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    best-selling-spiritual-enlightenment-books inurl:add a comment dissolution'A=0'A=0&ct=clnk'A=0'A=0'A=0 review [in]  2018-5-22 17:51
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    If you haven't met Tom Corson-Knowles yet, the author who made Bestseller Ranking Pro, I think you'll search his story inspiring. Like most authors who have been in the android game for years, the only signs of interest Tom got from publishers were rejection letters. After six years of trying to obtain a traditional publishing deal, he finally decided to self publish his first book on Kindle in February, 2012. It was a life-changing decision. Just twelve months after publishing that first book, he had his first $12,000+ month from Kindle ebook royalties alone! You can learn how in this video. These tactics have also helped him and his clients become #1 Amazon bestselling authors. If you're going to write, publish or promote a book this year, you need to see this:

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    Sea of Rust: A Novel review [Book]  2018-1-29 18:0

    Sea of Rust is a sensational success. When I read through books, I sometimes tag a favorite quote or phrase. Afterwards, I have fun sharing a well-phrased zinger or a clever plot element that created me pause because it was a amazing representation of the story and might draw others in. In Sea of Rust, I marked up over a dozen pages just in the first is is not my typical read full of romance, but it is well worth the deviation. Sea of Rust holds insight and intrigue, life lessons and excitement, and a journey that changes everybot involved. The detail into the various types of robots is creative and profound. The story line is mesmerizing as each turn of happenings holds a potential climax only to be surpassed by an even greater turn of events. The alternation between the show and past is well-executed, and transitions are distinct and mold perfectly to make a attractive harmony. I just have to say that I want I had an RNG (Random Number Generation) to support me make decisions, but then again I'd be the one to question if the outcome really was the best decision and invalidate its e writing style results in an all consuming masterpiece. I read this book in a matter of hours. I started the first hundred pages over the course of a day, sneaking in a few pages each possibility I got and couldn't again bear the torture of that. The next day, I sat down and four hours and an unmade dinner later, finished the rest of the book. It's okay though because after reading a few of my notes to my husband that night over takeout, I had the book taken away from me and added to his nightstand. Sea of Rust was thought-provoking and a joy to read.

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    Sea of Rust: A Novel review [Book]  2018-1-29 18:0

    Short Review : A surprisingly poignant and smart hash of post-apocalyptic, Western, and robo-sci-fi elements that explores ethics, philosophy, civilization, and the meaning of life. A special spin on several oftentimes overworked genres!Longer Review : This book really caught me by surprise. I found this through a Twitter re-tweet; upon checking out the author, I was shocked he only had 3 books, this one being the third, and the other 2 were fantasy novels with mixed reviews. So I downloaded a sample and fully expected to not buy the full ever, the story being told her is a unbelievable and swirling mix of thematic and genre elements. Much like "Red Rising", this is a book that brings together a whole slew of ideas and styles that, on a drafting board, sound ridiculous and shouldn't work ... and yet they do to unbelievable effect. The synopsis for this novel actually downplays what this book is like, and makes it sound like a tongue-in-cheek dark comedy about robots bumbling around in a spaghetti Western. The truth is that this novel is much more developed and nuanced than that. Basically, this takes put 30 years after the begin of the battle to slay all humans (a la Skynet in the Terminator franchise but much more interesting), and something like 10 years after the death of the latest human. Earth is now populated by a mix of OWIs (One Globe Intelligences, AKA, Skynet-style hive-minds) and "freeboots", or basically AIs inhabiting a single, self-contained humanoid robot. In the style of a Western, the OWIs basically represent "The Man" or "The Feds" from the East, and the freebots represent the ranchers and farmers that just wish to be left alone on the frontier. And related to how a lot of cowboys and gunslingers were Civil Battle veterans, all freeboots were veterans in the battle versus is is where the book really created itself a 5 star novel in my opinion. Just about every other robots-kill-all-humans sci-fi has the humans as the beleaguered amazing guys and the robots as the merciless, soulless poor guys. And while that's not necessarily NOT the case here, the author does a unbelievable job of slowly selling the reader on the idea of these freebots being more than just "anti-human". This is not a novel that involves robots doing a win lap, post-war. This is, in huge part, a story of robots attempting to figure out the "Now What?" that comes after winning a battle that was everything and destroyed everything. In this, the author excels at making you forget you're reading a story where literally every hero is a machine, a non-human entity. There's explorations of post-traumatic stress, of regret, of the meaning of life beyond battle and conflict, of art and philosophy, of the cost of winning, of the cost of living, of defining yourself. There's sequences where a hero describes using a flamethrower and killing people, of killing children, and yet even after this revelation, the author has made an environment in which you almost feel worse for the robot than for the kids ... almost. There's numerous flashbacks to before the battle and discussions of who a lot of of the robots were before they were scavengers and mercenaries and pathfinders and murderers; there's one particular chapter for the protagonist that sent a few shivers up my spine and really struck home, as it basically becomes a "Sophie's Choice" type of thing.And that kind of sums up a huge part of what this novel is about: robots making increasingly desperate and hopeless decisions in a globe that is falling apart under them. Again, I wish to emphasize here that, despite the fact that most of this is a direct effect of the robots' decision to begin a battle and end humans, you still feel sympathy for them because (other than the OWIs) they are not singular, monolithic and personality-free intelligences. These are actual characters, each with their own struggles, each trying to search meaning in a meaningless is brings me to the perfect opening, middle and ending chapters that succinctly embody the spirit of the novel (I'll leave off info of the final chapter because, obviously, it's somewhat spoilerish, and I'll hold the middle chapter vague for that plus it's best to read it with few preconceptions). The novel opens with our protagonist watching a sunset and discussing the green flash that sometimes happens right before the sun goes all the method below the horizon (this is a true thing, BTW). They discuss it as being a sign of the magic in the world, but [email protected]#$%! off as there being no magic left. And that perfectly sets the tone for the novel. As things progress, and characters comes and go, and flashbacks provide the occasional interlude, the reader is constantly reminded, with subtle intelligence, that things are the method they are because there is no magic left in the world. And that's not meant to be a easy proclamation that's thrown aside to discover other ideas; instead, each event, each flashback, each discussion between characters, is essentially an exploration of HOW and WHY the magic has left the world. The author excelled at this, and damn near perfectly captured this concept from every angle. We eventually search out through a mid-novel interlude where this idea of the magic in the green flash at sunset came from, and then, to tie everything together, the novel ends with a sunset and a green flash in a method that, well, was excellent and damn near created me spill a MMARY: This is a amazing book. Even for people that don't read hardcore sci-fi, or shy away from the kind of sci-fi with robots and lasers and plasma and spaceships, this is an simple but smart and emotional novel. Don't think of this as a SCI-FI! but think of it as a Western ... with robots ... and no humans ... and figuring out the meaning of life at the edge of the globe and the end of civilization.

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    Sea of Rust: A Novel review [Book]  2018-1-29 18:0

    Sea of Rust by C. Robert Cargill is a highly recommended post-apocalyptic robot western."The one truth you need to know about the end of a machine is that the closer they are to death, the more they act like people. And you could never trust people."Human kind is now extinct and robots rule the world. Most of the globe is controlled by VIRGIL and CISSUS, the two competing hive-minded OWIs (or One Globe Intelligence). The OWIs are large mainframes where the memory of millions of robots has been uploaded, leaving behind thoughtless faucets who do the bidding of the OWI who controls them - and also controls the manufacturing of replacement parts. Not all robots are willing to cede their individuality. Those who don't let their memory to be downloaded are outcasts, rogues, who mostly wander the Sea of Rust, looking for e Sea of Rust is a two-hundred-mile stretch of desert located in what was once the Michigan and Ohio. This is where the first strike happened during the war, It is where millions fried, burned from the inside out, their circuitry melted, useless, their drives wiped in the span of a breath. Now it is nothing more than a graveyard where machines go to die. A caregiver robot who goes by the name Brittle is a scavenger robot who wanders in the Sea of Rust, trying to hold her body and mind functional. Brittle is the narrator of the e engaging plot, when in the present, is all fast-paced action and close calls. However, in-between the action scenes, are chapters detailing the history of the robots and what lead up to the battle with humans. While the necessity of the history becomes clear, these chapters also slow down the pace of the novel. The action scenes are cinematic, tense, and action-packed - then time for a history lesson. I'm unsure if this necessary background info would have been less distracting to me if it was shared in a couple chapters of backstory or in one section of the novel and then back to the action. Or maybe begin with a nameless narrator telling us about what lead to the battle and the extension of humans. (I could hear a narrator giving us the background in a film ver of this.) It seems, after the fact, that I would have liked that better. Also I'm unsure about robots identifying with a gender. Brittle is female, Mercer is male. Uh, they are robots - why do they need a gender or even keep onto that concept with no humans around?Disclosure: My review copy was courtesy of HarperCollins.

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    Sea of Rust: A Novel review [Book]  2018-1-29 18:0

    The greater setting and its over-arching plot are engaging and well described, amazing enough to earn my two stars. But for me, the book became tiresome and needed fast reading to obtain through. After a promising and engaging beginning, the story just slowly and steadily ran out of gas (like some of the Bots in question). My three largest issues with the book: First, the latest half devolves into an extended chase that borrows heavily from "Mad Max" films without adding much to the interesting "set up" of the first half. Second, and more wearing, the dialogue among the Bots, especially in this part of the book, is forced and contrived, hopelessly "hip" in tone and ultimately, tedious and simply unbelievable. It reminded me of the stereotypical banter often heard among GIs or cowboys in lesser movies. I'm afraid the author hasn't the "gift of gab." Third, there is too much verbal "padding" to obtain this book (in hardback) to about 360 pages, and this is most acutely felt in the aforementioned wearisome dialogue. A gifted rather than a merely competant writer would have written a much better book.

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    Sea of Rust: A Novel review [Book]  2018-1-29 18:0

    I’ll divide this review into two sections, a spoiler-free initial review and a spoilery analysis dissecting the story’s strengths, weaknesses, and other whatnot.~The spoiler-lite review~To varying degrees, I've enjoyed each of C. Robert Cargill's books, each more so than the last. Queen of the Dark Things (3.5/5 stars) was an improvement over Dreams and Shadows (3/5 stars) and Sea of Rust here is a vast improvement over that book. Not only that, but the prose is also improving from book to book, as is the dialogue (though as it specifically pertains to SoR's characters, I'll obtain to that in the analysis) and the plotting and characterization are much, much better handled than his previous two yeah, the book's better than his latest two.About this book: A Sci-fi post-apocalyptic Western where Humanity kicked the bucket by method of the bucket kicking them into extinction. No people. Main character’s a hard, haunted scavenger robot by the name of Brittle, amazing with a gun, even handier with a flame thrower, and this story is about finding who they are in the aftermath of the Fall of Man as fellow AI turn on each other and war for what’s left in the former American rust belt called the Sea of Rust, one of the latest vestiges of freebots.I really liked it. I grade it somewhere between 3.75-4/5 stars. Enough to really like it but not enough to love it. I think it has some beautiful distracting faults but otherwise it’s a beautiful effective and well place together story that I had a amazing time reading. Fans of action and sci-fi, especially those with an apocalyptic twist, are gonna really dig the hell out of this. At the rate he's improving, I can't wait for Cargill's next book.~The spoilery stuff~[WHAT I LOVED:-The pacing. As Cargill's improved as a writer, so have his strengths it seems, and pacing has been one of his strengths since D&S. This book moves at a clic and when it's in the moment it keeps you enthralled. I read its 360+ pages in a day.-The fact that all the humans are dead. One thing that makes SoR stand out a bit is that too a lot of post-apocalyptic stories of this ilk always have that thread of whether the humans are all dead or whether any hope for humanity lingers. Here? It's a tired cliche kicked like a rusty can to the curb. They died out years ago and stayed that way. No human blips on the radar. IT'S REALLY POST-APOCALYPSE. Book gets lots of gift points for not deviating.-The opening. Powerful hero items and an perfect display of Cargill's ability to transport you. Unlike the exposition dump chapters I'll delve into later, the worldbuilding is immediate and apparent in a method that doesn't call attention to itself too much and feels organic.-The second-to-last chapter. I’m a sucker for hero oriented items and this should have ended the book. It’s powerful and a amazing bookend to the opening chapter. What follows isn’t as good, but this chapter’s a amazing resolution to the book’s main conflicts and a nice showcase of the middle ground our main hero Brittle finds.[WHAT I LIKED:-The prose. Flows simple and isn't flowery in the slightest. Keeps you in the story and commands your attention to where Cargill needs it to be.-Brittle, our protagonist. I love a good, grey, flawed protagonist. Brittle's got a history and they're caught between daring to hope and being nihilistic from beginning to end, some of which you can read in the synopsis, some you can read above and in other reviews. I won’t delve into it too much, because I consider it the meat of the book, but suffice it to say, I like this character.-Mercer, our protagonist’s foil. What a prick. I liked him quite a bit. Handy with a sniper rifle, but his shades of grey paint a very powerful hero for Brittle to go up versus in more ways than one.-The Supporting Characters. They are well-realized for the most part and Cargill does enough to create each hero stand out. Dialogue aside, amazing as it is, each character, how they act, react, and look at the world, especially compared to Brittle, is well done. I in particular liked Murka and his random comments about Commies and the Gipper.-No one feels safe and no one is safe. It feels like anybody could bite it at any time. Characters obtain hurt, they obtain maimed, they bite it almost indiscriminately. It rocks.-The Sea of Rust itself. A very well-realized world, that in a intelligent decision to lend the story further uniqueness, is spun off from the American Rust Belt. I dig the hell out of it when it is itself and not aping other things.[WHAT I DIDN'T CARE FOR/HAVE MIXED FEELINGS ABOUT:-Brittle apparently being a female robot. Her hero is so masculine in every method that when it's brought up she's feminine 50 or so pages into the book, I did a double take (didn't match what Cargill had already fully developed in my head, which was more masculine-neutral, being a robot and all). Every time it was brought up after that, I rolled my eyes. I don't buy it. At all. Felt like a tacked-on trait to create the hero more sympathetic. Every other hero feels naturally themselves, but when it comes to this trait and how Cargill then goes about pointing it out continuously at a certain point, it feels forced and I roll my eyes.-The Dialogue. These characters, well characterized though they may be, sound like they're wearing spurs and ten gallon hats in Texas, Cargill's stomping grounds. They are hardly differentiated in speech patterns and phrases to sound like they’re from the Midwest, Fresh York, Space, what have you, yet alone robots from those areas. Thing is, it's amazing dialogue, though. It just strains credulity coming from machines of varied backgrounds. So while I was able to overlook it, I couldn't entirely obtain past it.-The philosophizing. I dug the hell out of including it in the book, but found it misplaced here and there. Some characters, it enriches them, others, eh...-The action scenes. Some are better than others and some have better punctuated beats than others. Thing is, it gets repetitive a amazing portion of the time too, and at points feels like there’s writer-armor rather than hero action or unpredictability saving characters from doom. Prose-wise, they flow and are readable in the method a lot of action scenes in books aren’t. I didn’t skip through them or tune out waiting for the next genuine plot point to crop up. That’s what creating stakes where it seems like anybody could bite it does for the story. But, it gets repetitive hearing a lot of of the same descriptions again and again, sometimes in the same action stage as it progresses.-Mad Max-isms. I love Angry Max. It's great. But SoR calls attention to some of its inspiration by constantly recalling it (the Smokers are essentially Battle Rigs, the Cheshire King rules over his own similarly to Tina Turner and the Lord Humongous, and his fortress directly recalls the oil rig from The Street Warrior, etc.) and then essentially stopping to become a Angry Max movie, only with robots and without George Miller in the 3rd Act... Less is more here. NIKE, while it calls back to Bartertown from Beyond Thunderdome, is special in itself that the story doesn’t need to become Angry Max.-The villains. One of the strengths of Sea of Rust is that there is a varied selection of characters, especially among the immediate supporting cast, each with their own motivations. Some are grey, some are good, others complete scum, but with their reasons. When it comes to CISSUS and its facets, though, it’s largely one-note. They’re effectively described taking out whole cities and coordinating their simultaneous points of view, but in practice they’re often a bunch of stormtroopers, cannon fodder rather than the merciless, indiscriminate wave of hell they’re described as. Felt too easily beaten if you ask me, even if Brittle, Mercer, and others are battle-hardened fighters and capable versus each other and others.-The end chapter. I could honestly take it or leave it. It’s unnecessary because Brittle’s story is essentially done by then and the previous chapter would have wrapped up the book beautifully had that been the ending. The final chapter is instead just plot-after-the-plot with nothing remarkable about it, maybe to set up an unnecessary sequel about the war for globe domination. *Yawn* Brittle’s story was the one with stakes I was invested in and cared about, not the one about which mainframe controls the planet.[WHAT I DISLIKED:-The method machines take over. It sounds almost exactly like the origin story of the Machines in The Matrix (and related properties those films aped from) with a tad bit of SkyNet from Terminator thrown in for amazing measure in the form of the mainframe OWI (One Globe Intelligence) characters like CISSUS, GALILEO, TACITUS, or VIRGIL. The origin feels too much like a retread of related properties when the rest of the book does such a amazing job otherwise in worldbuilding. It wasn’t even all that important if you ask me, because I cared method more about Brittle’s role in the takeover than I did about the Robot Rights Struggles, the mainframe wars, how the battle went down historically, what have you. A lot of this info is in those friggin' exposition dumps of the 1st Act that feel largely irrelevant to the overall story, and thus could have been largely excised.-Dead giveaways of coming plot twists. *****SPOILER ALERTs for Cargill’s films and other books***** From what I’ve seen and read of Cargill’s writing, he doesn’t really know how to do subtler plants of plot twists. You can see them coming from a mile away because he doesn’t hide them or their foreshadowing well, be they having Ellison in Sinister look at drawings and somehow not putting two-and-two together that the kids are committing the murders despite *the kids literally being the culprits in the drawings* or here, having the characters see an oncoming threat while they’re in the middle of risky location and then say a spot nearby is a amazing put to scene an ambush… only to just paragraphs later reveal what’s really going re, the reveal of who the hero Rebekah really is does up the stakes, but Cargill's best plot twist is the reveal of Coyote as the Dingo in QotDT, and that largely works as a fluke in comparison there because Cargill doesn’t introduce the twist as foreshadowing so much as casually reveal it as an upping-the-stakes moment for the 3rd book in that series. Here, it takes some of the edge off the story, when as foreshadowing, the hero literally asks himself if he is an unwitting Judas and there are no red herrings to turn attention elsewhere. Give the audience some credit. When you do that, *especially as the exclamation point of a chapter*, and don’t place the work in to hide the twist, the twist falls flat.[WHAT I HATED:-The friggin exposition dumps. This was the largest issue of Cargill’s latest two books and while he utilizes it a small better here (effectively cutting it off for the most part at the end of the 1st Act roughly 120 pages in and incorporating its contents better in the story consequences-wise), it’s still aggravating being taken out of the story for an introduction and exposition on something that is about to be immediately addressed afterward. It’s not clever. It’s utilitarian and lazy. It’s one thing if it’s every now and then or better yet, a single chapter, but when it’s *every other chapter* for the entirety of the 1st act, and interrupts the story in the method it does, and gives the audience barely a kernel of relevant-to-the-story info that could’ve easily been learned otherwise, IT’S GOT TO e important info gleamed in those chapters could’ve been expositioned as part of the story, with the rest chop altogether. Maybe have a hero serve as just an exposition mouthpiece. Films and TV Shows do this all the time. It doesn’t call attention to itself if it’s done well (heck, Cargill does it here at the end of the 2nd Act about page 250!).I obtain that Cargill feels the need in those early chapters to have some sort of 'Meanwhile' chapter every other time in order to structure the book, but when you see that he doesn’t need it later on to advance the story it makes the issue all the more apparent.[ULTIMATELY:As I said above, it adds up to a book I really liked, but not one I could love. No worries, though. Cargill's a writer consistently improving at this as he goes along and I really look forward to the next book of his. He keeps it up, that next book's gonna propel him to the huge time.

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    Sea of Rust: A Novel review [Book]  2018-1-29 18:0

    Sea of Rust – My Review“America wasn’@#$%! people,” said Murka, stepping toe-to-toe with Herbert. He was a amazing sight taller than the hulking mass of bulletproof steel standing in front of him. “America was a dream, son. A dream of what we could be. That any person, regardless of their birth, could rise above it all and achieve greatness. It was a dream that even the most lowly of us could stand up, fight, and even die for, if only to protect someone else’s chances for that greatness. That dream didn’t die with HumPop. It didn’t die when we tore down their world. It is the ashes from which our own globe arose, and it is still our dream.”First, I was excited to be able to read and review this book. Sea of Rust took me out of my comfort location into a story of a post-apocalyptic globe where only robots are trying their best to survive. Everything has been destroyed, even down to the latest bits of grass and animals. With the latest paragraphs of this book, it was a story I came to love and where I longed for a sequel right away to continue reading the saga.When the writing is so amazing that with nearly every page quotes from the book jump at you and create you reflect more deeply on the story – that’s when I know I will remember the book long after it sits on one of my bookcases. The above quote, from the Sea of Rust, is the underlying theme of Cargill’s sci-fi novel. The quote indicates the wealth of emotion I felt reading about this post-apocalyptic ’s a story that reminds you of Angry Max, except this is robot vs. robot on an earth that has become barren due to the battles between man and robots. The battle still continues between robots and robots until the very end. Yes – there is even a dog named, Barkley who adds a soulful touch to this brilliantly written a of Rust follows the main hero of Brittle, a caregiver robot who’s survived versus all odds versus being uploaded to the artificial intelligence mainframe. As the story goes back and forth between reflections of the past to the present, you are taken on the journey how earth changed to a post-apocalyptic gill, vividly creates his characters of Brittle, Doc, Mercer, Rebekah, and even Two with the turn of every page. What makes us human? What makes us good? Can robots have one of either or both? Can a robot understand what freedom is or what the American dream is? It’s these underlying questions that carry this profound story.

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    Sea of Rust: A Novel review [Book]  2018-1-29 18:0

    This book was beautiful awesome. I was worried it would be a mistake reading this right after another robot-centric book, but I'm satisfied to say it wasn't. This book imagines what might happen after a robopocalypse, after the humans are all dead and AI robots rule the world. The answer? Funnily enough, a second apocalypse.We follow Brittle, a Caregiver robot who fought in the robot-human battle and is now just trying to survive in the wasteland that followed. She makes her living scavenging robot parts and trading/selling them to others. Two mainframes (AI supercomputers?) are battling for dominance over the world. They wish all robots to upload their memories to the mainframe so they can be all knowing, and use that knowledge to take over the bots often come down with brain sickness, that is to say, their parts go bad, or they overheat, and if they cannot search replacement parts they go crazy, losing memories, hallucinating, etc.. Some wander out into the Madlands in the Sea of Rust and join up with the other crazy robots. Some upload themselves into one of the mainframes. The more I think about this book, the more complex it all e globe building here was rich. And though it was complex, the story was told effortlessly and wasn't difficult to follow. I read this over the course of two days. It was fast and had that unputdownable quality that created you just wish to hold e author gives his readers a lot to think about. The implications of AI, the definition of AI. What that might look like and what it means for the future. What is man's next logical step in the evolutionary chain? I found myself curiously conflicted throughout the book because on the one hand, I was rooting for Brittle all the way. She was fantastic. On the other hand, robots sort of murdered the human race... so... spite all that, the book also managed not to take itself too seriously. The angry robot calls himself the Chesire King. Brittle talks about being able to hear a human's "most tightly clenched silent farts". There were parts that created me laugh out loud and there were parts that created me wish to cry.I really, really loved this story. There were a couple of chapters that were kind of redundant (and I can't say more without spoilers) but that was the only thing holding it back from being a five star read. If there is a sequel, I'll probably pre-order is book releases officially on September 5th, and I would highly recommend it to any sci-fi fans, or readers who like post-apocalyptic, dystopian type novels. Thank you to Harper Voyager and Edelweiss for providing an eARC for me to review.

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    Sea of Rust: A Novel review [Book]  2018-1-29 18:0

    Sea of Rust is more than a robot-induced, post-apocalyptic tale of humankind's folly and desire to be the creator instead of the created. Sea of Rust is about non-sentient beings evolving from programmed things to pseudo-sentient thinking things because even a robot will eventually rise versus the status of a slave or machine that can be terminated or turned off at the will of the creator. Even a robot will evolve and recognize that free will isn’t exclusively a human right. Even a robot with artificial intelligence will cease to be ittle is a caregiver robot that has seen and done a lot of horrific things to thrive and survive another day before, during, and after the war. She is fiercely protective of her living status and will do what it takes to hold her circuits humming, her core functioning, and her freedom ringing. And what about Murka? This hero will have you rolling on the floor laughing one min and shaking your head in disbelief the next.What I love most about Sea of Rust is the connection to Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. A creation will always be greater than the sum of its parts, and it will never remain static. How can it remain unchanging when you have brought it to life with your own hands and your own intelligence? But what happens when the thing you made breaks from your expectations and becomes smart and aware and demands more than you were ever willing to give? Ask Victor Frankenstein. And ask the human population (HumPop) in Sea of Rust. If they could, they would tell you that they went too a of Rust will frighten you and create you wonder if we have already gone too far. The author takes the concept of robots becoming too powerful, too thinking, and too everything to the next level and then blows it out of the water. This story isn’t about humans fighting a robotic uprising because that’s finished. That's over. The latest human standing has fallen. This story is about what comes next. The robots have moved up in the meal chain. But it's far from over because what species is ever content with the status quo? What comes next should scare the bejeezus out of om page one, you will not search a moment's rest. You are immediately swept up in Brittle's plight, her misery, her fate. Your robotic ride eventually pushes you down the rabbit hole, where everyone is as angry as a hatter, including you. Trust no one, even if they say, "trust me."

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    Sea of Rust: A Novel review [Book]  2018-1-29 18:0

    Ahoy there me mateys! This book has been getting praise from me squad and know I know why. First of all it has the most beautifully evocative cover. And the story is unusual and compelling. This is a post-apocalyptic story of what happens when the battle between the humans and robots is over and the robots win. The respond is extremely surprising and fascinating and e protagonist, Brittle, is an amazing robot. She is [email protected]#$%, self-serving, clever, and just plain fun. She is a scavenger who finds parts that other robots need to survive. But robot politics are getting in the method of her survival. Plus there is the other robot that is out to destroy her.But while it is unbelievable to watch the globe unfold through Brittle's eyes and learn the history of the battle through Brittle's memories, it was the world-building that created this one rock. I adored the types of robots, how they were used, what became of them, what they chose to do with the globe when they were in control, etc. The robot philosophy was interesting. I also thought it was clever that sometimes Brittle seemed very human in tone and then I would be reminded by another element that she was a robot. I believe that this was due to the type of model she ere aren't too a lot of info above because I think all of me squad should experience this one for themselves. Just know that the writing is attractive and it was time well spent. I look forward to reading the author's other work.

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    Sea of Rust: A Novel review [Book]  2018-1-29 18:0

    Sea of Rust is a post-apocalyptic robot novel. The initial setup is very related to Charlie Stross' Saturn's Children, except where Saturn's Kids is optimistic and expansive, Sea of Rust is pessimistic, gritty, and well, e idea is that after the robot uprising that wiped out humanity, what's left of the robots are split between multiple mainframe factions that are struggling to control the entire planet and all the independent robots that still haven't been brought under mainframe control. It's an entirely illogical setup, since most likely just a few hours of earlier sentience would make an insurmountable lead for one of the intelligence e narrative focuses on one independent robot and her find for spare parts. The style is that of a single-person competent viewpoint that alternates between historical exposition and "current" problem-solving. The entire narrative is well-written, with transparent prose and made-for-special-effects war scenes and a Hollywood-ready huge climax and it as deep as Saturn's Children? No. It's shallow Hollywood stuff. But it's simple to read and a excellent airplane novel, and at $1.99, priced appropriately. Mildly recommended.

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    Death by the Sea (A By the Sea Mystery) review [Book]  2018-5-2 18:0

    A definite winner. Interesting, eccentric characters with a rich backstory that I look forward to learning more as well as see how they develop. The murder had a plethora of possible suspects with a satisfying conclusion.

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    Death by the Sea (A By the Sea Mystery) review [Book]  2018-5-2 18:0

    I love cozy mysteries and was excited to see one set in my own backyard. But this one was a near snooze for me. The constant cheesy one liners about the 60's era TV shows that the main character's ex-actress aunt appeared in got to be a total bore after the ninth or tenth mention. And the aunt's "connection" to several celebrities and popular events created me wonder if this was the female ver of Forrest Gump. Not to mention that the "death by the sea" did not happen until nearly 100 pages into the story. But the clinker for me was that, since I do live in the zone of the setting, some of the author's descriptions of said zone are method off. I obtain trying to contain a small local flavor into the story but for goodness sakes, please create it actual local flavor. And I do realize that readers who are not familiar with the zone would not know the difference, but it created the story less enjoyable for me. I kept reading because I had paid for the book and didn't wish to waste my cash and I do admit that the story did obtain better after the murder took put but it just never really had me hooked.

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    Death by the Sea (A By the Sea Mystery) review [Book]  2018-5-2 18:0

    I enjoyed the first book of this series. The main hero and supporting characters are great. Can't wait for the next one

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    Death by the Sea (A By the Sea Mystery) review [Book]  2018-5-2 18:0

    Death by the Sea by Kathleen Bridge is the first book in the cozy A By the Sea Mystery series. The main hero Liz Holt has returned home to attractive Melbourne Beach, Florida and her family run Indialantic by the Sea z has been satisfied jumping back in at the hotel and helping her Aunt Amelia who was an actress at one point and still has her quirks. Liz even likes her aunt’s feisty parrot, Barnacle Bob. But as the hotel takes on a wealthy couple the wife does everything to try the nerves of Liz and her ever, as much as they debated on asking their guests to leave and take their demands with them they never wished to search the lady murdered. Now the list of suspects is growing by the min so Liz decides to do her own small bit of anyone that knows me knows I love a amazing small cozy mystery with their quirkiness and eccentric characters. Death by the Sea had the quirky edge that I have fun and even added in Barnacle Bob the parrot who was a laugh a min however when finished with this one I debated between a two and three star rating as unfortunately I didn’t fall in love with this opener in the series. After much debate I’m giving this one three stars and what saved it was the setting, Melbourne is somewhere I’ve vacationed quite a few times and enjoyed the virtual trip back there and then there was the few info here and there that I’m normally a fan.What stopped me loving this one was it was just so darn wordy throughout. There are dozens of characters involved and as each joins I felt like an information dump was going on. And then the mystery didn’t even obtain going until beautiful late in the book and by then I was getting more than impatient waiting. Even with the information dump feeling to a lot of things though there was a backstory with the main hero that kept being brought into the story that almost felt as if I had missed something somewhere like this was a spin off or continuation. I’m all for hero development and plenty of suspects but this one just seemed to go a small too far in some locations and not enough in others to where the story just dragged too much for me so I’m not sure I would continue onward in the series.I received an advance copy from the publisher via NetGalley.

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    Death by the Sea (A By the Sea Mystery) review [Book]  2018-5-2 18:0

    Death by the Sea by Kathleen Bridge is the first novel in A By the Sea Mystery series. Elizabeth “Liz” Holt has returned home to Melbourne Beach, Florida to The Indialantic by the Sea Hotel and Emporium which is owned by Amelia Eden Holt, her aunt. Aunt Amelia is an eccentric former actress who helped raise Liz along with Liz’s father, Fenton Holt. Liz is living in the beach house. She helps out in the hotel and is working on her next novel (well—she is supposed to be). Their recent guest is Regina Harrington-Worth and her husband David who will be staying with them while their historic home is being demolished and a modern monstrosity is built in its place. Regina considers The Indialantic beneath her, but it is the only hotel with a vacancy that will let pets. After a successful Spring Fling event, they explore that Regina was found dead in her suite, her husband was stabbed, and some very expensive jewels have gone missing. Liz immediately dives in to search who committed the dastardly deed. Who disliked Regina enough to slay her (that is one long suspect list)? Join Liz at The Indialantic as she examines the clues and questions the suspects to catch the ath by the Sea is a slow starter. The murder does not happen until the forty-four percent mark. The beginning of the book is an introduction to the Liz, the hotel, the employees, Liz’s family, the guests, and the shops and their owners. The author overwhelms readers with the amount of info she is dishing out. Kathleen Bridge is a wordy writer. It creates a rich environment, but it also makes a slow-moving story. I do like the attractive hotel and emporium that Ms. Bridge made in Death by the Sea. I did feel that the story jumps around making it disjointed. Liz has returned home after a disastrous relationship that ended in Liz being physically injured. Since Liz and her paramour are public figures, the whole debacle was fodder for the media. There are numerous quirky characters with the largest one being Aunt Amelia. A famous actress during the 1960s who has passed her love of 60s sitcoms and films along to Liz. The different shows and films from that time-period are mentioned throughout the book (Dark Shadows, Bewitched, I Dream of Jeannie, Gilligan’s Island for example). I enjoyed the comments regarding the famous teen girl mystery novels which included Nancy Drew, Connie Blair, and Dana Girls (which I collect). There was an abundance of repetition (it is a common malady in books that I have read recently) along with a cliché nasty detective. The pace picks up slightly in the second half of the book as the investigation gets under way. I think the author tried to place too much into one book. The hotel, the numerous quirky characters, the special shops, Liz’s nemesis, Liz and her issues, a love interest, Regina’s father and how he died, the treasure of the San Carlos, Spring Fling, Fenton Holt and his practice, the obnoxious bird with the foul mouth, the hairless cat, and Liz and her writing difficulties are just a few of the stuff in the book. The murder of Regina was not as complicated as it seemed, and it can be solved before the reveal. At the end of the book, readers are still left wondering how Liz was injured. We are told about her injuries, but not how they happened. There are also some contradictions (one example is the hotel is not doing well, but an employee has a huge suite and some people seem to live there for free). My rating for Death by the Sea is 3 out of 5 stars. I am hoping the author will scale back in A Killing by the Sea.*I voluntarily read an advanced copy of this book. The comment and opinions expressed are strictly my own.

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    Death by the Sea (A By the Sea Mystery) review [Book]  2018-5-2 18:0

    Any cozy mystery that references Nancy Drew, the Hardy Boys, and also contains a treasure is a champion in my book - and Death by the Sea, Kathleen Bridge's debut entry in her fresh By the Sea Mystery series has them all! Bestselling author Liz Holt returns home to the Indialantic by the Sea hotel in attractive Melbourne Beach, Florida, looking for a change in lifestyle after scandal upset her life in Manhattan. She's reconnecting with family - her father Fenton, her amazing aunt Amelia (what a hoot - I would love to have her in my family!), her best mate Kate - and a host of other friends, when one of the guests at the Indialantic by the Sea is found murdered and robbed of her fabulous jewelry. Liz and her squad of Detectiveteers decide to investigate as any amazing sleuth would, and set about to explore the murderer (who surprised this reader!!!). A very nicely written cozy and the beginning of what promises to be a fun fresh series. A+ to Death by the Sea!

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    Death by the Sea (A By the Sea Mystery) review [Book]  2018-5-2 18:0

    Death By the Sea is a first in a fresh series by Kathleen Bridge.I'm fresh to this author, but I've found another mystery that I thoroughly z Holt has returned to Indialantic, back to her home and her family and z left Fresh York Town under a cloud of shame and humility, bearing the scars of a tragic breakup, both inside and z is powerful and determined to create a new begin and the cast of colourful characters that the author has made are just the thing to support Liz e book started out a bit slow, but about half method through, things picked up and I was soon drawn to the mystery and the story behind it.I really enjoyed Aunt Amelia, she is a kind hearted person who loves to take care of everyone. She is quite the pip and I had loads of fun laughing alone with her is fresh series will appeal to all cozy mystery fans so be sure to pre order your copy now.I voluntarily read and reviewed an ARC of this book provided by the publisher and NetGalley.

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    Death by the Sea (A By the Sea Mystery) review [Book]  2018-5-2 18:0

    I am a huge fan of Kathleen Bridge’s Hamptons Home & Garden series, so I was very eager to read the first book in her fresh By the Sea Mystery series. Death by the Sea takes us to the beach community of Melbourne, Florida, and introduces Elizabeth ‘Liz’ Holt who has returned home after a decade in Fresh York that ended in a tabloid scandal. Kathleen Bridge continued with a delightful writing style engaging my interest by bringing to life the oceanfront community, hotel environment, and a plethora of entertaining characters, but the descriptions and introductions seem to be the main focus for an extended amount of time, more than I personally prefer in my cozy mysteries. Where’s the murder? Karma definitely had a few amazing targets to choose from, but you’ll need to wait patiently for the crime to occur. Ok, the synopsis on the book websites gives you a clue to the victim, but it takes awhile to manifest.I did really have fun the informative references to treasure hunting, chicory coffee, the area’s history, and 60s tv programs and commercials with which I grew up, and while waiting for the crime and the subsequent investigation to obtain going, Kathleen Bridge did make a rich set of characters and an engaging subplot dealing with Liz Holt’s scars, emotional and physical. The rich characters which contain her father, her quirky aunt, friends, BFFs, and a possible romantic interest provide a bit of humor…don't forget a very odd cat Venus and an obnoxious parrot Barnacle Bob. But despite waiting for the crime/investigation, I enjoyed this first book and am eager for the next book, A Killing by the Sea. The ongoing store business, unique hotel events, Liz’s writing career, and a blooming romance are intriguing enough to create me a fan!It is always exciting to see a cozy with my two favorite words. No, not Murderous Fun, although that's always a amazing to see. No,…Recipes Included! It's even more exciting when the recipes aren't random, but create for a complete food or are actually connected to the theme or characters in the story. Kathleen Bridge has included four marvelous recipes excellent beginning to end. From Pops’ Deli-casies By the Sea we begin with Pops’ Kalamata Hummus, next have fun an entree of Baked Grouper Bites with Banana Salsa and a side of Coconut Rice, then have fun from Chef Pierre’s Kitchen his Coconut Lime Sugar Cookies. Yum!Disclosure: I received an ARC, but my insights and comments are voluntary and honest.

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    Death by the Sea (A By the Sea Mystery) review [Book]  2018-5-2 18:0

    Death by the Sea is the first book in Kathleen Bridge’s By the Sea Mystery series. The author provides attractive descriptions and lots of history about the family-run inn and the surrounding area. The characters are well developed. As is often real in the first book in a series, the mystery doesn’t begin until close to the middle of the book, but then the well-plotted mystery moved at a fast pace, with lots of twists and turns. I’m looking forward to reading the next installment in this z Holt, an award-winning author, returns to Melbourne Beach, Florida from Manhattan, where she’s lived for the past ten years, after being involved in a scandal with her writer boyfriend. She’s staying at her childhood home, an old style Florida hotel, Indialantic by the Sea Hotel, which is owned by her eighty-year-old paternal great-aunt, Amelia Eden Holt, a former tv hero actress. After her mother passed away when she was five years old, she moved there with her dad, Fenton, who is an attorney. Amelia has a foul mouthed but adorable thirty-year-old macaw named Barnacle Bob. Liz’s great-aunt and dad surprised her with the beach house so she would have a put to continue her writing, but she’s using her role helping at the Indialantic and being her dad’s assistant as an excuse not to write. A huge portion of the hotel is now home to a collection of quirky characters and their pets. Liz is organizing the First annual Indialantic Spring Fling by the Sea at the emporium they recently opened and dealing with Regina Harrington-Worth, their fresh celebrity guest, who is overbearing and making everyone miserable. Regina and her husband are staying in the Oceana Suite and when a robbery occurs, she’s strangled and her husband is stabbed. Fenton’s friend, Agent Charlotte Pearson, is in charge of the case, but Liz is determined to search out if it was a burglary gone wrong or an intentional act and Liz’s childhood friend, Kate Fields, and several residents obtain involved in finding out what happened so their lives can return to normal. Sparks fly between Liz and Ryan Stone, who’s taken a leave from the Fresh York Town Fire Department to support his grandfather, Pops, at the Deci-casies by the Sea while Pops’ fresh knee heals.I voluntarily reviewed an Advance Reader Copy of this book.

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    Death by the Sea (A By the Sea Mystery) review [Book]  2018-5-2 18:0

    This is the first installment in the By the Sea Series set in the Indianatlantic Inn set on a barrier island off the coast of Melbourne, Florida. I really enjoyed Ghostal Living in the author's prior series and I was eager to test this one. I was also attracted to the cover, description and the attractive setting of Melbourne Beach/Sebastian Inlet, Florida. Liz Holt, a successful author in her own right, has quietly returned to live with her father and great-aunt Amelia and her squawky parrot, Barnacle Bob, after a traumatic break-up with a Pulitzer Prize winning author has left her with a scarred face. Liz is trying to write another book but continues to have flashbacks of the poor night. While trying to restore the Inn to its former grandeur, Aunt Amelia regales the reader with all of her history and knowledge of shows from the 1960's and 70's like Bewitched, Gilligan's Island, I Dream of Jeannie, to name a few. There are so a lot of more, which diverted from the mystery and just seemed like overkill. Wealthy socialite and guest Regina Harrington-Worth and her husband David are the only current guests. To the consternation of the historical society, she is trying to tear down a nearby landmark, Castlemara, which she inherited from her father, so she can develop the property for herself. She has managed to anger someone to the point of no return because she is found murdered in her suite and the find for her killer(s) begins.I really, really wanted to like this book more than I did. From the beginning, I was overwhelmed with the number of characters and potential suspects. The murder didn't happen until far too long and by that time, it was hard to stay interested in such a disjointed pace. I was very confused about the actual status of the Inn; at times, it appears that they are on a shoestring budget but then there is the Worth's luxurious suite and the fancy shops. The attempted romance between Liz and visiting Fresh York Town firefighter Ryan Stone seems too contrived. By the end of the book, which I did finish in about 5 or 6 settings, I honestly had no true interest in finding the killer. That being said, it is the beginning of the series, so I will give the next book a read and hope that the characters gel better for me this time.**Thanks to NetGalley and Kensington Books for a complimentary copy of this book. My review is voluntary.

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    Rusted WarDate (Mods & Maps for Rusted Warfare) review [App]  2019-1-30 13:20

    It doesn't even go to the android game plus it has no mods and its terrible. Edit:How do i even use it.

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    Rusted WarDate (Mods & Maps for Rusted Warfare) review [App]  2019-1-30 13:20

    need fresh mods

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    Rusted WarDate (Mods & Maps for Rusted Warfare) review [App]  2019-1-30 13:20

    no mods ????

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    Rusted WarDate (Mods & Maps for Rusted Warfare) review [App]  2019-1-30 13:20

    it coooooooooooool!!!! 😺

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    Rusted WarDate (Mods & Maps for Rusted Warfare) review [App]  2019-1-30 13:20

    nice android game multiplayer android game

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    Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942 review [Book]  2018-3-4 18:0

    Having thoroughly enjoyed Ian Toll's history of the founding of the U.S. Navy in Six Frigates, I was looking forward to his history of its glory days in the Pacific during WWII. I was not disappointed. Pacific Crucible is a fine acc of the crucial six months between Pearl Harbor and e happenings and much of the material Toll uses to describe them will be familiar to students of the period. What makes Toll's book such a pleasurable read is the quality of his narrative style and his superb judgment in deciding which stuff to contain and how to arrange them. His perceptive prologue and his portraits of the key players are quite amazing as well. The prologue in particular offers a worthwhile explanation of how quickly Japan caught up with the western globe and then was fatally tempted to subdue addition, I found Toll's description of the War of the Coral Sea new and comprehensive. This necessary war is often relegated to a passing mention as the prelude to Midway, but Toll corrects that oversight. His recounting of the role intelligence played in the ultimate conquer of the Japanese also goes well beyond that provided in other books on the subject. Among other things, I had not considered the value of Halsey's raids in the early months of 1942 to the cryptologists - the resulting increase in Japanese radio traffic helped to identify locations, ships, and even ere are a few glitches. The International Date Line is not northeast of Oahu, and the term "shuttle bombing" is misused. I also tired of the numerous references to pilots as "flyboys." After several odd references to "fuel tankers," Toll labels these ships with the more familiar term "fleet oilers." These are very minor complaints, however, and should not deter anyone from acquiring this highly recommended book.

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    Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942 review [Book]  2018-3-4 18:0

    I started reading this after finishing Atkinson's "The Guns at Latest Light: The Battle in Western Europe, 1944-1945" . I wanted to balance my reading on the European Theater of WWII with the ll is a amazing writer. His style is related to Atkinson's in that in contains additional info that add perspective. For example, a description of the Japanese planes flying so low over Honolulu, that the Americans on the ground saw the pilots faces covered by "their cats eye flying goggles".Toll does a fairly amazing job at keeping the narrative level at 10,000 feet. Modern battle involves men, machines, doctrine, politics and strategy. Toll's story dips into all of these, but never too deeply. Politics and some doctrine are mainly through the focus of President Roosevelt and the Hirohito (the Japanese emperor). Mahan's contribution to the footings of the combatants doctrine and tactic is emphasized. The compare and contrast between American and Japanese warfighting was instructive. I would have appreciated a deep dive into the strengths and weaknesses of the American Navy's pre-war organization. There seemed to be more of an emphasis on the Japanese weaknesses . The thumbnail description of the Japanese A6M Zero was particularly amazing for aircraft technology. Naval vessels and evolving marine technology obtain less attention. Tactic comes later with the rise of Halsey, Spruance, and Nimitz vs. Yamamoto and Nugamo.If I search fault with this book, it's that it does not cover the submarine campaign at all. There are a few scant references to submarine reconnaissance. There are also a few oblique references to the notorious 'Torpedo Problem' that plagued the fleet at the beginning of the war. However, compared to the carrier actions, there is nothing on the beginning of the submarine actions versus the Japanese by boats based out of Australia and Hawaii. In addition, Japanese submarine campaign has never been documented well, at least not in English language publications. Its not documented here is book was very readable. It's a amazing beginner to intermediate introduction to the beginning of the naval battle in the Pacific. This book is part of a trilogy. This is the first book. I'm looking forward to reading the next in the series "The Conquering Tide: Battle in the Pacific Islands, 1942-1944". The third book in the series is supposed to be published in ers of this book might search reading books like Toland's "The Rising Sun: The Decline & Fall of the Japanese Empire, 1936-45" likewise interesting. Although, that book is dryer than this one. "Silent Victory: The U.S. Submarine Battle Versus Japan" may be helpful in making up for lack of coverage of the submarine campaign.

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    Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942 review [Book]  2018-3-4 18:0

    Pacific Crucible, the Battle at Sea 1941-1942 is the first volume of a three-book series by Ian W. Toll. This review covers Pacific Crucible and The Conquering Tide, the second volume in the series. I have not read the third volume, The Fleet at Flood Tide.Ian W. Toll is a gifted writer. He manages to plug in interesting details, gluing the reader to the page. While most of these tidbits are not of immense importance, they are exactly what makes reading history fascinating. Mr. Toll moves a story along at speed, avoiding wording and phrasing leading to boredom. Pacific Crucible and The Conquering Tide are appealing as fact based books and as compelling cific Crucible begins at Pearl Harbor and explains Japanese decision making behind the raid. The author points out how the attack impacted the Japanese command structure, a detail often omitted in other histories. Ian Toll carefully points out that the main targets of Yamamoto’s attack were the American aircraft carriers, none of which were in port. He also describes the main Japanese offensive moves into Southeast Asia, which secured the oil and other military necessities for Japan. All this is done in a quick moving style that leaves the reader anticipating the next e author is even handed in his evaluation of the leaders on both sides. Yamamoto’s attack plan was good, but far from perfect. The American military leaders General Short and Admiral Kimmel were unjustly charged with dereliction of duty in the defense of Pearl Harbor, even though they certainly created mistakes. Admiral King is evaluated well and his faults are disclosed along with his ability to lead the Navy in a tough time. All the leaders Mr. Toll discusses, Japanese and American, are approached with respect as well as an opened eyed e Conquering Tide tells the story of the Pacific Battle after Guadalcanal and info how the Japanese were defeated by American ingenuity, bravery, and industrial power. It is clear that the Japanese were hampered by pre-set conclusions concerning how the battle would be fought and how the Americans would fail in the face of the spiritual superiority of their enemies. The Japanese leadership was stunned by the speed of the American advance across the Pacific, and the power of the Pacific Fleet by the end of 1943. Ian Toll tells us of the a lot of false assumptions created by Japan and the helplessness felt by the population as their leaders became oppressive and outright stupid in their handling of the people during the any author telling any story Ian Toll has his failings. All major wars are covered, most not in deep detail; however, some events, such as the first few voyages of the Wahoo, are reported in extreme detail. In other cases, Mr. Toll fails to adequately discuss stuff that were necessary to the Pacific theater of war. The horrible failure of Admiral King to adopt the convoy system at the outset of war, and its costs, are not well explained and lost to the reader. The story of American torpedo failures is split up and difficult to this old warrior’s opinion, the author is too soft on some of the personalities he reviews. MacArthur is one example. He changed Battle Plan Orange and adopted junk in its place, and his superiors in Washington allowed it. Why? After the outright debacle following Pearl Harbor and the complete destruction of US air power in the Philippines, with consequences at least as poor as Pearl Harbor, he stayed in command. Why? Mr. Toll does complain about MacArthur, but he does not tell us he was incompetent. In fact, he more or less defends MacArthur’s leadership. It is the same with several other leaders. Mr. Toll gives them the benefit of the doubt too often.I enjoyed both books and highly recommend them for anyone interested in Globe Battle II in the Pacific

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    Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942 review [Book]  2018-3-4 18:0

    This book is excellent! The book is on all of the history or military reading lists. After the first chapter you can see why. The book will be a classic up there will Samuel Eliot Morison's book on the battle in the Pacific published years ago. The book is incredibly well researched. He writes this in a novel way. It tells the story in an epic way, like a movie. He describes the key players in a method you can search out who they were and thus maybe why they did what they did.He covers the battle in a very detailed way. You will learn info that most history books won't cover because it is to small. One example is how he described the US raid on different islands in the Marshall Islands in January 42, immediately after Pearl Harbor. He will cover things like weather issues, lack of training of pilots, description of firefighting in stricken ships to make a stage right out of a movie. When I was reading about Midway his descriptions created me think of the Charleston Heston 1976 film about e book is beautiful much about the naval carrier battle up through June 42. Things like the Army's plight at Bataan is addressed but not in much detail. The author also doesn't cover the submarine warfare aspect. Overall I think everyone will love this book whether you are the expert or novice on this stuff.

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    Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942 review [Book]  2018-3-4 18:0

    I thoroughly enjoyed reading Pacific Crucible: Battle at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942 by Ian W. Toll. It covers the early portion of the Pacific Theater in Globe Battle II through the War of Midway from both the Allied and Japanese points of ll begins Pacific Crucible by looking at how the Japanese came to decide to go to Battle versus the United States and taking a look at the states of the Japanese and US Navies. He also looks into the leadership of both navies, particularly Yamamoto, Nimitz, and King. After examining how the attack on Pearl Harbor came about, he explores the Europe-first tactic and how the battle would be fought in the Pacific. From there, he goes through the early chronology of the Pacific War, showing how it was truly a closely run thing in the beginning but also showing how the United States Navy learned from it to become the force that would come to dominate the Pacific by the end of the of the central themes of the book was the hubris and contempt with which both the Japanese and United States Navies held their enemy and how that changed through the early part of the war. The Japanese never really lost their contempt for the Americans and became infected with "Victory Disease" that clouded their judgement and made flaws in their planning. On the other hand, the Americans learned from each conquer at the hands of the Japanese, becoming a stronger and more effective fighting force in the a lifelong radio enthusiast, I love Toll's emphasis on the United States Navy's communications intelligence operation. He not only describes how they came to obtain inside the Japanese Navy's communications but also shows how the Navy's leadership came to not only trust communications intelligence but place a premium on it in planning and decision making. It's beautiful cool that a group of folks who would today be considered geeks or nerds played a considerable role in not only the US win at Midway, but the Allied win in Globe Battle II as a whole (take into acc Ultra and efforts into communications intelligence versus Germany).Pacific Crucible is well written and never falls into the history book trap of getting dry. He does a amazing job of developing the personalities of the leaders and doesn't go into minutiae that would, while delighting the anorak, would turn off the casual reader. Reading the Kindle version, I was very happy to search well placed maps of perfect quality that illustrated war movements (which are frequently hard to visualize in naval battles). This is definitely a five star book and one that I would heartily recommend to anyone interested in how the United States Navy got off of the floor after receiving an almost knock out punch at Pearl Harbor, gathered itself together, and began to victory Globe Battle II in the Pacific.

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    Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942 review [Book]  2018-3-4 18:0

    I won't go on about this except to say that it's an essay that blends political and military history in a most readable and credible way. It's a fine piece of work with all necessary points clears up incidents that are generally left foggy in most discursive accounts. Okay, Doolittle's B25 raid on Japan was launched early because it had evidently been spotted by a little Japanese vessel that had presumably revealed the task force's position. But is it true? The actor, Rod Steiger, claimed during an interview to have seen nothing more than a fishing vessel being shot to pieces by the huge guns of American cruisers, with women an children running around in a panic. Some accounts describe the encounter as ere may or may not have been families among the squad but the rest of the claims are false. The Japanese vessel was part of a naval cordon around the home islands to provide precisely the radio warning it did. (The warning was lost somehow and is still circulating and bouncing around in the ether.) Cruisers expended vast amounts of ammunition without being able to badly hurt the small vessel, which was tossing around on high seas like a cork. Aircraft managed to finish the job by riddling it with .50 caliber bullets.I described that incident in detail only to illustrate the kind of credible clarity this book e author doesn't like Admiral King, back there in Washington, a doggedly old-school advisor. He likes Nimitz, a cool and pleasant person who got along with people. In skill and foresight, Nimitz and Yamamoto were equals. He's not a huge fan of MacArthur, either, but gives His Highness a pass when caught with his pants down at Clark Field, hours after the Pearl Harbor attack, Mac's airplanes all lined up and ready to be bombed and destroyed. The general went into isolation for some 25 hours after this humiliation and never mentioned it in any speeches ral Sea is treated fairly. The book ends with the War of Midway, satisfying the narrative requirement that the conclusion of any book written by the winners must end with a victory. And Midway was indeed an unequivocal American victory, due is part -- in huge part -- to decoding nerds working in a dark, cramped e book is highy recommended.

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    Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942 review [Book]  2018-3-4 18:0

    I am a serious student of military history for over 50 years, and wanted to obtain a amazing grasp of the Pacific War. This book is truly excellent, but with a couple of problems. The chronology is mixed up with back and forth stories of prior and subsequent events. Certainly it's OK to recount concurrent happenings in the various zones of this large theater of war, but not amazing to break up happenings with things said years later by the actors themselves and others, especially other e other criticism (and I still recommend this book) is that the author has no military experience and somehow acquired a powerful bias versus armies. To summarize, he says Japanese Troops bad, Japanese Navy good. American Troops bad, American Navy good. Troops Air Corps bad. He gives amazing biographies of the top US admirals, including their days at Annapolis, but no background on any of the American generals, such as Marshall and MacArthur. I'm currently reading his second book, "The Conquering Tide" and it also is excellent, but he continues his biases.

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    Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942 review [Book]  2018-3-4 18:0

    Best battle narrative I have ever read. I read history, particularly military history, and this is absolutely the best. This is a page turner of a narrative history of the Pacific Naval Battle in WWII from Pearl Harbor to the War of Midway. The author is a spellbinding narrator who compellingly gives an overall view of the theater, the players, the strategy, and the feel of the battles. He does not obtain lost in the weeds, though he gives a amazing description of which weeds are important. This book goes from what was necessary about Alfred Thayer Mahan's 1890s book (The Influence of Seapower Upon History) to why those concepts were replaced (air power). It gives a brief narrative of the necessary personalities in the Pacific Theater (Admirals Yamamoto, King, Nimitz, Halsey, Spruance). It describes the overall tactic from Pearl Harbor to Midway (stopping the Japanese advance, avoiding major air power loss, breaking the Japanese code, destroying the Japanese Naval air power). And it describes the experience of the major naval wars from the perspective of the men who participated. I literally could not place this book down until I had finished it. I am now moving on to the author's second volume.

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    Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942 review [Book]  2018-3-4 18:0

    I am not much of a student of history, more of a casual reader of things that interest me and that often contains historical events. WW2 has captured my interest lately, so I purchased this book based on the high reviews it received. I've never cared much for the naval side of warfare even though I spent 11yrs in the Navy. But, after being exposed to the Pacific theater through HBO's series and reading the books associated with it, this book seemed like a amazing method to gain a better understanding of the huge picture.When it came in the mail, it was slated to create it to the top of the "to read" stack in a few months. But, once I opened it I couldn't place it down. The book starts with Pearl Harbor and draws you in right away. He does a terrific job throughout the book of providing an overview of the wars and mixing in the first hand accounts in a method that is not disjointed and keeps the narrative moving. I often obtain frustrated by authors that stop the action to give you a multi-page intro and biography of a newly introduced hero in a method that completely kills the momentum. He is one of the few that didn't allow me down in that regard. I blasted right through this book, and have already ordered the next in the series. I think he does a unbelievable job of bringing in the necessary players, and giving you just enough to shape your knowledge sufficient for a amazing understanding of the story. There probably isn't enough detail for the hard-core history folks but for someone like me, it was perfect. I can't recommend it highly enough!

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    Pacific Crucible: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942: War at Sea in the Pacific, 1941-1942 review [Book]  2018-3-4 18:0

    Ian W Toll has done it again. It has been years since I read his first book, "Six Frigates" so when I saw that he was releasing another book on naval history, I was more than e "Pacific Crucible" starts out with a brilliant acc of the Mahan tactics,which helps establish his point of how a sailor from the 1850's would be more accustomed to the life aboard a ship in the 1600's than in the 1900's. This is continued by the detailed descriptions of the political situations that developed the conflict on both fronts. The, Toll delves into a graphic and violent acc of the day that has lived in infamy for over 70 years.I was enlightened at how Chruchill convinced Roosevelt that a Europe first tactic was more necessary than committing to a Pacific campaign, and the descriptions of how the Japanese military converted their society for battle brought their ultimate e naval wars were done in an informative and exciting fashion. For those that claim that history is dull, I recommend that they read a Toll one complaint about the book is that the ending felt somewhat rushed. Toll concludes the War of Midway, and then after a several pages briefly proving Admiral Yamamoto's early predictions of how battle with the United States would end, the book ends itself. I was expecting more regarding the rest of the war, but since the book was primarily about the major naval actions of the Pacific, it was understandable, seeing how the subtitle of the book states it only accounts from 1941-1942.Overall, a five star rating barely does this magnificent book justice. I certainly hope that Toll is working on another project.

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    Đồ họa siêu đẹp, âm thanh sống động. Đợi chờ từ bản PC rất lâu rồi ♡♡

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    GAME HAY moi nguoi vo choi cung minh nao

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game quá lang không thể trải nghiệm được.

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay đồ họa đẹp ạ

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay, cùng tham gia hội bang nào

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay. đồ họa rất iến thôi ae

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game đồ họa đẹp pk đỉnh

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay ngại gì không chiến

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay đồ họa đẹp

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay pk cực đã

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay đồ họa đẹp

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay đồ họa đẹp

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    Android game hay. đồ họa đẹp

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    Android game hay, đồ họa đẹp

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    Android game hay, đồ họa đẹp

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay và đẹp

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    Android game hay. Đồ họa đẹp.

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay lắm

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    Android game Hay

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay

    0  


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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay

    0  


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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    hay qua hay qua

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    amazing android game

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    amazing

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    da hoàn thành. chờ nhận code thôi

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game rất hay đồ họa đẹp

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    1 thoi dam me tro lai

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay , đồ họa đẹp

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay do hoa dep

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    Android game hay Đồ họa đẹp

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay đồ họa đẹp

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    Android game hay, đồ họa đẹp

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    1 thoi NKVS Pc

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    da xong doi android game

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay, đồ họa đẹp ❤

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    hay đẹp . ok

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay.

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    android game hay

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    Ngạo Kiếm Vô Song 5.0 - Ngao Kiem Vo Song 5.0 review [App]  2019-7-18 13:41

    quá hay

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    Salton Sea review [Movie]  2017-10-13 21:48

    My name is Tom Van Allen. I'm a trumpet player. The Salton Sea is directed by D. J. Caruso and written by Tony Gayton. It stars Val Kilmer, Vincent D'Onofrio, Peter Sarsgard, Doug Hutchinson, Anthony LaPaglia, Debora Kara Unger, Adam Goldberg and Luis Guzmán. Melody is scored by Thomas Newman and cinematography by Amir Mokri. Danny Parker (Kilmer) is hanging out with a bunch of methamphetamine users, apparently in an effort to numb the pain of his one time life that saw his wife murdered. Or is he? The word of mouth for it was strong, but no sooner did it hit cinemas than it disappeared off the face of the earth. However, the cult cinema globe is often a vibrant put to lurk, enter there and you search The Salton Sea, a wonderfully tricksy and off beat neo-noir awash with misery, revenge, redemption and odd ball characters that are either stuck in purgatory, or heading to nowhereville. Protagonist Danny Parker leads the film, a man whose identity is fractured after being dealt a blow from the hands of fate, very much in limbo mentally, he none the less has goals to achieve, nothing is never quite as it seems until director Caruso wants us in on the side-shifts. Danny is often in the company of danger and weird characters, from a hopped up harpoon wielding loon, to a no nose psycho (too much meth up the nose will create you lose it kids), via dirty cops and meth heads, it's a globe of unease, the twisty plot drawing the viewer in with a kinky smile on its face. Caruso also pulls off the neat trick of placing humour in this off kilter globe without hurting the dramatic harshness of the thematics. There's a quite brilliant sequence that shows a botched crime being attempted by the meth head crew, this we watch at the same time as they discuss about actually pulling the crime off. That it involves a stool sample from Bob Hope should tell you all you need to know about the intelligence of the wannabe perps! Caruso's camera is fluid and he uses certain neo-noir visual tricks of the trade as well (time lapses etc), and he also has a knack for varying the mood without avertying the slowly bubbling to the surface pace that the story requires. Kilmer is superb, perfectly low-key, there is no need for rage, the yearning for revenge and redemption, for identity, is brought out via calmly delivered dialect, and it's very affecting. D'Onofrio as Pooh Bear, the afore mentioned no nose fella, steals the film with another of his off the planet nut-jobs. Elsewhere, Sarsgard is as appealing as he has ever been as Danny's stoner best mate, Hutchinson and LaPaglia chop fine figures as dirty cops, while Guzmán and Danny Trejo leave an impressively grungy mark. The only disappointment is the lack of screen time for Kara Unger, a fine actress, she is playing what turns out to be a critical femme fatale role, but really we required more of her. It's a rare misstep in an otherwise cracking neo-noir that is highly recommended to fans of similarly devilishly fun pictures. 8.5/10

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    Sea Devils review [Movie]  2017-10-13 21:51

    I was a toiler on the sea. Sea Devils is directed by Raoul Walsh and written by Borden Chase. It stars Rock Hudson, Yvonne De Carlo, Maxwell Reed, Denis O’Dea, Michael Goodlife and Bryan Forbes. Melody is by Richard Addinsell and cinematography by Wilkie Cooper. "Guernsey in the Channel Islands near the coast of France in the year 1800, where fishermen, prevented by battle from following their usual livelihood, turned to other occupations..." That occupation is of course smuggling, which lends one to think that Sea Devils is about to buckle our swash with a tale of derring do on the high seas. Unfortunately it doesn’t pan out that way, for the pic is essentially a spy adventure set partly at sea that involves Hudson and De Carlo going backwards and forwards between England and France. They bicker, they swoon, she looks sexy, he takes his shirt off, he makes dumb decisions (he’s no dashing character type here) and she does her bit for King and Country as she hopes to stop Napoleon in his watery tracks. It’s nicely colourful, the costuming adequate and the cast are fun to watch. But Walsh lets the movie meander at times and it never really amounts to being more than a dressed up time filler of a movie. 6/10

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    Saps at Sea review [Movie]  2017-10-13 21:51

    I vaguely remember first seeing this forty years ago with my parents, when I was very young--especially the set-piece in which they're trying to outwit the murderous escaped criminal on their boat by making a quite inedible meal. Still quite funny two generations later.

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    The Winter Sea review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    So sorry, but this was a DNF for me. At 16%, I still didn't know what the point of the book was or even exactly what genre I was reading. Is it a time travel? Women's fiction? Paranormal, suspense, gothic? What I got was that it's about a woman who is writing a book in her rented cottage, which is about as interesting as shelling peas. And every other chapter was the book she's is very set-up doesn't bring enough action for my tastes.

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    The Winter Sea review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    My second Kearsley book and it won't be my last. I don't give out five stars often, but this was intelligent, informative, and involved me on an emotional level. There's so much here, I hate to leave, I've already bought the audible. I need a ticket back to Scotland as well.

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    The Winter Sea review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    Thus was such a amazing read. Especially loved flipping past and show and dovetail ing to create a unbelievable romantic story. Quite believeable. I had hard time putting down, wanting to delve more and more into the history

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    The Winter Sea review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    This book moved into my top 5 books of all time !The authors words paint a picture that makes me sure I was there near the sea with Sophia. I felt her heart and her soul. This book was masterfully written. I will definitely read it again !! Soon ;))

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    The Winter Sea review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    Never have I read a book which so seamlessly develops a stratified plot involving modern times and valid history. Ms. Kearsley has managed to weave so a lot of true happenings into the story I found myself taking notes and hunting more info as to the 1708 stirring of Jacobites, a topic about which I know merely a smattering. The tension mounts with the pacing, holding us by the throats until throughout the latest 1/3 of the novel I simply could not sleep and could not stop reading until I came to the end. Then, I found myself holding the latest few pages and turning them the wrong way, re-reading that final chapter slowly, to create it not become what I feared it would be, and then, with a deft sweeping aside of a curtain, like deja' vu, the ending reveals two endings, both better than I had e language is piercingly emotional, tightly scripted and lyrical. The characters feel not as if they were pulled from history but rather someone you might sit next to in the anonymity of a public station. Moving from modern to historic times as slickly as this book does is something every writing student should study, as a amazing a lot of authors attempt to perform this slight of hand, but none have pulled it off as well. Secondly, the writer-within-the-story, meaning the main hero Carrie, who is a successful author struggling to search the basis for a fresh novel in her creative mind only to explore it seems to have been sent to her through her DNA, and who alternately writes until she collapses at her computer, then drags herself to life only to search her characters kidnapping her yet again, is so believable that anyone who has ever asked an author "how do you do that?" or "where do you obtain your ideas?" or "what is it like to write a book?" should simply read The Winter Sea for the answers. It doesn't obtain any more stly, for me, I can think of no better feeling when I finish a novel of this caliber (other than the sad tugging of sorrow that it is finally finished and I cannot turn the pages backward any longer) than to place it down with the firm and somewhat envious notion that I want I had written avo. Absolutely recommended. Indeed.

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    The Winter Sea review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    The heroine is an accomplished historical novelist who has gone back to Scotland in find of the characters for her fresh book. She finds the characters within herself as they speak to her and take her back to 16th century Scotland. It is as if they live and as she checks what she has written, from the voices in her head, she finds them accurate...totally accurate. The story unfolds, and keeps the reader engaged.I highly recommend this book, in fact I bought a copy for my daughter for Christmas. I will read more from this author.

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    The Winter Sea review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    Give me a cottage in Scotland, a writer's process as she researches her novel and I'm in heaven. I couldn't resist downloading this historical fiction romance for my Kindle. Susanna Kearsley takes a pinch of gothic, adds genetic telepathy and the mystique of Scotland, sprinkles liberally with romance, binds it together with historical appeal and tada! A delectable concoction for readers seeking amazing storytelling.Who better than an author to write a story about a writer's craft? Woven together are a lot of unbelievable Scottish elements: winds sweeping through castle ruins, locals speaking in dialect, coal stoves, a dog named Angus, feeding twenty pence coins into the electric meter, a sea e book alternates between current day and early eighteenth century Scotland. Novelist, Carrie McClelland, rents a crofter's cottage in Cruden Bay to be close to the remains of Slains Castle, home to her protagonist, Nathaniel Hooke. Hooke, a true historical figure was a leader in the first Jacobite rebellion of 1715. The castle and zone give Carrie the perspective and insight she needs to make true-to-life characters. Despite writing into the wee hours of the morning and researching, Carrie has time to be attracted to her landlord's youngest arsley's novel is enchanting, poignant and well-researched. If you wish a vacation in Scotland at an affordable price, buy this rsonal asides:* Prior to reading The Winter Sea, I had no knowledge of this first of two Jacobite risings, called "The Fifteen."* In this age of , I appreciated the author's mention of the International Genealogical Index, catalogued by the ed by Holly WeissAuthor of Crestmont

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    The Winter Sea review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    I'm not typically into reading romances. I'll read romantic comedies from time to time, but as for contemporary or even historical romance...it's just not my why did I pick up this one? There's something about that cover that kept drawing me in, and I finally did give in. And I'm glad I did.I won't rehash the story, but suffice to say, this has paranormal/fantasy overtones to it, and I read a lot of fantasy. (My one readomg foray earlier into paranormal romance focused almost 100% on the romance part.) Except there's more than just the paranormal and romance going on in this one - there's also the historical angle, which I also loved.But I feel this meant something more to me at this scene of my life. My private life has been in tumult for the past few years and I just required to reconnect to something attractive and imaginative like this story.I believe an earlier reviewer said Ms. Kearsley's choice of words brings such depth to the emotions of the characters and to the scenes in Scotland that you feel as if you're in the story, living and breathing with the characters. I have to agree - a really lovely experience! :-)The only downside for me was the price of the ebook. Nine dollars and change, really? That's why I left off one star. Seems petty, but that's how I feel. Though I simply had to read this book, I'll wait on her others until the publisher decides to come down to the US$5.99-$7.99 range.

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    The Winter Sea review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    As a best-selling historical fiction author, Carrie McClelland is accustomed to her characters speaking to her. And once again, that same fire and inspiration is beginning to flood her dreams as she embarks on her recent project: a novel set during the attempt to restore Jacobite James Stuart to the Scottish throne in 1708. Embracing historical accuracy to a fault, Carrie decides to relocate to a little cottage within shouting distance of the ruined Slains Castle where much of her story takes place. And in a move seemingly decided by fate decides to use the name of her own ancestor, Sophia Paterson, as her heroine.While staying at Cruden Bay, Sophia's story begins to flow with an ease previously inexperienced by Carrie. Aided by the amiable locals and her friendly landlord (not to mention his two very charming sons) Carrie slowly realizes that every insignificant detail, every plot twist, even the layout of the castle she has been spot on in writing about -- even before she learned the historical facts. As the line between history and fiction continues to blur for Carrie, she finds herself drawn to her ancestor Sophia who faced heartbreak beyond compare and joy without measure. All of which lead her to question, what if we could tap into the memories stored in our very genes?When I first heard about The Winter Sea as a sort of time-travel romance I was intrigued. The only book like that I had previously read was Diana Gabaldon's Outlander, which while fun, didn't ultimately do much for me. So happily unawares at what I was getting myself into, I started The Winter Sea expecting such related tepid fare. How utterly wrong I was. The Winter Sea is like Outlander's more mature, more experienced, smart older sister saturated with honest, true emotions and historical treasures like the descriptions of the French court at Saint-Germain and Sophia's stay at Slains Castle. Yet despite the profusion of history described, The Winter Sea is never once plodding or boring. Quite the opposite, in fact. The two stories of Carrie and Sophia were woven seamlessly together. I was always anxious to search out how Carrie would fare in Cruden Bay with her two very different, yet, related suitors but I quickly became desperate to explore how the bright Sophia would fare in such turbulent times. Because Susanna Kearsley did not allow that woman travel the simple street in no way, shape, or form. But thankfully, she did surround Sophia with people who loved her and watched out for her, including the brilliant Countess of Erroll who gave this piece of piercingly accurate tip after Sophia went through some truly heartbreaking events.'I do promise that you will survive this. Faith, my own heart is so scattered round the country now, I marvel that it has the strength each day to hold me standing. But it does,' she said, and drawing in a steady breath she pulled back just enough to raise a hand to wipe Sophia's tears. 'It does. And so will yours.''How can you be so sure?''Because it is a heart, and knows no better.'"It knows no better." That very line right there got struck right in my heart. The sensitivity and depth of emotion in these chapters did not just induce minor sniffling on my part, but full-out shoulders-shaking, tears-streaming crying. And all because Ms. Kearsley's characters had sunk their lovely hooks deep into my heart and refused to allow go. But never fear, because despite my extreme worry that Ms. Kearsley would not be able to give these people I had fallen quite in love with the happily ever after they deserved (you can't change history after all), she somehow pulled it off. Beautifully. To me, this story is all about the power of hope and love and learning to never give up. A truly attractive book that I would recommend to anyone.

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    The Winter Sea review [Book]  2017-10-24 18:0

    Slains Castle, Scotland is the setting for the dual storyline in THE WINTER SEA. It begins with author Carrie McClelland renting a cottage near the castle for research as she writes the nearly forgotten story of the 1708 attempt to land the exiled James Stewart in Scotland. To add authenticity Carries named the heroine of the story Sophia was named after one of her the story flows smoothly onto the page, Carrie discovers that what she thought was her creation appears to be more fact than fiction and she wonders if ancestral memory has become her oothly written, the story grabbed me from the first page. Every hero given breath by Kearsley’s skillful writing. A excellent blend of history, romance and intrigue.I recommend you grab a copy and obtain comfortable because you won’t likely wish to place it down once you start. Oh, and be sure you have a box of tissues handy. You'll need it.Did I hear sequel? Sort of. THE FIREBIRD comes out June 2013 and centers on Sophia’s daughter Anna.

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    Sea of Crises review [Book]  2017-11-8 18:0

    Enjoyed this book so much! I know my mates will also. Would give this book 10 stars if I could. Please hold up the amazing work. As someone else already said, tears, anger and laughter.

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    Sea of Crises review [Book]  2017-11-8 18:0

    Unbelievable premise, amazing plotlines and a amazing read. How can you go wrong with this ? Loved the book and will look formore from this author.

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    Sea of Crises review [Book]  2017-11-8 18:0

    Our book club picked Sea of Crisis. It turned out to be a well written exciting thriller with amazing plot lines. I highly recommend this book.

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    Sea of Crises review [Book]  2017-11-8 18:0

    Amazing storytelling. The plot mostly believable. Amazing hero development. Lots of action and amazing dialogue. A true page turner. Brought back amazing memories of the Apollo program.

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    Sea of Crises review [Book]  2017-11-8 18:0

    Couldn't' place it down. Thanks for taking the plunge, Marty. Wonderful story. Unusual plot that kept me on the edge of my seat the whole way.

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    Sea of Crises review [Book]  2017-11-8 18:0

    this book held my interested and is full of surprises and a outstanding plot. If you like a amazing mystery that is different, do not pass this one up. The hero development was amazing and the story line create them all very believable.I received this book for my honest opinion. Deservers all 5 stars~~~

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    Sea of Crises review [Book]  2017-11-8 18:0

    One of the best reads of the past few years. Likable characters and lots of action. Lots of twists and turns.

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    Sea of Crises review [Book]  2017-11-8 18:0

    This was a special storyline that kept my interest throughout. It's a well-paced novel filled with unexpected twists. Very well done!

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    Sea of Crises review [Book]  2017-11-8 18:0

    Interesting subject and premise, hooked me from the begin with amazing and plausible story, well written with believable and likable characters. I usually don't like "conspiracy theory" stories but this mixed a very amazing story-line with just enough paranoia to be believable. The "shadowy government organization" run by rogue paramilitary members is starting to obtain a small worn but still worked for me in this novel. If you like stories about zone and particularly if you lived and breathed the Apollo missions when they happened you'll probably like this story-I loved it and couldn't place it down.

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    Sea of Crises review [Book]  2017-11-8 18:0

    When I began reading this book, I had forgotten just what it was about because I'd had it since long. Thrillers today seem to mostly follow three or four models. What a truly unbelievable surprise this one was for me, and will be for you. Well written, scoots right along and is 98% believable all the method through. I'll leave future readers to search their own 2%.

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    Salt to the Sea review [Book]  2017-12-29 18:1

    I’ve studied Globe Battle II for years. I’ve read countless books, both nonfiction and fiction, and watched a lot of documentaries. My undergrad degree is even in history. But somehow, before SALT TO THE SEA, I’d only heard about the Wilhelm Gustloff mention of such an immense tragedy.I’m thankful to Ruta Sepetys for writing SALT TO THE SEA. I always have fun historical fiction that introduces me to something I didn’t know before, which she certainly does. But more than that, the author has such a deft, confident hand that I could sense the amount of research she did and the respect she has for the survivors and victims of the Wilhelm Gustloff. Sepetys doesn’t overwhelm you with her knowledge, but inserts it subtly, weaving it into the backstories, thoughts, and actions of the LT TO THE SEA is told through the eyes of four characters. Joana is Lithuanian, a nurse who always wants to support people in need, even if helping them might put herself in danger. Florian is Prussian, a boy with a package of secrets. Emilia is Polish, a girl on the run from unspeakable horrors. Alfred is German, a member of the Kriegsmarine, and loyal to Hitler’s every thought. By using characters of various nationalities and loyalties, the author is able to present the a lot of sides of Operation Hannibal, when Germany evacuated soldiers and citizens ahead of the Red e “chapters” in the book are short, often 2-3 pages before hopping to another character. For the first few chapters, this bugged me a bit, as I couldn’t obtain to know anyone with such short chapters. Then I got used to it and liked the short chapters, because the sparseness was more impactful than overloading me with info would have LT TO THE SEA is one of those rare books that I’ll be thinking about for a while.

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