Read selected student reviews, rating & opinions:

Check all selected student reviews below or publish your opinion.

100 Reviews Found

Sort by: Most Accurate (default) | Newest | Top Rated

  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Assistant []  2020-1-8 18:51

    I was surprised to see this fresh book from the series. It didn't disappoint. The conversational depth engaged the continuing subjects of xenophobia, ethics, human hypocrisy in relation to our freedom desired but the fear and shame experienced while engaging with a species where dialogue is necessary if real acceptance is to be achieved. The fact that the zone farers were still not accepted by humans and their lives still in danger when alone among the human population was disconcerting but they understood human reticence. Take away the physical differences of the zone farers and I could be reading a book about racial, ethnic, and cultural differences between humans. That Muriel was so loved by all, human and other world, brought tears to my eyes. Well written story and it helped that I'd read the other books in the series from Sapphire Fletcher to Galatea Heavenly Rice and this was a very amazing read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    Theodore Sturgeon is one of the greatest writers in our century, so those ratings that appeared at the begin of this interaction are kind of absurd? Allow me go ahead and quote a ver of Sturgeon's Law; "90% of everything is crap. And that's how you know what the amazing items is." This is the amazing stuff.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    As with a lot of short story collections, some are quite amazing and a couple I just slogged through. Also some of the stories seem to be written by various people. Overall I enjoyed the book but I think the reputation doesn’t always live up to the work.

    0  


    Add your opinion on selected student or scroll down to read more reviews ↓

     

  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Assistant []  2020-1-8 18:51

    An engineer travels to the ET's Africa compound to troubleshoot and repair hardware which interfaces with alien technology. Needless to say, she has her own romantic encounter. The stories are getting less massive handed as they go along.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    Full Contents:1. Thunder and Roses2. The Golden Helix3. Mr. Costello, Hero4. Bianca's Hands5. The Skills of Xanadu6. Killdozer!7. Bright Segment8. The Opposite9, The [Widget], the[Wadget], and Boff It10. A Method Of Thinking11. The Man Who Lost The Sea12. Slow Sculpture13. A Biography of Theodore Sturgeon

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    Each story is so very various than the next. However they all share one trait in common: excellence! The dozens is amazing. The story Killdozer is nothing like the cheesy TV film I remember from my youth. From a group of people living together in a boarding house to a malevolent swamp thing to A voodoo doll The stores are brought to life with an awesome writing urgeons law is that 90% of anything is crap. This book includes the other 10%. Enjoy!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    Having just read so a lot of short stories by the same writer I search that I would be unable to recognize another. Every story has its own singular style. From the nuts and bolts mechanical info of Killdozer to the emotional intensity of Slow Sculpture, but no two alike. Several were familiar from a lot of years ago but I had never taken note of the writer's name.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    Theodore Sturgeon was one of the greatest of all science fiction authors, even if he never acquired the fame of some of his contemporaries like Heinlein or Asimov. That may be due, in part, to the fact that he wrote very few novels, and only one amazing novel-- More Than Human. But he wrote more than 200 shorter pieces, some of the best of which are included in this volume.Any fan of Sturgeon will quibble about some of the choices created in this collection, but the stories here all range from very amazing to superb, and they present Sturgeon's range-- the stories contain supernatural horror ("It," "Killdozer"), psychological horror ("Bianca's Hands," "Bright Segment"), near-future science fiction ("Thunder and Roses"), far-future science fiction ("The Golden Helix"), literary experimentation ("The Man Who Lost the Sea"), and more. But all of the stories have three things in common-- attractive prose, psychologically-astute characterization, and a deep sense of love for humanity, despite its failures and foibles. Very highly recommended.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    After all the derivative, cliched, "action//suspense looking for a plot somewhere to hang onto", "extend it into 10+ sequels" Sci-Fi, re-reading Sturgeon after all three decades was like a breath of new , I take that back. It was more like a simultaneous whack upside the head and binge-swallowing a waterglass filled with 150-proof moonshine. All I can say is "WOW!"Clean, even terse, phrasing that draws a picture of an entire culture or planet in one or two short paragraphs. Various POVs that really **feel** like differing individuals. Tight, disciplined storylines without extraneous vagaries. Often an edge of horror, carefully restrained which makes its impact of fear and anxiety all the more true to both hero and oooo good! Do yourself a favor and explore what created sci-fi a genre beloved by its early fans. Sturgeon sits nicely between the more optimistic Midwestern Americana of Ray Bradbury and the harder, edgier style of Harlan Ellison. Highly recommended!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    I read and loved Sturgeon's stories as a kid. I'm in my late 50s now and have been sporadically re-reading some items I thought amazing in my youth. Not all of it stands up, but Sturgeon does. If you like thought-provoking stories, buy and enjoy!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems []  2020-1-22 19:24

    I've never been much of a poetry reader--my past experiences with poetry have often left me emotionally unmoved and vaguely frustrated. I realize this is more of a reflection of myself when reading poetry, but I mention it as a contrast to my amazing enjoyment of this collection, and as an admittance of my lack of knowledge of the technical or historical info of poetry as a medium.I purchased this collection because I love Nabokov's playful method with words, and poetry seems like a natural fit for his writing style. It is! The poems in this collection range from cute sketches to extended narratives, but they are universally good, and a lot of of them are astonishing. Depending on your tastes, some poems will be misses thematically, but there is such a dozens that you're sure to search ones you love, and the ones you love will move you deeply.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems []  2020-1-22 19:24

    marvelous book!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems []  2020-1-22 19:24

    Fresh translations by author's son plus all poems from previous Poems and Problems, plus a dozen more from one amazing master! I search it highly enjoyable and well worth the price!A must have for Nabokov fans.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Assistant []  2020-1-8 18:51

    This is a amazing progression of the Selected series with both fresh and returning characters being developed well, and a amazing bit of world-building to go along with a amazing main plot drive. It opens up some intriguing possibilities for the future of the series. Perfect read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Assistant []  2020-1-8 18:51

    I thought this was an amazing addition to the series. I really enjoyed reading about Taisha and her experiences with the ET’s. Her openness was amazing to see and that she helped search the solution to the issues with Muriel’s avatar. I also liked how she interacts with everyone especially Carolina. As always looking to continuing to read more of this series.I love that Roseau has android games throughout all of his books.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    This was so good. It started off a small slow for me, the first couple of stories didn't grab me. But as I got deeper into the book it got better and better. Sometimes, I think Sturgeon could be a small too technical in the info as on "Killdozer", which was a amazing story but I don't know a lot about construction, so a lot of his descriptive language was over my head. But that's a minor thing and he has some really amazing stories in this collection. Recommended.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems []  2020-1-22 19:24

    Perfect selection, attractive poems, tradition meets modernity.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems []  2020-1-22 19:24

    This is not Nabokov's fault -- but I need to warn other readers not to buy this book if you already have the Penguin Collected Poems. The content of the two volumes is identical in every way.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Assistant []  2020-1-8 18:51

    Once again, Robin Roseau has written a unbelievable story. Being one of my favorite authors, I wasn’t terribly surprised. However, I ended up being surprised by the end of the seems to happen with Robin’s stories, there is an apparent opening for a story or more to complete this r a reader, who is just starting reading Roseau’s work. Wait on reading this storing and start reading with the first story in this series.ENJOY!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Stories []  2020-1-22 19:17

    A collection of 13 Sturgeon stories, written from roughly 1940 to 1980, but I didn’t search them to feel dated at all. These are hero driven stories, relying more on hero interaction than story line, and the dozens of settings kept me interested. Some really thoughtful pieces here. My 3 favorites were:The Man Who Lost the SeaThe Golden HelixSlow SculptureNice collection.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems []  2020-1-22 19:24

    Nabokov is underrated as a poet.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems []  2020-1-22 19:24

    Nabokov was first and foremost a poet. His book demonstrates an exceptional talent for using primary words of the English language to express complex ideas and emotions. He believed that poets should be direct and to the point without using excessive metaphors or embellishments. This master of English, Russian and French has provided poetry readers with a lot of perfect examples of his philosophy of e subjects of Nabokov's poems reflect his involvement in the amazing political upheavals of the 20th century beginning with his exit from Russia following the Communist revolution to his life as a professor in the United States.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems []  2020-1-22 19:24

    This is a well-bound, well-typeset edition of the poetry of our greatly missed Vladimir. Its always nice to search a fresh read from the master. The original editions of his poetry are very expensive, so this gives a reasonably-priced access to these ere are a few omissions, but if you're a fan, you have them in other volumes. And, if you're a fan, you'll need this book!Nabokov would be proud of this volume.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    100 Selected Poems []  2020-1-28 22:2

    For anyone who dismisses mings as a lightweight poet toying with typography, this book will be an eye-opener. The best of these poems are thoroughly endearing; full of warmth, freshness, and humor. Some readers will be surprised to learn that mings is especially fine in the love poems, with memorable lines such as: "since feeling is first / who pays any attention / to the syntax of things / will never wholly kiss you;"At the same time, unfortunately, this collection provides numerous examples of mings' more irritating work. Virtually all of the best poems are in the first half of this chronological volume; after that, mings devolves into increasingly tiresome verbal gimmicks. The actual content in these later poems is slight, and the self-congratulatory tone becomes grating. Nonetheless, given the high quality of the early poetry, this book remains a firm recommendation.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    100 Selected Poems []  2020-1-28 22:2

    Edward Estlin mings has been a favorite of mine since I first experienced his poetry, his art, while at Sewanee... it must have been in 1959...maybe 1960. His poetry can turn your brain outside in and shake all the crap that's worrying you out like hanging out your wet, clean underwear. His stylized printing of his name in all lower case fascinated me. His total abandonment of convention created him, to me, a renegade hero. And of course I, like hundreds of other aspiring writers, imitated or attempted to imitate him. I didn’t come close. There are other volumes of mings’ work in my library. I’m going to hold this thin volume in my backpack. You never know when a brain jog will help. I’m in advertising…TV, radio and print and I see a small of his influence prying its method to the surface in a lot of the items I produce. I know it’s there; I doubt that anyone else notices.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Writings (Dario, Ruben) []  2020-1-24 23:44

    Along with Becquer, Ruben Dario is the wellspring of modern Spanish poetry. Poets who followed him-- from Juan Ramon Jimenez to Federico Garcia Lorca or Pablo Neruda-- recognized their debt to this Nicaraguan poet who (Lorca said) "taught maestros and kids with a sense of universality and generosity lacking among today's poets. He taught Valle-Inclan and Juan Ramon and the Machado brothers, and his voice was water and saltpeter in the furrow of an ancient language.... Spanish had never known such a feast of words, such a clash of consanants, lights and forms [...] He captured the murmur of the jungle in a single adjective and like fray Luis de Leon, a master of language, he created stellar signals with the lemon and the hoof of a deer and with mollusks full of infinity and terror. He placed the sea - with frigates and shadows-- in the pupils of our eyes, and laid an enormous promenade of gin over the grayest afternoon the sky has ever known. He called the dark north wind by its first name-- all heart, like a Romantic poet--and laid his hand on the Corinthian capital with eternal sadness and ironic doubt." Dario's poetry is translated here by two American poets: Steven F. White, a leading authority on Nicaraguan literature, and Greg Simon, co-author of a memorable translation of "Poet in Fresh York." Readers should be grateful for this selected Dario, which makes an ample selection of poetry and prose accessible to a fresh generation of English readers.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Writings (Dario, Ruben) []  2020-1-24 23:44

    Ruben Dario was the first amazing Spanish symbolist poet and perhaps the greatest of all Latin American poets. It's amazing to see a substantial selection of his poetry in Spanish in accessible form. The English translations, however, are inept almost beyond belief. What the reader with some Spanish needs is a careful and competent trot, as in the unbelievable "Penguin Book of Spanish Verse," where the translator gets every nuance.What the reader gets is verse translations in which every consideration of meaning is subordinated to the need for rhyme. Moreover, the translators, in the interest of a spurious readability, create no attempt to suggest the orotund classicizing side of Dario's diction. I have the impression that a lot of such poems, among Dario's best, have been suppressed as too difficult and/or unfashionable. Finally, the translators apparently wouldn't recognize a literary allusion or quotation in the original if it fell on e Stavans introduction is just contemptible, as both biography and literary criticism. Stavans' prose style, as always, is just awful. Mr. Stavans, there is no such English word as "illusive"!I've never written an Amazon review before, but then I've rarely approached a book with such high hopes and been so disappointed.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Barbara Crooker: Selected Poems []  2020-1-24 23:47

    I was introduced to Barbara Crooker, years ago through her poem “Ode to Chocolate” and have been a avid reader of her work ever since. This book is alive with her sharp focus on info that can swing the direction of your attention by one brief phrase, a twist of words that totally changes the meaning of what you thought was the intent. In “Summer Women” she presents the golden, graceful women on the tennis court who “never sweat” comparing them favorably to the rest of us. In their globe the “messy life” does not intrude. Their desires are fulfilled “and if it equals zero, they’ll call it love.” She backhands the winning shot in those latest ooker takes the pulse of people, places, situations, relationships, art and nature. She shows us aspects of life that we thought we knew all about until she turns her attention to info that we never considered. She causes us to laugh, sigh, consider, wonder and remember or reevaluate. This collection of poems is a amazing adventure for the neophyte or the aficionado to be enjoyed again and again and then shared with friends. It is too unbelievable to just hold on the shelf.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Essays, 1917–1932 []  2020-1-19 20:3

    we're talking about eliot...

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Essays, 1917–1932 []  2020-1-19 20:3

    I was very surprised that I got through this book. It is not every day that a person will pick up a collection of essays on Classical, Elizabethan and other types of literature, for enjoyments sake. Eliot really outdid himself with his reviews of the literature that he was surrounded by. The definite reads, if you do not wish to go through all the essays, are the essays "Dante", "Hamlet and his Problems" and "A Dialogue on Dramatic Poetry". "Dante" is a beuatiful study on both the "Divina Comedia" and "Vita Nouva". "Hamlet" is a putdown on the play that everyone "loves" so much--with the exception of the writer of this sentence. "Dialogue" is a well crafted arguement of the essence of the poetic plays and how they fit into modern--it was written in 1922--times. This book is pure genius, although at points rather "holier-than-thou." Eliot was a genius and he makes sure to allow you know it in his essays.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Upstream: Selected Essays []  2019-12-19 18:54

    We first read Mary Oliver when we visited USA. Her poetry is naturalistic and real, and it appeals to our Icelandic sensibilities . This collection is wonderful. I have read it in its entirety, and her prose is as luminous as always. I have enjoyed reading her essays, including the one on Whitman. She is in a class of her own, and she marches to her own, natural rhythm . In this world, we need her more than ever. She reminds us why nature is so close to our souls.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Upstream: Selected Essays []  2019-12-19 18:54

    From her reflections on walks in the woods to wonderful illuminations of her favorite authors, Oliver's collected essays of Upstream offer a writing for everyone."The best use of literature bends not toward the narrow and the absolute," she says, "But to the extravagant and the possible. Answers are no part of it; rather, it is the opinions, the rhapsodic persuasions, the engrafted logics, the clues that are to the mind of the reader the possible keys to his own self-quarrels, his own predicament" (69). A poetic description of reading if ever I've read one. She continues in the same paragraph, of Emerson: "The one thing he is adamant about is that we should look [at things for ourselves]--we must look--for that is the liquor of life, that brooding upon issues, that attention to thought even as we weed the garden or milk the cow" (69).Observations like the one above abound in Oliver's work, and I would place her nature reflections on par with Emerson or Thoreau, though not as earth-shattering (pun intended) as their writings were for their time. As she says in her writing "Let me be who I am, and then some," she certainly offers who she is, and then some. I, as her reader, am thankful for the experience.Extra note: She once built a little house in her back yard for $3.58 using scrap lumber and found materials. I search this incredibly inspiring.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Upstream: Selected Essays []  2019-12-19 18:54

    Much like Annie Dillard's "The Abundance", "Upstream" was a delight to read. This is the kind of writing I believe the show globe hungers for. I only realized this after the reading and I will seek out the more literary writings in the future. Like Ms. Oliver, I, too, once lived in the Ohio Valley and could relate up close and private with her experiences.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Descartes: Selected Philosophical Writings []  2020-1-15 22:44

    Wonderful selection of Descartes' works. However, the book was advertised as "Like New", even though the spine was badly damaged, the pages heavily underlined, and the margins marred. WACK!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Descartes: Selected Philosophical Writings []  2020-1-15 22:44

    Although I don't really agree with any of the arguments Descartes has in this book, it is an interesting read that I would recommend for anyone.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Writings (Penguin Classics) []  2020-2-4 23:30

    I was referred to Marti' through other literary sources. What I found far surpassed my expectations. Whether it is his writing style, his first hand accounts of necessary moments in US and Cuban history as a reporter or the insight into US and Cuban relations and the inevitable attempts at a Cuban revolution that followed, this is necessary reading to any serious or even curious student of Cuba, US History or Latin American literature and literary figures. The writings evolve over a lifetime and combine the life experiences of Jose Marti with the evolution of US social and political upheaval during this period, the growing discontent of Spanish rule over Cuba and reveal much about the US and Cuba through the eyes of an activist observer who ultimately became part of the story. His final writings and accounts of the Battle and his role in an ill fated revolution are some of the most intimate and foreboding accounts of a person's life mission that I can recall ever having read and seem to be a turning point in modern Latin American writing and literature. The final doent of the poet warrior's chronical of his and his country's pending demise.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Writings (Penguin Classics) []  2020-2-4 23:30

    The Cuban character, as it turns out, is not so much a development of the post-Castro trauma in which so a lot of Cuban-Americans live but rather the expression of a deep and inescapable sense of exile. In this gorgeous, captivating translation of Marti's writings--some appearing in English for the first time--this 19th century journalist and poet is truly the epic voice of the Cuban people, articulating their pathos and homesickness in his dispatches from Fresh York, putting his finger into the wounds of their suffered humanity in his poetry and travelogues. An elegant, profound picture of the Cuban soul, long before the Ilan Gonzalez happenings cast such an unfriendly light upon it.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    New Selected Poems []  2020-2-5 1:6

    He writes good.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems (Penguin Classics) []  2020-2-4 7:36

    The poems are beautifully translated, the book in excellent condition! It arrived quickly and the quality of the book itself is outstanding. The excellent book for every poetry-lover.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems (Penguin Classics) []  2020-2-4 7:36

    I agree with the other reviewers. If you have a modi of French, this is the translation to go for -- plain, prose, with an perfect introduction to primary problems involving French poetry (syllable-ization, tone, word choice, etc.). The introduction alone is masterful. There are a lot of other facing page translations -- I have used Fowlie and Richardson in the past -- but I would now go with this one.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lorca & Jimenez: Selected Poems []  2020-2-4 7:44

    As advertised.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Canterbury Tales []  2020-9-8 18:13

    classic publication For a amazing price.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Canterbury Tales []  2020-9-8 18:13

    Great

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Stories (FSG Classics) []  2020-9-8 18:18

    Like nothing you've ever read or will search again. Robert Walser is a craftsman and his tales do not end without their intended effect.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems 1988-2013 []  2020-11-25 20:35

    These poems from the second half of Seamus Heaney's career continue to draw on the land, the daily globe of country Ireland. Also here, however, are darker poems concerning The Troubles, nighttime raids and sudden deaths in the Northern Ireland of sectarian strife. Heaney masters the violence and grief to make vivid, moving poetry, like Yeats before him to turn conflict into "a not good beauty."

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems 1988-2013 []  2020-11-25 20:35

    Nothing like Heaney. Nothing like his clear-eyed reality laced with meaning, history, and those subtle silent metaphors.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Ambient Works II []  2020-12-1 21:58

    Right from the start, Selected Ambient Works Volume 2 is a strange, challenging listen. Richard D. James has never had qualms about straying from the norms of ambient/techno/electronic music, but this album's length and weirdness create it nearly inaccessible at first. Aphex Twin defies rhythms and hooks on most of the songs. What's wonderful about an album this vexing is that it still manages to trap you. For me, the songs that initially caught my attention were the atmospherically eldritch tracks "Grass," "Tree," "Grey Stripe," and "Spots." During my first listen, I guessed - correctly - that these tracks would become enduring favorites. It took more time to appreciate other tracks. Soon, I found myself wondering how I had ever managed to resist the tranquil beauty of "Rhubarb," "Parallel Stripes," and "Lichen." It took more time yet to appreciate the straight-up bizarre tracks "Radiator," "White Blur," and the maddening "White Blur 2." Fresh listeners will most likely warm to groove-laden selections like "Weathered Stone," "Blue Calx," and perhaps even the oddly catchy "Window Sill." These tracks feature some of the album's sparse percussion and are as close to being "catchy" as the songs get. While this album isn't an simple listen, it's always a rewarding one. Once its caught your attention, you realize you wouldn't wish to hear it any other way.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Ambient Works II []  2020-12-1 21:58

    A fast rundown on this awesome collection of ambient music:This is a 3LP set released by Warp a label well known for electronic melody featuring artist like Boards of is ver (black vinyl pressing) is often considered rarer, and holds up better in comparison in terms of sound quality to the brown vinyl problem that came out before hand. The two versions have various covers, black vinyl has cover as the photo above (orange/brown). Brown vinyl problem had a grey/silver is is a gatefold sleeve, all the tracks are ment to be 'untitled'. The cool thing here is on the labels themself they list a picture all of various ambient lighting representing various tracks. The only listed track is (I believe) "Blue Calx" which is also my private e melody ranges from dark cavernous vacant aside from bat top clanged caves, to watery dripping rooms of nothing. Noisy wirey tracks to deranged dark tunes. This is a Warp classic, Aphex Twin's material is all great, but to me this is the most memorable.(As a heads up a lot of will see this album displayed as Saw II)

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Dance Into Eternity-Selected []  2020-12-1 22:18

    I absolutely adore Omar Faruk Tebilek. I recently visited Turkey, and fell in love with the mystical and sacred feel of this country. I tend to have fun middle eastern melody anyway, but this CD is like nothing else I have heard. The special sounds create you feel like you are back in the time of the Ottoman Empire, when the sacred was still very sacred. You can feel the melody slowly drawing you into some spiritual zone where religion doesn't matter ... only you and the devine are united. The devine being all of humanity. This melody evokes so a lot of feelings, which is rare in these days of "twerking music" and such. I admire Omar for sticking with his love of melody for so a lot of years, and never giving up. With time all dreams come real ... and I am glad he has made so a lot of amazing recordings.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Dance Into Eternity-Selected []  2020-12-1 22:18

    Pleasant music.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Upstream: Selected Essays []  2019-12-19 18:54

    Would give it 10 stars if I could. Mary Oliver is a revelation and anything she writes is worth reading, studying and thinking about. I've been reading her poetry for years, and she is lined up with the greats, the everlasting, the Whitmans, insons, Thoreaus, she leap frogs over categories,transcends literary compartments, a pragmatic romantic or romantic pragmatist? No labels fit, she is Mary Oliver - how fortunate we are that she was born into our time so that we could follow her path and thereby search our own with so much less trouble.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Upstream: Selected Essays []  2019-12-19 18:54

    Perfect - more of Mary Oliver.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Descartes: Selected Philosophical Writings []  2020-1-15 22:44

    A must read.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Descartes: Selected Philosophical Writings []  2020-1-15 22:44

    The best translation for the most necessary works by Descartes. I highly recommend this if you're looking to study Descartes' works, and you only wish a single volume.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Descartes: Selected Philosophical Writings []  2020-1-15 22:44

    Its too hard to actually critique on of the most philosophically necessary books of all time. While Descartes views have been discredited over the years as views of philosophy have shifted radically in their paradigms, his work still remains foundational (pun intended).This book's binding is one of the worst I have eve seen though. It literally split as I opened to read it. I don't know what they use for glue but pages were almost falling out during my philosophy class, and I started with a brand fresh copy. Stay away from this edition if you intend to hold it on your shelf for years.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Writings (Dario, Ruben) []  2020-1-24 23:44

    I ordered 2 copies of this book. Delivery was prompt but one of the copies is defective, missing like 10 pages of the introduction. I was of course disappointed.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Barbara Crooker: Selected Poems []  2020-1-24 23:47

    Selected Poems by Barbara Crooker is a “must have” for anyone who delights in language, form, and extraordinary insight. Writing about a life not so differentfrom ours, she manages with uncanny clarity to see into her topic as a lot of of us do not, illuminating essence whether family, seasons, gardening, travel, food,or loss. Her work is rooted firmly in life, and Crooker lives her life om “ At the Cimitière de Monmartre,” for example, after strolling among the graves of the famous, she and her husband search a wrought iron bench, have fun a feast of camembert, pain de compagne, a kilo of cherries, “when for a sweet moment, I loved you so completely, /when I die, I wish our ashes to mingle; bury us in earth,/plant a rose bush/ etc.” Love blossoms even in the cemetery. Or considerthe poems for her son David who has autism. Crooker writes compassionately but realistically. In poems such as “The Mother of a Handicapped Kid Dreams of Respite,” she lists all the ways she could escape, then tucks in the penultimate line “ I will dance in satin slippers at my broken boy’s wedding” followed by “I will drive clear to the Pacific and never come back.” or “ Driving Under the Clerestory of Leaves” where Crooker describes driving David to school, explains how he is developmentally delayed, mildly retarded, how she waits for him, tries to write, “turn straw into gold,” and speaks of the beauty of the “mixed hardwood in full conflagration. And the latest three lines: The architect who created these trees was sleeping when he created this boy. And my heart, like the leaves, burns and is collection of 101 poems taken from 10 chapbooks and including the fresh later poems, perhaps more meditative and reflective, taking an acc of a life as in the latest poem, “ The Mothers,” from the profane “to the sacred, the opening between two worlds, the method we all came in, part of the wheel, the hoop, the amazing turning. “I encourage you to buy a copy of this stunning collection, Selected Poems by Barbara Crooker. You will not be disappointed.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Barbara Crooker: Selected Poems []  2020-1-24 23:47

    Barbara's poetry is as diversified as nature itself is! Themes of nature, art, loss, parenting, and relationships resonated for me. Barbara's poetry is like reading delightful lyrical prose. In this collection, I savoured every accessible poem. Ordinary Days captured my attention years ago. Now it's a pleasure to have Crooker's collected works in one anthology on my bookshelf to be treasured when inspiration is needed.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    100 Selected Poems []  2020-1-28 22:2

    Glad this collection remains in print. It was the first collection of mings I ever owned back in the 1970s.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Essays, 1917–1932 []  2020-1-19 20:3

    I'm a true fan of Eliot's poetry -- but I found myself bogged down in his essays on Victorian and earlier poetry. I should've gone into this with a more begin mindset. But his ysis of little-known poets -- 18th and 19th century especially -- really slowed down my excitement level. He covers essayists as well. I've taught a few of these writers, yet found myself bored by Eliot's Christian take on a lot of writers, judging their merit on their orthodoxy as well as their literary ability.Eliot is of course a brilliant writer: more than articulate, a genius with the language, and a careful researcher and reader. But I'm afraid that despite the accolades that accompany this book, and despite my Master's in Modern Letters -- he darned near place me to sleep with some of this criticism. Sorry -- I wanted to be carried away with his reports. But instead, I found myself skimming instead of digging deep.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Essays, 1917–1932 []  2020-1-19 20:3

    T.S. Eliot was the dominant figure in modernist literature not just because of his poetry, but also because of his criticism which changed our view of English literature in ways which can still be felt today. He resurrected the forgotten John Donne and had him eclipse John Milton as idol of poetry. He showed that Shakespeare was not the only playwright of his time. He was brillitant at explaining what created modernist literature various from its perdecessors.Eliot's style is a pleasure to read compared to what passes as lit crit today. A lot of of his insights may seem outdated, but any student of literature will search fascinating views, especially about Elizabethan literature.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Heine: Selected Verse (Poets) []  2020-1-22 19:6

    Robert Wallace(The Would-Be Herbalist on Kindle): I've been reading these translations for years and it's always struck me as odd that Heine continues to be(so it seems) known, if at all, in the English-speaking globe primarily by settings of his early work in the lieder of Schumann and Schubert. The early work, while charming, in itself does small to give a full indication of Heine's talent and range. More than a lyricist of deceptively limpid verse he should be seen as almost modern in these prose translations with a lively, ly wit. He develops the conventional themes and motifs of his early love poetry and overlays with irony, humour and self-mockery. So you have the romantic feeling of young love or infatuation but along with this the note of disillusion to follow, all in the same poem. Or some incongruous description or happening existing simultaneously. The result I would say is more multi-layered than simply ironic or what we now call post-modern. Figures in the poems are sometimes undergoing partial transformations or the narrator is discussing the modern globe with a Barbarossa temporarily awakened from sleep. Avalon, King Arthur, Barbarossa, knights, troubadours all rub shoulders with coachmen, merchants, beautiful women to encounter in Paris streets. The popular Lorelei is here as well as Heine's döppelganger. There are also poems with talking animals, birds and flowers but along with these fanciful notes there is sometimes an indignation and biting criticism of human affairs. Most of all the poems are a delight to read--one feels oneself in the presence of another living being. Note: as is the case with a lot of Penguin translations of poetry the main text is given to the original poem with the English prose translation at the foot of the page-- I mention this as it seems some readers search this off-putting.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems (Penguin Classics) []  2020-2-4 7:36

    Unlike other translators, Carol Clark has really captured Baudelaire's intent in both the imagery and meaning because she didn't mix her own notion of poetry with his rhyming craft, and correctly settled on a prose translation; and therefore, as closely as possible, retained the real essence of Baudelaire in English format. For example:Evening Harmony"...The violin trembles like a wounded heart, a tender heart which hates the vast, black nothingness! The sky is sad and attractive like a amazing alter of repose; the sun has drowned in his curdling blood. A loving heart, which hates the vast, black nothingness, gathers up every trace of the shining past! The sun has drowned in his curdling blood...Your memory within me shines like a monstrance."This translation reveals Baudelaire's real heart. In a lot of aspects his visions are like Poe's but his ideals focus on hard-bitten romantic love. In a lot of translations, he comes off like a whiny poor boy because the constraints the translator placed on himself to keep poetic form higher than meaning. In this one, Baudelaire's real genius is allowed to shine.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lorca & Jimenez: Selected Poems []  2020-2-4 7:44

    Not having read other translations of Jimenez, by far the lesser known of the two poets, I can't comment on Bly's translation other than to say it keeps fairly close to the Spanish. Bly, the American surrealist poet popular for his theories of "leaping poetry," does a fine job overall. I've read better Lorca translations, but a lot of a lot of amazing poets have tried their hand at Lorca.Bly goes beautiful even-steven: half Lorca, half Jimenez. Both were Spanish poets who lived in the United States. A lot of of the poems they wrote about the U.S. are included. The selection is very amazing overall, if somewhat biased toward poems that represent Bly's theories of "leaps" in perception and logic.What you're getting here is a doent of not only two amazing Spanish 'surrealists' (if we must place them in a category) but also of a leading American surrealist's take on them. Readers interested in surrealism as a movement or in Bly and his "leaping verse" would do well to read this. I'd also recommend the book for those interested in exploring Lorca and Jimenez. If you are only interested in Lorca (and can't read him in the original Spanish) you might wish to test reading complete translations of his GYPSY SONGS and POET IN NEW YORK, rather than the fragments of those two seminal works presented here. For those like me who are already familiar with Lorca, Bly's take will prove interesting, and you will greatly have fun Jimenez. A dynamic duo. In total, there is a amazing deal here to recommend itself and that is why I give it 4/5 stars.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    New Selected Poems []  2020-2-5 1:6

    As an article in the May 2016 problem of The Atlantic said, Les Murray may be the best poet in the world. That is, of course, debatable. But he is clearly one of the greats of the latest 50 years and anyone who loves poetry needs to be familiar with him. He is a magician with words and images, and no one captures the essence, the physical sense, the culture of Australia better. This collection is the one to get; published in revised form in 2014, it's a greatest hits of his career.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    New Selected Poems []  2020-2-5 1:6

    Les Murray: a master of refined and unrefined intelligence -- a blend so rare that he is a star all by himself in the galaxy of his own making. Although it makes you wish to know more of the Australia and the Australians -- that breed of the non-understood folks, you don't read him for him being an Australian -- far from it -- but from what he is taken from his life, his landscape and for the alchemy of turning his globe into his poetry.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    New Selected Poems []  2020-2-5 1:6

    The greatest living poet writing in English. Of that, there is no doubt. His only true rival, Geoffrey Hill, to often lapses into mannered obscurantism. Murray's abilities with language are, at times, of a sublimity, emotional complexity, and technical accomplishment that place him in the first rank of poets of the latest 125 years--in league with Yeats, Eliot, Frost, and more recently, Larkin. Larkin especially comes to mind. Murray has his same savage wit, his daring to mix the quotidian and mundane with the speculative and metaphyiscal, and his cynicism, but not, ultimately, his despair. There are "old fools" in Murray's work, but their lives have meaning and somewhere in them, a dignity. His unfashionable sacramental view of the universe, a universe that is filled with things that are not of themselves, but are charged with supernatural significance, looks decidely out-of-date. We live in a post-post modern age now, as the shape shifting deconstructions of Derrida and Foucault fade and as a kind of brutal, deterministic biologism more and more seems pervasive. Murray is a throwback, yes, but also an alternative: of how to write poetry, and maybe even of how to live.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Writings (Penguin Classics) []  2020-2-4 23:30

    Marti was a prodigy, a genius, yet he is small known in the U.S. either for his prose or poetry. Those who have heard of him may associate him with Radio Marti or know him as a Cuban revolutionary.While this beautifully rendered translation contains a broad spectrum of Marti's works, some not previously translated, his descriptions of America in the latter half ot the nineteenth century are by themselves sufficient reason to buy this rti, coming from a various culture, sees things about America that we do not, and he describes them with a passion lacking in the reportage of his North American contemporaries.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Writings (Penguin Classics) []  2020-2-4 23:30

    Jose Marti's writings were really my first entry into Latin American political thought. I was greatly impressed by his writing style and his ability to project how the Western hemisphere's development would unfold over the 20th Century. This is an necessary book for understanding the region, and also modern today Cuba and Venezuela.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Canterbury Tales []  2020-9-8 18:13

    Chaucer's Canterbury Tales are a unbelievable collection of stories which I highly recommend. This translation, however, takes liberties. Nicholson embellishes Chaucer's work, which does not need such additions, and changes words to fit his sentiment rather than keeping with the meaning of Chaucer's original. Examples:Chaucer: Whan that Aprille with his shoures soote ...Nicholson: When April with his showers sweet with fruit ...Chaucer: To Caunterbury with full devout corage, ...Nicholson: To Canterbury, full of devout homage, ...Corage means heart or spirit, NOT homage.I recommend an interlinear translation, it keeps the translators honest, and allows you to see where they have deviated from the original.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Canterbury Tales []  2020-9-8 18:13

    Unbelievable book

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Canterbury Tales []  2020-9-8 18:13

    The book arrived damaged.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Stories (FSG Classics) []  2020-9-8 18:18

    I'm stunned to discover, especially with new, more colloquial translations, that I am the first then to draw readers' attention to the work (all the little body of work) of the Swiss writer Robert Walser. His work is comparable to no one's being the product of a mind both solipsistic and wry, an ironist, an observer of human nature. A humorist. A naif. It is impossible to theorize whether Walser understood he was profound in the most canny way. His narrators are sharp-eyed, sharp of tongue -- wholly endearing. Perhaps there will appear elsewhere raves about his few existing works. Especially I cite his novel Jakob Von Gunten, and the Selected Stories. But all - I own all - take us on a riveting journey to a highly original mind. Hardly a sentence ends where it begins. They cannot be predicted or emulated. Intellectuals globe over cite him now for his deliriously skewed vision of world. I search it more interesting to know he wrote microscopically, principally on 2 x 3 business cards than that he was in and out of asylums most of his adult life ... spent his latest two years, electively in an asylum. It could be said, literally and figuratively, he went into snow, died in snow, without knowing his works would be so hard to transcribe, then to translate, that he was not known for some years after. - from The Madding Crowd [:] Sandra Stone, Portland Oregon and elsewhere. [see my few reviews. Search my two books on Amazon if you can. I invite your comments of reviews of tails with Breughel at the Museum Cafe. And (2013) The Inmost House [:] memory making journeying dwelling. Write back in your separate maxims if you're impelled.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Ambient Works II []  2020-12-1 21:58

    Richard D James aka Aphex Twin is one of the greatest musical geniuses of modern times. With amazing albums like "Selected Ambient Works 85-92", "Drukqs", and my private favorite, "I Care Because You Do", "Selected Ambient Works, Volume 2" doesn't fit in with these others. However, that is not a poor thing as this is a special album in itself. Yes, there are no beats (for the most part) on this double album, but James makes it work like no one else could. The first disc has the more experimental items and weird items on it. Track #4 will scare you out of your wits while Track #9 sounds like it should have been a part of "The Shining" (Kubrick's version) soundtrack. Track #11 sounds like an alien autopsy. Disc 2 has the more attractive tracks including the only really "named" track (all of the tracks are nameless but have pictures except this one) in "Blue Calx". The most attractive of them all is the latest one or the "b+w stripes II". Whenever I hear this track, I think of myself is is a amazing album but it takes patience to listen to. Don't give up on it after one, two, or even three listens. Also, create sure that you have plenty of time to slay in listening to this and preferably on headphones. If you are fresh to Aphex Twin, I would not recommend this album; however, if you have fun the melody of Richard James, then you will have to pick this album up eventually. And you will not be sorry in doing so.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Ambient Works II []  2020-12-1 21:58

    When listening to this album, you must reserve all of your patience. It is a very beautiful, yet dark album, but it is extremely long and the songs are lengthy. Most of them have a depressing/haunting sound, but some are more uplifting or dreamy. I kind of group the album into 3 parts - Dark, Dreamy, and Melancholy. Some are more of a dly, one of the best songs on the album is not on the CD ver - "Stone in Focus"Honestly, it's one of the most attractive things I've ever heard.Other stand-out tracks contain - "Rhubarb", "Cliffs", "Lichen", "Curtains", "Blue Calx", "Tree", "Blur", and "Windowsill"

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Dance Into Eternity-Selected []  2020-12-1 22:18

    The guy that produced, wrote and played this melody sure knows what he's doing! The blend is clearly Turkish but its quite eclectically energized as well. Amazing melody for something different.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Dance Into Eternity-Selected []  2020-12-1 22:18

    Mr. Tekbilek has a true gem here, so if you like ME melody you simply need to purchase this CD. It's GREAT in a car.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems 1988-2013 []  2020-11-25 20:35

    The late Seamus Heaney is brilliant, and this is a attractive collection.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    100 Selected Poems []  2020-1-28 22:2

    This his best collection of poemsHe hooked me in high school

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    100 Selected Poems []  2020-1-28 22:2

    Glad to be able to replace my lost copy of this attractive book.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Heine: Selected Verse (Poets) []  2020-1-22 19:6

    For a bilingual reader, this collection is fascinating

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Poems (Penguin Classics) []  2020-2-4 7:36

    This ver of selected works is one of the best French to English translations of Baudelaire I've come across. The text is not manipulated to rhyme in English as it does in French, and therefore is much more representative (in meaning) of the work in it's native language. I'm not much of a poetry reader, but next to Leaves of Grass by Whitman, this (the selections from "The Flowers of Evil" in particular) is my favorite.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lorca & Jimenez: Selected Poems []  2020-2-4 7:44

    While I prefer other's translations to Robert's from time to time, on the whole this collection is a gorgeous, important artifact. We should be so lucky to have the opportunity to spend time with it. Thanks Robert.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Lorca & Jimenez: Selected Poems []  2020-2-4 7:44

    I was in college, was poor, had heard of Lorca from a film and this book had the same poem in it. I hadn't particular cared for a lot of of Bly's men's movement stuff, but his translations of Jimenez and Lorca are phenomenal. To me Jimenez gives you a glimpse of life in it's beauty, while Lorca opens the shadow like a door. One of Jimenez's poems called'"I was sitting", mentions him reading "the bitter and melancholy book of the poet who knows my dreams", this book of poems has become that same book to me. After 7 years, I still read it on a regular basis. I have the 1973 edition, but the pages are falling out and coffee stained. I was elated to know it has been republished, and will purchase the 1997 edition to replace my older one. I'll say again that I haven't cared for Bly's other work, but his translation of these and other poets is breathtaking.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Writings (Penguin Classics) []  2020-2-4 23:30

    Amazing addition to history book collection

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Writings (Penguin Classics) []  2020-2-4 23:30

    Good,enough info to start search.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    New Selected Poems []  2020-2-5 1:6

    Les Murray (born 1938) surely is one of the world's best living poets. NEW SELECTED POEMS includes about 360 poems from the 1960s through 2010, as selected by Murray himself. It is a splendid introduction to a amazing poet.I search it almost impossible to characterize Murray, but I will list some of the qualities or characteristics of these 360 poems: Most of them are relatively short (a page or less; the longest is ten pages). There is a wide range of styles and formats, although most of the poems employ formal measures to some extent and a goodly number also employ rhyme. Even greater in range is the topic matter of the poems. A lot of are set in Murray's native Australia (Murray writes that "three quarters of our continent [is] set aside for mystic poetry"), but Murray has a very amazing sense of the entire world. He knows high culture, but most of his poems center on laboring men and women, especially those who settled the Australian continent. He seems to have no ideologies, though he is a practicing Roman Catholic and the volume is dedicated "to the glory of God". For the most part he uses down-to-earth language (albeit Aussie English). The poems are shot through with energy, high spirits, humor, compassion, and a profound sense of om the evidence of NEW SELECTED POEMS, Murray writes about anything and everything. He has an extremely fecund imagination. What follows is a little sampling of the topics found in these poems: eating Vindaloo at a restaurant in Wales; the gum forest; setting grass fires to facilitate agriculture and ranching; the emu; his mother's town of Newcastle; fencing (in the marvelously deft and imaginative "Time Travel"); removing a spider web; the shields of heraldry; those who read poetry and those who write it; the first and only time Murray skied; tectonic plates; money; the bronze bull of Wall Street; the marriage of his daughter; and the future. In one poem, he even contains Tony Hillerman's Navajo policeman Jim Chee. Unlike most poets, Murray's political poetry is both amazing and poetic.I offer "High Sugar" as a representative poem (though not my favorite, which is "Crankshaft" and at five pages is too long to quote here):Honey gave sweetnessto Athens and Rome,and later, when splendourmight rise nearer home,sweetness was still honeysince, pious or lax,every cloister had its apiaryfor honey and waxbut when kings and fresh doctrinesdrained those deep hivesthen millions of peoplewere shipped from their livesto grow the high sugarfrom which were refinedfrigates, perukes, human racesand the liberal r my usual practice, as I read through the book I marked those poems I would like to re-read at some point in the future. In all, I so marked thirty-nine poems. But should I live long enough, I think it possible that I re-read the entire collection. Murray is that good.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    New Selected Poems []  2020-2-5 1:6

    I've kind of stayed away from Murray for years because he seemed too conservative. What a mistake. The man can write poetry. Unbelievable sense of language, of timing, hits emotional and thoughtful notes with precision.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    New Selected Poems []  2020-2-5 1:6

    Astounding collection of poems.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Writings (Dario, Ruben) []  2020-1-24 23:44

    okay.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Barbara Crooker: Selected Poems []  2020-1-24 23:47

    How thrilled I was to unwrap Barbara Crooker’s Selected Poems to add to the collection of her vibrant works that grace my bookshelves. These rich, profound poems from a series of earlier chapbooks literally glow in the dark! The poem Ordinary Life "unwrapped itself/like an unexpected gift.” I laughed knowingly at The Latest Woman in America to Wash Diapers who must deal “with the s*** in her life.” And wept at the mother of an autistic kid in “The Stone” whose weight “not one/could bear…/Yet how they loved it.” I panicked like the speaker in Amusement Park who trusted the machines “to return those bodies/intact.” And welcomed the moment she drops to her knees “stained in crimson,/our garnet fingers/praising the earth.” In Fever,“ fresh growth roots/from perennials” praise a satisfied marriage, and in Skating after School one can visualize “sky and ice a single seam/stitched by black trees.” A loon is a metaphor for the frustrations of writing: “diving in dark water/ and surfacing—where?” In the first sonnet of “Nine Days in April,” where Crooker did a writer’s retreat: “Nothing but false starts today,/ first lines begun that simply go nowhere.” On other days though, she is “writing as quick as I can.” Although the poems are largely affirmative, “more poor news/than the human heart can stand” now and then fall like icy pellets into the poet’s world. “How we forget to love one another,” she grieves, “in the tangle of daily life.” In several poems she mourns the cancer of a dear friend: “Piece by piece they’ve pruned her body./Now they wish to harvest her marrow.” And later we see the courageous patient “like a maple leaf, burning in crimson,/she’s hanging on with everything she’s got.” The poet, too, offers the reader everything she’s got—and more – in these wise, luminous poems, lovingly harvested from a fruitful past.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Barbara Crooker: Selected Poems []  2020-1-24 23:47

    I first read a Barbara Crooker poem in a collection of a lot of various poets. It was one of my favorites in the book, so I decided to seek out a whole book of her poems. She is an perfect writer, one who frankly makes me envious of her gift. She has a knack for describing daily scenes with attractive and evocative language. I always feel transported to the put she is writing about. I heartily recommend this collection.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Descartes: Selected Philosophical Writings []  2020-1-15 22:44

    Translation is perfect and readable, with extra footnotes for further elucidation. Descartes is an necessary person in Western philosophy and cannot be overlooked, whatever you think of his views. This is a amazing starting point.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Descartes: Selected Philosophical Writings []  2020-1-15 22:44

    Great

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Descartes: Selected Philosophical Writings []  2020-1-15 22:44

    This first volume in a two-volume set contains: (1) Rules for the Direction of our Native Intelligence, (2) Discourse on the Method, (3) Optics, (4) Meditations on First Philosophy (together with Objections and Replies), (5) Principles of Philosophy, (6) Comments on a Certain Broadsheet, and (7) The Passions of the Soul. The only book missing from this amazing volume is Descartes' Geometry, but given the breadth and depth of the current volume, such an omission is e translation is among the very best, with the consistent use of nouns and verbs and direct objects throughout the different texts. The book is accompanied by an perfect index, and an occasional note only when absolutely necessary. The text is allowed to speak for itself, and this it does with only regret is my copy is not printed on acid-free paper, and after a decade is already beginning to age prematurely. This one complaint aside, this volume is both well written and covers Descartes' best ideas. This particular volume belongs in all serious students' and collegiate libraries.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Essays, 1917–1932 []  2020-1-19 20:3

    This is the best single volume collection of essays by T. S. Eliot, and a superb introduction and anthology of his literary/intellectual/cultural passions and pursuits.Understandably, he is still mostly known only for his poems - well, at least in schools, where he's taught in literature courses; usually and only the poems The Waste Land, and The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufock (the latter being my favourite of his poems, transcending in quality and feeling his most famous, The Waste Land, not simply because it is far more accessible, but it is more from the heart, rather than the head, and there are more rewards to be gained by the marvellous riches of the metaphors and similes used).The collection is the third and final revised edition whose contents only Eliot himself selected and it is most highly recommended to you, whether you dip in and out of the Sections and individual essays according to your particular interests, or read them all from cover to cover without changing course. If you are passionate about pre-20th century poetry, literature in general (especially English for the latest two clauses here), criticism thereof, or the humanities in general, you will search much to engage and stimulate your mind and love for literature.While all of his essays demand your undivided attention as a close reader, because every sentence of his matters, rest assured that such dedication is more than rewarded by the learning, pleasure and insight you will gain from reading them. And, as with all truly amazing critics, his individual studies of writers compel you with passion and enthusiasm to read their works to which he r those interested in the specific content itself, the following goes into greater detail: This anthology is divided into seven sections: The first has two polemics, one on 'Tradition and the Individual Talent', the other - 'The Function of Criticism' (published in 1923) - was and remained for a lot of decades a milestone in literary criticism, being regarded as of the first really modernist perspectives/approaches to it (though I feel the 19th century talented critic, poet and novelist Matthew Arnold's criticism deserves much more recognition for being a powerful advocate of modernist literature). It radically differentiates itself from the Edwardian and Victorian literary criticism (save the caveat of Arnold's work!).Section II comprises essays on Euripides, Dramatic Poetry, Rhetoric and Poetic Drama, and a unbelievable one on `Seneca in Elizabethan Translation'.Section III is one of the two biggest (the other being VII), consisting of several essays. The third section is devoted to Elizabethan poets and dramatists and, within it, you will search beautifully written articles on Marlowe, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, and `Shakespeare and the Stoicism of Seneca'.Section IV is represented by a standalone essay, and deservedly so: on Dante. The greater part is, rightly, devoted to the Divine Comedy, and it is a truly marvellous, deeply researched and stimulating series of reflections, arguments and contextualisation (both culturally- and historically-situated).He also signposts the significance of Dante's earlier poem, written in his youth, The Vita Nuova, clearly showing you how 'some of [its] way and design, and explicitly the intentions, of the Divine Comedy are shown [...] help[ing] particularly towards understanding of the Comedy'. Inevitably, too, you wish to rush to read or re-read Dante's amazing poems. As with Eliot's earlier essay on the functions of criticism, at the time of the publication of `Dante' in 1929, it was also regarded as a landmark in Dante ction V is devoted to poets, and all the pieces are marvellous: compelling, insightful and appreciative. He writes superbly on the Metaphysical Poets, besides individual ones on Swinburne, Tennyson (devoted to his major poem, In Memoriam', while considering his others, Eliot argues that it is this one in which Tennyson finds `full expression' and is `unique' in his oeuvre). And he is brilliant on Marvell, Dryden - most especially - if you were ever place off by reading Dryden in the past, as I was, or are otherwise unfamiliar with his work, I assure you this essay will drive you with gusto to his poetry - and ction VI is an odd mix and is the only one that doesn't seem to cohere as a group; essays on Lancelot Andrews and John Bramhall are, to my mind, not of much merit, and, worse, there's a tiresome 25 pages of reflection on the 1930 Report of the Lambeth Conference, popular at the time, about the problems within, state of and future considerations of the Church of England: unless you're a devoted theologian, or an absolute C. of E. enthusiast, its history and all, I just can't see how it would interest any one at all. But then Eliot redeems himself wonderfully well, by two stimulating essays: one on `Religion and Literature', and a somewhat intellectually intimidating one - frankly, I think it the most such of all his essays herein - on Pascal's Pensees (and apologies to purists for the absence of the accent).Most satisfying of them all, you arrive at Section VII, where you're drawn into perfect criticism on Baudelaire, The Humanism of Irving Babbitt, Second Thoughts about Humanism, and on the critics Arnold and Pater, besides two other essays, and an absolutely unbelievable one on the multi-layered, complex relationship - both literary- and friendship-wise - on Wilkie Collins and ens.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Upstream: Selected Essays []  2019-12-19 18:54

    Insightful and elegant. Poetry in prose. Oliver's observations of the natural globe are breathtaking and sometimes heartbreaking. A book that is also a meditation. Profound is the word that comes to mind, written with no pretension. Honest and beautiful. Highly recommend.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Upstream: Selected Essays []  2019-12-19 18:54

    Mary Oliver, poet sublime, shares intimate observations, musings, and philosophies in this brief and luminous book of essays on art, ecology and what it is to be alive in the om the essay, Winter Hours—“I would say that there exist a thousand unbreakable links between each of us and everything else, and that our dignity and our chances are one.”From the essay, Owls—“the snow falls slowly and aimlessly, and the whole globe smells like water in an iron cup.”Her prose, like her poetry, is quiet, filled with respect, and the kind of wonder that leaves a soaring ache.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Stories (FSG Classics) []  2020-9-8 18:18

    I like to escape with short stories from time to time. These stories are real, funny, full of humanity, and the daily wanderings of the free time of an early 1900's German citizen. Thus, we see common life from a German perspective. I always liked alternate perspectives, their difference and their similarities to our own , as one might suppose, this book is not for everyone. It is an acquired taste. However, if you like fiction, literature, short stories, and a German perspective of early 1900's life, this book my be one for you.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Selected Canterbury Tales []  2020-9-8 18:13

    Received new fresh copy within hours of placing my order!

    0  



    Search Cloud

    About us

    Use our product reviews finder and generate tons of ratings & opinions on any item, shop product or service. Search, read and publish reviews for brands, TV shows, ebooks, gadgets, video games, meals, music, household items or movies. Would you like to rate recently purchased thing? Go ahead! Express satisfaction or sadness, describe own experience & identify strengths and weaknesses of the product. Write short or detailed review with a few clicks.

    Community

    Publish review of any item you find here, registration is not required
    Share own experience, point out the pros and cons, warn or recommend
    Search for opinions on any item, product or service, read tons of reviews

    Contact

    www.add-reviews.com

    Use contact form to reach us or write a message via email:

    [email protected]

    Describe your problem, share ideas or report a bug on the site.

    https://add-reviews.com/
    0856-458-386