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    Introduction to Geopolitics []  2020-1-22 20:22

    I would recommend this to anyone who is taking a geopolitics class. Very simple to read and understand.

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    The New Geopolitics of Natural Gas []  2019-12-23 20:31

    The Fresh Geopolitics of Natural Gas is a must-have for everyone interested in energy geopolitics of Russia and Eurasia which is often a key factor behind foreign and domestic policy decision-making in these nations. It is a comprehensive and up-to-date study of both energy industries and its multiple linkages to political interests, influences and decisions. It presents not only a captivating historical narrative of what gas industry has come to mean for Eurasian nations but also an incredibly useful source of recent developments both in the political stage and gas industry. The book provides a very detailed description not only about well-researched case studies such as Russia but also countries that are isolated and have strict censorship such as Turkmenistan. Despite the fact that the book includes a huge amount of information, it is presented in a highly accessible form that makes this work appealing both to the experts and wide audience.

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    Geopolitics: The Geography of International Relations []  2020-7-4 18:29

    Very accurate book

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    Geopolitics: The Geography of International Relations []  2020-7-4 18:29

    amazing book

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    The New Geopolitics of Natural Gas []  2019-12-23 20:31

    A phenomenal read for anyone interested in how natural gas affects geopolitics the globe over.

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    The New Geopolitics of Natural Gas []  2019-12-23 20:31

    Grigas book is an perfect example of how closely intertwined relations between energy and politics could be so clearly explained. Going from the broadest trends to the local nuanced examples, Grigas provides an insightful look at the implications of the current shifts in the natural gas markets. A must read for policy advisers, consultants, academics and everyone in the energy field seeking for a comprehensive understanding.

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    Geopolitics: The Geography of International Relations []  2020-7-4 18:29

    Love it

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    Geopolitics: The Geography of International Relations []  2020-7-4 18:29

    It's good. But I don't know how to return...

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    Geopolitics: The Geography of International Relations []  2020-7-4 18:29

    While I cannot comment on the whole book, my concern is that Prof. Cohen's view of Easter Europe is rather shallow and very outdated, despite his mentioning of the current Ukrainian events. Just one example. I would like to ask the author what gives him a moral and intellectual right to claim on p. 250 that Belarusians (spelled by him as Belorussians, which is at least offensive - to the same extend as calling a Jew "Y*d" or an Affrican American "N****r" - if not simply outdated and superseded two decades ago by the Library of Congress Geo Authoritues) "never developed a distinct culture, language, or identity apart from Russians"? Such a claim is at least inaccurate and ignorant and is very much unbecoming of a scholar of Cohen's stature.

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    The New Geopolitics of Natural Gas []  2019-12-23 20:31

    Agnia Grigas: The Fresh Geopolitics of Natural Gas. Harvard University Press. by Lars GronbjergThis is an necessary book for those who wish an all-round understanding of changes in global energy markets with focus on fresh developments in the natural gas sector. The book reviews the history of gas and developments in technology, transport etc. It has a global perspective and is especially interesting in the context of current energy problems in Europe and anges and trendsThe driving force behind the changes is the remarkable increase in production of shale gas and oil in the US which in a few years has turned the US into a net exporter of gas in the form of LNG. This follows from a coincidence of several independent developments of a technical, legal and economic nature plus the strength of American entrepreneurship and the weakness of the American environmental movements. Such a favorable combination is not found elsewhere. Shale gas can be produced in a lot of places, but only the US seems currently to be in a positon to take advantage of it. The US is rapidly moving from a long-standing energy importer to a net exporter. It has major implications for the whole world, not least for Europe and l gas is changing from a regional towards a global commodity on a more uniform global ssiaThe power of the huge sellers, especially Russia, will decline if infrastructure is developed and the trend continues. The Russian economy depends on energy export and the fresh developments can lead to less demand and lower prices. Russia’s influence on the shop is likely to decline. More tournament will create energy export less profitable for igas argues that Russia may have too a lot of hurdles to cross for it to become a significant LNG exporter even through investments are being created in Yamal. This means that Russia will remain largely dependent on its piped gas exports to Europe, and to China in some ssia’s energy tactic shows that it is aware of the challenges. It is seeking more stable relations with traditional consumers and fresh markets in the Asia-Pacific. It also seeks better integration of Russian energy companies in international energy business and creation of a common energy shop in the Eurasian Economic is will remove limits to tournament that follow from long-term contracts with Russia. Traditional elements in Russian contracts are being phased out, such as take or pay, destination clauses and gas prices depending on oil prices. Spot prices are becoming more ropeEurope’s own production is falling, leading to more import dependency. It has gas coming in pipes from Russia, Algeria and Libya. And now LNG supplies are beginning to come from the US. This allows an improvement in Europe’s energy security and possibly also a decline in the gas portant now is that Europe manages to move forward with its energy policy. There are amazing ideas and plans, but the speed of implementation has not been impressive so far. It is not only a matter of getting the legislation in place. The EU must also develop the infrastructure for a united market.Divisions within the Union are strong, and it costs. The EU countries have their own energy policies often based on powerful political opinions that differs among the member countries e.g. with respect to the choice of energy e EU has not been able to agree to make a united attitude towards Russia – to negotiate with Russia with one voice. Russia has benefitted from this to make divisions in the Union and diversify prices based on its monopolistic positon and its ability to use political influence in the various e huge fresh design is the European Energy Union which was proposed only recently. It aims at a fully integrated energy market, diversification among suppliers, energy efficiency, and use of renewables leading to a higher degree of energy security. We will see how it develops. It will not be easy.East European countries may be willing to pay a premium price for LNG to hedge versus disruptions from Russian piped gas. Poland and Lithuania have been first to take advantage of the fresh development to increase their energy e question is: Can the EU limit Russian power of supply and increase its own power of demand. Can it change the power balance? Will the EU do what is necessary?The main issue for Europe: Corrupt transit countriesThe most necessary result for Europe is that the power of transit states (Ukraine, Belarus) will decline. Ukraine in particular has caused major issues for European energy security. This led the Commission to a powerful reaction versus Ukraine in January igas gives a amazing acc of the issues caused by transit countries along gas pipelines: Belarus and Ukraine. But her acc of the most severe issue that arose in January 2009 is weak. She only refers to two American newspaper articles written before it was clear what was happening. On this point it is useful to read the more full acc by Katja Yafimava to whom Grigas refers to on several other points .Grigas is remarkably pessimistic in her view of Ukraine. There is small possibility that Ukraine will be able to obtain rid of the corruption and inefficiency in the gas sector. Powerful Ukrainian interest groups will prevent Ukraine from seizing opportunities that may arise from changes in the global gas shop such as the shale revolution and greater interconnection of gas markets in Europe. The recent report from the European Energy Community agrees; Ukrainian energy policy is not working in ina and Central AsiaSeveral Central Asian countries have managed begin gas export to China based on Chinese infrastructure investments. This will strengthen Chinese influence on these countries but they will at the same time be able to free themselves from massive Russian influence which has limited their ability to conduct independent energy policy in the entire post-cold battle period. They will no more be isolated suppliers.Central Asian gas is still on the want list in Europe. Memorandums of understanding have been signed and deadlines agreed. But Grigas does not provide amazing hopes for an end to failures and delays here. A gas pipe is under construction in the South Caucasus to lead Azerbaijani gas to Southern Europe, but its size is not impressive. It passes through regions which cannot be considered stable for the coming 30 years. There are a lot of transit countries on the e futureIt is very necessary to note that Grigas is careful to avoid predictions about the continuation of the current trends. It depends on a lot of factors which can change on short notice. Risks and uncertainty are similar to several drivers behind current ere is also uncertainty about the position of gas in the longer run. Is gas a supplement to renewables or a substitute? Is gas a bridge from climate massive coal and oil to sustainable energy? Gas has only half of the climate footprint compared to oil, and it is cleaner. The main issue is that the investments in gas are heavy. It is not certain that gas will take over. The globe is still dependent on coal, oil and nuclear fuel. They will also develop.We need to follow developments closely. Grigas’ book is an perfect starting rs Gronbjerg

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    Geopolitics: The Geography of International Relations []  2020-7-4 18:29

    Great

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    The New Geopolitics of Natural Gas []  2019-12-23 20:31

    Grigas adequately and informatively explains the complex (and simple) geopolitical situations resulting as a fallout of the abundance of natural gas in the global market. It is worth the read, no doubt.

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    Geopolitics: The Geography of International Relations []  2020-7-4 18:29

    The book has an perfect assortment of info on geopolitics written by an expert. I enjoyed his expansive vocabulary and grew mine the process of reading this book.

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    The New Geopolitics of Natural Gas []  2019-12-23 20:31

    Dr. Grigas' book clearly and succinctly captures the evolving nature of the global gas markets. She delves into the history of gas politics in each region, helping the reader understand the economic and geopolitical motivations behind fresh the current state of the gas market. She contributes to both the theory of gas politics, working especially to expand upon theories of gas suppliers and gas transit countries, but also adds to the practical app of gas politics, by addressing the political implications. In particular, Grigas explores the complex nature of Russia's gas shop as it relates to Europe, the Caucasus, and Central Asia. In her discussion of Russia's gas politics, the reader can understand the broader geopolitical implications within the region. Grigas aptly discusses how these relationships based on gas are shaping contemporary global politics- her ysis adds a required layer of understanding to the relations between Russia and the different other is is a must read book for those hoping to understand some of the motivating factors in contemporary geopolitics and the ever-changing globe of natural gas.

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    Rethinking Education and Poverty []  2020-12-28 20:8

    Amazing book—I bought it for my PhD program. However, the Kindle format was awful. The delayed shipping wouldn’t obtain the hardcover book to me in time, but I want I would’ve gone without for that first week rather than waste my cash on the Kindle version.

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    Rethinking Sovereign Debt []  2020-2-2 2:32

    Solid coverage and very innovative insights

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    Rethinking Education and Poverty []  2020-12-28 20:8

    Well respected author does justice to this sad subject.

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    Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet: The New Geopolitics of Energy []  2019-12-23 20:31

    The issue with this book, like most other economics books that contain figures and predictions, is that it becomes old fast. For instance, in 2008, China was the fourth biggest economy in the globe and Klare predicted it would become the second biggest in a decade or so. China overtook Japan to become second biggest economy, behind the US, latest is said, despite the outdated figures, the book's main arguments remain intact and applicable today.Rising Powers opens by introducing the link between energy-producer states and energy consumers, and shows how such links have defined the geopolitics of the globe ever since fossil fuel became centerpiece in the life of civilization, more than two centuries e continuous consumption of fossil fuel was based on the assumption that oil companies will hold on discovering fresh sources at a pace faster than that of the demand. Apparently that turned out to be false as companies seem to have discovered them all. Klare argues that out of 116 giant oil fields that supply the globe with most of its demand today, only four were discovered in the past quarter of a t only the world has surveyed and tapped most of its oil resources, demand for oil has skyrocketed with the transformation of the economies of the world's two most populated countries, China and India, from agrarian to massive anwhile, after having conceded its oil and natural gas resources to personal firms in the aftermath of the collapse of the Soviet Union, Russia, with its former President, and now Prime Minister, Vladimir Putin, came back. Employing some arm-twisting and other illicit tactics, Putin nationalized the oil and gas firms, and monopolized them in the hands of the state. This gave Russia immense geostrategic power, and Moscow has been keen on using it in countering America's attempts to tap hydrocarbon resources in the former Soviet republics, especially in Azerbaijan and Kazakhstan.Klare identifies three globe regions for fossil fuel production: Africa, the Capsian Sea and the "American Lake" or the Middle East. He argues that the race over tapping oil resources around the globe has made two main proto-blocs. In the first is the US, Japan, Australia, South Korea, Saudi Arabia, Turkey and Kazakhstan, among others. In the second is Russia, China, Iran, Sudan Uzbekistan, Armenia and other countries.While not an imminent threat yet, Klare believes that the politics of Amazing Powers arming their energy-producing allies is a risky game, especially when mixed with populist politics of nationalism.He concludes by writing that the energy race has been straining the environment, leading to global warming and slowing economies. Instead, Klare argues - albeit naively - that oil not good America and China should not be competing but rather complementing each other's quest for alternative, clean and renewable sources of this, Klare fails to message that only because both America and China are oil poor, does not mean that they will cooperate to explore alternative fuel. Telling from history, in such situations, it will be the race toward alternative energy that would ultimately effect in finding a solution. And, also from history, whichever nations arrives at the breakthrough of discovering energy that is alternative to fossil fuel first will thereafter have fun the reaps of its discovery and rule the globe for decades to come.

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    Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet: The New Geopolitics of Energy []  2019-12-23 20:31

    Amazing item, amazing seller!

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    Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet: The New Geopolitics of Energy []  2019-12-23 20:31

    Michael Klare's book is provocative and informative. It is interesting to read how Russia, China, and India are rising as major players in the quest for oil and natural gas. Additionally, it is interesting to consider how their entry can (and already does) affect geopolitics.Klare raises an interesting point throughout the book, perhaps the most provocative of all. This is the idea that the only method for any state to truly have energy security isn't through war, but working with other states: e.g. U.S. working with--rather than e prospect for a future showdown between the United States and Russia or China is within the realm of possibility. While such a conflict in the conventional sense, Klare overstates this chance on a certain level. The more likely scenario would related to what Russia has already done to Ukraine: i.e. manipulating energy supplies (including cutting it off) as a political tactic.

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    Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World's Oceans []  2020-1-18 20:44

    This book is written for an uninformed audience. Much of the info presented is familiar to anyone who has a primary level of understanding of globe history and geography. Most unfortunately, it appears that the author did not employ the services of a professional editor. The phrase "to say the least" punctuates all too a lot of sentences. For example, admiral Stavridis describes his relationship with a former subordinate as "close, to say the least." What does that mean?The book is also littered with disjointed throwaways of questionable academic value, such as the assertion in the context of Munich that "Appeasement failed, as it always does." Always? This particular phrase illustrates the nature of this book; an undisciplined, barely edited pseudo-academic stroll through the woods of globe history. Were they to read this book, my professors ar the Naval Postgraduate School would surely feel miral Stavridis injects his private experiences throughout the book, but these anecdotes strain to add anything to the story. Take for example the acc of the Egyptian pilot who nearly ran the then-captain's ship aground. So what? The reader learns not one single extra thing about the Suez C. We do learn that if a US Navy captain allows the vessel under his command to bump into something solid, his career is over. What does this have to do with "geopolitics "?If you are a prospective buyer of this book, take the following try before you spend your money. Do you know absolutely nothing about the oceans or geography of the world? Do you like to read autobiographies devoted to self-aggrandizing? Do you think that being a 4-star admiral makes someone an expert in "geopolitics "? If you answered in the affirmative three times, you should buy the book. If you prefer in-depth learning about the world's oceans and their role in history, read the works of Samuel Eliot Morison, who was promoted to flag rank on the strengh of his scholarship.

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    Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World's Oceans []  2020-1-18 20:44

    Amazing read. Can learn a lot as if you were sitting at a conference where he is a speaker. I haven't finished reading the book yet. But am 2/3rd through.

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    Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity []  2020-8-6 18:42

    From water and meal scarcity, this book has it all. Plus there are solutions to the issues we search ourselves in. Brown is successful in assimilating a heavy amount of trend data to present us where we have come from, where we are headed. What was difficult was to track back the research citations that were alluded to at the end of each chapter, although they were in end notes--a bersome approach when reading on a Kindle. The editor needs to take the reading approach, book or Kindle into account.

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    Rethinking Marketing: The Entrepreneurial Imperative []  2020-7-6 19:52

    This book is horribly boring. The only thing amazing about it is that it's smaller in size than a regular textbook. There are no pictures and very few bolded subtitles to differentiate between subjects. There are no definitions conveniently listed on the side of each page. This book is very hard to follow and amazing luck trying to stay awake while reading it.

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    Rethinking Marketing: The Entrepreneurial Imperative []  2020-7-6 19:52

    Thank you.

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    Rethinking the Power of Maps []  2020-8-18 18:31

    A +

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    Rethinking Marketing: The Entrepreneurial Imperative []  2020-7-6 19:52

    Did provide amazing standard information, though no "ahah!" moments.

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    Rethinking Marketing: The Entrepreneurial Imperative []  2020-7-6 19:52

    I downloaded the kindle ver of this book and I am extremely disappointed. The reason being is that all the page numbers are missing and it's really hard to follow along with my HW assignments because the teacher is going by the page numbers on the physical book.

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    Rethinking Marketing: The Entrepreneurial Imperative []  2020-7-6 19:52

    THANKS GREAT BOOK

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    Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet: The New Geopolitics of Energy []  2019-12-23 20:31

    It is very supportive book for my research.

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    Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World's Oceans []  2020-1-18 20:44

    This is quite an enjoyable book, which joins the private and the political—the role of the oceans in the career of an admiral, along with a highly readable history of maritime strategy. The concluding chapter provides a useful roadmap for the future.

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    Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World's Oceans []  2020-1-18 20:44

    For anyone who loves the seas .... Son is a grad student in Nautical Archaeology ... book is "recommended reading", so I read the introduction and couldn't place it down. The Admiral's real bonus is in his writing and how he shares his love and knowledge of our earth's interdependence on the oceans .... Truly a pleasure to read.

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    Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity []  2020-8-6 18:42

    As the founder of both Worldwatch Institute and the Earth Policy Institute, Lester Brown has been described by the Washington Post as "one of the world's most influential thinkers." And he's probably done more thinking and research about mankind's wasteful use of land and water than any other person in history. In this small book, he did a amazing job of summarizing that wealth of information. Although he makes it very clear that our current practices are unsustainable, he offers no clear roadmap for how to change it. That's where we come in...I had the privilege of visiting with Mr. Brown by phone in November of 2013. During our one-hour talk, he expressed optimism that my premise (shared by my colleagues James Cameron, T. Colin Campbell, John Robbins and others) just might work. That premise is this: "Shifting to a whole foods, plant-based diet will do more to ensure the longterm sustainability of our species than all other possible initiatives combined." I urge you to read this book and become part of the urgently required elimination of our highly wasteful, harmful and grossly unsustainable feeding model of meat, dairy, eggs and/or fish three meals a day. J. Morris Hicks

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    Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity []  2020-8-6 18:42

    This is a nice deeper text when you wonder about the underpinnings of Syria's discontent (water scarcity), Egypt's uprising (bread prices rising too high). I don't remember if these two things were specifically in the book but to understand that our globe will change, has changed and how we will manage requires more reading than what one can search in the general media. This is a amazing tool, recommended.

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    Rethinking the Power of Maps []  2020-8-18 18:31

    Maps are my thing and I always appreciate an in-depth book on the subject. However, in the case of this book, I felt that I couldn't obtain a clear focus on the main points the author wished to make. Maybe it's just me, be I was left feeling confused.

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    Rethinking the Power of Maps []  2020-8-18 18:31

    Today they are scribbled on the back of business cards, delivered with admonitions by our GPS, or arrive on our desktop from Mappy or Google. Most of us, if we reflect on maps at all, are likely to think of them as aids for getting from one put to another without getting lost, satisfied not to risk roadway suicide refolding their bed sheet-sized ancestors to fit the glove compartment! In the newspaper or on the Internet maps may also seem to be simple ways to digest data, viz., the red/blue state maps used to explain the 2008 US elections or tracking the spread of influenza. However, Denis Wood's sequel to The Power of Maps, takes us far, far deeper into the substratum of how we come to have and use these tools. It examines the assumptions we create about them and their import for both local and global communities.Wood topics what we call "a map" to a strict historical scrutiny. At least in the West, maps are with few exceptions a product of the age of nation building. To quote the author, "The things we recognize as maps gained currency only in the latest 400 years or so and within this period only in relatively stable states with entrenched, centralized bureaucracies and well-established academies." In truth, far from being passive reflections of geography, maps support construct the state as we know does this work? Drawing boundaries and naming locations are ways of affirming the existence of a state and its reach. The resulting maps, then, both affirm and are affirmed by the authority of the state. The existence of the map offered a sense of identity to both the population within and a claim of proprietorship versus those without. Maps are used to tell us that "things are," and that they are "there." At their absolute worst, as history shows, they often give legitimacy, if not a sense of absolute righteousness, to engaging in seizure and s are not passive pieces of paper or pixels on your computer screen that they at first seem to be. While they show themselves as simply representing facts of nature and society, maps, whether gerrymandering local voting or school districts or staking a claim to territory, are in fact propositions supporting both local and geopolitical agendas in find of sides chronicling this power and agency of maps with numerous historical and contemporary accounts, Rethinking the Power of Maps includes a brilliantly written, major case study, the mapping and counter-mapping and counter-counter-mapping of Palestine. The focal point of this history is the claim to existence of the State of Israel and propositions as to its geographical reach. I started reading the book from the beginning, but found the cartographic language a bit daunting, so followed the author's suggestion of jumping to this illustrative chapter, whose story line and impact helped me create much better sense of the s share in the power of culture, in which the making of maps has in fact become a part. They are social constructs shaping our reality. They operate like the most influential levels of culture, those that speak to us from below the waterline of consciousness about what we should believe to be true and meaningful. Maps easily close our minds and eyes to conflicting or competing realities that might challenge implanted values and attitudes. Whether justifying contemporary Israeli expansion or motivating the century long march of the "Manifest Destiny" of the white man in America, maps ease the conscience of both their creators and users. Who can argue with "what is?" Here as well as elsewhere rapacious abstraction has the power to gnaw at our yond tracking the primary story of the development of mapping and its purposes, Wood explores the impact of the legend and symbols and colors used in designing maps, what they tell us and what they hide, as well as how they advertise. The incisiveness and precision with which he examines elements that we take for granted on maps is at once a sociological and epistemological ysis of the minds of both makers and end users of maps. It explains the results of the employing them and gives us clues to the interpreting the language and codes they s are about relationships, how one landscape or feature of what is being measured and presented relates to or elbows another aside in the style of presentation, relative size and importance. Far from innocent notes and symbols, the legend placed on maps (or its absence), too, inevitably bear intentionality. Though we might generally agree that even the most lavishly illustrated menu is not the meal, when it comes to maps, we are far less likely to disentangle reality from its representation by the cartographer or fathom the intentions of his or her ven the political, military, financial and social influences behind the creation and use of maps, it is not surprising that elevated consciousness about their actual sources, origins and nature would effect in resistance to propositions they espouse. Inevitably this leads to counter-mapping as an expression of criticism and protest.Wood looks at the rise and fall of cartography as a scholarly discipline, both in the making and classification of maps. He points to a decline of sustainability in this academic venture, due to both internal and external criticism and the fact that technological tools are democratizing the ability to create maps. He provides numerous examples of "home grown" mapmaking taking on a life of its own, embodying both artistic elegance and a sense of affection for the locations in people , the blabbing GPS, et al, are now automating the past intentions and assumptions of mapmakers. Recognizing this, Wood becomes an unabashed advocate of "talking back to the map" and, in a populist sense, "taking back the map." This perspective and tone resonates through the entire the book, but is most explicit in Chapters 5 to 7 where alternative propositions, everything from activist criticism to Dada map art are explored. Wood argues that we need to obtain beyond the fictive "public participation" that is often championed with a political agenda of balancing help and interests for projects if we are to enter into true democratization of thinking the Power of Maps, is not an simple read, but an eye opening one. The language can be daunting even for US English speakers, not just in the use of vocabulary but in the broadness of the conceptual frame--I read it with my browser begin to Wikipedia. The end notes are a copious resource not only listing and explaining references but providing extra commentary on the part of the author that would have overburdened the sum, I can do no better than quote from the first pages of the book: "Maps are engines that convert social energy into social work," whose outputs contain the framing of social space, social order, and social knowledge.

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    Rethinking Marketing: The Entrepreneurial Imperative []  2020-7-6 19:52

    It's the kind of book I can jump into anytime. Not too long or short. The chapters provide true life examples of business practices (Disney, Apple, etc) that I can relate to.

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    Rethinking Marketing: The Entrepreneurial Imperative []  2020-7-6 19:52

    The book came in on time allright. However when I openend the pack what I found wasn't the original book, but a shady handmade copy, done by a crappy printer. Really, you guys should be embarrassed. I can't believe in our globe these practices still exist. I should charge you guys with copyright infringement... come on...

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    Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World's Oceans []  2020-1-18 20:44

    Long on history and a valuable insight on how a top ranking admiral views future threats. Also reads like a biography and resume for the author. Perfect book covering the past, present, and future of each of the seven, (eight) seas and all of the nation's that gain power and influence by controlling them.

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    Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World's Oceans []  2020-1-18 20:44

    Amazing introduction to naval power from a modern perspective. The author is knowledgeable, authoritative, and interesting. I recommend this book to anyone interested in global history or about to embark on a sea voyage.

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    Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet: The New Geopolitics of Energy []  2019-12-23 20:31

    This well-researched, data-rich, and thought-provoking book is a amazing primer for anyone who wants to be more literate about the geopolitics and geoeconomics of energy in the 20th and early 21st centuries. Although there have been significant energy-related geopolitical developments since the book was published in 2008 -- for example, China's increasingly aggressive encroachments into its neighbors' territorial waters and Russia's incursions into the Ukraine -- the context provided by this book makes these developments simple to understand, irrespective of how one judges them from legal and moral perspectives. The book's 269 pages of narrative are accompanied by helpful maps, tables and over 50 pages of end-notes. Highly recommended.

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    Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet: The New Geopolitics of Energy []  2019-12-23 20:31

    This book should not be read at night when alone. This book if read sober will scare the s*$# out of you. The truth has a tendency to do that to people. Every US citizen should read this book no matter your job, education, or whatever. Michael Klare hit a home run with this America sits in front of their TV stuck in a deep trance about American Idol or the recent screw up by some film or pop star the globe has been changing. Everyone still thinks things are like the method they were in the 50s, America sits on top of the world. I only want things were like that. The latest spike in gas prices at the pump shows us all how things are NOT like the is book shows the reader just how the globe has changed. He chronicles the change in both the globe and the globe oil market. Rising powers, thus the name of the book like China and India have drastically increased their thirst for oil. This increase demand on oil from those two countries and others have changed the globe oil market. At the same time the safe fields in locations like Texas have dried up. This has forced the oil providers to go deeper into the world's sewage ponds to obtain that ose ponds are increasing more and more violent and less and less stable. These two things are creating a special shop paradox. Prices have jumped as we all have e rising demand different countries are experiencing is pushing countries to work harder to secure that oil. Klare does a amazing job doenting how China is aggressively doing whatever it takes to secure that oil. Oil is no longer just a good. It is a strategic asset for almost every country. Every country defines not only growth but survival in terms of oil a effect of this fresh view of oil nations are posturing like crazy all over the country to ensure that their interests are taken care of. That is where the scary part of the book enters into things. The modern day suburban opinion is that man has evolved out of war. That is behind us. Of course the people that believe that are the ones who don't go to war. People forget two of man's bloodiest battles started by accident, over night. Klare puts it best:"As the desire for ever scarcer energy supplies builds, the potential to slide across this threshold into armed conflict and possibly amazing power confrontation poses one of the greatest dangers facing the planet today"After reading the book you will see what he is talking about. It pans out in the news almost everyday. Those readers who are Christian believers will really be shocked. The story of tournament for oil reads a amazing deal like the prophesy of the end times spoken about in numerous books of the bible. It also reads like the old Hal Lindsey book in the 70s about the "Late Amazing Planet Earth".Klare ends with a call for diplomacy to work things out. He is right about calling for that. However I doubt it will work. When you are cold from no oil or hungry or have your national pride wounded because of oil similar issues nations might not be in the mood for diplomacy.

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    Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity []  2020-8-6 18:42

    This book talks about how humans are treating each other and our planet with possible steps on how to fix it. It is one of those "doom and gloom" books, but it's info based to support spread the word and educate people on what needs to be done to have a sustainable world both during and after each generation. Don't knock it because it's about meal and it talks about how screwed we are w/the current path humans are taking to feed ourselves - give it a chance, it's def. worth it.

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    Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity []  2020-8-6 18:42

    A lot of what the author said was not fresh to me and the latest chapter was kind of weak. Brown wants us to become politically active to create changes in our globe but I think it has more to do with the decisions we create every day that will create a difference.

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    Rethinking Marketing: The Entrepreneurial Imperative []  2020-7-6 19:52

    This book describes the environment of entrepreneurship and is a amazing tutorial book to those interested in learning more about this subject.

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    Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet: The New Geopolitics of Energy []  2019-12-23 20:31

    I found this book to be thorough, well written, and thought provoking. Though I had read other books about energy, this gave me a better understanding about the political aspects, changing alliances, and the extent of the problem. After several chapters that can be described as doom and gloom, Klare does offer some suggestions on the world's method out - if we create a serious effort to do so. I strongly recommend this book.

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    Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World's Oceans []  2020-1-18 20:44

    I liked the history of each of the major bodies of water. The political realities of each of the regions are clearly presented.

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    Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World's Oceans []  2020-1-18 20:44

    A lot of this book summarized the history of human seafaring specifically in the chapters on the Atlantic and Pacific. The portions on the SCS, Med, and Arctic were quite substantive with ways forward in contentious parts of the world. Worth the read if only for those portions.

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    Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity []  2020-8-6 18:42

    This book title is perhaps best surmised on page 121 in a quote from the author: "The overriding threats in this century are climate change, population growth, spreading water shortages, rising meal prices, and politically failing states."In chapter one author Brown reminds us that meal shortages were seminal forces in the demise of ancestral civilizations. The Sumerians and the Mayans are believed to have perished because of feral agricultural me 1 billion people living in the Indian subcontinent or sub-Saharan Africa are malnourished and chronically hungry. About half of all kids in India are compromised mentally and physically. One fourth of families in India have foodless days.Each year the globe adds 80 million to the populace. They all do not enter an environment of full plates, potable water and abundant resources.Half the global populace, in some 18 countries, are confronted with depletion of water aquifers, soil erosion and rising planetary temperatures, all a threat to 1804 globe population was 1 billion; the incremental rise to 2 billion was humanity's count a century later in 1927, in 1960 the number was 3 billion; in 2011 we saw a more than doubling to 7 billion. These numbers equate to aquifer depletion, fisheries in decline, and the desertification of lands in parts of the grassland Brown proposes in Chapter 11 that the eradication of poverty, a stable globe population, and better use of land and water for meal production will address his "empty plate' syndrome. These problems have been headline makers since public discourse gave them social status but their manifest dominance of human destiny has not altered any of the charts of dependency that Man's interference into natural processes seeks in the journey to Utopia.

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    Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity []  2020-8-6 18:42

    Has every politician and political advisor read this book? If not, why not? I would say it is the single most important, fundamentally important, book in print today. I cannot believe that anyone, no matter what you may have formerly believed or not believed, would not be influenced to act, and with alacrity, after having read this book--which I did in a single 24-hour period, because, while thoroughly sourced, it is entirely accessible. Totally compelling, although deeply disturbing. Catastrophic change is imminent

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    Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity []  2020-8-6 18:42

    If you know Lester Browns work, you will understand what you are getting when you buy this book. Honest Data, Straight Talk, Insightful ysis. If you do not know his body of work, I highly recommend you introduce yourself to this author. All of his work is thought provoking.

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    Rethinking Marketing: The Entrepreneurial Imperative []  2020-7-6 19:52

    I had to read this for a graduate marketing class. It is poorly written and cheesy. The chapter material is also very redundant.

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    Rethinking Marketing: The Entrepreneurial Imperative []  2020-7-6 19:52

    This is a truly visionary, even revolutionary, book of business scholarship. Dr Schindehutte comes from a background in the hard sciences, and in the tradition of Ilya Prigogine, crosses over to the social and applied sciences of business marketing. With a scientist's keen eye for observation, whe finds the old ways of marketing quickly being replaced by a fresh paradigm. The traditional 4 Ps are now replaced by what she calls the 4 Cs. Organizations that don't adapt to the fresh competitive environment emerging will become extinct. Only those organizations that re-think traditional marketing and apply fresh revolutionary techniques will survive and thrive. A mind-expanding work.

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    Rethinking the Power of Maps []  2020-8-18 18:31

    We take maps for granted, but this book explains how maps can misinform as well as inform. In fact, the very nature of a map has to contain some misinformation. It requires an informed and ethical person to show as honest a map as possible and not let their bias to control its production.

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    Rethinking Collection Development and Management []  2020-12-13 18:31

    I recently took a collection development and management course for a Master of Library Science degree program. We were assigned the usual sort of textbook that gives a broad overview and history of the field and defines all the important terms and concepts. As a secondary text, we were assigned Rethinking Collection Development and Management, the 2014 collection edited by Becky Albitz, Christine Avery, and Diane Zabel. Over the course of the semester, this text proved far more valuable than the basic text. Freed from the responsibility of having to explain every concept from square one, the authors of the chapters in the Albitz, Avery, and Zabel book are able to offer more detail about specific locations of collection development and management and offer insights from their private experiences as librarians. For example, while a typical course textbook may give general guidelines of things to consider when negotiating a contract with an e-book vendor, Chapter 16 of this book, “eBooks in Academic Libraries” by Michael Levine-Clark, gives info about specific e-book vendors, what services they offer, and what sorts of decisions one will have to create when choosing between them. In general, all the chapters in the book exhibit the same level of specificity, detail, and practical orientation. It doesn’t just talk theoretically about librarianship, but illustrates to students like me what the job of a librarian actually nce various chapters focus on public libraries, academic libraries, and unique collections, each student in the class can read the chapters that pertain to his or her preferred zone of specialty. (There’s isn’t much here on school libraries.) I read all the academic and unique collections chapters and a lot of of the public library chapters. With very few exceptions, I found the text very informative and well-written, in a matter that’s accessible to but not dumbed-down for the novice. Besides e-books, subjects contain serials, book leasing, streaming video, floating collections, scholarly communication, weeding, and preservation and disaster planning. It proved to be a very educational resource for the course I took, and after I graduate I can see myself using this text as a reference in years to come.

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    Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World's Oceans []  2020-1-18 20:44

    And extraordinarily articulate author. Just because I am also a retired naval officer doesn’t alter my view. Well worth reading by anyone who is a critical thinker about history.

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    Sea Power: The History and Geopolitics of the World's Oceans []  2020-1-18 20:44

    I would recommend this book to future globe leaders concerning the importance of global trade for all of us. Also, holistically we need to work together globally to hold our oceans environmentally safe for future generations. We have no choice in this matter and Admiral Stavridis articulates this requirement to the reader very eloquently in this book. Unbelievable read....

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    Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet: The New Geopolitics of Energy []  2019-12-23 20:31

    The charts alone tell the story of what lies ahead. The most striking figure for me is that the US, the world's sole superpower for the latest 2 decades, holds 3.3% of the world's natural gas reserves yet produces and uses 18.5% of the globe total - not sustainable long term tactic for a country that refuses to invest meaningfully or intelligently in efficiency or alternative sources of energy. More concerning yet is the growing concentration of the world's dwindling oil reserves in unstable regions of the globe where ALL of the major developing and developed countries are involved in a high stakes, high nerves 21st century ver of the Amazing Game. Klare lays out the situation simply and clearly and lets the reader draw most of the conclusions. It doesn't take much editorializing to support us understand why the US has 12 major military bases in the Gulf region or why China refuses to condemn the appalling situations in Sudan or Zimbabwe. For anyone who wants to understand the larger picture, this is a amazing book.

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    Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet: The New Geopolitics of Energy []  2019-12-23 20:31

    Thinking about the wasting of the world's resources? Here is a book that tells you lots about how a lot of countries are using, exporting and not noticing how this resource is d reading!

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    Rising Powers, Shrinking Planet: The New Geopolitics of Energy []  2019-12-23 20:31

    A sobering non-ideological acc of the struggle among globe powers for energy e author points to actions that could be taken to avoid the catastrophe of globe battle or another arms race as countries seek to get control of the remaining globe energy resources.

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    Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity []  2020-8-6 18:42

    I was raised on a farm during the 30's- - and this book 'rung a bell' for me. This one and 'Breaking Fresh Ground' by the same author really created sense to me - - that our globe is really over-populated and unless we begin learning about what is going on, future generations will have issues with having enough water - - enough amazing land to raise meal - - and too a lot of people who will test to take care of themselves any method they can think of. It will slowly become a risky world.

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    Full Planet, Empty Plates: The New Geopolitics of Food Scarcity []  2020-8-6 18:42

    required for class and amazing to have

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    Creativity is Everything: Rethinking Technology, Schools & Humanity []  2019-12-18 20:24

    As an educator, a parent and a life-long learner, I see a lot of potential for this book both as a reference and a source of inspiration. It is an entertaining creativity tutorial with easy-to-do hints that present how students can truly benefit from technology as a tool for creativity and issue solving. A page turner, I read it in one sitting and will likely read it again and again.

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    Rethinking Leadership: A Collection of Articles []  2020-1-8 19:45

    Perfect book for a doctoral program.

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    My Kind of Transit: Rethinking Public Transportation []  2020-1-14 19:2

    It's an OK book. I read and skimmed the book about how cities sold and marketed their mass transit. Didn't obtain a lot of ideas from it.

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    My Kind of Transit: Rethinking Public Transportation []  2020-1-14 19:2

    This book is a beautiful amazing primary book about some of the various kinds of transit. It was a amazing read.

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    The State of Affairs: Rethinking Infidelity []  2020-1-18 20:28

    Esther Perel offers wisdom and insight into almost every conceivable type of human infidelity and the underlying causes. Though every affair is various and will not resonate with every reader, every reader will search something in this book that personally resonates. We're all human! When reading this book, I was in the midst of writing a novel that involved the first marital transgression in a 25-year marriage, and I wondered if such a scenario was even believable. Who would wait 25 years before suddenly being unfaithful? Perel's book helped me understand how easily - and often - this happens, and empowered me to write with more confidence. I also liked Perel's take on marriages that are not monogamous, but forced obstenance by one of the partners. Perel asks the question, Who is the offender in such a union, when has been denied and thus sought elsewhere? I also appreciated the chapter on the "other woman", a role that is often neglected and that deserves more of our thought and understanding. This book will fascinate even those of the human race who believe their life has never been touched by infidelity, for it is a human behavior that has touched nearly all of us at some time in our lives.

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    Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition []  2020-3-30 20:22

    Campbell's starts out possibly a small boring but accelerates throughout the book to a conclusion that strikes me as a crucial criticism and warning about our society which is based on profit and e key word is REDUCTIONISM ( versus wholeism ). .... I.e every segment of our society .... medicine, Pharma, agriculture, etc etc. goes the reductionist route. That is, we are driven by cash and capitalism, and all concepts turn into ' cash and profit concepts '..Campbell in his final chapters lays into the medical and nutritional organizations that should be bringing out the truth and defending us. But, the exact opposite. ... Coke, junk meal inc, you name it ... they are donating huge bucks to American Cancer Society and down the line .Sad, medicine is all about curing the diseases they should be concerned about preventing.!! It's a rigged system as Campbell rightly points out.And, very sadly, the people who choose to read the book already know but may not fully realize.A revolutionary notice ... that sadly may go unheard and ignored . Capitalism may motivate but has it's weakness in reductionism. A amazing word for what is event to our society.

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    Rethinking Incarceration: Advocating for Justice That Restores []  2020-1-27 20:51

    I was excited to obtain this book because the idea of a theologian discussing mass incarceration and racism is intriguing. However, to me, it was e opening half of the book, where the author most heavily discusses incarceration and systemic racism within the criminal justice system, is best described as a rehash of Michelle Alexander's "The Fresh Jim Crow." And, to be fair, the Fresh Jim Crow is the authority on the subject. But this subject is too expansive to rehash and summarize. It leaves too a lot of too chunks of meat left on the bone and the reader is left hanging for more information. Granted, this will spark curiosity and possibly further reading, but low hanging fruit is never a poor thing.I also felt that the biblical referencing was incomplete as well which probably damage the most. I found the author too a lot of times simply referencing a Bible verse/passage and then not saying what that passage o a lot of times I had to stop reading and Google the referenced verse to see what it even said. This created for a choppy reading experience and it was off putting.Did I learn stuff? Sure, but I feel like there could have been more.

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    Rethinking Incarceration: Advocating for Justice That Restores []  2020-1-27 20:51

    With Michelle Alexander's The Fresh Jim Crow and Ava DuVernay's "13th," mass incarceration is gaining greater famous exposure. Rethinking Incarceration uniquely contributes a critically important theological assessment of our carceral state while also providing a theological corrective that is both creative and faithful to Scripture and Christian ever, Gilliard not only examines the subject from a high-level viewpoint, but also grounds it into a call for Christian ministry and engagement.An necessary resource for followers of Jesus who are not only interested in learning more about prison industrial complex from a theological point of view but also motivated to do something about it.

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    Rethinking Corrections: Rehabilitation, Reentry, and Reintegration []  2020-1-23 19:6

    Up-to-date data and researched perspectives, well organized, well doented, but does not pontificate, blame or gloss over; doesn't give answers but points toward solutions. Locations corrections within the context of social justice, which not only broadens the perspectives but provides a deeper grounding for rehabilitation, re-entry and reintegration as similar to public safety, individual responsible growth and interdependence, and just and cost-effective social policy. It promotes critical thinking and critical understanding of America's special development and role in criminal justice.

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    Rethinking Corrections: Rehabilitation, Reentry, and Reintegration []  2020-1-23 19:6

    Amazing book

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    Rethinking Normal: A Memoir in Transition []  2020-1-23 0:14

    amazing insight into a globe I knew nothing about. It really created me see trans problems differently and I feel like I understand a lot better. Well-written, too! Even without the trans aspect, the story was really interesting--the author's depression, family life, boy troubles, mates and school problems created for a lot of interesting drama.

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    Rethinking Normal: A Memoir in Transition []  2020-1-23 0:14

    Yay Katie! You are attractive and create our globe a better place! May the faeries bless you and yours with much magick, love and joy!

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    The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity []  2020-1-31 21:29

    The Lies that Bind is an necessary book about an obviously necessary topic. Not a lot of subjects are discussed as often as identity but Kwame Appiah is still able to bring a new perspective to the topic all the while writing with clarity and in a style which can be understood by academics and non-academics alike. I happen to disagree with a lot of of the conclusions but I will test to focus this review more on what the author wanted to say and less on my particular iah first recognizes the enormous importance given to problems of identity in the modern world. These identities— whether racial, religious, national or cultural—tend to be viewed through an essentialist lens: they are true things that express themselves in iah rightly dismantles the essentialist account. Instead he offers his own theory that identities are merely labels which correspond with certain expected behaviors and certain expected treatment by others. One can test to change these norms but the labels are shared by a wider community and so ultimately one must persuade the wider public that a change in attitude is necessary. (A latest example of this is society’s change in attitude towards homos.)To accomplish this dismantling Appiah advances example upon example of the fluidity of identity labels. While gender may be appear to be binary there are in fact a lot of inter people. While we tend to view religions as creeds there are a lot of various beliefs within one community. And while people do have various skin colors there is no such thing as a e issue with this dismantling is that Appiah oversimplifies the construction of these identities. While genetic aberrations may occur that create some people not fully biologically male or female this doesn’t prove that gender is a mere label anymore than any other genetic malfunction causes humanity to lack a certain characteristic. And while, in the wake of the Protestant Reformation, a lot of churches began stressing their respective creeds, the example of a lot of beliefs within one faith community does not prove that there are no core teachings any more than the fact that libertarians disagree on legalization proves that libertarians do not have an essential belief towards limited government. Finally, the idea that race as reported by the census bureau is largely a social construct does not mean that genetic differences don’t exist between various peoples around the globe that can partially explain differences in short, while not an essentialist, I simply don’t agree that all identities are merely labels with no core meaning whatsoever. While sympathetic to Appiah’s defense of those marginalized by identity, I do not believe that all identities are lies which bind. Some identities are meaningful though Appiah’s deconstructions are worth considering before opting for a very rigid notion of identity.Wonderfully written with a sincere effort to provoke thought and better the globe I do recommend this book to all even though I must disagree with some of its major conclusions.

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    The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity []  2020-1-31 21:29

    This book is not really a scholarly study at all. It reads like a diary, or something you might discuss at a tail party.

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    The Federalist Papers (Rethinking the Western Tradition) []  2020-7-13 20:4

    In the description it says, "This book features edited highlights of the essays". This isn't the case for the hard copy edition. It doesn't even have half of the papers in this edition. Returned

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    Rethinking the Economics of Land and Housing []  2020-1-31 7:46

    A book that create you think and view the housing shop in a various angle

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    Agents of Change: Rethinking Insurance Agency Marketing []  2020-1-19 22:5

    Wow, this book is packed with information. I love the format... taking us through the day to day of a struggling to obtain by insurance agent, then how that insurance agent transforms his business and his life by better marketing. This book is a must read if you are in today's hyper-competitive insurance agency business.

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    Agents of Change: Rethinking Insurance Agency Marketing []  2020-1-19 22:5

    This is amazing inspiration for creating a plan and sticking with it. Do something. If it doesn't work, stop and do something else but this book gives us amazing starting suggestions. Create these stuff Non-Negotiable.

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    Agents of Change: Rethinking Insurance Agency Marketing []  2020-1-19 22:5

    Normally I don't provide reviews, however, this book was excellent in so a lot of ways. It was a very quick read that got right to the point. No matter what your profession is, this book is a must on business, life, and values.

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    Rethinking Normal: A Memoir in Transition []  2020-1-23 0:14

    It's allows you to hold an begin mind. That life's struggles are true for everyone. They may not look the same but they are. Respect and hold yourself educated.

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    Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition []  2020-3-30 20:22

    I went into this book hoping to learn more about nutrition and what diets/foods are associated with improving certain markers of health. Instead, it was a rant about how things are broken with minimal references to back his claim about his research (both about how protein and dairy are the causes of cancer and how everything is broken). In particular, I was really unsettled by his attack towards science (especially being a scientist). I only finished this book because I can't stop a book I started ave to give an informed review. If you are wanting to learn about nutrition, look for another book.

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    Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition []  2020-3-30 20:22

    I quickly purchased this book for my Kindle as I was running out the door to leave on a trip. Without checking around to see what the content of the book actually is, I simply assumed that a book by T. Colin Campbell titled, "Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition," would be about whole foods. Instead, I think it is a defense of his book, "The China Study," versus its critics. The "whole" in the title refers to Campbell's call to whole foods, whole health, and research that looks at whole nutrition and whole bodies. He opposes reductionism--the focus on single nutrients or single to combat single diseases. Campbell spares no medical association, no "disease" advocacy group, no government agency, no meal corporation or dairy & meat industry, in exposing their bottom line self-interest in their pursuit of patenting and profiting from foods and medicines and medical procedures--and covering up research damaging to their interests. The government agencies commissioned to protect the public are staffed with meal corporation and dairy and meat industry people or researchers indebted to the funding of such corporations or industries. If you wish to know why you cannot trust what you read about nutrition or research in nutrition, this book will create it very obvious. But don't expect to learn much about whole foods.

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    Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition []  2020-3-30 20:22

    First, this is not a book about diets. If you are expecting a book that tells you what to eat on Tuesday for breakfast, this is not it. I loved this book for a dozens of reasons. First, the author explains the logic and structure of medical research along with a amazing overview of the balance between reductionism vs. a holistic view. The author has years of experience communicating around the subject of nutrition, and his experiences are valuable across multiple disciplines. Coming from an IT background, I was reading the book with moments of clarity at how related enterprise IT is to issues faced in the nutrition/medical community when distilling ideas without losing context. I read this book AFTER reading the China Study, and I think it created more sense in that eat book. Fully recommend it to anyone wanting to learn more about the past 50 years of nutritional research and/or ways to distill/communicate ideas.

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    The State of Affairs: Rethinking Infidelity []  2020-1-18 20:28

    I started following Esther Perel's work years ago when she did a riveting TEDtalk about infidelity & she authored a fascinating book called MATING IN CAPTIVITY. Both captivated me --not just because it's a titillating subject or because we were finally getting access to the underbelly of relationships that nobody openly discusses-- but because her work is full of human truths. About desire, love, the often inconvenient construct of marriage, egos, the secret longings people hide. Loneliness. Communication and the lack there of. Connection. alchemy. Marriage with and without kids. Trauma. Responsibility. She shines a light on all of it-- but never with sanctimony. Her work lets reality finally breathe.... uncloaked, so we can learn from it versus getting continually stuck in judgment. She discusses "what is" versus "what should be ....but never really was nor will be." These are often the same subjects that come up when I coach clients, so her work rings achingly true. I've recommended her work to a lot of clients whether they're married, dating or in between. Whether they have dealt first hand with infidelity or not. Why? Because Perel discusses the human condition in a new, enlightening method & her work reveals alternative ways to communicate & connect with those we love, about subjects we've been dodging. It's authentic. So now her recent book, THE STATE OF AFFAIRS is out. Wow. Even juicier, deeper, more revealing and enlightening. Without meaning to, she may have written the first guidebook to having healthier relationships (with ourselves and others) in the REAL world, because she tells us the actual state of affairs, not that Face-tuned version. Yes it's about infidelity... but really it's about SO much more. Cannot recommend it highly enough. I listen to the Audible ver in my vehicle & also at night when I sit outside. It's like hanging out with your smartest girlfriend after she's traveled the world. So grateful for her honesty, hard work, passion and compassion-- all of which she shares with lucky us. IG acefully

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    The State of Affairs: Rethinking Infidelity []  2020-1-18 20:28

    An exceptional work dealing with one of the "taboo" topics in the US and Western European cultures. Perel is an engaging storyteller and also an emotive writer with a clear, consistent style. Her TED talks are also worth watching as they cover a lot of of the key points in both of her books. It is very hetero-normative, yet she does reference same- couples as well, which was very refreshing and relevant for me to read. She also defines "an affair" in the best method I have ever heard.

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    The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity []  2020-1-31 21:29

    I have fun books written by philosophers for a general audience because they usually demonstrate such clear thinking. That is certainly the case with this book and the author has taken on an necessary and somewhat sensitive topic. He does an outstanding job of showing how the identities we take on are flawed and full of contradictions. We often have small in common with those with whom we identify . Therefore the title "The Lies That Bind". Interestingly enough though the author admits these identities are important for us to function well in society. I think the importance in this book and especially at this time lies in the fact that it so clearly emphasizes that we need to stop using identity as if everyone who takes on that identity has the same experiences, cirtances, or goals. That's the issue with the current identity politics. It doesn't recognize the fact that in the end we are all individuals. Highly recommended!

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    The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity []  2020-1-31 21:29

    This is not a work of philosophy, but rather a private memoir and an exposition of (pre-post-modern) Sociology 1. We all have multiple sources of our private identity, and an attempt to reduce one's identity to a single 'essential' identity (cultural, religious, ethnic, or race) is bound to be a lie. But it may be a lie that binds disparate individuals together in a common task. Feminists bind all females together, radical black activists bind their racial compatriots together on the basis of skin color, Marxists test to bind workers together on the basis of their common relationships as economic ese are lies, and mostly do not work well, but sometimes they work well enough to achieve necessary political ntemporary left-wing identity politics promote lies, but lies that cannot support the oppressed because minorities can effectively agitate for inclusion, but by sowing discord, must lose. Moreover, the idea that all 'minorities' will bind together on the basis of being a 'minority' has never worked in the past and is unlikely to work in the future.

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    The Lies That Bind: Rethinking Identity []  2020-1-31 21:29

    Kwame Anthony Appiah shows what classifies an identity or label. He exposes issues with these classifications being overgeneralized and how individuals identify with groups. This creates problems as identity is more complicated than just sorting categories to explain behavior or stereotyping. The author explains that this is human nature and serves a purpose. He elaborates on negative effects of this throughout history and contradictions created by other philosophers and scholars. Kwame Anthony Appiah dismantles concepts of identities using a private and thorough tone. With a philosophically methodic approach, Appiah conveys to the reader his corroborating evidence to his points. This rhetoric leaves the reader overwhelmed with unfamiliar info and forces them to draw their own conclusions. Kwame Anthony Appiah leaves most his points open-ended at the end of each chapter. I believe this draws on his title of rethinking identity and was exactly what he set out to accomplish. The method the book flows, it sparks critical thinking. Most chapters begin with a story of an individual, whose life doesn’t quite fit into a single identity or classification. Appiah throws historically “wrong” ideas, coupled with drawn out explanations with dozens of supporting evidence pointing to theses lies. Then, reverts back to the persons story and leaves it up to the reader to form a conclusion. The concluding chapter was somewhat of a disappointment. Kwame Appiah Anthony does provide some closure and explain his thesis, but not with the same depth as he does throughout the book. He cites a poem and points out that it is meanings that groups attach to labels that matter. Interpretation of greater ideals and misinterpretations associated with groups lead to major misconceptions. It is my belief that this is what he implies with the title The Lies That Bind is an necessary subject that I think should be included in most people’s read list, hence the 4/5 stars. Kwame Anthony Appiah’s argument that the method we think of identity is flawed is well supported. While an exhausting read for me, it led to exploring more of Kwame Anthony Appiah’s work and was happy to be introduced to Appiah’s scholarly articles. The anticlimactic nature of this book does not impede the authors message. The critical thinking sparked, could be considered overthinking but it ties back to his points, and so it makes sense after continuing to read. That being said, I was grateful to have gone down the “rabbit hole” and encourage others to read this book!

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    Rethinking the Economics of Land and Housing []  2020-1-31 7:46

    This book was a true eye opener and a refreshing explanation of what is now a major problem in our economies. The author not only dispels a lot of entrenched assumptions about the role of land but also goes as far as to give practical suggestions for how these problems can be tackled

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    Rethinking the Economics of Land and Housing []  2020-1-31 7:46

    Interesting book that opened alot of info

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    Rethinking Incarceration: Advocating for Justice That Restores []  2020-1-27 20:51

    This book provides detailed context, the ways in which our current justice system is dramatically flawed, how the church’s theology is connected to mass incarceration, what the Bible says about justice, and how the church can lead a movement of restorative justice. “Rethinking Incarceration” not only builds upon ideas and foundations built by Angela Y. Davis, Michelle Alexander, and Bryan Stevenson among others, but because it was written for the church, it also has the specific distinction of providing tangible steps for Christians who are interested in biblical justice. While other books on the subject have the tendency to leave the reader overwhelmed and discouraged, Gilliard empowers the reader to be part of changing the broken justice systems at hand.

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    Rethinking Incarceration: Advocating for Justice That Restores []  2020-1-27 20:51

    This book explains how the current U.S. prison system just isn't working. The TV show, 60 Minutes, had a clip about how Germany is working hard to both "Train", and "Re-Employ", it's prison population. After all, most prisoners will sooner-or-later be re-joining the rest of society. A significant part of the U.S. population has been in prison, and would benefit from what is described in this book. Changes to our prison system start with educating the rest of the population, and this book is a amazing start!

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    My Kind of Transit: Rethinking Public Transportation []  2020-1-14 19:2

    This is not a book to use for a class. To me it is more of a book for some reading on transportation systems and how they have evolved.

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    My Kind of Transit: Rethinking Public Transportation []  2020-1-14 19:2

    Perfect

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    Agents of Change: Rethinking Insurance Agency Marketing []  2020-1-19 22:5

    Amazing content, more info could be a amazing idea but it seems AMM might advise you. Will modernize my review after checking their website

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    Rethinking Leadership: A Collection of Articles []  2020-1-8 19:45

    Purchased for a class. Amazing read

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    Rethinking Leadership: A Collection of Articles []  2020-1-8 19:45

    EXCELLENT resource for aspiring leaders! It will change your life.

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    Rethinking Leadership: A Collection of Articles []  2020-1-8 19:45

    Amazing thoughts! Sergiovanni is one of the best at getting you and I to wish to do more and be better.

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