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    Love and the Dignity of Human Life: On Nature and Natural Law review []  2020-1-22 19:52

    I heard of Robert Spaemann's work through reading Oliver O'Donovan, who translated Spaemann's "Persons: The difference between Someone and something (2006)" book into English. This is a very rich treatment of love; Spaemann follows a long Jewish and Christian tradition in arguing that love and knowledge are of one piece (he cites as an illustration Genesis 4:1, "Adam knew his wife). He takes this concept and holds it up to the light, exposing its a lot of facets. I was surprised by several points (never really considered that jealousy is a important part of unique love, e.g. for one's spouse?) and by his latest chapter focus on Brain death. His illuminating analysis created me reconsider my views on end of life issues, especially as he deconstructed the 'person' versus 'human' distinction used by a lot of ethicists and activists. This is moral reasoning of a very high order in defense of the weak, but accessible (and short enough!) that even a non-academic like myself can engage. Definitely worth the time invested; will re-read this one.

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    Love and the Dignity of Human Life: On Nature and Natural Law review []  2020-1-22 19:52

    Great!

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    Naturally Natural review [App]  2019-6-10 13:21

    natural

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    Commonsense Justice: Jurors' Notions of the Law: Juror's Notions of the Law review []  2020-1-28 21:42

    Until recently, jury nullification, and the role of jury discretion, were relatively obscure topics. Although there were literally hundreds of law review articles and other academic writings on the topic, almost none of them were available outside of the larger law libraries. The newspapers discussed the subject - inaccurately and sensationalistically - and the general public had no reliable source of , however, there are several books on the topic. Godfrey Lehman's "We, the Jury" looks at the topic from a historical perspective. Jeffrey Abramson's "We the Jury" (now, sadly, out of print) and my own "Jury Nullification: The Evolution of a Doctrine" look at jury nullification from a historical rman Finkel looks at how juries work - and when and why they nullify - from a psychological and sociological perspective, using legal cases to highlight when the law fails, and how. This unbelievable work shows how jurors - and other citizens - view the law, and how the law SHOULD work, and contrast those views with those of judges and legislators.If anything, this book shows that jurors should be less shy about standing up for what they consider just. Chances are, if the jury believes the law is wrong - most of the rest of society would agree.

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    Accidental Justice: The Dilemmas of Tort Law (Yale Contemporary Law Series) review []  2020-1-22 1:53

    great

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    Accidental Justice: The Dilemmas of Tort Law (Yale Contemporary Law Series) review []  2020-1-22 1:53

    I required this book for a class I took. It is a very stupid book. It is mostly fluff and could be a just a few pages long. Once it explains how forensic economics works, it beautiful much just repeats itself for the rest of the book. I sold it on for a couple dollars as soon as the semeseter was over.

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    Divine Covenants and Moral Order: A Biblical Theology of Natural Law (Emory University Studies in Law and Religion) review []  2020-1-27 21:12

    Very thoughtful! VanDrunen advances the only contemporary biblical case in help of natural law theory that is situated in the Reformed tradition that I am aware of.

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    Divine Covenants and Moral Order: A Biblical Theology of Natural Law (Emory University Studies in Law and Religion) review []  2020-1-27 21:12

    thanks

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    Divine Covenants and Moral Order: A Biblical Theology of Natural Law (Emory University Studies in Law and Religion) review []  2020-1-27 21:12

    If you're looking for an in-depth scholarly resource on natural law from a historic Reformed Christian point of view, this is the book you want. VanDrunen talks about natural law as it is found in Scripture - specifically, as it is found in the unfolding history of redemption (including the covenant of creation/works, the Noahic covenant, the Abrahamic covenant, the Sinaitic covenant, and the Fresh Covenant).The primary structure of the 550+ page book is as follows: PART ONE - 1) the covenant of creation, 2) the Noahic covenant, 3) the judgement of Sodom, 4) the prophets and judgement, 5) an exposition of Romans 1:18-2:16. PART TWO - 6) the Abrahamic covenant, 7) the Sinaitic covenant, 8) Wisdom literature, 9) the Fresh Covenant, 10) conclusion. In each of these chapters, VanDrunen discusses the natural law themes of morality, justice, equity, and judgment. There are a lot of summary sections, which support nail down the main points of each chapter. There is a Scripture index, but sadly it is not exhaustive. After the conclusion of the book there are several doubt some readers will disagree with certain aspects of VanDrunen's exegesis and conclusions. Others will search them persuasive. Either way, if someone wants to learn about this subject in a biblical and Reformed way, this book will engage the reader in a lot of ways. Though I had a few questions here and there, I enjoyed the book - especially the section on wisdom and natural law. There are not a lot of resources like this - it surely deserves to be read and studied by those who are thinking about and doing work in the zone of natural law.

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    Divine Covenants and Moral Order: A Biblical Theology of Natural Law (Emory University Studies in Law and Religion) review []  2020-1-27 21:12

    It would seem that having the combined skills of a professor, a minister, and an attorney have placed David VanDrunen in the ideal position to study and analyze the topic of natural law as it relates to the creation of universal moral behavior.With a topic like natural law, an author has a lot of options in terms of direction. In Divine Covenants of Moral Order, VanDrunen chooses to study the earliest covenants God created with humanity and how these act as the foundation for understanding His power to govern the globe under natural law. The book also looks God's covenants with Abraham, Israel, etc. and how they established the obligation of God's people to obey natural law and wraps up expressing the importance of natural law in Christian life and the need for a solid theology. I found this section of particular interest since finishing Van Seters' Abraham in History and e viewpoint here is one of a Reformed Christian theologian and the analysis definitely adds to the current discussion. Thoroughly researched and examined, this study of natural law will likely be referenced by scholars for years to come. This will also be a amazing resource for those interested in learning more about the biblical (as opposed to secular) aspects of natural law.

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    The Laws of Human Nature review []  2019-12-21 18:51

    Reading this book as a Robert Greene fan and student of human behavior, I kept asking myself why I didn’t like it. Greene has a special bonus to pull from sources throughout history, search the underlying patterns, and pack them together into succinct universal laws. I first read The 48 Laws of Power 6 years ago and still regularly search myself quoting the laws as I apply them to my own life. Sadly, I won’t be doing the same for this can tell he place an wonderful amount of research into the subject of human nature. As I read the introduction and saw the authorities he was going to cite to create his points, I was glued and kept turning the page to see how he would pull it off. I noticed subtle changes to his style—the chapters are longer, he’s more often quoting scientific principles instead of historical examples, and each law is stuffed with definitions of various cognitive biases we all suffer from. Each time he told the story of an historical figure, I read with curiosity to search out how he would use their experience to create his point. I was disappointed with the results. It came across to me as Greene offering encyclopedic knowledge of the topics rather than presenting insightful takeaways. After a few chapters I soon lost interest and ended up skimming the is created me question why I lost interest in this book after being hooked to his previous ones—was the issue him or me? I had to compare this to his older books to search can tell this book looks slightly various from his previous ones without buying it: it doesn’t pull you in with attractive graphic design like his other books do; the table of contents is minimal, unlike his previous books where each section comes with a description; and the back cover will create you squint your eyes as it takes a second to e first law in The 48 Laws of Power is “Never Outshine the Master”. It’s 7 pages. It starts with a 3 sentence “judgement”, followed by two memorable stories: one “transgression of the law” and one “observance of the law”, with his interpretations after each. He wraps it up with his “keys to power”, which peppers in more historical examples. On the sides of the pages are quotes, poems, and short stories, all similar to the law. The graphic design and color makes it simple to scan. It’s smart, simple to read, and simple to look at the first chapter in this book. Its 28 pages. “Master Your Emotional Self”. A longer 6 sentence description. The first six pages are a story of the law and the remaining 22 are about his observations and lessons. Instead of using historical examples to persuade us, he’s quoting scientific studies and explaining various cognitive biases. The whole design is black and white, and just one quote at the end of the chapter. Instead of leaving the chapter remembering a compelling narrative about the dangers of throwing a nicer party than your boss, I’m left with a hazy memory of him listing a few cognitive biases that I generally already knew about and agreed with.I know this is a little sample size, but it shows the main differences: Human Nature is longer, trades stories for science and lectures, less memorable, and not something you can pick up for ten mins at a is book doesn’t have the charm that makes Robert Greene’s other books classics. You wont search yourself quoting a law to someone, or picking it up off your bookshelf to read a chapter you found interesting a month from now, because thats not how it’s structured. It’s long and covers a wide dozens of topics. At almost 600 pages, it feels like he sacrificed readability to fit in a few more subjects he wants you to know about.

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    The Laws of Human Nature review []  2019-12-21 18:51

    I was so looking forward to this book as his previous I found to be very much along a Machiavellian line of reasoning, baring human nature in all its uncomfortable glory. This book neither delineates human nature as it has been understood throughout the ages, nor reveals any laws, as that term could be understood. This is a self-help book that should be classified as part of the Fresh Age genre or famous psychology. As other reviewers pointed out, this book is an abrupt departure from his previous books. Those recounted OTHER amazing thinkers, pre-moderns, in their observations of actual human nature in regards to seduction and power dynamics. This time, he draws on the wishful thinking of the 20th Century that has given us the show crisis of character.

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    The Laws of Human Nature review []  2019-12-21 18:51

    This book is written in the reverse of his past works. Instead of getting historical examples and then interpretation you obtain long literal explanations of these different laws of human nature followed by a historical e change in format is not for the better nor is the execution. The true issue is that Greene goes on too long in his explanations of each law. It becomes boring at times. The discussion on narcissists borders on obsession. This book is closer to Mastery than it is his other ere's still much to like of course. I think his explanations of the laws are correct and useful. Just too much. The historical examples are perfect of course but there are too few of them.If you are a Greene fan I think you'll see this one is various and just not up to the excellence of past works. Still enjoyable and worth the purchase. Just not overwhelmingly great.

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    The Laws of Human Nature review []  2019-12-21 18:51

    1st day - Huh I guess everybody craves attention2nd day - Oh my god I have been repressing my essentially anger nature for is book rapidly alerted me to the parts of myself that I have been trying to hide from myself for addition to that this book will give you a bunch of info on how to understand and interact with other people.

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    The Laws of Human Nature review []  2019-12-21 18:51

    Its true... Its not like his other books. The format is various and yet the topic is related and has been touched on before. This is a large overhaul of info that have not been given by his other books on topics like emotional control, communication, empathy, narcissism, emotions in general like envy, aggression, pride, passive-aggression, and more. Read it and reread it.

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    The Laws of Human Nature review []  2019-12-21 18:51

    Robert Greene at its others have commented, there is a strange feel about this book. Almost as if this book had been written by a ghost writer instead of Robert Green.Whereas previous books of him were poetic and insightful this one is naive, fresh edgy, and ter much reflection, I returned both, the book and the , however, need to create your own mind. I know it wasn’t simple for me to return a book from an author I admire.

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    The Laws of Human Nature review []  2019-12-21 18:51

    So much of discovery is a find for patterns. What links to what? Which variables are related? But patterns aren’t always signs of connection or influence. They can be causal or merely coincidental. And they are seldom universal.Which is exactly why such a high percentage of scientific discovery turns out to be incorrect, or at least not complete. There is a pattern, but it’s not THE pattern – or at least not the only pattern. And, of course, patterns tend to change over time for a nearly infinite number of reasons.And that’s the method I felt about the “laws” articulated in this book. I just never got the impression that they were a complete or universal explanation. I could see the pattern. It wasn’t just pulled out of thin air. But it struck me as presumptuous to assume that the “law” was in any method complete or permanent. It might be complete some of the time in some instances. But is it really the final respond that being called a “law of human nature” clearly e issue is that laws require generalizations in order to be articulated and applied. And that might work reasonably well in defining traffic laws. Human nature, however, is far more complex and variable. Saying, therefore, that “Introverts are more sensitive and easily exhausted by too much outward activity,” or that, “To the extrovert, the introvert has no fun, is stubborn, even antisocial,” strikes me as applying two-dimensional generalizations to problems and traits that are far more complex than they can accommodate. Isn’t that, after all, part of the explanation for the rancor we currently see in our politics?I really wanted to like this book. Who doesn’t wish to know the laws of nature? Particularly now. To the point that throughout the book I went back to the marketing materials to see what I was missing. And in the “About the Author” section it describes the author as a “renowned expert on power strategies.” And that makes sense to me. And if power tactics is what you’re looking for, and you can buy into the tip - “Take message of people who praise or flatter you without their eyes lighting up,” as opposed to recognizing they may have just stepped off the red eye, then you will probably like this book very interests, on the other hand, tend more to philosophy than psychology and I do tend to believe that the Daoists create a very amazing point – reality is just too nuanced and complicated for our human brains to understand at the level we would need to lay out the laws of human nature.But if the topic sounds interesting to you, it sounds feasible that one book and one author can lay it all out, or you just like this author, please don’t allow me discourage you. (I will admit that I have not read any of the author’s other works.)He’s obviously accomplished. And if you have fun the history of psychology you’ll search a lot of gems here. For me, however, the author’s theories are just a small too assertive and built on risky generalizations to live by 24/7. But I’m not much on “power strategies,” either, so take that tip for what it is.

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    The Laws of Human Nature review []  2019-12-21 18:51

    Note: This is my private review which might be skewed by my study of Philosophy, Psychology and all of Robert's previous works, as well as my unconscious biases. Therefore, please take it with a grain of salt.I've been waiting for this book for around 5 years and after reading it cover to cover I am largely underwhelmed by its contents, I have a lot of points to voice but I wish to be concise so I'll highlight the most necessary ones in three various e Book.1) My main problem with this is book is its self-help nature. Unlike previous works which served as a dispassionate look into the dynamics of people, power, seduction, or war; this book feels like the oh so prevalent genre of self-help, telling you how you should live your life to attain "greatness" at every r instance, I quote: "You feel the need to be on top of all the info and global trends so you can control things better, but you are drowning in information. It is hard to see the proverbial forest for the trees. This is a sure sign that you have lost a sense of your priorities"2) It takes such a long time to obtain to the point and most of the chapters are convoluted, they repeat themselves and tend to be contradictory at times.3) The selection of stories are less precise in illuminating a point, sometimes it looks more like conjecture rather than an illustration of the "Law"The Message._ Most of the laws have been either illustrated before or they are plain common sense. For instance, it takes a whole chapter to understand that people tend to be grandiose but that's amazing if we can channel it._ The use of scientifically validated knowledge is unsound. For instance Greene is fond of ideas such as "Multiple Intelligences" "Emotional Intelligence" or The "10000 hour rule". These so-called theories rest on slim evidence at best and are downright misleading at worst._ Greene overlooks much of the current literature in Psychology and prefers to revert back to the ideas of arcane psychologists like Carl Jung or Sigmund Freud (The very people that the term Pseudo-Science was originally used against)*On that note, he has a persistent fixation with subjects like "the ego" and Freudian developmental phases in childhood. I tried to shrug it off at first but that’s simply impossible to overlook because the system is such a farcical approach to psychology, or as Psychological Science place it:“There is literally nothing to be said, scientifically or therapeutically, to the advantage of the entire Freudian system or any of its component dogmas.”The Author.1) With this book Greene seems to depart from his dispassionate nature, which like Machiavelli's was amazing for truly getting to the core of human interactions. Now he takes a moralistic approach arguing things like empathy and caring for others are the highest expression of human thing wrong with being a amazing person, but as this book purports to be an objective evaluation of the nature of people it should abstain from any judgmental tendencies on it, or at the very least not state these judgements as "Laws".2) The notice is tainted with political undertones, e.g. stating that we live in a disoriented era where "demagogues and tyrants" take advantage of us and our tribal tendencies. (These undertones are created explicitly in the pre-release gifts which take a very leftist approach, but I wish to leave that aside because that's not part of the book itself)I'm an apolitical person so I couldn't care less one method or another, but it's very off-putting to search this kind of rhetoric in supposedly objective l in all this is probably a amazing book for you if:1) You have zero knowledge of psychology and/or have minimal experience dealing with people.2) Or You Have a desire for Self-Help tip that can tutorial your life decisions (if that's your case).Otherwise please save yourself some time (around 20 hours) and pursue some more meaningful sources on the matter.

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    The Laws of Human Nature review []  2019-12-21 18:51

    There is a stage in Hamlet when Polonius, the self-important elderly adviser of the king, offers rather meandering and useless tip to his son. In the twenty-first century there are plenty of Polonius-like figures offering tip to the young on how to adapt to the rapidly changing world. Thankfully, Robert Greene is not one of them.While entitled the Laws of Human Nature this book is more of a practical tutorial on how to use a proper understanding of human nature to gain success socially. Greene summarizes insights from leading psychologists, biologists, anthropologists and other cognitive scientists and then embodies these ideas in role models from ancient and modern e intention is to tutorial the reader from someone who is potentially a slave to their own nature into someone who understands human nature in themselves and can use this knowledge to influence and outsmart r example, Greene summarizes Daniel Kahnemann’s insights into rational biases so that you can recognize these potential errors and avoid them in your own thinking. Another section summarizes contemporary biological theory on the emotions and shows how to use these to catalyze rather than impede your the section discussing human beings’ need for a meaning to their life, Greene shows how Martin Luther King transformed from a intellectual minister into the charismatic leader of the civil rights movement. He also dips into the more distant past for role models such as Augustus Caesar. His use of case studies saves the book from seeming like a long lecture in human e could have relied more on disciplines like neuroscience but then the narrative would not have dovetailed so well with his biographical sections. It seems like it would be hard to explain, for example, how a certain role model exemplified the correct dopamine balance.If you are looking then for a scientific/theoretical exposition of human nature there are already a lot of books written by scientists providing this theory (Behave by Robert Sapolsky is a particularly amazing one.) But if you are young, or just young in mind, and looking for a practical tutorial to success in society which connects modern culture with its predecessors you will be hard pressed to search a better rongly recommended to all those who wish a thorough grounding for understanding and then implementing what contemporary science has to say about human nature.

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    The Laws of Human Nature review []  2019-12-21 18:51

    I think this is an perfect book!! It is very well researched and full of loads of valuable information. I agree with other reviewers, in that this book is dissimilar to Robert Greene's other books. In his other books, Greene "tells" you the conclusions to reach to tutorial your actions. In this book, however, he presents all the information, but does not tell you exactly what to do with it. I actually prefer this format now that I'm older (when I was younger, I wanted books to tell me what to do and give me simple answers, but now, I wish to think about everything and draw my own conclusions). I highly recommend this book! Please tag if you search my review helpful. Thank you so much!

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    The Naturals (The Naturals, Book 1) (The Naturals (1)) review []  2020-1-23 0:11

    Well, this was quite fun! I really enjoyed the introduction into this globe Barnes has created. I'm a heavy fan of Blacklist, Blindspot and a few other crime shows, especially about FBI, so this is bound to be a amazing series for me as it progresses. (Though I've yet to watch Criminal Minds, which Jae, Sue and Almera are probably frowning upon, but this will be a summer of binge-watching, I'm telling ya!)I think the plot could have been a small thicker? The mystery kept me guessing and I actually had another suspect in mind, but the outcome created sense; most of it at least. The characters and their dynamics are a total sweet spot for me, though! My favorite out of the squad has to be Michael, because he managed to create me laugh and smile and his commentary is simply the best. The rest of the squad is on their method of being super duper amazing too, so I really hope we obtain to know them more as the books go e romance is beautiful subtle regarding the other aspects of the book. I kinda ship Cassie with (view spoiler) but I'm not opposed to the idea of Cassie and [spoilerrr]. I just feel like the latest one is a small trope-y, but it makes sense as to why it would/should/could happen and it probably will happen, so it's prime time I obtain fully on board as well. (Maybe in next book, hah!)As for Cassie, she's a decent main character, though a small lackluster in the "memorable characters" department. The rest of the characters just outshine her a little, I guess. I do like her though! She isn't perfect, but that's not what I'm looking for either. She's bound to create mistakes on her journey of self-discovery (and solving the future cases), but I have a amazing feeling that with the support of her new-found mates she will be just fine on her path. Really intrigued to search out more and can't wait for when I have time to sit down and discover what happens next!Overall rating: 3.5 out of 5.0

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    The Naturals (The Naturals, Book 1) (The Naturals (1)) review []  2020-1-23 0:11

    Rating: PG13 for violenceSex: kissesLanguage: 8 Lord's name in vainViolence: kidnapping, knifing, shootingHEA or Cliffhanger: the case is I need to read books before this one: noWould I read more of the series: yes!!Wow, this was intense! The pacing was spot on! Did not see that ending coming! This book focuses on Cassie's getting into the program, learning how to be a profiler, and getting to know the team. We learn a small about her childhood, we understand her motivation to support the FBI. She's a teenager with an unusual background, so she's confused and we are a little, too. The other characters aren't as clear, but their stories are in future books. There's also a case to solve. The plot was intricate, the villain well hidden, the romance a nice added touch. The setting was negligible, but it wasn't necessary.

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    The Naturals (The Naturals, Book 1) (The Naturals (1)) review []  2020-1-23 0:11

    You can't go into The Naturals expecting a chilling serial assassin novel that gets your heart racing in fear, characters that will create you sob for hours, or a perfectly crafted plot. But you can expect a fast and enjoyable read with some mystery and plenty of supporting characters with actual depth.(Bear with me for this incredibly short review, considering it's been a few months since I read this.)You definitely have to suspend some disbelief for this novel, but when you do, I think the idea is fantastic. Cassie has a really cool talent - give her just a few seconds and she can know plenty of info about you that you'd never have shared. I love the method Barnes writes this - it appears logical and factual on Cassie's part, not mystical and magical. This, of course, is a very desirable trait for the FBI, who already have a project started with a few other gifted teens. Though I want we had gotten a better glimpse into the inner workings of the FBI and their investigation, I still say it's a really cool concept, and Barnes certainly writes it e Naturals contains short chapters written in the POV of the serial killer, and this was a amazing addition. Definitely created it creepier and kept me on my toes. This could have been done horribly, but getting a glimpse into the action and the mind of the serial assassin was beautiful cool. I definitely think it could have been even creepier, but that doesn't really fit with the style of the novel. I think I just wanted to be scared. (My mate and I did an entire project on Jefferey Dahmer and Ted Bundy latest year. We watched interviews at midnight in the dark for it. I like the fear, apparently.)We obtain to watch Cassie adjust to living with other teenagers - Michael, who can read her emotions like a book, Sloane, a bit of an oddball who's a whiz with math and statistics, and Dean, a fellow profiler, albeit an angrier one. Romance aside, Cassie's developing relationships with them was fun to see. Everything felt very natural (ha. ha.) and each hero had their own quirks and certainly served a purpose, rather than just being there for decoration like secondary characters in a lot of novels.And, of course, we search two men for potential relationships. I'll tell you that, for the most part, the love triangle didn't annoy me simply because the plot overshadows it most of the time. It's still irritating, though. It always is. I dare you to search me one that doesn't annoy me.Overall: The fact that Barnes was able to completely surprise me with the end of the novel speaks volumes. I enjoyed the concept, the plotline, and the characters immensely. 4 stars.

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    The Naturals (The Naturals, Book 1) (The Naturals (1)) review []  2020-1-23 0:11

    I thought this was a very engaging book with enough suspense and suspects to hold me guessing. Right up until the huge reveal, I kept changing my mind. That speaks well for this suspense/mystery/thriller because that doesn't happen very often in a head so full of plots and predictions. I liked the characters, who represented a dozens of personality types with their white, black, and gray sides. I liked the concept. No, I didn't really believe the concept could happen, but I was able to suspend disbelief and just have fun the ride. The plot moved quickly and there were no noticeable lulls, but there were some sketchy relationships. That might be due to the fact that these children are all suppose to be masters of deception and detection and thus created themselves really hard to read, or it might be the fact that I smelled a more than awkward love rectangle early in the game. I honestly wasn't bothered by the Anita Blake/Stephanie Plum they are going to pass each other around relationship set-up, but I would have enjoyed a more clear-cut romance. Don't wish to write it myself, though, so I'll take what I can get. I particularly appreciated the fact that Cassie wasn't forced to join the squad and we didn't have to listen to her sullen resentment - it is a breath of new air in the YA genre. She did pull some tern pouting when she didn't obtain her way, but nothing on the scale I expected. Overall, I enjoyed this book, and I think my high school readers will as well, particularly those who have fun watching Criminal Minds or just interesting if implausible teens hunting murders read. Language and situations are appropriate for high school, but as an adult reader of YA, I got a kick out of it as well.

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    The Naturals (The Naturals, Book 1) (The Naturals (1)) review []  2020-1-23 0:11

    This book was very entertaining, although hardly a very memorable, thought provoking novel. And that's fine, sometimes you just need a light book to read fast.I liked the premise of a group of teenagers with unique profiling abilities like the squad from Criminal Minds, although you'll search that for all the praises and celebration these kids' talents keep through the book, they are not as unbelievable or natural as they seem to be. Maybe that's unfair of me, but when it came to the huge twist at the end, you realize that when it matters they are all beautiful e author tries really hard to make complex characters with dark backgrounds. She succeeds at times, and fails at others. Particularly with Cassie, the protagonist. Cassie has a tragic back story and all the elements to be interesting, but she's not. In fact, I'm tempted to describe it as a clear case of a Mary Sue. As soon as she shows up in the house, the two boys in the squad are of course interested in her, for no clear reason other than she's the protagonist. Then comes the biggest, annoying issue in this book: a love triangle that will clearly drag through the series with constant "I don't know what I want" from our damsel... Who likes love triangles? I search it hard to care in this e twist is very predictable and kind of ridiculous, but at least it opens interesting possibilities for the next book. I won't give up on these children just yet, but I hope we can see more of their abilities place to amazing use and less useless teen drama.

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    The Naturals (The Naturals, Book 1) (The Naturals (1)) review []  2020-1-23 0:11

    Actual rating: 4.5 starsOriginally posted at [...] The Story Goes...This book is about a group of five teenagers called Naturals by the FBI for their Natural and uncanny abilities the read people, to profile them, or read their emotions, or tell when someone is lying. Recruited by the FBI they keep training to support on Cold Cases but things go horribly array when a assassin starts stalking one of their own! (I am horrible at explaining books!)Let's Talk - Characters -I really loved basically all the characters. I felt like there maybe could have been a small more hero development but overall I really liked them. One thing that surprised me is that I ended up liking both the guys that begin to form the love triangle in this book, I still feel like there's one Cassie obviously likes more(though I could be wrong), but I did like both Micheal and Dean which for me doesn't happen very often. I also really liked that there was no insta love, this hero wasn't jerking around both boys and claiming to love them, she admitted she was confused and tried to stay away from them so as to not damage them. So that was refreshing. I'm really interested in finding out more about Micheal, Lia and Sloane because I feel like we don't know anything about them and I really wish to know more. The Huge Reveal - So of course there's the moment towards the end of the book where the assassin is finally revealed...and I don't know, it didn't feel as shocking as it should have. I mean it was a shock, I had never once considered that person, it never crossed my mind that it would be that person but still, I just didn't feel shocked. That whole part was a small disappointing to me. The Plot - I love mysteries and I feel like that is one genre YA is lacking in(maybe I just haven't been looking hard enough?) and obviously this is a tad unrealistic what with teenagers working with the FBI and all but it didn't feel unrealistic, it was really well written to where not even once did I question why teenagers would be working with the FBI. I also felt the suspense was done really well and like I said I don't think it's simple to figure out who the assassin is which is always a amazing thing in a mystery.Overall - I really enjoyed this book. It was fun and interesting and suspenseful and I can't wait to read the next book!

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    The Naturals (The Naturals, Book 1) (The Naturals (1)) review []  2020-1-23 0:11

    This book was great. As an adult, that survived fairly extreme abuse, it was believable to see coping skills place to use for the good. I came from a huge family and saw the various skills, shown in the book, that I had witnessed in my siblings and myself. Not to the extent the book portrayed, but still errily close to it.I was able to begin the front door an know within seconds if it was safe to go in the house. I had a brother that provoked the anger and “punishment” as a method to be acknowledged or just to prove he could take it. All of us got beautiful amazing at spotting lies, but I had one sister that would look you dead in the eye and lie about the time of day just because she could. She often used her lying ability to obtain others in problem or just to mess with people.

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    The Naturals (The Naturals, Book 1) (The Naturals (1)) review []  2020-1-23 0:11

    I think the most welcome surprise about The Naturals is that it turns out NOT to be a teen paranormal novel. Instead Jennifer Lynn Barnes unveils characters that fit more at home in those CSI/FBI-type TV thrillers. For a pleasant swerve, nary a one in the cast boasts "super powers." In The Naturals we strike up an acquaintance with Cassandra Hobbes, a 17-year-old misfit who has an uncanny knack for reading people based on their body ssie is ever haunted by the vicious unsolved murder of her mother five years ago. It's what compels her to jump at the FBI recruiter's offer to join a classified program that trains exceptional teenagers to support resolve unsolved homicides. Cassie's natural aptitude for behavioral analysis, the recruiter informs her, makes her a cinch as a the Naturals academy Cassie meets others of her ilk: Lia, the unscrupulous human lie detector; Sloane, the shy forensics analyst and statistics genius (and, also, Cassie's roommate); Michael, the vexing emotions expert; and Dean, Cassie's fellow troubled profiler. Large chunks of the book track Cassie's acclimation to her fresh environs and trying to obtain a bead on what makes her classmates tick. And, yeah, everyone's got baggage. It's kind of The OC that is being a YA read, of course it's not long before Cassie is corralled into a romantic triangle. Thankfully, the pining and eyelash batting take a backseat to what really drives the narrative. See, Cassie's ulterior motive for signing up rests solely on her obsession with her mother's death. With the FBI, she finally has the resources she requires to uncover the truth about that night five years ago. So what if the children are only ever supposed to lend an help to cold cases from behind-the-scenes? So what if the children aren't ever allowed to visit the actual crime scenes? Today, the FBI is frantically working an active case, pursuing a sly serial assassin at large. And when that serial assassin gets too close to home and compromises Cassie, can she and her contentious classmates effectively pool their talents together?If you'd already clued in to The Team and the Raised by Wolves series, then you know that Jennifer Lynn Barnes can tell a crackerjack story. The Naturals feeds off the equity built up by Barry Lyga's I Hunt Assassins (Jasper Dent) and Dan Wells' I Am Not A Serial Assassin (John Cleaver Books). It's a deep dive into the dark, terrifying corners of human psychology. It's a bit of a creepy read, the interludes that give us a peek into the mind of the serial assassin as he selects and hunts down and closes in on his victims. I'm no expert on behavioral science. I'm relying on Barnes to have done her research and that these Naturals' feats and deductions don't fall too far from what's authentic. I enjoyed reading this one, and I'm on pins and needles for that inevitable sequel. YA mysteries have certainly evolved from those old school Hardy Boys/Nancy Drew/Trixie Belden stories. The Naturals is one more absorbing YA psychological thriller. And, no, I couldn't guess who the serial assassin was. That's a amazing thing.

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    The Naturals (The Naturals, Book 1) (The Naturals (1)) review []  2020-1-23 0:11

    Nothing is more terrifying than a serial assassin hunting in your back yard. Well, maybe a horde of zombies, but one is more likely than the other. In Jennifer Lynn Barnes' first book of a fresh series, The Naturals, she explores the desperation of the FBI to catch these brutal hunters, even if it means she has to enlist the support of some ssie knows her grandmother loves her, but after her fake-psychic mother was murdered and Cassie was the one to stumble upon the crime scene, living with her grandmother has always left her feeling like an outsider. When she is approached by a boy sent by the FBI to consider entering a unique program of other Naturals, she assumes they are just messing with her. But the offer is real. There is a unique group of children who are Natural profilers, genius statisticians, and human lie detectors who can swing the effect of any investigation. They aren't allowed into the field, but the agents house them in an old mansion and ask them to review cold cases in the hopes of solving previously unsolvable crimes.Michael brings her around to meet the other kids, but while he is welcoming, the others aren't exactly interested in her presence. They all live in a house with pictures of serial assassins on the walls, but that isn't even the strangest thing about the place. Liv can read lies and Sloane is like Rain Man (and a klepto). But mysterious Dean is the unreadable member of the team. The agents wish to ease Cassie into the process, but when a serial assassin starts hunting in the middle of the city, they obtain desperate. The children aren't willing to stay on the sidelines, though, and their meddling gets them, Cassie in particular, the attention of the one person they don't want: the serial e Naturals was my first experience with Barnes, and I have to say it was definitely a amazing one! The story was a nice mix of slightly paranormal (the kids' "natural talents" feel a small like unique abilities) and a crime mystery. The serial assassin is a beautiful creepy twist with unique short chapters between Cassie's chapters where you obtain inside the killer's head. Creeptastic! Barnes did a amazing job of building enough suspense that you couldn't place the story down, and better yet, it seems we will have a sequel to look forward to. The one aspect of the story I struggled with was the boys. Michael and Dean are supposed to be the Cassie Love Triangle, but neither really appealed to me. I was more interested in quirky Liv and Sloane than I was the boys, which created it tough to be too invested in the little amount of romance in the story. But Dean has a promising back story that could obtain e story can be kind of gruesome at times. Basically, if you would allow a child watch Criminal Minds, they could read this book about these serial killers. The house the children live in is a small morbid, but it adds to the creep factor of the whole place. The story was fast-paced and incredibly interesting, so it would be amazing for any reader interested in mysteries or crime writing. I am looking forward to the next story to see what happens to all the Naturals!

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    The Naturals (The Naturals, Book 1) (The Naturals (1)) review []  2020-1-23 0:11

    Sure, there were no true "super" powers, but Batman always was more my speed... And how did I NOT see the killer?!!?Cassie's like any other traumatized, road intelligent kid: always assessing and waiting for the other shoe to drop, but she takes it one step further as she automatically catalogues the characteristics, behaviour and min info about everyone she meets, getting inside their re, she could be the next scammer on the rise, like her murdered mother before her, but Cassie's too deeply ensconced in the bosom of her newly acquired loud Italian family to be a scheming plotter and so far there's no Clyde to create going Bonnie worth at's e's about to obtain a crash course in how to use her powers for amazing (well.. for the DBI, anyway) and maybe support catch some VERY naughty villains along the e can do e's a riously: amazing book. Perfect plot filled with just enough teen drama to create you roll your eyes, while the hero building makes you wish to smiffle (smile while you sniffle)... If you're the e driving pace of this procedural just kept rushing you along with the tide and you never wanted it to stop twisting you around it's blood smudged small ing the next book NOW!

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    Justice for Some: Law and the Question of Palestine review []  2020-1-22 1:50

    In "Justice for Some," Professor Noura Erakat delivers an anti-Israel tirade in the antiquated terms of e main target of Professor Erakat’s assault is the 1922 British Mandate for Palestine (the BMP), the League of Nations law that enabled the creation of the State of Israel. The professor declares that the BMP institutionalized a “racist,” “settler-colonial,” “Apartheid regime” of “oppression” dedicated to the “juridical erasure” of the Palestinian people. Equally extreme is her view of the Oslo Accords, the set of agreements signed by Israel and the Palestinians in the 1990’s to resolve their longstanding feud. She condemns the Oslo peace process as a continuation of oppressive “colonial practices.”To combat the alleged colonial oppression, Professor Erakat recommends worldwide “resistance,” described as a blend of economic and legal activism versus Israel. These “coercive pressures,” she contends, would reverse the legal injustices of the past, “dismantle” Israel’s “illegal … colonial infrastructure,” and “liberate” akat champions two similar forms of resistance: the BDS movement, a boycott campaign “aimed at isolating and shaming Israel;” and “lawfare,” the use of legal strategies to hurt a political enemy. She agrees with BDS leaders that all Palestinians should be allowed to relocate to Israel under a supposed “right of return.” Regrettably, she omits the fact that such a novel population shift would create Israel a majority-Arab state. Even more disturbing, she enjoys hinting at the prospect of “Palestinian sovereignty” over Israel. Although the professor maintains that “armed struggle” is available to Palestinians “as a matter of legal right,” she considers BDS and lawfare more essor Erakat is not the first Palestinian to assail Israel with the debunked Marxist rhetoric of oppression and resistance. The Palestine Liberation Organization has been spewing the same hate-filled jargon since its founding in 1964. The only difference between the two manifestos is that one would annihilate Israel through terrorism while the other would do the job through the cynical weaponization of economics and instream scholarship on the BMP confirms the mandate reflected a valid recognition of Jewish self-determination, not an act of colonial oppression. The law was approved unanimously by a vote of all League of Nations members, not just the “colonial powers.” The amazing powers did not even share a common political goal, allow alone a scheme of oppression. They competed shrewdly for influence over the areas topic to the League’s mandate system. Amazing Britain, the empire that most actively prepared the Jews for statehood, soon became the movement’s most strong opponent. Moreover, the Jews could not participate in the League’s BMP vote because they lacked membership in the globe body.Far from serving as agents of any colonial hegemons, the early Zionists immigrated to Palestine to escape the persecution of those regimes. Another 800,000 Jewish immigrants came to Palestine from the Arab world, including the Jordanian-occupied East Jerusalem and West Bank, where they had suffered a brutal ethnic cleansing. Jews from all hemispheres migrated to the “Land of Israel” because that was their ancestral home. There, they supplemented indigenous Jewish communities much older than the region’s first Arab dwellings.Middle East Arabs won the greatest share of mandatory bequests. They gained four huge fresh states: Lebanon; Syria; Iraq; and Transjordan (present day Jordan). By contrast, their Jewish neighbors had to settle for a much smaller tract because Amazing Britain reallocated 77% of their League-designated location to make Transjordan. The Arabs could have celebrated their vast, newfound sovereignty. But instead, in 1948 they waged a five-state military jihad versus Israel and grabbed portions of the Jewish foothold for themselves. That illegal offensive was the true “oppression” that turned the BMP border-drawing exercise into perpetual ethnic an international lawyer, Professor Erakat must realize that expunging Israel through terrorism or any other manner would violate the animating principle of the United Nations. Article 2 of the UN Charter requires nations to settle their differences “by peaceful means” without harming the “sovereign equality,” “security,” “territorial integrity,” or “political independence” of any a human rights lawyer, Erakat should know better than to portray the existence of Israel as a racist endeavor. That unfounded charge constitutes antisemitism as defined by the International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance and officially recognized by the US, Canada, 24 EU member states, and five other state signatories. She compounds the human rights affront by endorsing the BDS movement. A September 23, 2019 UN report titled “Elimination of all Forms of Religious Intolerance” determined that BDS is a form of antisemitism.A less biased study of legal claims in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict would have considered both sides of the debate. The author would have acknowledged Israel’s indigenous rights, self-determination rights, and sovereign rights to the areas in dispute. She would have weighed possible remedies for the Jewish refugees from East Jerusalem and the West Bank. And she would have backed at least one legal measure to curb terrorism. Sadly, “Justice for Some” demands justice only for Palestinians.

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    Justice for Some: Law and the Question of Palestine review []  2020-1-22 1:50

    Amazing book on the history of the Israel-Palestine conflict form a legal perspective. Erakat talks about how Israel's legal maneuvers in not withdrawing from the lands it occupied during the 1967 battle through a loophole. It skirted occupation law and the Geneva conventions so it could move civilians into those lands. It used maximum force on armed resistance not as a police force, but not battle either (because then they would concede that the location doesn't belong to them), but something on the cusp of war. Finally, it treats anybody employed by Hamas as part of Hamas, i.e., as terrorists, so it's begin season on Gazan civilians come wartime.

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    Justice for Some: Law and the Question of Palestine review []  2020-1-22 1:50

    Really enjoyed and informed my perception about the Palestine Question and the logical explanations to history happenings similar to this Question, I really recommend anyone from any background to read and highlight the interesting analysis in this book, since they are strongly connected to the understanding of International law and its dimensions.

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    Justice for Some: Law and the Question of Palestine review []  2020-1-22 1:50

    Enlightening book.

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    Constitutional Law and the Criminal Justice System review []  2019-12-24 19:20

    I am taking a class that is not my favorite subject. This book has lots of info about court cases and laws that you will need in a criminal justice classes.

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    Constitutional Law and the Criminal Justice System review []  2019-12-24 19:20

    Item as described.

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    Constitutional Law and the Criminal Justice System review []  2019-12-24 19:20

    Not sure why I bought it, though.

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    Constitutional Law and the Criminal Justice System review []  2019-12-24 19:20

    Amazing

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    Constitutional Law and the Criminal Justice System review []  2019-12-24 19:20

    I have ordered several rentals on Amazon and have never had a problem. The info is delivered quickly and accessing the textbook is fast and simple through the Kindle app. Its a large savings over buying the textbook!

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    Constitutional Law and the Criminal Justice System review []  2019-12-24 19:20

    Much cheaper to rent here than at my university

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    Constitutional Law and the Criminal Justice System review []  2019-12-24 19:20

    I really do like this book. The author writes really well and clearly and simply. The only issue I had woth renting was the book came with something pink and sticky on a couple of the pages.

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    Constitutional Law and the Criminal Justice System review []  2019-12-24 19:20

    very concise and informative regarding the Constitution and different cases

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    Constitutional Law and the Criminal Justice System review []  2019-12-24 19:20

    It's a textbook, what do you expect?

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    Summary of The Laws of Human Nature By Robert Greene review []  2019-12-24 19:19

    I got a amazing deal out of this book. I do comprehend the reactions that Harari can be unfocused in this rundown of exercises, or rather inquiries without clear answers (however what's going on with that?), and it isn't exactly the must-peruse that was Sapiens and even Homo Deus.If just there was an approach to create everybody on the planet read Harari and have some genuine point of view beautiful much all that is going on. Truly, those with power might be only the sorts to not to look for truth- - as is expertly clarified inside - yet it beyond any doubt would be pleasant on the off possibility that they read more.

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    Summary of The Laws of Human Nature By Robert Greene review []  2019-12-24 19:19

    This is a amazing book to read and learn, it covers about various characters and how to be a better person in live. I recommend this book if you're in sale or just be a better person.

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    Summary of The Laws of Human Nature By Robert Greene review []  2019-12-24 19:19

    This book was requested by my son, he really likes it

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    Summary of The Laws of Human Nature By Robert Greene review []  2019-12-24 19:19

    Another amazing masterpiece of literary genius. A very concise yet straightforward explanation of the 18 chapters, that give readers a digestible snapshot of the course at hand. A very amazing read!

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    Entertainment Law: The Law Student's Guide to Pursuing a Career in Entertainment Law review []  2020-1-24 21:53

    You mean the law student's tutorial to selecting courses and looking for a thing in here about the actual practice of law ---sound familiar?

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    Entertainment Law: The Law Student's Guide to Pursuing a Career in Entertainment Law review []  2020-1-24 21:53

    Super useful info for someone who is trying to obtain themselves together and obtain serious about entertainment law. Does everything work? I can't say- only time will tell for me. For now, it's still amazing information.

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    Entertainment Law: The Law Student's Guide to Pursuing a Career in Entertainment Law review []  2020-1-24 21:53

    I read this book cover to cover, expecting to learn something more than what I could search on my own online. Boy was I disappointed. A mentor of mine recommended this book, as I wanted to spend my 2L summer learning all about entertainment law. I take it that he never read this book before telling me rst, there wasn't any fresh info here. Everything written could have been found online without having spent the cash for the book. That really disappointed me because I feel cheated. I wanted to learn but I just spent cash on an unhelpful, uninformative, poorly done Internet , there are a bunch of links in the appendix section, which is more than half of the book, by the way, and some of those aren't even correct. Is it that hard to create sure your links are accurate? Apparently.Overall, I am very disappointed by the purchase. I could have used the $10 on a various book that might have had some actual info in it. Serves me right, I guess. If you are a law student looking at this review, don't waste your time on this book. Google will tell you the same garbage for free.

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    Entertainment Law: The Law Student's Guide to Pursuing a Career in Entertainment Law review []  2020-1-24 21:53

    Outline is clear, simple to read, right on to point. So far so good. Hope this book will support me obtain a general idea about entertainment law.

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    Entertainment Law: The Law Student's Guide to Pursuing a Career in Entertainment Law review []  2020-1-24 21:53

    I am definitely gonna recommend this book to my colleagues as my school doesn't have that much of a sports and entertainment course directory to offer.

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    Entertainment Law: The Law Student's Guide to Pursuing a Career in Entertainment Law review []  2020-1-24 21:53

    Very informative for anyone thinking about going to grad school. She also provided resources to search a job and various organizations to join. It's a bible for law students. Amazing read

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    Entertainment Law: The Law Student's Guide to Pursuing a Career in Entertainment Law review []  2020-1-24 21:53

    interesting book on this subject I [email protected]#$%! had more information. I am deciding this as a career field.

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    Entertainment Law: The Law Student's Guide to Pursuing a Career in Entertainment Law review []  2020-1-24 21:53

    very informative book. dozens of useful and practical info on anyone interested in practicing entertainment law. i love this book. packed full of amazing information and inspiration

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    Entertainment Law: The Law Student's Guide to Pursuing a Career in Entertainment Law review []  2020-1-24 21:53

    Amazing book. Amazing author. Ms. Thomas knows the industry and how to maneuver it. I highly recommend it for law students, practitioners, or anyone interested in getting into the professional entertainment industry.

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    Entertainment Law: The Law Student's Guide to Pursuing a Career in Entertainment Law review []  2020-1-24 21:53

    A concise resource for those considering this field.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law review []  2019-12-22 18:35

    Preet Bharara powerfully narrates his own story. Hearing it in his voice makes it all the more powerful. It is a human story, a story that can be listened to and enjoyed without taking notes. He speaks in every day [email protected]#$%!&? is an elegant speech. I search it thrilling that it is like listening to a soliloquy. I hold wanting to speak up and often do. Yes, I have interrupted Preet is is not just the story of his year in and out of office. This is his story, not the story of Barack Obama and Donald Trump. It is a story about who we are and who we should be. It is also about the true globe -- it is about integrity and leadership. The meaning of truth is under fire: "The creeping contempt for truth" is e Southern District of Fresh York makes me think of Tim Russert saying: 'Florida, Florida, Florida.' At some point the entire drama will end up playing out in the center of the world, not Florida this time, but the Southern District of Fresh York.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law review []  2019-12-22 18:35

    I'm a few chapters into the book, and I'm a bit dismayed that PB didn't have some kind of editor -- or at least it seems as though he didn't. He makes a point, then makes it again, then repeats the facts that comprised the story that led to the point, then makes the point again. It's a good-hearted book, full of valuable lessons that unfortunately I felt beaten over the head with. I would like to see PB appointed to the US Supreme Court, but at the same time offer my services as a reader/editor should he decide to write another book.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law review []  2019-12-22 18:35

    This is not a Trump bashing book. Instead it is an inspiring ramble through the legal process. It looks at the process and mindset of how justice should work. I am a scientist, and I was especially impressed by how much legal investigation and prosecution has in common with lab research. Patience, continual questioning of data and bias, and the necessity to admit when you are wrong; and of course, pursuit of truth.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law review []  2019-12-22 18:35

    This is a beautifully written and thoughtful book about aspects of the criminal justice system that should be of interest to everyone. As a lawyer myself--but not one who is involved in criminal law--I found the book fascinating because it not only explains the nuts and bolts of the system, but uses stories of true people involved in it to bring it ere is also something comforting, in this fraught time, about Preet's calm, measured, even humorous tone, both in writing and speech. I have both the Kindle and Audible editions and recommend them both.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law review []  2019-12-22 18:35

    A must read for everyone vested in the rule of law and the future of America. Ordering one for my 19 y/o granddaughter now.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law review []  2019-12-22 18:35

    I enjoyed Preet's take on our justice system. He explains the method things are supposed to work (as opposed to the method Hollywood shows it), and how hard the decisions can actually be for the prosecutors, defenders, and judges. He uses actual cases to illustrate his points, and finds a method to explain the intricacies of our legal system in a method even non-lawyers can understand.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law review []  2019-12-22 18:35

    i found several passages pendantic and often thought Kindle had created unexpected jumps to sections i had read. Over all this book has intensified my distaste for the ignorant oligarchs trump has unleashed on America. i feel more confident karma will grace ex-president trump with a Fresh York orange jumpsuit.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law review []  2019-12-22 18:35

    Well written, readable and SHOULD be read by anyone who wants to understand how the Justice department denizens think and go about their work.

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law review []  2019-12-22 18:35

    Doing Justice is the best non fiction book I've read in a long time. Preet has a storytelling expertise that keeps your interest. It is so refreshing to hear someone speak with such integrity, honesty and work ethic values. His words can certainly apply to all facets of life. Amazing book. Janet Shiers, retired elementary teacher

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    Doing Justice: A Prosecutor's Thoughts on Crime, Punishment, and the Rule of Law review []  2019-12-22 18:35

    I had a hard time putting down a lot of sections of the book. To me, the most interesting and intellectually enlightening section was about soliciting info from different poor guys including terrorists and was glad to read that the patient and humane treatment worked best. Amazing read. Mr. Bharara would create a amazing US attorney general.

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    Nature's Trust: Environmental Law for a New Ecological Age review []  2020-1-17 21:25

    As an Environmental Law Professor at the University of Oregon, Ms. Wood is uniquely positioned to evaluate the success, or lack thereof, of environmental legislation and regulation since its inception. The power of this book, however, is in its relevance to both the show day and the future, as we face a rapidly changing globe with intensifying environmental consequences. The problems addressed in this book are not about the aesthetic desirability of a clean environment, but the absolute survival necessity of reclaiming the legal foundation that can sustain a delicate ecological balance, rather than the status quo that exacerbates the severe ecological imbalance threatening ourselves and certainly our children. Surveying past failures of environmental law, Ms. Wood challenges us to consider the imminent threat and pervasive consequences specifically of climate change, which she appropriately re-terms as climate emergency. The issue isn't a benign "warming" of the planet, or even what some see as a hum-drum acknowledgment that the climate is changing. It is the fact that our obsession with all things economic and material is placing us on a path to a radically various globe of climate extremes. Her impassioned call to awareness - isn't about something that "might" someday affect us - it is to recognize that relying on ineffectual environmental law is currently having truly disastrous consequences. As global, "average" temperatures rise, they exacerbate patterns of both drought and flooding, as well as intensifying extreme storm conditions like typhoons and hurricanes. These weather patterns are but the hint of the iceberg (a metaphorical iceberg that isn't melting - but can easily take down not only the Titanic, but any and all luxury cruise ships that continue on autopilot). The latest person I would expect to highlight the hopeless failure of current environmental law would be an environmental law professor, and I think this is a courageous and profoundly honest book. It is a call to reclaim the essential foundation of law itself, its purpose and meaning. The success of utilizing legal technicalities has biased courts and governmental bureaucracies toward the letter of the law - indeed we've gotten lost among the dotted `i's and crossed `t's and have sacrificed completely the spirit and intent of our environmental laws. While it appears the author is advocating a paradigm change, and that's a helpful construct to use, the actual issue is we've lost sight of the sun itself - the organizing principle of our legal maze, without which we are topic to a piecemeal, chaotic, relativistic, legal universe now threatening all we keep dear. To reclaim the legal foundation of the trust doctrine, as conceptualized here, based constitutionally on the ecological/natural world, provides an otherwise lacking common-sense approach to a legal system hopelessly complex, irrelevant and impotent. It can offer the environmental protections and behavioral guidance that we rely on a legal system to provide. Reclaiming language, Ms Wood advocates a conservative perspective in the absolute truest sense of the word, in response to the radically extremist perspective that we can live without regard to the consequences of blind resource extraction and pollution. The denialist outrage that often greets books such as this is nothing more than the cries of withdrawal of those powerfully addicted to greedy dreams of unlimited Wood masterfully contrasts the imminent threat of ecological crisis as perversely matched in degree by the impotence of existing environmental law. Seeing grievous past failures and a searingly bleak future prospect as she assesses where our current legal and ecological climate is leading us, she does not blink, there are no blinders, there is no denial. It is difficult sharing in her perception of the current state of the world. But such acute perception of "what is", also lends itself to a tangible, meaningful vision of what could be. Despite years of increasing pessimism, I experienced this book as tremendously inspiring, and dare I say, cautiously hopeful. Content aside, it is an immensely enjoyable book to read - the author uses words, concepts and history like the strokes from an artist's brush to provide context, impact and vivid color to a very bleak topic. If you value democracy this is a very necessary book to read. If law is to have any validity or meaning in the future, this book is a vital statement as for rescuing it from its lost moorings. And if you simply cherish our globe with all its ecological richness and beauty - and have a desire to see it continue, this is an absolutely essential book to read. Then, buy it for those others we know in the regulative bureaucracy, the courts, the legislative branch and for any engaged citizen of our commons.

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    Nature's Trust: Environmental Law for a New Ecological Age review []  2020-1-17 21:25

    The author is a real environmentalist, and also a professor of environmental law at the University of Oregon Law School. As such, she is very familiar and has significant expertise in the legal protections that are provided the environment by not only our myriad of statutes and regulations, but also by historical applications of the common law that have fallen into disuse in the decades since statutory law became dominant. It is her frustration with both the current state of the law and the public attitudes toward the environment that prompted not only this book, but also her help of fresh efforts to take advantage of past legal remedies. She feels that the current maze of environmental laws and regulations have become so arcane as to be opaque to all but those most steeped in their app and interpretations. This is a narrow group of government administrators, industry lobbyists and lawyers, and a few well organized environmental groups. The state’s traditional role in protecting valuable common assets has been lost amidst this quagmire of acronyms and nebulous regulations. The uninitiated have no possibility at understanding the proper role of their political leaders, and feel disconnected from the process. The author feels that the effect is a close relationship between administrators and industry, often resulting in “revolving doors” of employment between the two. She postulates that the myriad of rules and regulations enacted with the expressed purpose of protecting the environment (Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, Endangered Species Act, etc.) have instead become cars by which industry obtains permits to slowly degrade the natural resources they were intended to protect. Indeed, Ms. Woods notes that: “The agencies implementing the environmental laws have become perpetrators of legalized destruction, using permit provisions contained in nearly every statute to subvert the purposes Congress and state legislatures intended.”This slow degradation reflects a “politics of scarcity” rather than abundance. Such “(P)olitics of scarcity focus on creating legal mechanisms to allocate the benefits of an ever-declining natural resource. In other words, officials use the power of the state primarily to divide the latest crumbs (allocating those to the most politically strong individuals). These politics have led society to this perilous point in time. The politics of abundance, by contrast, reach persistently and undauntingly toward protecting and building natural wealth.”Political systems might help politics of scarcity or abundance, but the Earth’s natural systems can only help the latter. These short sighted policies reflect a society bent on unlimited and unnecessary show indulgence without regard to the globe left to future generations. One if the most telling reflections of this goal of unrestrained economic growth, and perhaps the most dangerous, is the show and future result of climate change. The author presents very persuasive scientific evidence about the threats posed to our environment, and is very critical of the lack of political action, and in fact the suppression of scientific evidence during the Bush administration. These discussions are almost a book in themselves, but the thrust of “Nature’s Trust” is the legal theory which the author advances as providing not only a viable remedy, but an alternative method of thinking which would hopefully move public opinion. The author starts with the recitation of a primary principle that “Government, deriving its authority from the people as a whole, must act as a fiduciary to protect the natural resources held in trust from damage, as well as from risky privatization.”This recognizes that land has both a public and a personal component, and that governments keep the public interest in primary ecological assets, such as water and air, in trust for the benefit of all citizens, both current and future generations. Thus, “***private use and enjoyment of trust property by individuals and corporations remains at all times topic to an antecedent encumbrance in favor of the public in order to maintain the ecological stability important for society to thrive.” This doesn’t mean that all personal property is topic to a public trust, but the author notes at least four common situations that would activate the public trust: “(1) where circumstances involve trans-boundary interstate assets (such as an interstate rivers, lakes, underground aquifers, migratory wildlife, the air, and atmosphere); (2) where state trustees utterly fail to discharge their fiduciary duties to protect assets within their jurisdiction; (3) where national exigencies demand federal involvement, such as those involving national security, commerce among states, broad ecological or public health threats, or natural disasters; and (4) where disputes arise over resources shared with other nations or tribal sovereigns (such as oceans, fisheries, atmosphere, and the like).”Conversely, there are also situations in which governments might alienate land from the trust to personal parties. Such transfer could be allowed “(1) where trustees create the grant in aid of navigation, commerce, or other trust purposes; and (2) where the grant does not cause “substantial impairment” to the public interest in the lands and waters remaining.” When trust duties arise, the government must assume the traditional obligations of a trustee. It must first ensure the productivity and health of the asset(s) in trust. Second, it must take action when the trust assets are imperiled. Third, a trustee must exercise prudence in managing the trust, defined by courts as reasonable care, skill and caution. And fourth, and perhaps most importantly, a trustee bears a strict duty of loyalty in administering trust assets. If a public trust is recognized, then State and Federal governments must fulfill these responsibilities. But who recognizes such a trust and imposes such duties? The courts are probably the only entity equipped to do so. This can entail courts telling administrative agencies or even legislatures what they must do to protect trust assets. Such tensions trigger our primary principles of separation of powers. But the author notes these and other examples where the courts have successfully ordered appropriate remedies when other governmental entities did not fulfill their appropriate duties. In Fresh Jersey the State Supreme Court held that “each city in the state held a state constitutional duty to provide a “fair share” of affordable housing.” In Oregon the Federal court fashioned a remedy when the National Fisheries Marine Service failed to draw up an adequate plan to protect Endangered salmon in the Columbia River. Although rare, such actions are supported by precedent. Utilizing this public trust doctrine, in 2011 a non-profit organization known as the Children’s Trust, on behalf of young adults who are invested in a healthy future, initiated litigation in all the states seeking a declaration of a sovereign duty to protect the atmosphere sufficiently to reduce carbon emissions and thus counteract the potentially disastrous effects of global warming. They allege that such action is important to protect the atmosphere required by the youth and future generations for their long-term survival. The cases have not had much initial success. As the author notes: “Unfortunately, a lot of of today’s judges present distaste and fatigue at the prospect of managing the complex info of a meaningful remedy. They may hastily dismiss trust claims on procedural grounds, or characterize the trust problem as a political question committed to the other branches of government. This, indeed, has been the effect of some (but not all) of the lowest-court rulings in Atmospheric Trust Litigation.”NOTE-Since publication there has been a win of sorts in Washington State where the trust doctrine was recognized, but the court held that the Legislature was taking appropriate steps. The Children;s Trust also recently initiated litigation versus the Obama Administration in the Federal District Court of Oregon. (My reading of info in the papers.) So, with so small prospect of success, and with a political environment where global warming is questioned, and much of public opinion is directed toward expanded personal property rights and versus the idea of “the commons”, or the common public interest in a beneficial use of the land, what does the author see for this legal theory? From my reading, I do not perceive Ms. Wood as the least bit naive. She certainly hopes that the litigation will have some success, but she acknowledges that the true war to save the environment, and the planet as we know it, depends on a shift in public opinion, not just here, but worldwide. She hopes that the public trust doctrine might rekindle the sense of commons that has been show in our country since the days of the Founders. She also hopes that a related change in attitude takes put in other parts of the world, and does cite favorable attitudes. This book is a very complete legal discussion, but one that can be digested by a lay person willing to take the time. (I do have the advantage of being a retired lawyer.) It also is far more than a book on the potential legal remedies for climate change. It is also a primary primer on the science of climate change, and a literal expose of the corporate and political corruption that so threatens our planet. This is a serious book that demands a serious read. As with a lot of books of this sort that I have read and reviewed, I also feel that its notice could have been conveyed more succinctly, but all of the info is relevant and informative. It certainly discusses in detail the nature and extent of environmental degradation that should be of concern to all of us.

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    Nature's Trust: Environmental Law for a New Ecological Age review []  2020-1-17 21:25

    The publication of Nature’s Trust:Environmental Law for a Fresh Ecological Age by Professor Mary Christina Wood is the highest landmark to date on the trail to achieve environmental protection. Professor Wood illuminates a strong and effective tool to achieve rapid and lasting protection for Earth’s life help systems. Her explanation of the jurisprudence that supports the evolution of the public trust doctrine gives hope that there may yet be time enough to salvage Nature for her own sake and that of a philosophical justification for empowering and challenging jurists, lawyers, and citizens alike this treatise ranks with Aldo Leopold’s Sand County Almanac and Rachael Carson’s Silent Spring, with the added impetus of Edward Abbey’s moral outrage toward the foes of Nature and servants of mammon.

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    Nature's Trust: Environmental Law for a New Ecological Age review []  2020-1-17 21:25

    Nature’s Trust: Environmental Law for A fresh Ecological Mary Christina Wood*Review of Part I “Hospice for a Dying Planet”By Tim PalmerIn Part I of this seminal work, Professor Wood describes universal cultural values that acknowledge the essential nature of healthy ecological systems for sustaining life. That recognition is expressed in the admonition to consider the effects of governance decisions on the next seven generations, for example. This, and other fundamental tenets of Native American culture, inspired the Founders as they forged The Constitution of the United States. Ancient Roman law is also part of the foundation of our modern government. The Romans, too, recognized that responsible stewardship of the natural endowments shared by all citizens is a fundamental, organizing principle of representative e author chronicles the flowering of the environmental movement in the 1970s, a robust response to threats imposed by industrial civilization. Symbolized by Earth Day, there was a demand for protection of public assets such as clean air to breath, access to safe meal and unpolluted water, as well as the aesthetic enjoyment of a thriving, natural environment . In response, Congress passed the Endangered Species, Clean Air and Water Acts, among others. In an astounding exercise of executive power, the Nixon Administration also made the Environmental Protection Agency to administer some of these carefully crafted was a time when, in response to the will of its citizens, our elected officials reaffirmed their ancient obligation to govern so as to protect crucial natural assets, thus insuring they would be held in trust for the benefit of show and future ever, attentive citizens now recognize a rapid deterioration in the quality of the global ecosystem. Evidence of the failure of the 1970s model of environmental law contains a rapidly energizing atmospheric system, the startling disappearance of ice everywhere, and rapidly rising, acidic seas. The natural birthright of our kids and grandchildren is succumbing to the global frenzy of extraction and consumption wielded by the heavily industrialized system of corporate fact, the laws passed to protect the treasured legacy of our own, and our children’s natural resources have become tools used for carving them up, and then delegating management of each portion to a specific agency. These agencies, from the Fish and Wildlife Service to the Bureau of Land Management, are engaged in the continuous development of extraordinarily confusing regulations. These complex webs of rules are used to determine how much, when, and who will be permitted to exploit the assets under their us, a system initiated with the best intentions, illuminated by the bright promise of the early environmental movement, has become opaque to both the public and, by choice, the judiciary branch of government, as ever, this misleading labyrinth is easily negotiated by the corporate interests that shape its ongoing design. Elected and appointed officials are subjected to a dozens of influences, including offers of opportunities to leave public service for lucrative jobs in personal industry. Experience in these company jobs, combined with the knowledge gained while serving in government, produce skilled, highly motivated lobbyists who further refine the art of swaying their former congressional and agency colleagues. A lot of actually return to government service by executive appointment, often to lead the agencies that are responsible for regulating the very same industry they now l elected and appointed officials in public service have solemnly sworn to uphold The US Constitution as they discharge the duties of their office. The truth is that, tragically, a lot of of these people no longer personify the interests of current and future generations of rt II, “The People’s Natural Trust”In Part I, Professor Wood described the subversion of environmental laws intended to protect and conserve natural resources, permitting the destruction of the principal in Nature's Trust rather than wisely managing its conservation. This style of governance now puts the entire global life-support system in “The People’s Natural Trust”, she provides the sound, legal basis for the foundational changes she proposes. Her reasoning is ‘radical’ in the very best sense of the word, which is derived from radix, meaning the root, or the inherent nature of a e supreme authority of nations with representative forms of government is rooted in famous sovereignty. Therefore, one of the most essential purposes of such governments is “protecting crucial natural assets for the survival and welfare of citizens.” Those natural assets—resources that both born and unborn members of the state will require for their continued amazing health and happiness—constitute the principal held in the public trust that is the topic of the book. Elected officials are empowered to represent the interests of their constituents and are, therefor, responsible for insuring the safety of the trust assets. These officials of government are the trustees whose sworn duty it is to govern so that these resources will be available for the show and future generations who are its is fundamental responsibility of leadership is the explicit, central principle of governance in the constitutions of nations around the world. However, the “true origins of the trust reach far deeper than any one nation’s legal system.” This obligation is rooted in natural law. It is what John Locke, whose philosophy provided a cornerstone used by the Framers of our Constitution, called the “Fundamental, Sacred and unalterable Law of Self-Preservation.” The necessity of insuring the wherewithal for its members continued existence is “the basis of society.” This creates “a fiduciary obligation on the part of government to protect this human right.” One central conclusion of this line of reasoning regarding the principles of representative governance is that “…the people’s interest in the ecology essential for their survival and well-being limits their governments ability to destroy it.”The government’s obligation to act as trustee for the benefit of citizenry, rather than on behalf of strong unique interests, might come as a surprise to some. One might ask, “Where is this actually written into our laws?” The respond is that, “Properly understood, the public trust stands as a fundamental attribute of sovereignty—a constitutive principle that government cannot shed.” “The trust forms the sovereign architecture around which the Constitution and all other laws meld.” It is not set out in law because, as the author points out, Nature’s Trust is actually “the slate ‘upon which all laws are written.’” The structure of government designed by the Framers includes, as its intended sovereign legacy, to “secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity.” Thus, there is “an inalienable duty engrained in government itself …to govern…for the benefit of future generations as well as show ones.” Professor Wood cites a lot of United States Supreme Court decisions to help her contention that this principle is, indeed, the foundation of our government. She leaves no doubt that our representatives are entrusted with careful administration of the principal in this natural trust. The resources therein are those needed for life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness; those “unalienable Rights” that form the foundation of our amazing Nation. However, the officials responsible for conserving and protecting these assets for the benefit of all show and future generations are parsing them out to unique interests for private gain, instead!Nature’s Trust Review Part III “Nature’s Trust and the Amazing Transition”Professor Wood laid the foundation for the Amazing Transition by tracing the legal history of natural trusts back through Roman times and into the Indigenous cultures that preceded Western Civilization. U.S. case law provides abundant evidence that it is the sovereign duty of modern government to insure the preservation of natural trust principal. This includes, but is not limited to, clean air, safe water, sufficient meal and the biological systems needed to provide them. As its trustees, government officials are accountable for passing this ‘common wealth’ along, undamaged, to future e book also documents the perverse agency mismanagement of statutes like The Clean Air and Water Acts. Environmental law under the control of neoliberal capitalism provides bureaucratic cover for permitting widespread destruction of the very natural resources it was intended to protect. Justified by a presumed need for unending material growth, it is rapidly liquidating the natural resources and living systems that constitute the most vital stock of capital in Nature’s Trust, while calling it ‘profit’. This is the “ideology of a cancer cell”! It clearly violates the trustee obligations of any government, especially one claiming to represent citizen interest and dedicated to insuring their zenship contains the duty to keep government accountable for its destruction of vital, natural resources and to reclaim the endowment held in Nature’s Trust. Insuring a secure future for our kids requires the restoration of governance that administers natural trust law for the many, rather than providing obscene wealth for the few who have seized control of it for their own benefit.Unfortunately, we have forgotten both our dependency on the natural environment, and the stewardship ethic implicit in that relationship. As a result, we are vulnerable to the modern administration of environmental law, which effectively destroys any vestigial moral basis an individual might muster in an attempt to defend themselves and their communities from can we possibly prevail?Professor Wood emphasizes that moral principle is the foundation of law “not only to maintain credibility and respect in society at large, but also to inspire citizens to participate in democracy.” The Nature’s Trust approach revives four moral understandings that are fundamental to humanity’s continued existence:1. “That we owe …future generations a beautiful, rich and healthful environment.”2. “Natural law designates certain resources common to all mankind and not susceptible to personal ownership,” including the air, water and the ecological web that sustains community prosperity. (Claiming private ownership of such resources for oneself is theft.)3. Natural law compels using this commonwealth for the greatest possible public benefit. (Wasting community resources is a sign of greed.)4. Nature itself has a right to exist and flourish.When a community recalls its dependence on natural systems, it bolsters this constellation of values. Viewed in this frame, it is apparent that preserving the Nature’s Trust endowment, especially in the face of its imminent destruction, is paramount to everything else. The contrast between living in an environment governed by such precepts vs one dominated by greed, fear and waste provides extra essor Wood provides strong insights about how structuring property rights relative to Nature’s Trust can provide effective legal tools for curbing corporate power. As a fundamental property concept, natural trust law defines the obligations of governance in a deeply integrated, holistic method that applies to all sovereigns—from tribes to nations. This intrinsic quality endows it with legal validity independent of legislation— an essential characteristic where elected officials are bound by unique e integrity of the trust concept depends instead on a powerful judiciary to enforce the fiduciary duties of trustees—the very ones that have been sloughed off by our elected officials. The author info the “steps that judges could take immediately, within their realm of authority and judicial tradition, to restore integrity to environmental law and enforce the property rights of citizen beneficiaries.”However, making judicial findings that effect in the fundamental changes required requires courage. Judges must first understand the true gravity of the ecological disaster confronting us. It is equally necessary to help them with recollecting the fundamental human values embodied in Nature’s Trust principles.A citizenry acting in accordance with such values will animate the courts. Choosing to act in the best interest of coming generations, while simultaneously making very visible and vocal demands that corporate and governmental actors do likewise, (by eschewing wasteful uses of required resources, for example) is required. Such social behaviors are manifestations of the deepest human sensibilities. Begin display of these qualities is inspirational to humanity, including judicial actors.If they can be so inspired, the judiciary already has the power to create the important changes, as Professor Wood explains so well in Natures Trust!Tim PalmerMaster of Environmental Law and PolicyVermont Law School10 September 2015*Professor Wood is the Phillip H. Knight Professor of Law and Faculty Director of the Environmental and Natural Resources Law Center at the University of Oregon School of Law.

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    Nature's Trust: Environmental Law for a New Ecological Age review []  2020-1-17 21:25

    Outstanding. A must read for those concerned with expanding their understanding of productive climate crisis responses.

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    Nature's Trust: Environmental Law for a New Ecological Age review []  2020-1-17 21:25

    I checked this book out of our law library after hearing its values touted! I couldn't place it down. It is an perfect and timely book that addresses significant environmental problems from a very readable and understandable approach. She presents the challenge to all of us , and uses the term "planetary patriotism" as a sound method of looking at the issues. Checking it out of the library did not do it for me. I required my own copy and I treasure it as a marvelous investment.

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    Nature's Trust: Environmental Law for a New Ecological Age review []  2020-1-17 21:25

    Came exactly as advertised and in a timely manner!

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    Nature's Trust: Environmental Law for a New Ecological Age review []  2020-1-17 21:25

    author experiences

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    Nature's Trust: Environmental Law for a New Ecological Age review []  2020-1-17 21:25

    I read a lot of environmental books each year. May Wood's book is the most informative and best written book I have read on the environment in a long time. I hope we have the courage to create the paradigm shift she anks Mary

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    Nature's Trust: Environmental Law for a New Ecological Age review []  2020-1-17 21:25

    An necessary book, which returns ethics to the center of jurisprudence--as necessary as the Our Children's Trust movement that it spawned!

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    Rebooting Justice: More Technology, Fewer Lawyers, and the Future of Law review []  2020-1-24 21:55

    There is broad consensus in the judicial system that a vast number of us cannot afford even primary legal services despite there being a superabundance of lawyers. Further, a lot of people who can afford lawyers choose not to hire them because they cannot identify a return on investment. The effect is that courts are seeing dramatically increasing numbers of parties unrepresented by lawyers.What professors Barton and Bibas have expertly accomplished is distilling into one very readable book the a lot of factors that contribute to a largely inaccessible justice system. Whereas a lot of “access to justice” efforts in the past three decades have focused on identifying means of providing more lawyers to more people, the authors persuasively argue that “lawyering up” has not been an effective strategy. Instead, they propose simplifying processes that may not require lawyers, such as having unique dockets for unrepresented parties in low value claims, having judges become more active in eliciting necessary facts from parties, ensuring that easy forms are available, and piloting the use of technology to support people resolve typical disputes through online dispute resolution, to name just a few. The suggestions for reforming America’s archaic and inexplicably expensive system of legal education are particularly insightful.Having served on innumerable “access” committees over three decades where addressing the root of the issue is largely avoided, this candid assessment of legal representation, together with its array of potential solutions, is both timely and welcomed.

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    Rebooting Justice: More Technology, Fewer Lawyers, and the Future of Law review []  2020-1-24 21:55

    This book tells what particular situations it may be wise to use a lawyer and in what particular situations, it may be wise to test to avoid using a lawyer if possible. In cases involving a lot of legal technicalities and a lot of legal procedures, it may be wise to use a lawyer in those instances. Pro-se means without a lawyer. In Fresh York Town evictions, 88% of tenants are unrepresented by a lawyer and 98% of landlords are represented by lawyers. In California, 80% of family law cases involve at least one party proceding per se. The costs of preliminary hearings are usually between $2,000 and $10,000. A jury trial can run into six figures. In the 21st Century, England has deregulated the shop for legal services making it more deregulated than the United States. Bills from lawyers can add up fast. The largest expense in modern litigation is not time spent in court. It is time spent on the discovery process. It is harder and more expensive for a person to become a lawyer in the United States than in a lot of other countries. Between the years 1985 and 2011, roughly one in three law school graduates in the United States could not search work as a lawyer, and there are a lot of as 600,000 JD holders who are not working as a lawyer. Roughly a quarter of the lawyers are not in personal practice. In the 1700s and in the 1800s, a citizen could represent himself. Even then a lot of judges were not lawyers.

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    Rebooting Justice: More Technology, Fewer Lawyers, and the Future of Law review []  2020-1-24 21:55

    Very good

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    Rebooting Justice: More Technology, Fewer Lawyers, and the Future of Law review []  2020-1-24 21:55

    America has more lawyers/capita than any other nation. Yet, even a little firm's legal support costs $190/hour (average) or more. Bar authorities hold non-lawyers such as paralegals from offering more affordable service, yet rarely prevent incompetent or dishonest lawyers from harming their clients, or punish them for doing so. Bar associations and legal scholars propose more law, lawyers, and procedures. Law schools could offer shorter, cheaper ways to qualify as a lawyer - a lot of say the third year of law school is largely ton instead proposed simplifying our legal system where the stakes are lower and the problems simpler (eg. non-felony criminal cases). For a lot of easy civil and even minor criminal cases, technology (interactive www services - eg. eBay has online dispute resolution, fillable forms, hotlines, chat rooms, notice boards) could do the work. Licensing rules could allow trained social workers and accountants handle routine, specialized work. Another suggestion - have court officials actively investigate the facts and probe the evidence. In short, the legal system needs to go on a diet. Simplification is also more democratic - empowering citizenry rather than ton then provides examples of not good defense provided those accused (underfunding = underlying cause, along with a failure to weed out those failing their clients), and tells us that legal aid funding has been in steady decline since the 1990s - down 63% from its 1980s high pointAppointed criminal defense lawyers are often wildly overburdened, lack help (eg. personal investigator), and plead their clients guilty as quickly as possible. The situation in our civil courts may be worse. Mothers seeking kid support, tenants fighting eviction, laid-off workers claiming unemployment or disability benefits usually cannot afford lawyers. A 2010 ABA survey of state court judges, 94% stated that unrepresented parties fail to show important evidence, 89% said they suffer from procedural errors 85% said they failed to effectively examine witnesses, and 81% said they are unable to object to improper evidence offered by an opponent. In Mane, 75% of family matters involve at least one pro se party, 88% of tenants are unrepresented in eviction actions, and 80% of litigants in protective order cases are pro se. In MNC evictions, 88% of tenants are unrepresented and 98% of landlords are, while in D.C. the numbers are 98% and 93%.In the 1970s, unrepresented parties were rare - in less than 10 - 20% of cases. In 2014, the Globe Justice Project ranked 99 nations on access to civil and criminal justice. The U.S. finished 27th in civil and 22nd in criminal.

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    Rebooting Justice: More Technology, Fewer Lawyers, and the Future of Law review []  2020-1-24 21:55

    In a lot of courts across the country, more than 80% of cases have one or both parties unrepresented by counsel. In an adversarial legal system designed for both parties to represented, this results in a crisis of access to justice.Our laws and procedures are too complex for ordinary people to understand and navigate on their own. Paradoxically, the U.S. has more lawyers than any other country, but our lawyers are among the most costly. So, millions of Americans resort to “do it yourself” law to defend crucial legal rights in a byzantine legal system. As a result, throughout the country thousands of laborers are cheated of their wages, tenants are unfairly evicted, and consumers are taken advantage of by businesses -- all without any effective cording to Rebooting Justice, one issue is that most courts are still “partying like its 1899.” Courts and the legal bar are unwilling or lack incentives to adapt to a changing world. Judges feel it’s incumbent on litigants to learn their archaic and arcane ways, rather than making the system simpler for ordinary people (i.e, those who can’t afford expensive lawyers) to understand and avail themselves of the protections of the law. Lawyers have fun the monopoly they have on the legal e book is a unbelievable clarion call and should be needed reading for every state and local court judge in the country, as well as everyone who cares about justice for the not good (and middle class).

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    Rebooting Justice: More Technology, Fewer Lawyers, and the Future of Law review []  2020-1-24 21:55

    Bibas and Barton and blunt, and accurate, about the a lot of issues that have long been apparent in both civil justice and criminal justice systems in the U.S. This book is one of the few efforts to think about civil and criminal justice together--to search common ground in diagnoses of their issues and to borrow ideas for potential solutions. Its key premises are refreshingly honest and sobering. One is that we should recognize legislatures are never going to sufficiently fund lawyers for not good people in civil litigation or who face criminal charges; another is that the legal profession contributes to the problem, especially through insisting on a broad definition of "unauthorized practice of law" to resist tournament from non-lawyers. They offer powerful arguments for some bold, sometimes contrarian proposals, such as cutting back on the right to counsel; looking for ideas to improve public courts in technology such as online dispute resolution that tech firms such as Ebay have road-tested; and borrowing from the medical profession's example to advocate for legal-assistance equivalents to nurse-practitioners and physician's assistants--trained specialists who could provide competent services for a lot of ordinary legal problems at much cheaper rates than lawyers. It's a thought-provoking and in a lot of respects persuasive book, well worth the time of anyone interested in improving American justice systems.

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    Constitutional Illusions and Anchoring Truths: The Touchstone of the Natural Law review []  2020-1-24 22:2

    I read the book, and then read the reviews. Looking at the review by Peter P. Fuchs, I went to page 61 (as he invited his readers to do). I conclude his remarks as a reviewer exhibit a one-star mind! Move on, nothing to learn from this one.I would not argue that Arkes is always an "easy read." But, I never found it to be a "difficult read" either.

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    Constitutional Illusions and Anchoring Truths: The Touchstone of the Natural Law review []  2020-1-24 22:2

    Outstanding.

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    Constitutional Illusions and Anchoring Truths: The Touchstone of the Natural Law review []  2020-1-24 22:2

    The author presents a compelling case for natural law as the foundation of our constitutional law and all that flows from it. The argument I would rate as five stars. His writing style unfortunately is ponderous and badly in need of an editor.

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    Constitutional Illusions and Anchoring Truths: The Touchstone of the Natural Law review []  2020-1-24 22:2

    I have been alighting on some of these "natural law manifestoes" , a phrase recently coined by Richard Garnett, and they are not very lovely flowers. The whole idea of these things is so forced and wrong, and this is just one more of the type I have created fun of and highlighted before. Aquinas is brought in for no discernible scholarly reason. Check out p. 61 of this book. It is astonishing to any fair minded person. These people are operating is some sort of alternate universe where coherence matters not. Simply put, it is a word salad. First the author cites "Aquinas and Lincoln" as if they somehow historically belonged together. But no matter he moves on to Burlamqui, as if quoting him would say something definitive about the age. That is like choosing to analyze the depths of Leibizian thought only by method of Christian Wolff. But no matter, he then slithers into a quote by Hooker, and all that in a few paragraphs. And then suddenly -- I am NOT making this up!!! -- he is suddenly back to the "Church Fathers" ! Huh?? What in the world. He then glosses on the Patristics. How is this word salad even an argument. This is just pure nonsense as an historical argument. And it is only published as purest polemics. But much more interesting is a latest comment by the author online, where he helpfully admits the shadowy nature of this sort of argumentaion in the light of our republic:"I wish to thank our readers for their comments. Mr. JSmitty touches on a sensitive matter, and it may interest him, as well as others among our readers, that we announced, on June 4th, the establishment of a fresh Center for Natural Law in Washington, D.C., under the Claremont Institute, with my own writings figuring in the curriculum. But we hope to draw together a number of federal judges, along with lawyers and professors who wish to bring natural law out of the shadows and bring it forth with a sense of its practical and pressing importance. Our purpose would in fact be to offer an alternative to that positivism that has taken a dominant keep even among conservative--and Catholic--jurists in our own day. And so, to our mates in the Catholic Thing, I say "stay tuned."Natural Law wants to come "out of the shadows" eh?. How interesting. In other words, this type of forced, ridiculous argumentation wants to come out of the shadowy globe of bought-and-paid-for academic pseudo-scholarship and wants to be taken seriously. Amazing luck, fellas. If page 61 of this book is any indication you belong in the dark, shadowy gloom of reactionary swamps with a pile of Summas.

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    Law Express Question and Answer: Tort Law (Law Express Questions & Answers) review []  2020-1-24 21:43

    The answers in the book very useful to my examination.

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    Liquefied Natural Gas: The Law and Business of LNG, Third Edition review []  2020-1-17 21:26

    Perfect read all on value chain on LNG

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    What About Law?: Studying Law at University review []  2020-1-17 22:0

    Starting with an introductory chapter on la w and existing legal systems, the book continues as a clearly written exposition of the most necessary locations of law, each one discussed by primarily focusing on an interesting case similar to that area, followed by a critical examination of the challenges and implications that exist in the case, the corresponding decision(s)and some similar cases. Legal terms and the relevant laws are clearly explained for a reader without any law background and intriguing questions are asked during the discussions, some of which are answered, while some are left as meal for thoughtI think this is an perfect book for anybody who wants to know why law is such a fascinating subject for Intellectual enquiry, and how and why it is not just a set of dry rules to be followed mechanically.

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    What About Law?: Studying Law at University review []  2020-1-17 22:0

    An perfect introductory book for aspiring law students and non-law students interested to learn about law.

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    What About Law?: Studying Law at University review []  2020-1-17 22:0

    Very well written and succinctly put. This book was a very perfect read! It created me wish to study law all over again!

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    The Natural Laws of Children: Why Children Thrive When We Understand How Their Brains Are Wired review []  2020-1-21 20:50

    I gave this book 5 stars because it’s a amazing introductory book. It was my not a amazing read for me given my ’s a amazing book if the reader has limited understanding of the Montessori Ethos (specifically Maria Montessori) or an alternative to traditional ven my background with educational theory and implementation I found the book basic. It’s a amazing introduction book.Wonderful examples on how to education can support a kid grow comprehensively.

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    The Natural Laws of Children: Why Children Thrive When We Understand How Their Brains Are Wired review []  2020-1-21 20:50

    Must read for parents and teachers!

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    The Natural Laws of Children: Why Children Thrive When We Understand How Their Brains Are Wired review []  2020-1-21 20:50

    Maria Montessori wanted her successors to continue to modify her work based on advances in the knowledge of kid development. This is precisely what her successors did *not* do. Instead, they place her work into a box of organized educational techniques without adding tools as the body of knowledge surrounding kid development increased. This book documents an experiment on preschoolers in an underprivileged public school and the results are astounding. While these awesome results caught the eye of some educators, it really should create us all stand up and take message of how kids learn. We shouldn't stop learning about how kids develop but rather should seek to understand the natural laws of kids and how they learn best which is outlined in this book.I have seen the laws described in this book in my own toddler and I am looking forward to practicing some of the exercises in this book as he continues to grow and develop.Overall, I would not say that this book is just for parents or just for educators. While some may imply that they have a greater understanding of the ideas outlined in this book, there are a very limited number of people who could have written this book simply because, at least in the US, schools are needed to follow a curriculum and meet standardized testing goals. The preschoolers in this author's study were studied using methods that were not currently approved and yet they exceeded testing goals in all is is an perfect read and I can only hope that schools in the US can rethink how kids learn best while continuing to study kid development rather than assuming that what has already been learned thus far is set in stone.Highly recommend.

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    The Natural Laws of Children: Why Children Thrive When We Understand How Their Brains Are Wired review []  2020-1-21 20:50

    Much of the book consists of statements about what Alvarez believes are the wrong ways and right ways to teach children. It’s largely presented as giving the reader information, but since I found small of it to be fresh information, and since much of the right and wrong to be part of a ‘discussion / argument’ that has been going on for decades, I didn’t search it a helpful part of this book. Alvarez mentions lots of studies (ones well read readers will already be aware of) but doesn’t give a lot of info on them.I did think that the section of the book that covered specific teaching exercises to be useful, though perhaps not actually amazing. They are hands-on, experiential exercises, designed to engage students in mind and body.Overall, I found the rather negative focus of the book (in outlook; it’s not negative in the method it recommends teachers interact with children) to be a bit much and to detract from the book. I think the majority of the book is helpful if you’ve read nothing on the subject of education before; the exercises do offer some nice possibilities, though.But that’s JustMe.

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    The Natural Laws of Children: Why Children Thrive When We Understand How Their Brains Are Wired review []  2020-1-21 20:50

    All professional educators should read this book, imo. For most parents as readers, I'd give it 4 Stars. It's beautiful technical, and not really written to parents. Too bad, too, because if this material could be rewritten with parents in mind, it would be excellent. Still, amazing r example, the author wrote: "Rethinking our educational system based on the essential principles of learning and development would certainly be a huge support for the 40 percent of our kids who are having problem in school." Then she shows how the same thing would greatly support the other 60 percent of children are already doing well, but could do so much better. She wrote: "Starting in preschool, the method we test to obtain students to understand the idea of freedom is by imposing our will on them and then evaluating their ability to comply with it." Our educational system is mostly about schooling, only tangentially about learning. This is a major problem, and needs to be ildren, science has now confirmed, are born with brains organized to learn. But they aren't organized for schooling, and the push to schooling frequently attacks their inborn tendencies toward learning. Worse: adults let this, and even force it most of the e author wrote: "...the knowledge acquired by the kids in the course of activities they chose themselves was not only retained after a vaction break, it was strengthened." The opposite is also the norm: the things learned during forced activities/studies isn't retained very well. It's usually not effective learning. This books shows what schools should do, how they should change, and how to obtain started. Necessary book. Highly recommended.

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    The Natural Laws of Children: Why Children Thrive When We Understand How Their Brains Are Wired review []  2020-1-21 20:50

    As with so a lot of parents, I spend a whole lot of time in frustration and often despair at my children's educational experiences. And since my children are not neurotypical, I spend a lot of time - a whole lot of time - reading, researching, advocating. This book falls in lockstep with just about everything else I've read as far as the ultimate conclusion: We're doing it cusing mainly on preschoolers, Alvarez touches on the physiological, emotional, and neurological needs of this demographic. Candidly, I was wanting this book to touch on slightly older children such as my own. Even at 7 and 9, the lack of opportunity to learn to appropriately socialize and move their bodies compounded with ridiculous expectations as far as what they're "supposed to know" and benchmarks, benchmarks, benchmarks create their educational life beautiful miserable at varez presents a lot of info that's solid. At the end of the day, however, the question remains: So we know all this items about what should be happening, why isn't any of it happening? Why do we continue to participate in an educational system for kids that clearly understands nothing of them?

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    The Natural Laws of Children: Why Children Thrive When We Understand How Their Brains Are Wired review []  2020-1-21 20:50

    This book was fascinating to read and offered a lot of insight into the minds of kids and the why's and how's of the method they act, learn, and think. Much of what is in the book is what I already knew from extensive education of kid psychology as a Family Studies Major, but it's nice to see how well it is place together, presented, and laid out in such as method that the average person can easily understand and relate to the info & tip in the book. This is something most every parent could benefit from reading because no matter how amazing of a Parent you are, there is always room to improve and there is certain pride in trying to do better as a Parent for the amazing of your kids and it's our job as Parents to always strive for better. I love what the author is trying to do here. 4 BIG stars.*If this review has helped you create an informed decision on this book in any method please take a moment of your time and allow me know by voting this review as Helpful. Thank you!*

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    The Natural Laws of Children: Why Children Thrive When We Understand How Their Brains Are Wired review []  2020-1-21 20:50

    I shared this book with a amazing mate of mine and we agreed on a few things:- the author pushes what they think is right/wrong-very focused on education systemI think this would be a amazing book for ere really is no right/wrong when it comes to parenting. I think that there are overt messages to avoid and things that you definitely should adhere to (i.e primary needs and making sure your kid is safe) but one persons opinion shouldnt be the all knowing.

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