratives I have ever read. I now live in Frederick Douglas country close by where he was born... Frederick Douglas is a profoundly gifted writer that tells his story in a method that is poetic. This book gave me an even greater appreciation for all he endured, for all he overcame and lived through and for what he became! What an inspirational story that helps us all appreciate the life he lived and the impact he has had on millions of people! EXCELLENT read. Now I am on to the later, longer ver of his writings.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (AmazonClassics Edition) []  2020-1-17 20:20

    Illuminating. Beautiful much a must read if you are interested in history, black history, slavery, 1800s, civil battle causes, etc. However overly long. Several parts are really interesting: Douglass' insights into his own experiences as a slave; his insights into the stratification of slaveholder society and the ironic "prisoner of their experience" result on the slaveholders; and his post-CW tour of the European countries and his thoughtful insights into old civilizations are foremost. His wisdom is apparent. His flaws are exposed. This is the true history that isn't taught in mainstream schools. Should be a part of home school studies. Very helpful to me. If you are trying to even partially understand slavery, I would recommend two extra books, COMPLICITY and SLAVERY BY ANOTHER NAME. Both are available on Amazon.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Signet Classics) []  2020-12-1 20:1

    This autobiography was assigned to me when I was a junior in high school. Three years later, as a sophomore in college, I was asked to read the book again for my class on Black Thought and Literature. I want that I had taken the time to slow down and yze Frederick Douglass' narrative from a literal, ytical, and figurative perspective. Had I done that the first time around—as opposed to treating the book as another needed reading that I required to speed-read through—I believe that my understanding would have been more in-depth and meaningful. The emotion and conviction with which the author writes is not only poetic and moving, but captivating as well. The imagery, combined with Douglass' views on religion's role in the enslavement of black bodies, masterfully paints a story that (in combination with other narratives) has, unfortunately, been lost throughout time. In fact, a lot of Black writers during this period refused to publish their experiences for fear that they will be caught and returned to slavery. In other cases, some writers used pen names to add some anonymity to their experiences. Nevertheless, such works should be cherished and valued; for they let us to gain a better understanding of how far our society has come, and how much more needs to be done to ensure a future where everyone is equal (in the truest sense of the word).

    0  


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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Signet Classics) []  2020-12-1 20:1

    Amazing read. It took me a small less than 2 weeks to read this book. I only read it on the train to and from work so when I did [email protected]#$%! I had mixed feelings. I wanted to know more about his life once he was finally in the free state. He didn't explain how he navigated through the slave states to reach his final destination. He gave his reasons. Understandable for the time which was before emancipation but I was still curious and looking forward to reading about that. Also at the end he says he sent for his wife...She wasn't mentioned throughout the entire book then she pops up. Where and when did they meet? I'm really nip picking but overall a very amazing read. I definitely took advantage of the dictionary that was available on Kindle Unlimited. This guys vocabulary was crazy also some words we just don't use in today's world. Looking for another book to obtain lost in.

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    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Signet Classics) []  2020-12-1 20:1

    Illuminating. Beautiful much a must read if you are interested in history, black history, slavery, 1800s, civil battle causes, etc. However overly long. Several parts are really interesting: Douglass' insights into his own experiences as a slave; his insights into the stratification of slaveholder society and the ironic "prisoner of their experience" result on the slaveholders; and his post-CW tour of the European countries and his thoughtful insights into old civilizations are foremost. His wisdom is apparent. His flaws are exposed. This is the true history that isn't taught in mainstream schools. Should be a part of home school studies. Very helpful to me. If you are trying to even partially understand slavery, I would recommend two extra books, COMPLICITY and SLAVERY BY ANOTHER NAME. Both are available on Amazon.

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    Scourge of Henry VIII: The Life of Marie de Guise []  2020-1-16 7:7

    What a woman she must have been...constantly being betrayed (by family, countrymen, and external opponents alike), yet still maintaining an equanimity rare among the ruling elite. Unfortunately, everyone (except her parents) failed her; through betrayal, unfulfilled promises, foolishness, and old fashioned greed. She was most certainly one of the greatly wonderful women of that wonderful era! Awesome.

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    Scourge of Henry VIII: The Life of Marie de Guise []  2020-1-16 7:7

    I've read so much of Mary Queen of Scots and of the Scottish kings but never had any exposure to Marie De Guise, Mary's mother. She came from the sumptuous French cord into the rough and tumble of Scottish politics . One must have had to tiptoe around the tumultuous French English and Scottish environment . This was a amazing book if you're into UK history.

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    Scourge of Henry VIII: The Life of Marie de Guise []  2020-1-16 7:7

    I knew nothing about Marie de Guise and thought the book very interesting until finding, to my disappointment, that nothing the author wrote was substantiated by references from where her info was received. In other words this is an historical novel and not a piece of history. I must look elsewhere for the true thing.

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    Scourge of Henry VIII: The Life of Marie de Guise []  2020-1-16 7:7

    What an perfect book this was on Marie de Guise. Ms. Melanie Clegg did her homework when writing this and I thank her very much.

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    Scourge of Henry VIII: The Life of Marie de Guise []  2020-1-16 7:7

    Marie de Guise was mother and regent of Mary. Queen of Scots. Even though she ruled Scotland effectively, her accomplishments have largely been overshadowed by Mary, Queen of Scots failures. In the first biography of Marie de Guise in over thirty years, Scourge of Henry VIII brings Marie de Guise’s story to light. Marie is portrayed as a woman of keen intellect, charm, hard-working, and energetic as she continually fought to secure Mary’s inheritance. Marie de Guise was from the strong de Guise clan. When she was eighteen, she married the Duc de Longueville. She gave birth to Francois d'Orleans. The marriage was happy, but short-lived. Louis fell ill and died, leaving Marie de Guise a widow at the age of 21. Marie de Guise was satisfied enough to remain single. Unfortunately, she had two royal kings seeking her hand in marriage, James V and Henry VIII. According to this biography, Marie de Guise was inclined to marry Henry VIII. However, she left the decision to King Francis of France. King Francis wanted to hold up the alliance between Scotland and France and agreed to allow James V have Marie. Marie married James V through a proxy marriage and sailed for France. Her marriage to James was short-lived. She had five children, but only Mary, Queen of Scots survived. Defeated by the English at the War of Solway Moss, James fell ill and died leaving his daughter Mary queen at 6 days old. The regency of Mary, Queen of Scots fell to the Earl of Arran instead of Marie. It would take twelve years for her to be Regent, in which she ruled for eight years. She struggled with the rise of Protestantism, her conflict with England, and keeping her daughter’s inheritance secured. Thus, Marie De Guise’s struggle for power was long, but she continued to keep power till her death. Overall, this biography showed Marie de Guise to be a capable and politically-adept ruler. Scourge of Henry VIII is a comprehensive and light read for the general reader. There were a few historical errors, and I thought that there should be a more appropriate title for this biography. Nevertheless, it sheds light on Marie de Guise’s accomplishments. Marie de Guise learned from her mother-in-law Margaret Tudor’s failures. While Margaret’s marriages created her lose her authority as regent, Marie de Guise did not remarry so that she could still hold her authority. Mrs. Clegg compares her to Elizabeth because the two created sacrifices for their realm. Thus, Marie de Guise was a better ruler than her daughter, who has largely eclipsed her in fame. Hopefully, Marie de Guise’s story will be more known and she will be given the attention and credit of a capable ruler as she deserves.

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    Scourge of Henry VIII: The Life of Marie de Guise []  2020-1-16 7:7

    I really liked this work, mostly because I learned a lot of fresh things regarding Marie de Guise. Too often is she portrayed as conniving and devious, but here I discovered a noteworthy, admirable woman. In a lot of respects I discovered why Mary, Queen of Scots, Guise's daughter, was a lot of times courageous and well-meaning.

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    Scourge of Henry VIII: The Life of Marie de Guise []  2020-1-16 7:7

    I enjoyed this book about Marie and her family! I had read a lot of books on Mary of Scotland so it was with amazing interest to read of the regency of Marie. The author really drew you into the machinations of the French , Scottish, English Courts during this time . As Mary’s mother struggled to hold the country together to pass to her daughter in this male dominated society of the 1500s . Very good!

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    Scourge of Henry VIII: The Life of Marie de Guise []  2020-1-16 7:7

    This book provides a relatively in depth look at a historical figure about whom small is known generally. However, Marie de Guise played an necessary role in shaping the Scotland that her Daughter Mary Queen of Scots would eventually rule. I found it an intriguing source of info about one of the major figures that provides a back drop to Henry VIII. Well worth reading.

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    Scourge of Henry VIII: The Life of Marie de Guise []  2020-1-16 7:7

    This is the kind of history I like. Simple to read. Not too ytical in terms of motivation or psychology- it’s almost impossible to delve into the mind of a 16thC autocratic ruler after all. I learned more about Queen Mary of Guise from this than any other chapters in other books. Her Regency was always brushed over as a blip in History- when Scotland was ruled by a council in Mary Queen of Scots absence. What an awesome self sacrificing woman. I would love to have met her. Rod of Iron for a Spine. If you like Scottish History, read this, it fills in some Huge Gaps.

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    Scourge of Henry VIII: The Life of Marie de Guise []  2020-1-16 7:7

    Melanie Clegg has an engaging writing style. I had problem putting this title down and will be exploring her other titles. She gets the concept that people don't wish to read about bersome inventory lists - something that authors like Alison Weir tends to bog down readers with.

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    My Life and Work (The Autobiography of Henry Ford) []  2019-12-23 20:6

    Reading this book has been a life changing experience for me.Henry Ford begins by laying out his background (which he'll hold smattering here & there).Then he gets into the meat of the book which is plotting his journey from the kernel of an idea to execution and ultimate e majority of the book is him sharing his worldview on manufacturing & business best practices. If you're an entrepreneur then I assure you that you'll be taken to dizzying heights at this e thrust of the book is that you obtain to see patterns of timeless business principles that still apply today.Henry Fore of course also shares his philosophy on society, governance & capitalism. I honestly skipped some of these segments that kept droning e one huge takeaway that has altered my entrepreneurial mind is this: Business doesn't exist for profit first. It exists to serve mankind & by doing so makes more than it ever could while focused solely on profitability.He gives illustration after illustration of how the Ford motor company would continually work to lower price each year to create the vehicle accessible & in doing so grow to amazing heights. A total contradiction to today's greedy company is book scream be on your shelf or read list. Definitely taking another run at it.

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    My Life and Work (The Autobiography of Henry Ford) []  2019-12-23 20:6

    This book was a disappointment to me, particularly since I admire the man and his accomplishments—especially early in his career—and that of the Motor Company. I had hoped for a more detailed historical, objective perspective of Ford Motor Company under the reins of Henry Ford during that early period; instead, this book was largely a rambling, (at times self-aggrandizing), acc of his stubborn business concepts and ideology and "Ford" method of doing vertheless, Ford was very innovative with such things as the $5/day wage for workers during 1914, but this was done largely to keep on to workers rather than experience constant turnover in workers. On the other hand, Henry Ford saw nothing wrong with the Model T, and he was very reluctant to migrate to the newer and more sophisticated Model A in the early 1930s, eventually forced to create that change by a falling shop share and downturn in interesting anecdote regarding Henry Ford's stubbornness: in a (great) vehicle book, *The Birth of Chrysler Corporation,* written by Carl Breer of Chrysler, an acc was given about the late-20s introduction of the fresh Plymouth. In this account, Walter Chrysler and his three engineering directors decided to visit Henry Ford to present off the fresh Plymouth with it high-compression engine, 4-wheel hydraulic brakes, all-steel body, etc., to share these engineering milestones with the amazing Mr. Ford, a mate of Walter Chrysler. After a tour of the Ford facility and lunch featuring carrot pie (Ford's favorite pie), a ride in the Plymouth was arranged for HF. Relatively unimpressed but polite, Henry Ford and the others returned to the plant. At the end of the visit, Walter Chrysler gave the Plymouth keys to Ford as a gift, and the Chrysler men rode back to Detroit in a onically, all of these Chrysler's pioneering-engineering firsts eventually found their method into Ford cars. Yet because of Henry Ford's stubbornness and "do-it-my-way-or-the-highway" mentality, Chrysler overtook Ford in sales around 1929 and held on to No. 2 in the industry until 1950.Overall, there are probably a lot of other books other than *My Life and Work* that would better fill the need of a amazing Ford history during the Henry Ford years.

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    My Life and Work (The Autobiography of Henry Ford) []  2019-12-23 20:6

    Awesome timeless wisdom from one of the greatest business leaders the globe ever produced!I have to add that the producer of the audio ver created a lot of mistakes in various areas in the audio book. Clearly they did not conduct any quality control before publishing. Types of mistakes: Missing sentences, wrong words used that changed the intended meaning of the text the audio ver “ We have to have money. We have to have credit. Otherwise the fruits of production could not be “engaged””The text version: “We have to have money. We have to have credit. Otherwise the fruits of production could not be exchanged”Also noise in the background in a lot of location, repetition of ry not good quality control in producing audio ver of such a unbelievable book

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    The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron []  2020-2-6 22:27

    Howard Bryant ha written a superb book on the amazing Henry Aaron. The book begins with the difficult childhood of Mr. Aaron due to racial barriers, the same barriers he confronted throughout his entire playing career. Particularly fascinating were the parts of the book that dealt with Mr. Aaron`s thorny relationship with Willie Mays. Mr. Aaron knew that he was every bit the equal of Mays in every facet or the android game of baseball, just not as flamboyant. Therefore, Henry never felt he recieved his proper due in comparison with Mays. Mr. Aaron was proven right in the long run, since when their careers were over, Aaron had surpassed Mays in every statistical category. Of courst, the book delved deeply into Mr. Aaron`s successful pursuit of Babe Ruth`s home run record, from the dozens of hate mail and death threats he recieved as well as recieving no respect from baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn. The later stages of the book dealt with Mr. Aaron`s attempt to distance himself from Barry Bond`s chase of his home run record. Mr. Aaron apparantly believed what most of the rest of societly believes, that while Bond`s ultimately passed the home run record, he took steriods to do so. A unbelievable book about one of the 5 greatest baseball players ever.

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    The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron []  2020-2-6 22:27

    I bought two books on Hank Aaron and because of the layout of one I decided to begin with "HOME RUN: MY LIFE IN PICTURES," but being possessed by the influence of the topic matter, I was not able to create that decision on my own. Hank Aaron has very powerful views on the perception that is made about him. So, the choice was accordingly. Even though, I was looking for the glamorous aspect which I thought he could provide to the fresh industry of baseball. The choice made, surprisingly gave me such much more. The book includes no easy matters, no throwaways; not even in contexted words like "babble." My research into the word, which is still on going, has uncovered a relation with the biblical acc of the Turret of Babel; the situation is prophetic. It is not a easy word as it might at first sight appear; In our time it is the put where the national anthem is in context. The national anthem relates to the rate of speech mostly. The sound produced by the geese is not that of a turkey. It is part of the ..."gleam of the morning first beam.

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    My Life and Work (The Autobiography of Henry Ford) []  2019-12-23 20:6

    Toyota clearly followed Henry Ford;s ideas and recognized him as the ing the early history of the auto industry with Ford's assessments should be needed reading before going after "Lean Certification" as they now call the logistics optimization part of the "Toyota Production System" in my opinion. The entire industry globally was about making racing vehicles. Ford saw the opportunity to go after the mass shop but in careful steps to avoid need for financing. Each factory made the money for the next much larger factory near Detroit. But he did not do that by making "cheap" cars, he did it by engineering the lighter and stronger vanadium steels he found from parts lying around the race tracks from a French racer. Then making just ONE model at a time with continuous improvements. 2, 4 and 6 cylinder models eventually..only in black but serviceable as evidenced by long life of Model A's for example.

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    My Life and Work (The Autobiography of Henry Ford) []  2019-12-23 20:6

    This book is less an autobiography than an education in business and economics with a special philosophy. It is a amazing mirror to keep up to our current business practices and economic life. Reading between the lines, it is a warning to the leveraged buyout crowd and an incentive to our economic policy makers to think again.Henry Ford has been much ridiculed and vilified. True, he was critical of much and expressed himself very strongly. He was anti-Semitic. This was not unusual in his day. This book has none of that, but you can see one source of his enmity – the banks. Then, as now, the Jewish participation in commercial and investment banks was very pronounced. Ford felt that allowing bankers in led to a loss of control and running a business in a method far various from his philosophy. He was not very positive about lawyers either.Henry Ford is also admired for the “assembly line” system of manufacturing, which he admits he got from observing a slaughterhouse operation. Ford is also known for going a long time without changing models and lowering his prices (along what we now call the learning curve). He looked for constant manufacturing and engineering improvement (what the Japanese call “kaizen”). Also, like the Japanese in later generations, he pioneered “just in time” inventories.His goal was to supply easy high quality products at prices anyone could afford. Meanwhile, he raised the average worker’s wages to unprecedented heights and instituted companywide “social services” and a special brand of vocational education for the young. In a lot of ways he was neither a capitalist nor conservative. Rather he was a progressive thinker for his time and a “distributivist” rather than a sot. One might wonder whether his philosophy, if generally implemented, would have prevented the slew of economic and industrial issues experienced since the 1930s, but it certainly justifies listening to his views and considering them biography is not missing here. I enjoyed Ford’s description of his friendships with Thomas Edison, Harvey Firestone, and the naturalist John Burroughs. I recall being taught in school or elsewhere that Ford was a not good farm boy who became a mechanic and invented a vehicle in his garage. This is misleading. His father was an affluent farmer who gave his son a nice farm eventually. Ford did not like farm work and always was looking for ways to do things efficiently. This led him to mechanics and he was not like your corner garage mechanic. He became interested in gasoline engines and perfecting them. He was more what we would call a machinist. Moreover, through self-study and practice he became what we would call an engineer. He held responsible management jobs with a steam tractor company and Detroit Edison. While doing these things he tinkered on his own time with his original automobiles. His forward thinking is illustrated by his thoughts on why corn should be used to create “tractor fuel.” Sounds beautiful modern to the ethanol only issue with this book is that the paragraphs are too darn long, but that's the method folks used to write.I came away from this book with a renewed interest in Ford, a fascinating personality. His thoughts and “credo” about business and society and the proper put of the industrialist are well worth knowing and considering. They are as relevant today as 100 years ago. If you are in business management there is even more to think about and compare with what is taught in today’s business schools. If you worry about a globe awash in debt and influenced by “bankers” and leveraged buy-out artists this book will give you more meal for thought.

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    The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron []  2020-2-6 22:27

    Amazing American Here! One Reviewer Said They Thought Of Aaron As A Lousy Human Being. At Times Aaron Was Controversial And Speak His Mind. Hank As Other Black's Entering Baseball and Other Eras of Life. All Hank Wanted Was To Be Respected, Life Wasn't Very Amazing Even Long After Jackie Robinson Broke The Color Line And Wouldn't Stand To Be Treated Unfair. It Is No Doubt A Long Book And Required To Be Told Right. One Thing For Sure As Blacks Being Able Play Was Great, Baseball Fans Realized How Amazing Players. His Career Had A lot To Be Told and Howard Bryant Does Just That! Larry V Dodson

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    The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron []  2020-2-6 22:27

    Henry Aaron is a character of my youth. I have always believed that he was the greatest player,turns out he was always the better man..This book is so well written, I cannot recommend it eat job covering Aaron’s career and life afterwards.

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    The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron []  2020-2-6 22:27

    I haven't read any of the several reviews already posted here, but I feel that author Howard Bryant has done a very thorough job in covering the baseball career and life of Henry Aaron. Having been a baseball fan a few years prior to Aaron's arrival in the huge leagues I felt as though I was reliving those years all over again. Although I'm a fan of the Detroit Tigers I do well remember Milwaukee Braves' baseball android games being broadcast here in Michigan's Upper Peninsula with Earl Gillespie and Blane Walsh doing the play-by-play. Author Bryant covers Aaron's relationship with teammates such as Spahn, Burdette, Ad, Mathews, Bruton, and so a lot of others that created up those Braves' teams. Aaron's first manager, Charlie Grimm, saddled Aaron with a derogatory nickname and was more interested in being one of the boys with his banjo playing than in leading a ball club. The fact that the Milwaukee Braves won only one Globe Series was unfortunate when they could very easily have won four. A mere thirteen years were spent in Milwaukee (1953--1965) before a squad of whippersnapper carpetbaggers moved the squad to Atlanta.Henry Aaron had established his home in the Milwaukee suburb of Mequon, and didn't relish the move to the south. Author Bryant covers in amazing detail Aaron's chase towards the hallowed record of Babe Ruth's 714 home runs, his relationship with Willie Mays, and the controversy of Barry Bonds and his eventual breaking of Aaron's record. Aaron preferred to say nothing knowing that a comment versus a tainted steroid achievement would appear as sour grapes towards having his record broken while saying anything positive would appear to legitimatize Bonds' record.We have serious biographies of Joe DiMaggio, Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, and Ted Williams, and now thanks to author Howard Bryant we can add the name of Henry Aaron to the list. If you have fun baseball books and its glorious history this is another outstanding volume for your library.

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    The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron []  2020-2-6 22:27

    The most underated athletic in sports history............This book give such amazing insight into the man and what it meant to be a Black athletic in the 50's, 60's and 70's. A must read for all sport fans.

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    My Life and Work (The Autobiography of Henry Ford) []  2019-12-23 20:6

    I just finished Henry Ford's Autobiography "My Life and Work" and was quite surprised by it. Other that 3 or 4 pages where he wonders about the "Jewish Problem" (which I would skip if I were you), the rest of the book was astounding. If all businesses were run the method he lays out in the book, the globe would be a much better place. He stated that he believed that the purpose of a business was to serve the globe in the best method possible while providing employment and compensation at a level that would enable a worker the ability to purchase every need he (or she) had. The method he describes the average worker is astounding coming from a "Captain of Industry". He also proposes the proper put for money, finance, lawyers, and managers. I was completely, and happily, blown away by his vision. Too poor as soon as he retired Ford became like every other company and through most of his ideas out of the window.

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    My Life and Work (The Autobiography of Henry Ford) []  2019-12-23 20:6

    My 15-year-old son read this book for freshman year History class (home school). This is his review:"The title of this book, My Life and Work, would be better titled, My Work and Ideals. There is very small in this book about Ford himself. If you’re looking for a book about happenings in Henry Ford’s life, look somewhere else. He spends most of the book discussing the best method to run a business, and how these methods were place to use in the Ford Motor addition, I found this book very redundant in some ways. Ford spends a chapter on each of the aspects of running a business, and how it was done at the Ford Motor Company. The ideals used in each of the chapters are really all the same, just applied in various scenarios. You could just read the first chapter of this book and save yourself the time of reading the whole thing; you’d obtain almost as much out of so I have to say that the font in this book is horrible! I don’t know about the hard cover, but the paper back’s font is super squished and hard to read. If you wish to read this book I recommend that you obtain a various copy with normal print so you can read it more easily.If you wish a look inside Henry Ford’s head obtain this book! However, if you’re looking for a book about his life and the happenings therein, there’s a better book for you!"

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    My Life and Work (The Autobiography of Henry Ford) []  2019-12-23 20:6

    This is a amazing short book for anyone interested in Ford, in business, in history. It feels just like spending about three weeks with Ford, visiting with him every day. The print is very, very small, so if you have problem reading very little print, you will need a magnifying glass. Very enjoyable book. There is as much info packed into it as a 250-page book. The chapters are concise, well-written, and well-edited. A very pleasant and thoughtful read.

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    The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron []  2020-2-6 22:27

    As some of the other customer reviewers have indicated, this is a book about America in the 1950s and 60s, just as it's a fine private acc of the amazing Henry Aaron. I found it exceptionally well-written, with the baseball action always vivid and the ulative portrait of Aaron across the decades no less riveting in a various method entirely. This is because, even with Aaron's cooperation (a coup in itself), the author had to meet the challenge of portraying a relatively personal man who never wore his heart on his sleeve (well, maybe with the exception of his uncharacteristic, in-air war with Rico Carty). Howard Bryant succeeded admirably -- his yses of Aaron the man and athlete are clear and penetrating, and the reader comes away with well-rounded pictures of both realms. No matter what cruelties he encountered (including from the press) amid his a lot of triumphs, Aaron stayed real to himself and proved to be more of unassuming role model than people knew when the steroid era dawned. Seeing locations like Mobile, Milwaukee and Atlanta through the prism of Aaron's experience, we learn a lot about America (south and north) and baseball in an era when both nation and sport moved slowly to more enlightened levels. The story of the Braves' move from Boston to Milwaukee is fascinating in itself (as are the portraits of teammates Spahn, Mathews, Ad, Bruton and Burdette). Bryant also gives us deep thematic contrasts between Aaron, Willie Mays and Jackie Robinson. There's a lot of rich baseball history in "The Latest Hero," and throughout it turrets a class act whose ambition to be the best baseball player alive was matched by his pure strength of character. A genuine page-turner.

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    The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron []  2020-2-6 22:27

    well written. I didn't know how tough it was for blacks in the south during the 1950's.

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    My Life and Work (The Autobiography of Henry Ford) []  2019-12-23 20:6

    Henry Ford was a man of vision and conviction. A man who in a lot of ways was ahead of his time. He delved and embraced a lot of locations of life and it's commitments and responsibilities. He believed in hard work, private goals and gave an explicit street map for anyone of ambition to follow. He disavowed laziness and the tendency to lazy thinking. His book is more far reaching than just manufacturing vehicles on a volume basis; it delves into what a man should set forth as a general commitment to the entire approach to how one can lead a successful and honorable life. Must read.

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    My Life and Work (The Autobiography of Henry Ford) []  2019-12-23 20:6

    My Life and Work by automotive pioneer Henry Ford is a combination of memoir and philosophical treatise. This book gives us not only Mr. Ford's reminiscences of creating his first automobiles and the Ford Motor Company, it also gives us his thoughts on business, labor, production, finance, ecology, money, railroads, farming, government, war, and humanity. It is a amazing read for those who are fans of automobiles, history, and (auto)biography. I read this as an e-book on my kindle device. Ford doesn't spend words describing his childhood, but instead starts his story with a brief description of himself as a farm boy who liked to tinker with machinery. Mechanical aptitude allowed him to move off the family farm and take a job with the Detroit Edison electric company. That job allowed him time to work on horseless carriages. Soon, the Ford Motor Company was birthed. Amazingly, by sticking with one model, the "T", Ford was able to year after year drop the price, while still making a profit. Chapter X, "How Cheaply Can Things Be Made?" describes his philosophy behind this. It is interesting that in our modern world, while the prices of a lot of products do go down once they become widely adopted, fresh automobiles do not seem to be in that category any longer. It came as a surprise to me when Ford wrote about producing just enough component parts and having them delivered to the assembly points at the time they were needed. I first heard of this manufacturing idea about twenty or thirty years ago in an article about the Japanese automakers and their "just in time" production philosophy to hold costs down, and how that should be adopted by the American vehicle companies. It is certainly obvious that the Japanese read Ford's book. While it is beautiful well known that Ford did not invent the assembly line for manufacturing, he did place it to large-scale use. His memoir tells quite a bit about early time-and-motion studies, workers doing repetitive jobs, and jobs that people with disabilities were able to do in his factories. Ford's thoughts on these subjects are interesting. As I read these, I did have to remind myself not to apply twenty-first century knowledge to early twentieth century practices. As with all human knowledge, we now build upon what we have learned from predecessors, and they just did not know everything that we know now. A lot of automakers competed in racing, giving rise to the saying "win on Sunday, sell on Monday". Henry Ford seems to have built high-speed autos reluctantly. This was another surprise. Here are two quotes that also took me by surprise, coming from a captain of early twentieth century industry: "A country becomes amazing when, by the wise development of its resources and the skill of its people, property is widely and fairly distributed." "The human race cannot forever exist half-exploiter and half-exploited." Interesting quotes in this election year, and any time. After reading this memoir, I still do not know enough about the man to decide if I like him or not. I wonder if he and Will Rogers ever met? I do believe Ford was a very interesting man, and this book should be read by anyone in business.

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    The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron []  2020-2-6 22:27

    Author Howard Bryant gives Henry (what he is called by all of his friends) Aaron, whom he calls "the most underrated superstar of all time," his due in this exceptional biography.When Aaron retired after the 1976 season, he held baseball's records for most home runs, most at-bats, most RBI, most total bases and most additional base hits. Only Ty Cobb had more hits and scored more runs. Aaron, however, never quite received the publicity he deserved during his 23-year nsidered bland by reporters, Aaron preferred to allow his actions speak for themselves. Early in his career, he was overshadowed by this Milwaukee Braves teammates--Warren Spahn, Eddie Mathews and Lew Burdette. Later, he played second fiddle to the flashy, child-like and exuberant Willie Mays and the more flamboyant Roberto Clemente.Aaron, however, didn't support his case. Suspicious of the press, self-conscious about his background and uncomfortably thrust into the pre-dominantly all-white globe of professional baseball at an early age, Aaron, a loner, built a wall around n-confrontational, he allowed writers to turn him into a caricature of a simple, uncomplicated black man who wasn't intelligent enough to understand the reasons for his the age of 24, Aaron had been voted NL MVP, played on a Globe Championship team, won a batting title and a home run crown. He was, according to the Fresh York Times, "Milwaukee's respond to Mickey Mantle."The Braves played the Yankees in the Globe Series in 1957 and 1958 and lost a three-game playoff to the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1959. Aaron always felt as if the Braves should have won four consecutive pennants.While Aaron enjoyed some of his best years from 1960-65, the Milwaukee Braves spent just four days in first put during those years.When the Braves moved to Atlanta after the 1965 season, Aaron was less than enthusiastic to return to the deep South where segregation and racism were ever present. Concerned about civil rights, Aaron was reluctant to speak out and he was often criticized for his lack of involvement. He became more outspoken near the end of his career and in ter being overlooked in the 60s, attention turned to Aaron in the early 70s as people realized he had a possibility to break Babe Ruth's career home run mark. The quest to break Ruth's record became joyless as hate mongers threatened Aaron. Even baseball snubbed him when Commissioner Bowie Kuhn wasn't show for his 700th homer and baseball didn't recognize the achievement in any unique way.Aaron, the first player to collect 3,000 hits and 500 home runs, resented being considered a one-dimensional power hitter and being defined by his home run ter the Braves created small or no attempt to hold him after the 1974 season and didn't seriously consider him as a potential manager, Aaron was traded to the Milwaukee Brewers. Although it was a possibility for the financially struggling Aaron to money some hefty checks, all the magic was gone. In two seasons with the Brewers, he batted .234 and .229, slugging a total of 22 home retirement, Aaron prospered financially and created peace somewhat with the baseball establishment. Although he hoped to be the first unanimous selection to the Hall of Fame in 1982, Aaron received 97.8 percent of the vote, second highest to Cobb's 98.2 percent.

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    The Last Hero: A Life of Henry Aaron []  2020-2-6 22:27

    I did not know much about Henry "Hank" Aaron other than he was a popular baseball player. This book was TOOONG with a lot of trivial fillerinformation. Bottom line: Aaron was a amazing baseball player but a lousy human being in my opinion. Read the book and may each reader decide their own opionion!

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    The Art of Biblical Narrative []  2020-2-6 20:47

    This book completely changed the method I read scripture and interact with it. Although I did need a dictionary at hand in order to understand him, I would highly encourage everyone to take the time to read this book! Definitely a must read!!!

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    The Narrative of Sojourner Truth []  2020-1-30 21:27

    This narrative about the life of Sojourner Truth was dictated to her mate Olive Gilbert in 1850. However, Sojourner Truth who was born as Isabella Baumfree, went on to live until 1883; so, this is only a partial acc of her e was born as a slave in the state of Fresh York and spoke Dutch most of her young life. Her siblings were sold but she and one other sibling where kept along with her parents for much of her upbringing. Some accounts of her life were too painful for her to share, but we know that she was not allowed to marry the man she loved but went on to join in an unofficial marriage with an older e had five kids and the first born is believed to belong to her master. That kid always remained with the father on the farm or plantation for the rest of her life. She left the other kids except for her infant daughter with the husband after gaining her freedom in the 1820’s and moved to Fresh York City. Isabella’s youngest son had been illegally taken to another state and she was able to have the courts help her in getting him back. He did not know her and had been scarred from beatings but over time, they were reunited and the three of them stayed in the town for some years.Her faith deepened and she experimented with various religions. She always adhered to the Golden Rule and it served her when she felt as if she was losing her way. Her kids grew into adulthood and her son took a job on a ship after having a few bouts with the law. She left the town because of its negative influence and moved northward. Isabella felt that she was called to share The Word and preach what she had learned to e moved north to Connecticut and took on the name of Sojourner Truth. Thus, her evangelism began, and she preached morals and responsible living to unruly crowds. After staying in Hartford for a while, the record shows that she created her method to Massachusetts. Perhaps this is where she met the abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison who privately published this narrative and vouched for her strength of hero at the end of the this narrative, we do not hear her ver of her popular Ain’t I A Woman speech where she bared her chest to prove her point. This happened in 1851 at an Ohio Women's Rights Convention, but we do obtain a possibility to see what shaped this remarkable woman. She finally place down her traveling shoes and settled in War Creek, Michigan where her journey ended.

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    The Narrative of Sojourner Truth []  2020-1-30 21:27

    So fascinating to read a slice of history! This is Sojourner Truth's narrative of her own life. She was illiterate, so someone else wrote down her words. She carried this slight book with her to sell when she toured the country speaking about the ills of slavery and about women's rights. So a lot of authors have written about Sojourner Truth, but there's nothing like hearing a person's own words.

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    The Narrative of Sojourner Truth []  2020-1-30 21:27

    A strong and emotional reading experience, one that should be needed reading in Middle School, as I agree with one reviewer's journer Truth was born into slavery in the northern state of Fresh York around 1800, and escaped into freedom a year before the state abolished slavery within its borders. Her given name was Isabella Baumfree, and she changed her name to Sojourner during her travels. An abolitionist, women's rights activists, itinerant preacher, she's an extremely necessary figure for this period of American history. And, her story is both brutal and inspiring. Brutal, because the nature of slavery is just inhuman, and inspiring, because her private connection with God and Jesus served as a source of strength for her her entire ere are a lot of notable things from this biography for me. First, Sojourner was illiterate, as a lot of blacks and women were during her time. This is not her autobiography, so do not come to this book expecting her words. The book is written by Sojourner's mate Olive Gilbert, who wrote from Sojourner's dictation of her memoirs. As such, there is much of Gilbert in the writing, as is to be expected. Additionally, Sojourner was a very religious woman, and spirituality plays a important and immediate role in this book, as it did in the lives of a lot of people who lived in these times.I picked up this book because I was inspired by my 4th grade daughter's book - in her social studies section of class, she is reading Freedom Crossing, a fictional acc of the Underground Railroad. When I told her about Sojourner Truth, she was shocked that there were slaves in the North. And that when they were freed, the majority were left to starvation and destitution. I hope she picks up this narrative at some time in the next few years. I know I will encourage her in that regard.

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    The Narrative of Sojourner Truth []  2020-1-30 21:27

    I didn't know Sojourner Truth was so feisty and determined. I search the narrative hard to read. It's so heartwrenching to read that each of the 11 kids of her parents were taken from them and sold off so young. You can feel the pain in the words of her parents. That was something Sojourner was not going to experience regarding her 5 year old son. I'm still reading Sojourner's experience which I search compelling. I recommend this strong read.

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    The Art of Biblical Narrative []  2020-2-6 20:47

    A "must-read" for those interested in bettering their understanding of the Hebrew scriptures. Alter's work is geared to support readers readjust their reading glasses, to place on the perspective of ancient readers, to learn how to detect the method biblical writers crafted their stories with subtlety. The scriptures are more tragic, more funny, more ambiguous, more challenging, than a superficial reading suggests, and Alter helps provide tools whereby these elements of the scriptures can be drawn out. He provides principles and examples, not static checklists. Loved it.

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    The Art of Biblical Narrative []  2020-2-6 20:47

    This work can expand your thinking about all things literary, especially the Bible. After reading this I have come to the realization that the story of The Samaritan Woman in the Gospel of John is a type-scene of the betrothal repeated several times in the Hebrew Bible.

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    The Art of Biblical Narrative []  2020-2-6 20:47

    Robert Alter is a national treasure. Anyone who has read his brilliant translations of the Five Books of Moses, The Psalms and most of all the two Books of Samuel, has come away with their understanding of those texts profoundly this relatively slim book, Alter looks at the techniques used by the authors of the "Old Testament" to tell their stories and paint their characters. Alter, first of all, is a superb reader of these texts and he gives them a thorough word-by-word ysis that brings out all kinds of interesting nuances.He also explains in subsquent chapters some of the accepted conventions of biblical story-telling including stock scenes like the "annunciation by the well" stage that pop up repeatedly (Rebecca, Jacob and Rachel amd Moses). He explains how minor variations in these scenes have ter also discusses the use of dialogue as a narrative technique and the method the biblical authors brilliantly deploy dialogue again to illustrate character. He discusses the "laconic" style of the Bible in which words are not wasted and action or description that is deemed unnecessary to telling the story are left out. That means that every word that is included is there for a is is a book that everyone who loves or honors the Bible or who feels that this ancient text is worth studying and understanding should read. It will not threaten anyone's faith but it will deepen their appreciation and comprehension of these unbelievable stories.

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    The Art of Biblical Narrative []  2020-2-6 20:47

    If you are interested to know how to benefit more and understand Old Testament historical accounts better, then this book can help. I have benefitted much myself. History can be very enlightening when we know what the narator is convey. A lot of helpful clues can be found in this book

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    The Narrative of Sojourner Truth []  2020-1-30 21:27

    This is a very thin book, a total of 45 pages. It has none of the content as found in the other books called the Narrative of Sojourner Truth. If you are looking for the Narrative also called the Book of Life this is not it. Look for a copy that has closer to 300 pages. It was cheap and there is definitely a reason.

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    The Narrative of Sojourner Truth []  2020-1-30 21:27

    I expected to journey through Sojourner's life and be immersed into the time period to better understand her inspirations and contributions. This is not written as a biography, it's more of a spiritual narrative, which isn't such a poor thing. There are some thought provoking moments, but a lot of of them are based on the author's spiritual 'asides' as opposed to learning from her life lessons. It read more like literature.

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    Horrid Henry Big Box of Pranks [App]  2020-7-10 13:52

    I love this android game it is so fun and it is amazing for people that hate school🤣is is when you can do pranks and you have a time limit and the more points you obtain the less time you have and you can unblock loads of android games until you are the master! it looks a bit babyish but trust me it is not my dad loves it so much he can't stop playing it like me I hope this incoriged you to play it and of you do obtain it tell your freind s to obtain it to so the hole globe obtain it

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    Horrid Henry Big Box of Pranks [App]  2020-7-10 13:52

    just this is a fun android game for people who hate school😆

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    Horrid Henry Big Box of Pranks [App]  2020-7-10 13:52

    Did not like the gruesome nosed girl I would rate 5 stars if you could delete any sign of the gruesome nosed girl

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    Horrid Henry Big Box of Pranks [App]  2020-7-10 13:52

    I just got it with no permission It is so amazing I have wanted it for ages and finally got it

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    Horrid Henry Big Box of Pranks [App]  2020-7-10 13:52

    Well this is one of the best android games I played

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    Horrid Henry Big Box of Pranks [App]  2020-7-10 13:52

    Asome android game love it

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    Horrid Henry Big Box of Pranks [App]  2020-7-10 13:52

    Love it

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    Horrid Henry Big Box of Pranks [App]  2020-7-10 13:52

    Absolutely Awesome

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    The Art of Biblical Narrative []  2020-2-6 20:47

    love this book. I am only on page 40 but am really enjoying every bit of it. Anyone interested in the Bible should read this book or any books by Robert Alter. He illuminates subtle literary devises in the text that you wont search anywhere else in Biblical scholarship, except maybe if you were a Torah Scholar and studied the Midrash Tanchuma (Hebrew commentary on the 5 Books of Moses) and understood it completely. But then Professor Alter translates all this into understanding the structure of well-written prose or poetry. Anyone who writes plots or makes film, or is interested in Joseph Campbell will search this extremely rich in content. He suggests that the Bible is not fictionalized History, but historicized fiction, a proposal too blasphemes for most "believers" to entertain, yet in reading this book, we search that it is not so blasphemes at all. This book will push your study of ancient Hebrew texts to a fresh level. All educators should read and be familiar with Professor Alters work. I think he is a breath of new air that encourages, not dissuades, people from going deeper into study of the Bible, from the secular to the ultra orthodox. It is densely written so if you have problem with huge words or lofty word filled sentences, this might be a problem, but I found each sentence strangely palpable and easily digested even for the non-scholar, mostly illiterate-type like myself. The book is magical and I am ordering it for a few of my same-minded friends

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    The Art of Biblical Narrative []  2020-2-6 20:47

    This is a amazing book. I love how Alter points out the literary artfulness of some of the amazing stories of the Bible. He shows how the writers use symmetry, repetition, parallelism, wordplay, and tension to keep the interest of the reader. He begins with Genesis 38, the story of Judah and Tamar. Scholars have written this text off as a later insertion with small relevance to the Joseph narrative, but Alter shows how Judah's indiscretion is perfectly and deliberately in contrast with Joseph's purity. He notes how both narratives have themes of betrayal and deception (which is consistent with the rest of Genesis).Alter also discusses stories from the life of David, how the extensive speech by David climaxes at the point of Saul's choked cry "Is that you, David, my son?"Alter also points out names in the Hebrew Bible which carry meaning and significance for the meaning of certain e book is an eye-opening look at the narrative art found on the pages of Holy Scripture. It is well written and holds your attention. Recommended.

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    The Narrative of Sojourner Truth []  2020-1-30 21:27

    Started this book a couple of weeks ago, I'm not an avid reader (specially of the conventional kind). E-books are my ideal reading, Sorry. Attractive story, thought provoking, heart-wrenching. The separation of families, the chattel system, the cruelty on a subhuman level is just a few ways of describing 'Sojourner Truth'. Worth reading it over and over again,

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