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    Tales from the Inner City []  2020-9-23 20:9

    Tales from the Inner Town is a gorgeously written and illustrated volume featuring Shaun Tan’s paintings and drawings, one that invites the reader into a wildly imaginative, surreal world. It explores the mysteries and wonders of the natural world, one that humans may never fully comprehend. In the globe Tan creates, there are crocodiles living on the 87th floor of a skyscraper, pigs stranded in apartment backrooms, moonfish swimming the night skies, eagles hunting in airports, and a rooftop tree that blooms briefly once in a lifetime, among other stories. The artwork is luminous, the writing, lyrical. What the reader will explore in this recent offering by this awesome artist/author is a genuinely unconventional, exceptionally imaginative, and poetically presented world. Tales from the Inner Town is a real gem and creative wonder in its own right, and a book that is well worth reading.

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    Tales from the Inner City []  2020-9-23 20:9

    Amazing stories to match astonishing artwork.

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    Tales from the Inner City []  2020-9-23 20:9

    If you've enjoyed previous Shaun Tan works (especially his Tales from Outer Suburbia), be prepared to have fun more of the unbelievable surreal tales and drawings you already love. If not... If you have fun somewhat surreal tales with awesome art, check it out!

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    Tales from the Inner City []  2020-9-23 20:9

    I'm a easy man, I see Shaun Tan's name on a book, I buy. His works have added so much to my mental world, the part about dogs especially created me and my mates cry in this book especially.

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    Tales from the Inner City []  2020-9-23 20:9

    So a lot of wonderfully special short stories and attractive illustrations. In 6 sentences Tan can conjure an impossible reality that can be so readily accepted and imagined. Though his storytelling can work on various levels, from fanciful to thought provoking, I would characterize his stories in this book as the latter which, for me, makes it all the more enjoyable.

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    Tales from the Inner City []  2020-9-23 20:9

    The stories as well as pictures are very good. I am going to present this book to my family.

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    Tales from the Inner City []  2020-9-23 20:9

    I have never written a review. I'll create this short. Obtain this damn book. I'm stunned/shocked from how attractive it is. His artwork alone, brought me to tears. I did not expect anything from this book, bought it on a whim. There is something here that I can't describe. Maybe, its just pure heart mixed with talent. I'm tempted to drain my entire bank acc on this author. Just amazing. So, if you where once like me, trying to siphon through reviews...stop. Obtain this book.

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    Tales from the Inner City []  2020-9-23 20:9

    This is just a unbelievable book for young and old.. cannot recommend enough!

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    Tales from the Inner City []  2020-9-23 20:9

    Love everything this guy does. Imagination in overdrive. Amazing for children and adults.

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    Tales from the Inner City []  2020-9-23 20:9

    This book is attractive and amazing. The stories and art are deeply moving. You will be transported to another globe that is still very much of this one. Shaun Tan has place the intangible into words and images. Brilliant. Poetic. Lyrical. Simultaneously true and surreal.

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    SECOND OPINION: A Doctor's Dispatches From The Inner City []  2020-11-14 18:27

    The average American may read this book and think that a) the author is crazy, or b) these situation could never happen in this country. Unfortunately, neither of these ideas are correct and if people don't begin waking up, we will go the same method as the UK. Take heed America! This country was created amazing by people who were willing to work hard and create decisions for themselves.

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    SECOND OPINION: A Doctor's Dispatches From The Inner City []  2020-11-14 18:27

    His writing is as always. My only reservation with this book is the frequently quoted unremitting filthy language; it leaves me feeling in need of a shower. It's no wonder he has such a sad view of the British people. I'm afraid I share some of his pessimism anticipating the future of the USA, too. I can only hope we're both wrong.

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    SECOND OPINION: A Doctor's Dispatches From The Inner City []  2020-11-14 18:27

    More from a master of observing human behavior.

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    SECOND OPINION: A Doctor's Dispatches From The Inner City []  2020-11-14 18:27

    Interesting and witty descriptions of true life experiences by a British doctor. Western civilization is self destructing at an alarming pace. We can thank liberalism.

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    SECOND OPINION: A Doctor's Dispatches From The Inner City []  2020-11-14 18:27

    Love Dalrymple's writing style.

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    SECOND OPINION: A Doctor's Dispatches From The Inner City []  2020-11-14 18:27

    Another book written by Dr. Theodore Dalrymple in his dry style, about his experiences working for the as a consultant for British medical system and prison system. Very well written with humor thrown in where possible when dealing with the dark and depressing subject of humans and the breaking down of government in Britain. I have to applaud him for working in such a dysfunctional system for so a lot of years until he retired. There are a lot of stories about people who are their own worst opponents in that women who stay with abusive men. One of the saddest facts is the kids who are mistreated by both parents and used as a weapon by one or the other parent and sometimes both, versus the other parent. The author does not spend very much time addressing the impact on the children, but it is certainly there.Well worth reading, as it tells us where America is likely to go in the future.

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    SECOND OPINION: A Doctor's Dispatches From The Inner City []  2020-11-14 18:27

    Have fun his writing ability and his droll humor.

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    SECOND OPINION: A Doctor's Dispatches From The Inner City []  2020-11-14 18:27

    In the age of “no judgement” and moral relativism there is no finer solvent for cleaning away the hypocrisy and double-speak clouding our collective windscreen from the apocalypse roaring up from below while being alternately denied and encouraged from above than Dr. Dalrymple’s fine Curmudgeon Solution. Obtain yours today. Or submerge into subhumanity when your turn comes up.

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    SECOND OPINION: A Doctor's Dispatches From The Inner City []  2020-11-14 18:27

    At the end of the day I look forward to sitting in my armchair with my feet up on the ottoman, pouring myself a stiff Diet Pepsi, and inhaling several pages of Dalrymple at his driest. Second Opinion, imported from England, is chock-full of amusing tales of life among the savages. I know what you'll say - Dalrymple lacks compassion! And that's what makes him so delectable, so - so transgressive! In this era where we censor ourselves before thinking, Dalrymple dares to announce what we know is real but dare not say publicly or privately. His experience working in British prisons has given him a wealth of anecdote, but his genius is in the telling. Briticisms abound. I constantly flew to the Oxford English Dictionary to translate his language to American. (I learned that supererogatory does not mean unnecessary, as I had believed, but excess. That "instantiation" is not similar to "instantaneous".) There were a lot of phrases that were so Brit that I have no idea what they mean. Nonetheless, I got the gist and enjoyed the process. Second Opinion is superbly amusing and goes down painlessly, especially taken with a double dose of Schadenfreude. I wish to add that the book includes unexpected grace notes of wisdom, observations about finding meaning in life, as well as the sudden leap of empathy toward the rare patient who embodies a quiet heroism. His encounter with the young man who speaks of Othello with recognition and applies it to his own jealousy is poignant.

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    SECOND OPINION: A Doctor's Dispatches From The Inner City []  2020-11-14 18:27

    Dalrymple is a national treasure. I want he were OUR national treasure and not the UK's.

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    Living and Dying in Brick City: Stories from the Front Lines of an Inner-City E.R. [Book]  2018-5-12 18:0

    Very well done! As a nurse, I was able to relate to a lot of of the issues faced by the author in this book. Dr Davis addresses hard subjects and presents plausible solutions as well as provides resources for self-help. I was moved by his candor when speaking of his conflicting feelings and determined dedication to his family and the neighborhood he grew up in. The chapters were short, concise, dealt with a specific problem in healthcare/life, presented possible solutions for improvement, and then smoothly moved on to the next one. Davis's voice is simple to hear and follow and kept my interest completely from cover to cover. I recommend this book to everyone, but especially to those of us in healthcare. Finally, some answers to our problems!

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    Living and Dying in Brick City: Stories from the Front Lines of an Inner-City E.R. [Book]  2018-5-12 18:0

    As a fellow physician, I appreciate the much required commentary on where our healthcare system is lacking in resources and support. As a minority, I appreciate the social awareness this book brings to light. As a mother of a young Black boy, I am inspired by the story of this young boy with the odds versus him who with the love and help of mates and mentors, grew into a strong, confident Black man who changed his community! It gives me hope that maybe I can have that type of influence or impact on the younger generation too.

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    Living and Dying in Brick City: Stories from the Front Lines of an Inner-City E.R. [Book]  2018-5-12 18:0

    I greatly appreciate the work that Dr. Davis has done and continues to do for his community. What I most appreciate is the insight that this book provide regarding the need for seeing individuals and communities holistically, especially when it comes to health care. In this country, we do an perfect job training health care providers about health and medicine, but we failed to effectively train them to appreciate and understand people's complexed lives. And how those lives are shaped by their environment, policies that we create, and education.Dr. Davis makes clear that a majority of people in improvished communities are not looking for pity, but opportunity and respect. And if you, as a health care provider, desire to have a positive affect on the well being of others, you have to push yourself to go beyond stereotypes and biases and realize that individuals and communities can change for the better, but they must be given the opportunity and respect in order to create that change. Frequently, health care providers will take the position that they are poor, black, hispanic . . . so let's not expect better outcomes. Health care providers that have that position as their starting point, do tremendous hurt to the persons they are charged to treat.Dr. Davis challenges us to recognize that cultural competency is not about seeing color or condition and having empathy. It is more about appreciating where a person's starting point is and helping them to carefully and successfully navigate through life given their skill set, condition and/or cirtance. In essence, to be an effective health care provider, you must address and help individuals where they are currently and not where I wish you them to d work by Dr. Davis and I will be looking forward to more insight from him.

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    Living and Dying in Brick City: Stories from the Front Lines of an Inner-City E.R. [Book]  2018-5-12 18:0

    I agree whole-heartedly that its necessary to care and to allow people know you care. Dr. Davis speaks the method he lives ... all the way. I have recommended this book to my daughter who lives her life in a related way. I hope a lot of people read this inspiring book.

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    Living and Dying in Brick City: Stories from the Front Lines of an Inner-City E.R. [Book]  2018-5-12 18:0

    This book can keep its own versus any other related example of medical drama, a genre very famous in print and television. If that was all it was, it would create for an exciting reading experience, but then disappear down the rabbit hole of memory. There is, however, much more to the book, which makes it truly unforgettable. The book is divided into thematic chapters with cryptic titles such as "Love Hurts" and "The Fish Bowl", that leave one guessing what they might signify. Each chapter uses actual cases that Dr Davis has encountered in training or in practice, but supplements the narrative with commentary on public health and social problems as well as private biographical references. These three elements blend seamlessly and skillfully into each other effortlessly moving between them and yet creating a cohesive unit defining a specific problem. The descriptions of the medical cases are exciting, with all the drama encountered in an emergency room setting. The public health problems and issues are usually clearly defined and backed by statistical data that are sometimes alarming. The most gripping portion of each chapter, however is the biographical linking of the episodes and situations to the author by references to his private story. This is the most poignant and heartwarming aspect of every chapter. Very few persons, if any, describing such happenings can really say "Been There, or Done That." A constant theme is "Look at me now. If I can do it, so can You."Another special aspect of the book is the listing of helpful info pertaining to the chapter immediately after it. Purists might balk at this unorthodox approach, arguing that such material should be relegated to the back of the book along with the citations and acknowledgements. This however, is Emergency Medicine where the need to act is acute, and one does not push off things to the end. If someone really needs to use the info listed, he has most likely created a amazing effort to even read the chapter and needs the info readily at hand. Other chapters may not be pertinent to him and it is unfair to create him rummage through the back of the book to find for what he may need. Furthermore, these sections are clearly demarcated by a various font and one can easily move to the next chapter without losing the narrative. If one however decides to linger over the material, there is amazing items in there even for the jaded is book should be needed reading as part of all Medical School Curricula or in any form of training associated with the Health Profession. In these days of Impersonal Medicine fuelled by avarice and a push by most medical students towards the most lucrative specialities, it may be necessary to be reminded, that unlike a lot of professions, the practice of Medicine is really about helping others.If you live in an zone of the country related to Newark, and there are a lot of such locations in Urban America, this book may support you deal with your problems. It may offer you some hope, realizing that there may be a method out, and there are resources you can turn to for help. If you live anywhere else, you will learn about a part of the country you probably had no idea existed. It will give you something to think about when you are forced to create a detour through an zone you would never venture into. It may even inspire you to wish to do something about the problem. The costs of urban neglect are astronomical and are borne by the community at large, and so it makes amazing economic sense to do something about is book will create you laugh. It will create you cry. It will create you sad. It will create you mad. It will however warm your heart and perhaps inspire you. Every penny of the $25 dollars ( Much less if you obtain the book on Amazon) you invest, (not spend) will return more than you paid.If you like the book, tell your mates and neighbors about it. Donate or circulate your copies. Lead book club discussions in your community and create sure your library and schools carry it.If you hate the book, you probably hate kittens, puppies and babies and need a nice huge hug to warm your ril D'Cruz MD.

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    Living and Dying in Brick City: Stories from the Front Lines of an Inner-City E.R. [Book]  2018-5-12 18:0

    Sampson Davis is a amazing man. His work in what is now called The Inner Town is a mirror to the physical side of the therapeutic work I did in my own Inner City. His heart, his drive, his determination to give and to serve are inspiring and touching. Emergency Rooms are the items of drama, and his stories of the emergency room are e book is simple to read and very clear. The stories are fascinating. True human lives and deaths, especially in the Inner City, are even more fascinating. Part memoir, part ethical testimony from a Christian framework this Wiccan could love, part political statement of why Inner Town residents suffer and die early, gritty and gripping, part referral of resources and/or volunteer opportunies,I read this in 1 1/2 sittings, important tasks and sleep ignored in the face of Real Story--his book reaches mythical levels telling truths we too rarely hear. [Another brilliant MD with whom I worked in our Inner Town clinic concluded the same causes and solutions as did Dr. Davis to Inner Town blues.]Read it and weep or read it and rejoice. Better yet, do both at the same time. You will be moved.

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    Living and Dying in Brick City: Stories from the Front Lines of an Inner-City E.R. [Book]  2018-5-12 18:0

    Sampson Davis is a master at weaving the vivid stories of his life with true world, non-fiction tip of how to avoid becoming one of the unfortunate characters he's met along the way. He is very human and extremely humane. He paints his pictures in broad strokes and intimate a 17 year old growing up in the ghetto of Newark, NJ, he committed a robbery with two mates who wound up in jail. He got off with juvenile treatment from Family Court. He vowed with two other mates that they would all become doctors and come back to support the poorest people in their neighborhood. And they did e story starts with his first day as an intern in the emergency room of the Newark Medical Center he frequented growing up. From there he weaves the private narrative back and forth among friends, family, neighbors, strangers and patients. This is a compelling read for everyone and could serve as the core curriculum in every household of ghettos amazing and little whether they are located in not good neighborhoods or in the richest skylines of our cities.

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    Living and Dying in Brick City: Stories from the Front Lines of an Inner-City E.R. [Book]  2018-5-12 18:0

    I just finished listening to this book. It discusses the experiences of Dr. Davis growing up and working in the town of Newark, The experiences that he discusses having had working in the emergency rooms of some of Newark's hospitals are rich and sometimes explicit. He has a method of blending storytelling and facts that held my attention. While I learned so much about him I also learned a lot about a lot of locations of the health field and how to obtain help. I look forward to reading/listening to more of his work.

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    Living and Dying in Brick City: Stories from the Front Lines of an Inner-City E.R. [Book]  2018-5-12 18:0

    I liked how the book went into detail about ER medical procedures such as chest tube insertion. It was generous of the author to contain private info about his life, his feelings, disappointments and mistakes. There was a lot of patient teaching which is important.

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    Living and Dying in Brick City: Stories from the Front Lines of an Inner-City E.R. [Book]  2018-5-12 18:0

    This is a very interesting book, I could not place it down until I finished reading it. In addition to being well written, it is a source of reference for healthcare . As a healthcare worker I can relate to so a lot of of the described stories. Especially the one in which a person with asthma died so young while waiting for the ambulance to arrive. It would have given him some moments of life had his community or family known CPR. This is one thing that would be a amazing addition to the book. I would strongly urge all to read this book and create it a part of your library for others to have fun as well.

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    Out of the Ashes: Rebuilding American Culture []  2020-1-25 10:46

    This is a book with true insight. It provides a reminder of what we have lost, both as a people and as individuals, but it does not rest content with this but calls us to gird up our loins so that we may reclaim a more human life for ourselves and for our children. This is a Christian book. The author is Roman Catholic but it speaks to every Christian and the author is clearly conversant with the broad range of orthodox Christian thought and experience. While any person may benefit from this book I would particularly encourage parents or people who aspire to be parents to read this book. It will support enrich your vision of how you can raise your kids to live more fully the life that God intended man to live in the midst of His creation.

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    Out of the Ashes: Rebuilding American Culture []  2020-1-25 10:46

    My title for this review is in emulation of Esolen, and perhaps captures the best means I have of expressing my admiration for his work here. I like to think that the two words, "Simply Wonderful," follow his recipe for the success he has in this tome: telling the truth, and meaning it. This is a easy recipe, indeed; but it also inspired by the wonder of the power of truth and of language which delivers it to us in refreshing olen early in the book spells out that recipe with a reflection of the value of grammar: how learning grammar shapes the method we think. It teaches us how to use language, yes; but it teaches us the bigger, true lesson about grammar: that things have their proper places, and sanity is putting things in their right places. The rest of the book follows this basic lesson through a host of examples: men and women, , children, education, work, the state - all these things are, in our day, out of their is book may be called a Jeremiad. But not in its cheapened meaning (and, incidentally, cheapened meanings of words are a target at which Esolen often, accurately, and lethally takes aim here). No, this is a Jeremiad because it is prophetic. It laments and warns, but also announces the Lord's call to return. I thought often of this verse while reading: "The Lord's notice was, Halt at the cross-roads, look well, and ask yourselves which path it was that stood you in amazing stead long ago. That path follow, and you shall search rest for your souls" [Jeremiah 6:16].In Jeremiah's day things had gotten out of place, too. But this is just the story of mankind and sin in a nutshell. God's creative action in Genesis is an action of placing things: some waters above the dome, some below; some monsters on land, some in the air, some in the sea. Adam gives names to all the animals. He locations them. Then sin, things out of place: Adam and Eve's nakedness out of place, hidden in shame. And Babel: words out of place, too. The Law tries to restore this: don't boil meat in the milk of the child in its mother's milk, don't eat this or that: giving things a fresh designation of put that is only a preview of the true restoration the Redemption olen's ultimate notice is to remind us that, as we are redeemed, we have the power - and the duty - to be about the business of putting things back into place. So, while the pages here redound with examples of the dislocations and distortions and disorders sin has brought about, the clarion call comes through clearly, along with some practical suggestions, for us to relocate, restore, and rightly order the globe in which we live. We do it by keeping our minds and hearts set not on this globe at all, but paradoxically, by caring first about the globe to at future globe is implied on every page here, as a call to the present; but Esolen also provides refreshing examples from the past to bolster his observations. He follows the logic of Chesterton in so doing, who objected to social progressives who were always saying, "You can't place the clock back." "The easy and obvious answer," Chesterton retorted, "is: you can. A clock, being a piece of human construction, can be restored by the human finger to any figure or hour. So, too, human society, being a piece of human construction, can be reconstructed along any plan that has ever existed."It is only arrogance that prevents us from recognizing that the past may have some useful answers for us, be it the past of 25 centuries ago or only of 75 years. It isn't courage but timidity that prevents us from heeding Jeremiah's advice: " Halt at the cross-roads, look well, and ask yourselves which path it was that stood you in amazing stead long ago. That path follow, and you shall search rest for your souls."I heartily recommend this book to anyone who recognizes that we are at a cross-roads now and that it is time to seek a fresh path, and who seeks only a bit of courage - by method of encouragement - to do so.

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    Out of the Ashes: Rebuilding American Culture []  2020-1-25 10:46

    Though this book regales the pursuit of time-tested literature, I found it poorly written, with a sarcastic, arrogant voice at a time when mercy, justice, love...Christ-likeness..is needed. I wanted to connect as this book was recommended by someone I admire, but it isn't happening. Instead, read Chuck Colson's "How Now Shall We Live?" or Francis Schaeffer books.

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    Out of the Ashes: Rebuilding American Culture []  2020-1-25 10:46

    Esolen outdoes himself in his recent piece. The topic he has chosen is gloomy and depressing. But the book he has produced is anything but t content to dwell on the current craziness, he takes the reader on a romp through the countryside of Americana-past to message what has been lost by gradual erosion. His diagnosis is direct and devastating. But this makes the hope of rising from the Ashes all the more easy and realistic. If the "Benedict Option" is to establish sequestered communities of faithfulness, Esolen's option establishes such communities, not as sequestered, but in full integration with the fallen globe around e communities he envisions are families, simple, faithful, and true. Such families real to humanity are the truest form of "salt of the earth."I recommended this book to every family in my parish and to anyone who feels overwhelmed by the evil of this v. Jonathan Lange

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    Out of the Ashes: Rebuilding American Culture []  2020-1-25 10:46

    Once again, Dr. Esolen has challenged me, created me laugh out loud, kept me awake (because I either can't place it down or can't stop thinking about his message), created me cry, and given me hope. Brilliantly written and as profound as always, I whole-heartedly enjoyed every moment. One need not always 100% agree with Dr. Esolen to have fun his writing. As magnanimous as he is wise, his prose draws you into an intimate conversation... one that you perhaps hadn't expected, but one which you will welcome with begin arms (and one for which you will yearn long after you've read the latest page). Read everything he has written.

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    Out of the Ashes: Rebuilding American Culture []  2020-1-25 10:46

    Dr. Esolen does a amazing job at painting a picture of what we have lost through the revolution and the digital age. Dr Esolen is Roman Catholic and so his examples and experiences and all very Catholic. For examples of beauty he often turns to Medieval churches or Gregorian chants. Not that there's anything wrong with this in and of itself but this will not appeal to most Protestants, neither will his lack of gospel content. Dr. Esolen doesn't provide a grand plan to fix society, but he offers much amazing insight on what we could have if we tried. There is a lot of amazing meal for thought with this book and I would highly recommend it.

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    Out of the Ashes: Rebuilding American Culture []  2020-1-25 10:46

    First, check out the top of the page on the Amazon site. The first question: “What do you do when an entire civilization is crumbling around you?” All of the text that follows is drawn from the book’s jacket notes and gives the reader a fast summary of the book’s contents. It is a reliable e book is a pious jeremiad. The author is a fervent Catholic who gives no quarter with regard to essential principles. The rhetoric is prophetic, in the sense that the speaker/author stands upon a mountaintop, surveying a vast array of human behavior, and systematically records our current failures, failures which in a lot of cases are revealed as madness.We dwell in a morass of failure; we have sold our souls for a form of secular materialism that is, ultimately, vacuous. We have magnified Thoreau’s ‘lives of quiet desperation’, lost our sense of beauty, of love, of meaning, of learning, of manhood and of womanhood. We permit ourselves to be ruled by remote, self-serving bureaucracies and tyrannical courts and central governments. Disconnected from divinity our every step is doomed and yet we continue the is is a very brave book, one that—to place it mildly—runs versus the current grain. The notice is an necessary one, one that all should hear and reflect upon. I think its conclusions should be considered very carefully.I also think its conclusions should be considered empirically. For example, the notion that we once built objects of amazing beauty and fail to do so now. Some of this is opinion (opinion with which I fully agree, but opinion nonetheless). He prefers the art deco masterpieces of the depression to the international style glass boxes that look like a mixture of bureaucracy palaces and minimum security prisons. He speaks of the beauty of one-room, spired schoolhouses which make an ethos of the infinite as well as the public square, contextualizing the experiences that are heard and felt, within. I personally prefer Magdalen College, Addison’s Walk and the river Cherwell, but the question, a fair question, remains: why do we lack the vision (in our wealthy societies) to build objects of beauty?Dr. Esolen would return to traditional conceptions of male and female roles, believing them to be anchored in human nature. I don’t see us returning to 1954 anytime soon, though I share his belief that our current cultural practices are radically flawed. These are difficult rivers to navigate, but perhaps the technology which he sees as tyrannizing over us can be a source of hope, enabling the mother, father, or both to work at home and raise kids in more traditional ways. The actual breakup of the family (as opposed to the repositioning of the family) is as significant a issue as he perceives it to be, particularly when it ripples through our school ‘systems’, creating further disorder and failure.Our subservience to government, particularly a government with values that run counter to our own, has resulted in a realignment of political power, on which the jury is still out. Some of his principles appear wistful, but they echo with my own experience. He longs for the return to the play of childhood, with children outdoors, exercising, interacting and developing. When I published a book on my adolescence I was interviewed by a local radio station. The first question—asked by a young man who was probably 30-35 years younger than me—concerned ‘those unbelievable times when you could play outside, safely, in your neighborhood, in, e.g., the local woods’. I told him that every summer day in my youth was an adventure, beginning at first light and continuing until dinner time. But then, I pointed out, we were safe in Fenwick Park Woods because we were armed with knives, hatchets and BB guns. Some of Dr. Esolen’s book is almost Wordsworthian in its memories of childhood, though he is aware that we were human in all senses of that term, for amazing or some ways this book is like a copy of Reminisce magazine, but it is undergirded with considerable wisdom and a broad range of classical reference. At the same time it is a hard-nosed philippic that makes strong, defensible points and challenges a status quo that has, in a lot of ways, failed us miserably.I don’t wish to write a comparably-sized book here, but just a few points: the discussion of higher ed is spot-on, but I’m not sure that the encouraging and building of small, focused colleges (that, inevitably, will not be able to do serious science, engineering, etc.) will be sufficient to solve our problem. Second, the views of George Steiner on the necessity of the presence of the divine for all significant human activity would add greater weight to the argument. Finally, the discussion should go on, but with a greater sense of the info in which the devil is known to dwell. When one is moved by the spirit unbelievable things can happen, but one should also spell names correctly (it’s James, not Joseph Boswell and Carrie, not Carry Nation).Bottom line: a thoughtful, honest and necessary book.

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    Out of the Ashes: Rebuilding American Culture []  2020-1-25 10:46

    Where you search your own put in the culture battles will likely determine your response to Out of the Ashes: Rebuilding American Culture by Anthony Esolen. A professor of English at Providence College in Rhode Island, Esolen takes a rather dark view of contemporary American culture. And he defines culture broadly – politics, the arts, relationships, education, faith and religion, and even our definitions of beauty and ’s difficult to argue with e book was written before the election, but it’s as if Esolen anticipated “fake news” and “alternative facts,” otherwise known as lying (or “misspeaking,” the clumsy word invented to cover making false statements). That’s his first critique of American culture – we lie about everything, and we believe what fits our own pre-existing or preconceived olen goes on. We’ve lost any concept of the idea of beauty. Public education, and higher education, are disasters. Our ideas of manhood and womanhood have been turned on their heads, if not obliterated. Our understanding of both work and play are seriously lacking, and those lacks have consequences. And out ideas of community participation and involvement are talking to our mates (people of like mind) on Facebook.“So we need to clear out the garbage, admit our errors, and rebuild,” he writes. “When your only choices are repentance or oblivion, you repent.” Of course, we have entire industries that depend upon those errors continuing, regardless of the cliff they may be taking us is is an simple book to read and a difficult book to digest and accept. He speaks hard words, words that will produce outrage, especially among those who might classify themselves as progressive left.His solutions are radical. Some aspects of the culture will simply need to be allowed to collapse, while alternatives are developed and nurtured. Some of what he proposes may be politically difficult if not “Out of the Ashes,” Esolen looks at culture holistically. It’s not simply a case of one aspect or one zone being sick, but all of them. And each affects the e book deserves serious consideration. It is a serious book making its case for fundamental, radical, disruptive change.

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    Out of the Ashes: Rebuilding American Culture []  2020-1-25 10:46

    I first encountered Anthony Esolen as the translator of "The Divine Comedy," a translation well worth reading both for its art and its accompanying commentary. "Out of the Ashes" may sound like the lamentation of a curmudgeon at the outset, but an objective reading reveals the considered insights of a faith-filled observer of Western culture. While some will hear only a nostalgia for a long-lost past, others will explore the essence of community by looking back to the value of the local and the familial which are the root and essence of Western culture, indeed of culture.

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    Out of the Ashes: Rebuilding American Culture []  2020-1-25 10:46

    4.5 starsIn this short volume, Esolen writes with an urgent voice and a tone of loving concern. The thesis is driven by the hope that, with God's help, a culture of merit can be rebuilt in America.Rather than a single narrative, "Out of the Ashes" reads like a well organized collection of tightly similar essays. While the writing is intellectually well informed, it never reads "scholarly text". It is easily readable by anyone who is dispirited by the in toxic pseudo-culture of our day.Why deduct half a star? Pragmatic tip on how to start is often missing from the ideas presented. Assuming we can search others in our local communities to join in the work of rebuilding, how do we obtain started?For example, in the Chapter 9 Dr. Esolen talks about embracing the principle of Subsidiary versus the power of what Esolen calls "Jabba the State". Agreed! I recognize the errant nature of Jabba. I am willing do do my olen briefly outlines three propositions to achieve this end:1. comply rather than obey unjust edicts of the state2. use whatever liberty you have left3. revive social lifeAll perfect ideas! How?I realize this is not really the purpose of the book. Thus, the deduction of only a half star.

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    A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League []  2021-1-7 21:1

    Intriguing Read. I had to read this book for class. The author does a amazing job of inviting readers into the globe of the main hero -- Cedric, who is a young black male who has to deal with different types of environmental, racial, economic, and private obstacles in his life. We obtain to see how young Cedric lives and wars with his surroundings as goes through his special life journey. It is a solid ability Factor - below averageUplifting Factor - averageOverall Story -- beautiful good

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    A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League []  2021-1-7 21:1

    FANTASTIC BOOK. I loved loved loved this book. Cant beat it when trying to view our education system through the eyes of an inner town brilliant kid. Even the best have to struggle to obtain out. I recommend to ANYONE for a amazing read, but especially anyone in education, social work, government, politics, and interested in race topics.

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    A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League []  2021-1-7 21:1

    This book is the antidote to the drive-by, dishonest reporting of a Jason Blair, Janet Cooke, or Mike Barnicle that has so discredited the journalist as social observer. Ron Susskind has written an exhaustively researched and lyrically strong book of amazing breadth and subtle profundity. After four years of at least intermittent research, he has captured the internal essence and the external behavior of a cast of at least twelve various characters, the most necessary of whom is our hero, Cedrick Jennings, but which also contains his mother, his preacher, his father, and some of his mates and acquaintances at Ballou High School and then at Brown. Just the description of Jennings' afternoon with Justice Clarence Thomas or his interactions with the sixties radical Bernadine Dohrn and her son Zayd are worth the price of the book! More important, though, is Susskind's graphic description of the devastating chasm which separates the black ghetto child and his globe from that of the privileged Ivy League, a chasm which affirmative action only belatedly and inadequately begins to address.

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    A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League []  2021-1-7 21:1

    Suskind's non-fiction narrative of Cedric Jennings is to say the least compeling. He retells the struggle of an inner-city black young man who versus all odds wants to create it out. Cedric's struggle, however, does not end with graduating with honors from High School. That happening is just the hint of the iceberg. Suskind allows us to picture Cedric at Brown in the middle of yet more struggles to function and understand the complexities of a fresh mostly white- high middle class- always priviledged- clueless about his reality and that of others- culture. And at the same time we understand that Cedric becomes a rarity at Brown and also at home, and struggles with feelings of t, far beyond being a well-written and "entertaining" acc (as some choose to devaluate it); it is the story of public school education in America's inner cities.Cedric Jennings is just one of a lot of who chose the hard method out, because of, and inspite of, the surrounding sometimes unsurmountable negatives. Yet, we now that the amazing majority still exist who feel forced to take the simple method out and sucb to the pressures and in the end they never create it out or beyond. The most devastating truth is that there also exists an educational system incapable of providing enough hope for enough of these kids to search a method out in the us, "A Hope in the Unseen" should not only be needed reading in High School but it shoud be needed in all teacher training courses. This, in the hope that future teachers might be able to turn the tide around, and provide some hope to more of our kids in what is clearly unseen now.

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    A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League []  2021-1-7 21:1

    I was surprised to look up and see this book listed on Harvard's Summer reading list for incoming freshman, and then i went and read the book myself and found the reason why. it is a well written portrayal of the struggle of one particular youth to over come the odds and grab keep on the brass ring. Cedric took a journey that is not often an option for a lot of African-American youth, and beat the odds in spite of his short comings! reading through the book what really stood out to me the most was his sat score. allow college board tell the story, they will insist that a powerful sat score is important to achieve success in college. it was after reading this book that i realized that the sat try cannot measure a man's level of determination, or his work equity. whatever score is achieved, it has no finality in the life of the man."I shall arise from the ashes, though defeated, with my head unbowed"Nate Silver

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    A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League []  2021-1-7 21:1

    Not a very amazing book, required it for class. Never finished it.

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    A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League []  2021-1-7 21:1

    The difficult journey from hopelessness to "hope in the unseen," to, that is, faith that a better life awaits, is an often told story. In America, we have the "Autobiography" of Benjamin Franklin; slave narratives, like Frederick Douglass's "Narrative"; poverty-to-riches fiction like Horatio Alger's; immigrant narratives, like David Eggers's "What is the What." There is more than one acc of minority students and their path to the Ivy League. For a writer with this sort of "redemption" material, the difficult task is to shape a story whose ending we might guess at but whose info are so compelling that a reader can't place the book down. And this Ron Suskind has done. Because he tells Cedric Lavar Jennings's story in the voices not only of Cedric, but also of his mother, Barbara; his father, Cedric Gilliam; his classmates and teachers at Ballou High school and at Brown University; his pastor, Bi Long; and a lot of others, the book has a complexity that a related story told in a single voice could not have. Suskind presents these people exactly as they are, with not only their strengths but their weaknesses in full view: Barbara's difficulties with cash management; Cedric's standoffishness when his dorm friends attempt to befriend him; the father's struggle to stay off is difficult to call this book "inspirational," as some have done. As Suskind points out, he chose to profile Cedric Jennings precisely because "the primary appeal of Cedric's story was never rooted in his exceptionalism . . .he is, in his primary makeup, so very much like countless other young people . . .". And Suskind does not spare the institutions that fail students like Cedric every day: the bleak public school where learning is almost impossible, the "sink-or-swim approach for poorly prepared minority students at locations like Brown. Throughout the book, Suskind explores both the positive and negative aspects of affirmative action, letting the info of Cedric's experience create a case for it. This book is one family's experience. It does not--it cannot--encompass the experience of every inner town kid who hopes for the unseen. But it does offer strong testimony not just for broad prescriptions or programs, but for the incremental powers of love and determination. Recently on NPR, I heard a review of "A Hope in the Unseen" as one of those books not to be missed. The reviewer was right.

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    A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League []  2021-1-7 21:1

    Ron Suskind has written a "Huckleberry Finn" of modern America, following a young man on his journey from the worst high school in our nation's capital to an elite college. While his classmates plan spring break in Paris, our "Huck" wonders if he has enough cash to eat today.A real story that reads like a amazing novel. I hope there will be a sequel, as we are left wondering what happens next, hoping the awesome journey continues.

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    A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League []  2021-1-7 21:1

    The only method you can understand what it's like for a Black kid in America is to walk in their shoes. No one wants to do that, especially when the walk is difficult and confusing. A Hope Unseen is difficult and confusing. Comprehension of WHY and HOW are questions that can't be answered for you because it's not part of your reality. Ron Suskind attempted to provide a glimpse into the globe of hope unseen. The globe of kids born into generational poverty with no stimulus for improvement. You're predestined to become a product of your surroundings - or are you. Cedric Jennings was born to a mother who wanted more for him, as most mothers do. But Cedric's mother built a foundation of "you are better than what we live in." Cedric was smart, curious and because of his foundation, rooted in his church through his mother, he wanted more. I was encouraged by Cedric's life. I wondered about other students in those cirtances and I damage because they learn to give up so early in their lives. We throw so a lot of people away, but occasionally one shines enough to be lifted.

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    A Hope in the Unseen: An American Odyssey from the Inner City to the Ivy League []  2021-1-7 21:1

    An inspirational and interesting story about facing the odds versus you and succeeding. Granted, this kind of thing rarely happens, but it is amazing to know that it does sometimes. I cried lots of tears reading this because it shows what a hard life people can have through no fault of their own. Too a lot of have their lives ruled by cirtances.

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    The Emergency Teacher: The Inspirational Story of a New Teacher in an Inner-City School [Book]  2018-6-24 18:0

    I read "The Emergency Teacher" with amazing interest as my son and grandkids live in Philadelphia. It gives unbelievable background on the school system and racial inequities in the educatinal system. The author gives a balanced acc of her year as a teacher in Philadelphia and I highly recomment this book to anyone who is interested in what both students and teachers experience under difficult cirtances.

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    The Emergency Teacher: The Inspirational Story of a New Teacher in an Inner-City School [Book]  2018-6-24 18:0

    Heartbreaking stuff.

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    The Emergency Teacher: The Inspirational Story of a New Teacher in an Inner-City School [Book]  2018-6-24 18:0

    This was a very compelling read. I could not place it down. This should be needed reading for all educators and administrators. And frankly, it should be needed reading for federal, state and town leaders, too. As a public health professional, I encourage educators to reach out to colleagues in the field of public health. Maternal and kid health leaders, especially, will be ready to work with you to address social determinants of health (and education) and the effects of adverse childhood experiences described in this book. This book represents a real testament to life course thinking and a call to action to address the persistent inequities and racism that plague our communities' most vulnerable members.

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    The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood []  2020-4-5 18:17

    Books don't obtain much more strong or moving than e premise is simple-- former Baltimore Sun reporter Simon (the driving force behind HBO's "The Wire" which takes put in the same area)and reporting partner Ed Burns (formerly employed by both the Baltimore Town Police and the Baltimore school district) spent a year living on or around one of the busiest markets in Baltimore. They simply report what they see. In doing so, he they relate the stories of the people who inhabit this world: road pushers, children trying (although often not that hard) to stay straight and the parents who worry about them, when they're not too busy trying to score their next fix. The stories are harrowing--from hardcore junkies who spend their days cashing in scrap metal for money to earn their next fix to families sharing one little bedroom in a walk up shooting gallery. Beautiful much everybody is hoping for a change in fortunes, but the book offers few satisfied endings. In spite of this, its a fascinating glimpse of a globe where most of Simon's readers will never e narrative is occasionally broken up by Simon and Burns' musings about the battle on . No matter where you fall on the political spectrum, its hard to disagree with their belief that the battle has failed, at least in this small corner of the world. There's a particularly strong passage near the end where Simon and Burns flat out shatter the Horatio Alger myths that a lot of middle-class suburbanites cling to, particularly the idea that should they search themselves in that situation, they'd simply apply a small Puritan gumption and work their method out their unfortunate cirtances. In the end, he doesn't offer any solutions and precious small t, the characters who populate the corner are more than mindless junkies. They're human, with hopes and dreams and stories to tell. Perhaps Simon's greatest achievement is the method in which he employs his sharp eye and powers of observation to paint a wholly three-dimensional and, given the cirtances, refreshingly non-judgmental picture of a community in deep the end, its an amazingly strong read, one that will leave readers deeply affected and likely having shed at least a couple of tears along the way.

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    No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City []  2020-9-27 18:50

    Ever wish to know what it's like growing up in another globe while being in the same country as someone else? Katherine Newman opens the door to a globe a lot of people only pass through on their day-to-day trudge--never stopping to ask themselves "What about the person on the other side?"While there are definitely moments during which Newman tends to patronize her audience, the notice is loud and clear and sounds throughout the book. If we are not able to look at our own society and see the struggle a lot of of our fellow citizens go through then how can we ever advance together? There is no doubt that this book servers as an necessary piece in understanding diversity in our classrooms as well as our workplace--but the book also serves as a amazing example of understanding the other side and learning to not only appreciate, but incorporate them.4 Various Stars out of 5.

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    No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City []  2020-9-27 18:50

    If you know nothing of urban poverty except that it doesn't look appealing while driving past at 65 miles per hour on the interstate, or it looks risky in films - then this book and When Work Disappears by William Julius Wilson are the two books you should pick rough years of interviews and following entry level workers at "Burger Barns" around the boroughs of Fresh York, plus hands on experience working those jobs, the author and her assistants have place together an even-handed, if a bit pie in the sky, acc of how the urban not good actually live (and work).Those anecdotes of people not wanting to work, living off welfare, milking the state- well, yes, they are true, sometimes. But so too are the people who wake at 5 am, take 2 buses to school, leave school to go to work, then head home for an hour of homework and five hours of sleep. The former obtain the attention in the mainstream media and politics - it is simple to demonize that type. The author gives the attention to the e book is a bit pie in the sky - it does not keep most of these people responsible for their not good choices. Yes, having kids as a teen is a choice. One can abstain from , use birth control, practice oral - all those things that most of us did to avoid kids in high school (by choice or not). I feel that she should keep some of her examples to acc for their behavior and the results it brings, but can forgive the all, this book presents an unseen picture of the struggles and tribulations these people go through working unforgiving, unrespected jobs, in an attempt to better themselves. I certainly have a various idea of the working not good as a result.

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    No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City []  2020-9-27 18:50

    Underlines are perfect.

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    No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City []  2020-9-27 18:50

    Received as promised

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    The Emergency Teacher: The Inspirational Story of a New Teacher in an Inner-City School [Book]  2018-6-24 18:0

    As a GED teacher in Philadelphia, I deal everyday with the victims of the Philadelphia Public School system so aptly described in this book. The disturbing stories Ms. Asquith tells are related to stories I hear repeated often in my classroom. Unfortunately, her description is as accurate as it is e book begins with a detailed history of Julia de Burgos Bilingual Middle Magnet School. Ms. Asquith's prose is clear, informative, and always interesting. She describes how "white flight" and the subsequent neglect of inner town schools led to the current condition of a lot of of these schools. This material is disturbingly relevant in a time when Philadelphia is experiencing a marked increase in school Asquith's private acc of her own struggles as a new, untrained teacher are reflective and honest. She is begin about her naivete early in the year, her private experience with anger and cynicism, her successes, and her failures. She unveils some very disturbing goings-on of both teachers and adminstrators but gives them a possibility to defend themselves in interviews late in the book. The final effect is an overwhelmingly negative picture of what our urban kids experience every day. After reading this, it's simple to see why dropping out is such a tempting option. This is the type of book that should shake up the system and contribute to change. As I follow what is event in the public schools, I can only hope that the shaking starts soon.

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    The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood []  2020-4-5 18:17

    If depressing non-fiction is your thing, then this book is for you."The Corner" is kind of a 30 year sequel to the well received "Talley's Corner". The issue is, this current ver of the urban road corner makes Talley's hangout seem downright utopia."The Corner" is an ambitious project that took several years to write. Roughly half the book is spent in the trenches, that is, on urban Baltimore's and poverty infested roads where infiltrate every facet of life. One particular family is loosely followed over a number of years and, I guess, possible spoiler alert, nothing ends well for them. There is no satisfied ending, no salvation, no hope. On the slightest of bright sides, the concern, compassion, and empathy the writers feel for their topics is apparent. But, as a popular person once said, or maybe I said it, what can one (or in this case two) person do? Trillions of dollars have been spent on improving our urban slums and the reality is that nothing e other portion of the book is a detailed acc of what historically happened or 'went wrong'. This portion of the book is a history of the failed infrastructure of decaying urban America. Various sections of the book critically examine the different structures that are supposed to help and enhance the lives of citizens: the police force, economic development, health care, public education, etc., etc. If this sounds familiar, well it is. This book, and its writers, provided the impetus for the wildly successful tv present "The Wire".Yes, I finished the book. And after reading the book I immersed myself in the tv show. Ultimately though, I was left with a feeling that seldom occurs on my different reading endeavors.A total absence of hope.

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    The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood []  2020-4-5 18:17

    There is nothing fresh that I can add in praise of this book. What's depressing, disgusting, even, is that in the 14 years since this book was written nothing has changed for the better. As reviewer B. Marshall so succinctly stated: "There is no battle on . There never was. There is only a government-sanctioned industry of institutionalised retribution versus those who live in the economy." This is as real under Obama as it was under Nixon and everyone in between. The concept is so fundamentally flawed that it's hard to believe adult human beings thought it any case... The basic purpose of this review is to reiterate the opinion of a 1997 reviewer: if you have not done so, you should read "Tally's Corner" by Elliot Liebow. Liebow wrote about an inner-city corner in Washington D.C. 30 years before Simon and Burns. The juxtaposition of the two books gives enormous emphasis to the rather horrid (though unfortunately not surprising) changes that occurred in those 30 years. Which, interestingly, contain the entire span of The Battle on .

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    No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City []  2020-9-27 18:50

    Amazing book

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    The Emergency Teacher: The Inspirational Story of a New Teacher in an Inner-City School [Book]  2018-6-24 18:0

    It is fair to note that had Christina Asquith taught in a more affluent part of Philadelphia or a middle class suburban community, she probably couldn't write a book about her one-year experience as a teacher. Before being trained as such (even trained teachers have to struggle in the beginning by learning on the job) she should not have accepted a teaching job from a district which would simply throw her to the wolves, as such. As she pointed out, a few teachers in this abysmal school were dynamic and amazing managers of their classes. And it seems real (was for me, at least) that it takes about three years to build ones teaching techniques--and maybe five years to really feel confident. But Asquith had an unfortunate placement in a tragically-run vertheless, Asquith's portrayal of the (reputed) worst school in Philadelphia (and too a lot of others come close) is heart-rending and shocking, and the revelation an embarrassment to the district--let's e author had it a lot of times harder than I. How she held on for a full school year is a testament to her hero in the face of the school district's incompetence. The book is more revelatory than inspirational, and though a quick and sometimes engrossing read it is rather depressing. I think a prospective teacher--who isn't desperate--would tend to not teach in a big-city public school after reading this account.I retired a few months before Asquith started her experiment in teaching, and my school (after at least 30 years of relative calm) was just starting to become infected by students creating bedlam in their classrooms and hallways. I had amazing control, was creative and motivational, but even my tolerence with the system forced me and other veterans in the school to take the early retirement incentive being offered by the state (so the district could hire two fresh teachers for the price of one veteran with higher degrees). We could see what was , the reader will understand why 50 percent of fresh hires leave teaching within 3-5 years--the shorter time representing big-city public schools. Teaching can be very rewarding, but also one of the toughest jobs there is, and the emotional stress is equal to that of a police person "on the beat"--I've e following partial paragraph from page 98, gives a sense of the entire book:"I'd set out wholly single-mindedly to learn to teach, and suddenly my failure became a true possibility. I'd personally staked everything on suceeding, I'd given up my career, my Inguirer [Newspaper] friends... If I was failing and wasn't making a shred of difference, what was the point? How could I respond the question: How was your day?"The Creative Teacher: Activities for Language Arts (Grades 4 through 8 and Up)

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    The Emergency Teacher: The Inspirational Story of a New Teacher in an Inner-City School [Book]  2018-6-24 18:0

    This book chronicles the year a young woman spent as an inner-city Philadelphia sixth-grade teacher. She came to this position during a recruiting campaign, which the town began when they realized that it was the middle of the summer and they still had more than 10% vacancies with their qualified candidates already exhausted. Scraping the bottom of the barrel, the school district accepted individuals with no experience or background in education, just trying to obtain bodies in the classrooms. Asquith is a journalist who would like to change students' lives, but is concerned with the fact that as the year begins she has no training, staff development, or idea what is going on.Quote: "What happened to the teacher who taught here latest year?" "He left. He refused to ask for help. He thought he was Jaime Escalante or something."This is an perfect work, although I don't know if it would have the same appeal for a non-teacher. Asquith's year has its ups and downs, successes and failures, which makes "The Emergency Teacher" a well-balanced work. It is neither a rainbows and sunshine story, nor a doom and gloom story, but one that seems typical of a fresh teacher. It also makes some necessary political points about the use of teachers without the appropriate certification- Asquith makes the point that while these individuals are necessary to school systems that are in need of help, it is also necessary for the school and the school system to help these individuals with some training, development, et cetera, instead of just throwing the people into the fire and walking away.

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    The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood []  2020-4-5 18:17

    After reading and enjoying `Homicide', I expected Simon and Burns to simply offer a conflicting story from the road perspective*. `The Corner' exceeds the detective chronicles in presenting a compelling group of characters stuck in system that seems to be working versus e brilliantly crafted story reads like fiction. BUT, those of you expecting `The Wire', will search yourself on a very various journey.** The characters are richer and a larger palette is used in this Baltimore painting.While the series offered a subtle indictment of the US war, this book pulls no punches. Neither Simon nor Burns assign easy answers to these endemic issues, but they seem to have pinpointed the problem.Above all, this book is for those who desire a real understanding of the inner-city. While not dismissing private responsibility, the story turns the `bootstrap' notion on its head.`The Corner' epitomizes how empathy grows through sustained, close examination. I'll finish with what may be my favorite paragraph in the book:"It's a reckoning of another kind, perhaps, and one that becomes a chance only through the arrogance and certainty that so easily accompanies a well-planned and well-tended life. We know ourselves, we believe in ourselves; from what we value most, we grant ourselves the illusion that it's not possibility and cirtance, that opportunity itself isn't the defining issue. We wish the high ground; we wish our own worth to be acknowledged. Morality, intelligence, values- we wish those things measured and counted. We wish it to be about US."*which would've been fine**and you won't search a bigger `Wire' fan than me

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    The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood []  2020-4-5 18:17

    David Simon spent years on the Baltimore Sun, back when it really was a newspaper and this work reflects what kind of a reporter he was. My Aunt's house was three blocks South of The Corner and my memories are nothing but amazing of the zone in the 1960's. This book demonstrates what the epidemic does not only to a family but to huge sections of the city. Gary, Fran and DeAndre are not caught up in the epidemic, but washed away from it. Simon has a style of writing that is both entertaining, yet captivating. The psychology of what is transpiring between DeAndre and his teenage girlfriend after she discovers she is pregnant is one of the best examples of Simon's insight and style. He is very much a modern journalist, but his work in bringing a depressing and explosive environment to the reader is impressive. Read his work and watch the shows, "Homicide," "The Wire," "The Corner," and the newest HBO present "Generation Kill" because Mr. Simon is the wave of not only fresh journalism, but fresh programming. I feel this is his best written work and the topic matter makes it a must read.

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    No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City []  2020-9-27 18:50

    It's a amazing study. She goes back and updates her case studies 5 years later-you can search it in a pod cast interview she does. This is beyond the follow up she does at the back of the book which I believe was a year or two later.

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    No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City []  2020-9-27 18:50

    Really amazing book

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    The Emergency Teacher: The Inspirational Story of a New Teacher in an Inner-City School [Book]  2018-6-24 18:0

    As a former teacher, this book really hits on a lot of the major issues in education. Unfortunately there aren't simple, simple solutions.

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    The Emergency Teacher: The Inspirational Story of a New Teacher in an Inner-City School [Book]  2018-6-24 18:0

    The book was in amazing condition. It was an interesting and an informative read. Enjoy!

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    The Emergency Teacher: The Inspirational Story of a New Teacher in an Inner-City School [Book]  2018-6-24 18:0

    You will not regret this urnalist Christina Asquith gives the reader a gripping behind-the-scenes tour of an underprivileged school and the students trapped inside its decrepit quith's credentials create her a credible source on education. Her bio states she has written education stories for major national newspapers including The Fresh York Times, and she has a master's degree in Educational Philosophy. These experiences factored into the quality of her writing, making "The Emergency Teacher" a solid investigative piece, an entralling story and a excellent training manual for e nonfiction storyline highlights her one year as an emergency-certified teacher. Bits of history are integrated with dialogue that reads like a diary. Her writing welcomes you into her living room, offers you a new cup of coffee, and makes you feel involved in the plot. As a reader, I felt as if she was speaking to me as her equal, leaving behind the pretensions some authors carry into their writing. The engaging tone will be especially useful for teachers who feel lost and alone; Asquith's prose is the emotional equivalent of chatting with your best mate after a hard day: you immediately feel understood and empowered as you share advice, laughs and any amazing teacher, she entertained me, held my attention and created me care about the content. Like any amazing reporter, she candidly exposes the corruption, apathy and useless bureaucracy that infest far too a lot of school districts. Along the way, I became emotionally invested in the book's main characters - the 6th graders. I didn't wish to give up hope that they would somehow become "successful" due to her influence. In the end, I not only questioned my definition of "success," but also realized facilitating change in a child's life is neither fast nor quith took a brief recess from journalism to teach in one of the toughest neighborhoods in America. Young and idealistic, her mission was to transform her students' lives. She discovers that idealism is empty without realism, which was one of the basic themes I took away from "The Emergency Teacher."If you have ever wanted to create a difference, this is the book that shows you how. I learned this "difference" might not always be what we intend or envision, but a child's life can be dramatically improved if we accept the challenge. Those involved in public school education - taxpayers, parents, journalists, teachers and policymakers -should read this book as the first proactive step in saving a struggling system. If the class crisis in America is fueled in part by the deficiencies in our children's classrooms, it is our responsibility to focus on what's going wrong. Social issues such as poverty and racism can be traced back, at least partially, to lack of education; this book shows you why and starts the conversation about ter the final chapter, you'll see the huge picture, while also finding yourself attached to the small people lost in a system that has promised not to abandon them.If you become mad or depressed by what you read, it is only because you have been shown the truth. If you take that info and act upon it, this book will have served its purpose: inner-city youth finally will keep the education they deserve.P.S. Be sure to check out the reader's tutorial at the back of the book. It's useful for private reflection, book club discussions or teacher training.

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    The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood []  2020-4-5 18:17

    The copy of "The Corner" I ordered had been released from a library in Virginia because of, the red stamp in the front of the book read, "low demand." Therein lies a reflection of the tragedy at the heart of the book.David Simon and Edward Burns portray a year in the life of a -ravaged West Baltimore neighborhood -- "the corner" -- represented primarily by Fayette and Monroe streets, the website of one of numerous open-air markets in the area. But "the corner" is also an entity, in Simons' and Burns' telling, a being that draws residents to it, demands their cash and everyday commitment and ultimately consumes them in their everyday quest for a "blast."A clutch of characters the two reporters followed live at the heart of this big, vital book. Fran Boyd and Gary McCullough, each addicts, are parents to DeAndre McCullough, a teenager slipping toward the corner. In the course of the year DeAndre fathers a kid with 14-year-old Tyreeka Freamon, ultimately all but abandoning them. Different members of DeAndre's squad and "touts" for the dealers slide in and out of the narrative, a lot of of them drifting toward death or ere is also a moving portrayal of Ella Thompson, a stubborn organizer of community resources who struggles mightily to wrest the underlying humanity she still sees in her neighborhood to the roughout the book the authors hold the reader teetering on a razor's edge of fear and very slim hope. The people who inhabit "The Corner" are damaged people. As a middle-class person I found myself disappointed and mad when DeAndre blows off a job for no amazing reason or Fran struggles bravely toward kicking her habit but falls back or the tout "Fat Curt," gravely ill, fails to adhere to the medical care he so desperately needs. And we wonder why Gary, one of a lot of members of a solid, hardworking family and a man who had gained a huge measure of success and security in his life slid into an abyss of addiction."The Corner" is not without a point of view on this subject. The book is an indictment of the futility of the battle on , the ineptitude of the public school system and the frankly uncaring attitude of governments at all level toward people they view as expendable in the grand scheme of American is book is painstakingly detailed, a masterpiece of sociological observation, but it is not a old, clinical report of a crumbling neighborhood. The authors look at what they see clearly and unflinchingly and let the voices of their topics to shine through. Those voices may create you uncomfortable, they may create you angry, they may create you nod in agreement, they may create you laugh. They are always real, and the authors' connection to them is obvious.I am afraid that books like the "Corner," which portray urban life in the early and mid-90s, will more than ever be consigned to dusty library corners or the shelves of personal collections like my own. Listen to the rhetoric of the 2012 presidential race and it's clear how completely the descendants of the characters on "The Corner" have been marginalized. While we wring our hands about "the middle class," another class continues to struggle, as it has for years, outside our view.I was grateful for the little ray of hope that emerged at the end of "The Corner." Grateful because it had to war its method through so a lot of layers of the sadness that is at the heart of this unforgettable book.

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    The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood []  2020-4-5 18:17

    This is by far some of the best journalism I've ever read. The method the authors depict the environment and characters is incredible. You feel like you really obtain to know these people in Very intimate way. The commentary on the war, welfare, school system and institutional failure is spot on as well. This should be needed reading for politicians and civil servants. I could barely place the book down and know that I will be thinking about it for a long time to come. In a word; superb.

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    No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City []  2020-9-27 18:50

    This was a amazing book, I liked it very much. I have fairly powerful vocabulary skills in effect, I know the meaning of most words I come in contact with. This book really shines when it lets the people who keep the low wage jobs speak for themselves. I found most of what the actual workers say about themselves, their lives, their motivations hopes and dreams far more compelling and interesting then the "social science commentary, graphs and charts meant to justify what was shared. The clinical study and metrics used to quantify every aspect of the lives and problems explored was just method overdone in this book making an otherwise interesting subject dead boring.Jamal for example said things so compelling so profound and so honest about his life, his hopes and his struggles I had to place the book down for an hour to reflect. The honesty and depth of Jamal's [email protected]#$%! me like a freight train going 1000 miles an hour. Jamal was a amazing child trying to create a amazing life out of the horror his mom visited upon him. I was shocked that anyone could be subjected to the indignities he suffered as a child. I ride the buses of Baltimore Town from work each day and often lament how stupid, evil and wild the kid passengers are today. It never dawned on me that parents even those strung out or crack could be so evil to their own children. After reading Jamal's experience I am forced to look at the poor children on the bus with a fresh compassion heretofore unknown to me. When I see wild, stupid, insane appearing kids in public now I think about the crack addict mom, the dealer dad or the other worthless soul that likely ruined those not good children lives. Jamal opened my eyes wide to evils crackhead parents can do that my mind could never dream existed. I was clueless about the suffering not good maginalized kids regularly endure until his words assaulted my tiddy sheltered globe shattering it utterly. When I grew up I thought we were economically poor, thats what my parents said and I believed them. Yet I lived like a prince in a guilded palace compared to the threadbare primary subsistance lives of young adults like Jamal and others in this book.I'm a black man raised by what I thought were not good parents yet we owned our home, had a backyard full of toys, Holidays stocked full of toys, I was never ever once hungry, we never were without lights, heat and primary utilities. I did not have all my wants but my needs never went unmet. We had our own car. We had at least one amazing vacation trip every year. My family had to manage our cash and my grandmother was amazing at saving cash and making us feel rich. We did not always have the newest vehicle or the prettiest house on the block which created me think ok we are not good but we always had enough. We were taught to appreciate what we had as a blessing and to always support those less fortunate. I hate to say it but before reading this book I never knew amazing people like Jamal could be in such a horrible situation. I talk about how hard my life has been and finally I am ashamed because; on my worse day I never dealt with the pains Jamal and so a lot of in this book live with each day. I want there was some method I could support Jamal because; I am proud of him more proud than words can ever say. I am proud of all the amazing people who chose to work arther than just give up. All of you who work at the Burger Barn's and similiar slave wage jobs you all have my undying respect. I was not a huge fan of the minium wage raise to $9 an hour that has changed and hearing your stories in this book is the cause. I am a various man for having read NO SHAME IN MY GAME and for that I upgraded my rating to four stars.Had the book contained more first hand stories from actual not good working class folks sharing their struggles, histories and perspectives I would have loved this book more than any other. The endless graphs, psycho-babble and BIG MILLION DOLLAR COLLEGE WORDS create this book largely inaccessible to those who lack a substantial vocabulary. Words are used in this book that had me running to online dictionaries for answers which is extremely rare. Too often huge complex scientific words were used to describe a subject, effect or situation that could have been conveyed equally well is a few well chosen little words. The book has a bi-polar feel to it in that in some locations it is written in an inviting style with easy words and concepts laid out so the meaning is readily accessible to all. In other locations the choice of words are those so totally steeped in the mechanics of academia that their meaning is known only to those with a lot of letters after their e book tries too hard to discover the meanings of the struggle working not good people face that the not good people themselves are lost in the huge words, numbers, graphs and posh aires pervading this work. This book attempts to unblock and share the secret pains of the working not good by focusing on it at the "atomic macro level" Focus on the working not good too closely, too scientifically and you lose the person behind the graphs, graphics and numbers which is what this book did and why I took two stars off. The title of the book promises the sharing of stories of the urban working not good told by them. The book title "NO SHAME IN MY GAME" promises a look at how amazing working class people survive with dignity despite being in McJobs that leave them fiscally weak and vulnerable. What's worse this book does what so a lot of anthropological huge science books do, scientist types took a amazing interesting topic filled with immense, compelling attractive human interest, profound meaning and priceless wisdom and reduced it to a boring mass of numbers, graphs, graphics and conclusions completely devoid of the human factor. I liked this book because I dearly wanted to understand life and struggles of hard working people who live honestly in the ghetto. I am autistic, intelligent and have amazing vocabulary skills so I understood the hyper science when when it often took away from the strong notice the book. NO SHAME IN MY GAME would have been a ground breaking book if not good working peoples voices were amplified at the expense of BIG SCIENCE! As it stands now, this is just another BORING BIG SCIENCE BOOK filled with graphs, charts and huge words even if the title promises something better.

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    No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City []  2020-9-27 18:50

    Must read !!!

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    The Emergency Teacher: The Inspirational Story of a New Teacher in an Inner-City School [Book]  2018-6-24 18:0

    What we obtain here is a hotshot journalist playing teacher. Her beat is a tough Philadelphia school , her human interest stories the hapless immigrants she teaches (or tries to teach) We never obtain any OBJECTIVE assessment of her ability.What we do obtain is lots of whining but very few insights about an inadequate school system. Her writing style is uninspiring as her school, pedestrian high school English complete with numerous grammatical errors. There was cast of thousands to choose from. Why her?

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    The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood []  2020-4-5 18:17

    This was a tough read from the obtain go, if you come from the Wire to this you might be disappointed, I suggest to read homicide first and then read Then Corner, this book does not flinch in what ha-pens in a corner and for every page you read the weight of a system that has gone fubar starts to feel oppressing. Amazing book but not a light read.

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    The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood []  2020-4-5 18:17

    I read this book after having read Simon's previous work, Homicide A Year on the Streets. Simon and Burns did a amazing job of portraying these people of the corner and making me care about them. I also have a better understanding of why it is so difficult to leave the life on the corner. The authors point out a lot of issues with the different social programs which have failed to turn these lives around. What is depressing and disturbing to me is that there seem to be no amazing solutions to the issues of the corner. I don't have a clue, and that makes me sad for the amazing waste of human lives. I only gave 4 stars because the flow of the story was interrupted several times by a digression on the failures of the system and the battle on . I found myself skimming through to obtain back to the story. Maybe these should have presented as a latest chapter in the book. This, though, is a minor quibble.

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    The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood []  2020-4-5 18:17

    There should be a sign posted at the corner of Fayette and Monroe Roads that reads "Abandon all hope, ye who enter here". David Simon and Edward Burns take the reader on a Dantean trip through hell, leading us into the globe of a -infested neighborhood in Baltimore. Here we meet Fat Curt, who keeps on keeping on until his body, ravaged from years of abuse, gives out; Ella Thompson, who never gave up on the neighborhood and its inhabitants; Gary and Fran, who threw the rich promise of their lives away on , and their son DeAndre, a manchild who may never reach the promised land. Burns and Simon obtain us intricately involved in the lives of their subjects; and while we may react with disgust at Gary keeping on a straight course aimed at hitting rock bottom, we also feel sympathy and respect for Fran, who manages to obtain back up every time after she falls down. Above all, we feel the despair and disillusionment of the young people who learn from a very early age that to the rest of America, their lives have no meaning. What do these youngsters, left for the most part to raise themselves while their parents are strung out on and living for nothing but their next hit, have to look forward to, when their role models are pushers and stickup men? Simon and Burns have been criticized for not offering answers, which would have lent an upbeat tone to this book. The criticism is beside the point. They have no answers and don't pretend to. Their aim is to present the reader how this country's "anti- program" is lacking in coherence, goals, or any kind of common sense, and in this they succeed admirably. What would have lent extra interest to this book is some exploration of how some of the people of the Corner, despite every strike being versus them, manage to create positive lives for themselves when others test and fail, and some never seem to test at all: why is DeAndre still headed downhill when Preston, his mate and partner in crime, turned his life around, married, found a job, and moved his family out of the neighborhood? Why has Blue, an old Corner hand, stayed clean for three years when so a lot of of his mates have died from ? How did Tyreeka, giving birth to DeAndre's son at age 14, manage to avoid another out of wedlock pregnancy, finish high school and look forward to college? And where has Fran found the strength to hold trying to obtain clean and stay clean when an overdose place Gary into a coffin? We can only pray that Fran stays straight this time, that DeAndre pulls his life out of the tailspin it has been going in, and that this country finally develops a meaningful policy that will offer some hope and some true assistance to the fiends on all of the nation's Corners.

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    No Shame in My Game: The Working Poor in the Inner City []  2020-9-27 18:50

    Amazing condition. Enlightening information.

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    More than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City (Issues of Our Time) []  2020-1-15 23:2

    Ordered this book for a class. Arrived in amazing condition. The book was very simple to read. Explains what it is like being a black man, living in the inner city. Amazing read for anyone. Explains the evolution of African-American culture until show day from the perspective of a man who lived through it. No pity parties. Just a thorough explanation of the struggles faced by black men in America and how to overcome it.

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    More than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City (Issues of Our Time) []  2020-1-15 23:2

    I had to obtain this book for a course and it was great. The subjects were very necessary and amazing to read about.

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    More than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City (Issues of Our Time) []  2020-1-15 23:2

    A amazing read for political science or urban studies students.

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    More than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City (Issues of Our Time) []  2020-1-15 23:2

    The title says a lot and maybe too much. Either condition results in the same issues; either Black or Not good in the inner city.

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    More Than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City (Issues of Our Time) []  2020-1-26 23:30

    Anyone-- conservative or liberal-- must read this book and pay attention to Wilson if you wish to understand America's history in the locations of race and poverty. Wilson thoroughly researched the issues, organizes his material very well, and provides compelling ysis.

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    More Than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City (Issues of Our Time) []  2020-1-26 23:30

    An necessary book.

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    Don't Shoot: One Man, a Street Fellowship, and the End of Violence in Inner-City America []  2020-8-20 18:24

    I'm so glad I finally took the time to track this book down five years after it caught my attention because it is the most clarifying and transformative thing I've read all year. Based on his two decades of on-the-ground research and experimentation in more than a dozen cities of various sizes and demographics, criminology Kennedy lays out a compelling blueprint for reducing gun violence in urban America.Without getting too deep in the weeds, Kennedy lays out the three groups directly affected by gun violence: the people who live where it's happening, the police tasked with stopping it, and the people doing the shooting. He then breaks down just exactly why they all hate it, and why the common narratives about each group's complicity are largely myths, and then how to bring them together to drive the rates of shooting and murder ke no mistake -- this is not a book for gun-control advocates, nor is it a book for those dreaming of an end to all gun violence. Kennedy is instead laying out how to overlay data, ysis, network mapping, and other social science tools with law enforcement processes, and community and family incentives, to target the worst offenders, who are disproportionately responsible for gun violence. The outcome can be communities that are restored to those who live there, and I challenge anyone not to be inspired by the hope this can straightforward as it is, Kennedy is not shy of detailing all the times the plans haven't' worked, and why. It depends on huge amounts of bureaucratic cooperation, putting egos aside, putting established mindsets aside, and most importantly, committing to the governance structures important to maintain a complex, ongoing st reading for anyone interested in gun violence in America and what can be done to reduce it, as well as anyone interested in effective and respectful modes of law enforcement.

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    Don't Shoot: One Man, a Street Fellowship, and the End of Violence in Inner-City America []  2020-8-20 18:24

    I have worked in the public sector over 20 years - county government, community development, Director of prison health services, public hospital CEO , and with over 30 state legislatures. I have also taught public policy at the grad school level. So, David Kennedy's book "Don't Shoot" should be needed reading for anyone entering or studying public policy and public administration. Just because you come up with and can doent with solid data that something works, that something can produce results that are quantifiable, measurable , and valid does NOT, repeat - NOT - mean it will be welcomed in the public policy arena. Political , private and turf wars can and often do stop success dead in the water. Kennedy's book demonstrates a process that involved the work and effort of a lot of people before a project could start, the number of people that have to be convinced to sign in, and the number of "potholes" any such fresh thinking, fresh idea, fresh approach can produce. That's the true world, that's what happens in the public policy arena and method too a lot of people in academia, the media and the public just don't obtain it.We're being flooded, we need to build better dams, we need to obtain boats to move us to safer grounds, BUT we also may need to recognize that we can move to higher ground too and obtain a small method above the flood waters. Kennedy's book shows us how we can at least obtain to a bit higher ground, why don't we think about that chance while we test and stop the yfieldCounty a/k/a TM Hansen

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    Don't Shoot: One Man, a Street Fellowship, and the End of Violence in Inner-City America []  2020-8-20 18:24

    A well written book that has one of the best chapters ever "Across the Race Divide" about the folks who live in the hood, the police, and why each thinks the method they do. Kennedy's insights are rare and his perception of how things in unsafe neighborhoods can be safe is incredibly informative. If you are stuck in your thinking that nothing can change, then this is the book for you!

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    And Still We Rise: The Trials and Triumphs of Twelve Gifted Inner-City Students []  2020-1-20 0:39

    This gripping immersion into inner town school life makes the excellent companion read to Tracy Kidder's "Among Schoolchildren". From a nice, safe, concerned, caring enviornment, where the issues are understandable and manageable in "Among Schoolchildren"; to a put where success is measured not merely by acheivement but by the tremendous obstacles students must overcome merely to be in school, in this gripping, similarly styled work. The two books are a startling picture of the tremendous gulf of opportunity and enviornment at the spectrum ends of our society.I strongly recommend both books, to everyone; not just parents, teachers or those who are usually associated with "education" interests. "And Still We Rise.." is not merely a vision of a brutal social/educational reality that must be addressed, but a poignant drama, as well. The young people whose stories are followed are the heroes of the most brutal wars raging today; crime, , racism, and a culture of despair and degradation. These are the best and the brightest ... they are forced to face obstacles that should be reserved only for those who have transgressed horribly versus e incidental intrusion of the writer into this jouranlistic narrative is the only jarring note to be found in an otherwise seamless view. The unfortunate, even tragic cirtances that cause that intrusion, however, are understandable, from a human standpoint, even if they are inexcusable as viewed through the prism of journalistic purity.An emmimently readable, engaging work. Recommended.

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    And Still We Rise: The Trials and Triumphs of Twelve Gifted Inner-City Students []  2020-1-20 0:39

    This book is very inspiring, and offers a amazing perspective for teachers and others who work with children in inner town environments. Some chapters can be a small dense and a small political because it teaches a lot about affirmative action and other more political issues, but if you're reading this to learn, it's absolutely wonderful.

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    More Than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City (Issues of Our Time) []  2020-1-26 23:30

    I got this book for class but i thoroughly enjoyed it

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    More than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City (Issues of Our Time) []  2020-1-15 23:2

    I got this book for class but i thoroughly enjoyed it

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    And Still We Rise: The Trials and Triumphs of Twelve Gifted Inner-City Students []  2020-1-20 0:39

    This is an extraordinary tale following kids who, versus all the odds, seem to search comfort and safe haven in their desire to learn. I was fascinated by the struggle to see the next step for some of these kids, however. Even though they clearly value the education they are getting, the giant leap from the struggles of a neighborhood High School to a distant College Campus seems to really define how hard it is for these children to break the cycle of poverty and broken homes most have experienced.I am not an educator. I was motivated to buy this book after hearing it recommended on Imus. I thoroughly enjoyed the experience, and wonder what it will take to overhaul our dismal education systems.

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    And Still We Rise: The Trials and Triumphs of Twelve Gifted Inner-City Students []  2020-1-20 0:39

    to have more than just glimpse into the hearts, souls and spirits of these hard-working,driven,focused and gifted inner-city children. When we think our struggles are exhausting, theirs were 10X as great. I've read a number of books, all well-written on similiar topics "A Hope in The Unseen by Ron Suskind" is another perfect read), but in this book I found Miles Corwin wrote in such a method that I was so moved by his hero development of each and every one of the twelve students and even his own involvments and deep feelings. Their cirtances,each special in their own right, were written in such a method that I could FEEL what they were experiencing. I empathized with their struggles and pain,limited resources of their school system (i.e lack of books and computers), their dissapointments,disquiet,anger,anxiety,fears,loneliness, abandonment,allienation from their own peers, community and sometimes family,and ultimately...the joys of their triumph.I was spellbound and deeply moved.

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    More than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City (Issues of Our Time) []  2020-1-15 23:2

    Amazing and insightful

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    More than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City (Issues of Our Time) []  2020-1-15 23:2

    I Love it; no complain so far

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    More Than Just Race: Being Black and Poor in the Inner City (Issues of Our Time) []  2020-1-26 23:30

    Absolutely polished. Awesome social science and research. A real masterpiece. Should be needed reading for everyone.

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    And Still We Rise: The Trials and Triumphs of Twelve Gifted Inner-City Students []  2020-1-20 0:39

    I purchased this book simply because it was needed for a School Social Work class I'm taking. I ended up finding it very interesting and highly recommend it. More people should educate themselves on the public education system in the United States!!

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    And Still We Rise: The Trials and Triumphs of Twelve Gifted Inner-City Students []  2020-1-20 0:39

    I lived in Suburbia my whole life and I heard about these kinds of stories all throughout my life. Corwin did an awesome job illustrating every student's life. These students go through so much to obtain intellectually stimulated and to have an education with their peers. I enjoyed how he also dedicated some chapters to the administration and the teachers and all the things that surround the students and the teachers lives -- Affirmative Action, the school, the city, etc. It was a bit confusing since the chapters are named after a student but in between are the everyday class stories so it can be a bit confusing. But this is a definite recommended read.

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