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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    This menu is only for the parents and student. Unlike Nutraslice, it doesn't present images or actual ingredients. The meal stuff are not grouped together like they are served at each individual school. They place a menu together and allow you figure out which school line your kid us to eat in. A display of the meal should be placed in view so each kid can see what prepared meal looks like to create choices easier

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    Love it!! I love being able to create a profile specific to my child's dietary needs and it lets me know what they can or cannot eat.

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    Worked fine for the first month, then it didn't modernize to present the menus the second month. Much easier to take a snapshot of the menu from the school www service

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    keeps closing and does not present one of my childs menu

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    My son got autism from eating meal provided by sodexo

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    I liked the light ver that just told me what was on the menu. The fresh ver requires my 5 year old to make an account. That's not going to happen. This ver is amazing for parents who really need to track how their child is eating, but I just wish to know what's for lunch

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    It doesn't work, cannot add my child, nor select the school. Screens over lap and cannot click.

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    Doesn't let you to look at the menu unless you have a student added.

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    So Happy by Sodexo US review [App]  2019-8-14 13:31

    The first ver was better.

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    Sacred Marriage: What If God Designed Marriage to Make Us Holy More Than to Make Us Happy? review []  2020-1-22 22:42

    This is the marriage book I required right now. Rather than tell me how I can change my marriage, this book talks about changing my heart. Too a lot of marriage books assume that both spouses are going to participate in reading and enacting the steps given in the book; this is all about how my relationship with God is imaged and expressed through my marriage relationship. I feel the author "gets it". There are no simple steps, no how-to-fix this, just a heart-to-heart talk about what marriage is really about. This is a breath of new air in a crowded and stuffy room full of tip and "answers".

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    Sacred Marriage: What If God Designed Marriage to Make Us Holy More Than to Make Us Happy? review []  2020-1-22 22:42

    This book has left me speechless. Considering how the globe views marriage, especially in America, it's simple to obtain swept up into assuming marriage is all about you and romance and the surface stuff. This book gives you Heavens perspective on marriage. It will challenge you, but give you context for the challenges. Where things that I've endured in my life have seemed pointless and have left me questioning, this book punctuates all that you'll face in your marriage so that it makes sense spiritually and naturally. It gives you the wisdom, understanding, grace and strength that you'll need to press on through the rough times. It gives meaning and purpose to the obstacles that the opponent will use to test and destroy what God has called together. Gary Thomas nailed it! God bless this man for allowing God to use him to speak into the lives of so a lot of married and soon to be married couples. I will read and reread this book for the rest of my life!

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    Sacred Marriage: What If God Designed Marriage to Make Us Holy More Than to Make Us Happy? review []  2020-1-22 22:42

    Too often we enter marriage with the fairy tale idea and we will "live happily ever after". But then, the first huge war comes along and we decide that we are incompatible. When the truth is this war is only exposing our own bent toward selfishness. If we begin our hearts a bit, we can learn the lesson and improve our photo of God and subsequently have an improved WAREThis book can cause a private heart change followed by a amazing marriage. Read with a heart wide open.Pick up your copy of Sacred Marriage today and learn how you too can have not only a amazing marriage but a love affair with the One Real God.

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    Sacred Marriage: What If God Designed Marriage to Make Us Holy More Than to Make Us Happy? review []  2020-1-22 22:42

    I always tell people that besides the Bible this is the best book I have ever read. Completely life altering for me. It changes the method you view your marriage and your parenting. We have a issue in our culture because Christians view their marriages as an institution designed to create them satisfied and when they are aren't satisfied they test to search a method out. But for the Christian life isn't about being satisfied all the time (and if you live your life that method you are going to be greatly disappointed in not just marriage but anything). So Gary poses this strong question... What if my marriageis designed to create me holy more than to create me happy?

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    Sacred Marriage: What If God Designed Marriage to Make Us Holy More Than to Make Us Happy? review []  2020-1-22 22:42

    We need people in our lives that are more for our marriage than they are for either wife or husband, individually. Unfortunately, these people are few and far between. Gary speaks God’s truth into your life, reminding us to hold an eternal, biblical perspective of our marriages, challenging us to be accountable to our covenant and to our God rather than to our feelings or capabilities. It’s especially necessary when times obtain hard, so read it now when you don’t need it & later again when you do. This is probably my 4th or 5th time & it’s still both difficult and unbelievable - the challenge and help that I need. Read through the tough parts & hold going. It’s worth it. Highly recommend.

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    Sacred Marriage: What If God Designed Marriage to Make Us Holy More Than to Make Us Happy? review []  2020-1-22 22:42

    This book was recommended to me by a Christian marriage counselor. I have read a lot of self-help marriage books and after the first chapter, wasn’t so sure about this one either. But it really takes off and hits on the main problems that problem couples. I came away with a lot of info that I have applied in my life since. Amazing tidbits. I now know that my wife ‘nags’ and ‘talks in circles’ because she is trying to save our marriage rather than just to hear herself talk. That was a revelation to me. I can come out from hiding and truly listen knowing this fact. Highly recommend the book. It saved my marriage, believe it will improve everyone’s.

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    Sacred Marriage: What If God Designed Marriage to Make Us Holy More Than to Make Us Happy? review []  2020-1-22 22:42

    I had shelved this book for years thinking it would be just like other marriage books, but it definitely is not. The focus is your upward relationship with God more than the outward relationship with your spouse. Will it support your marriage? Yes-I can say it helped mine even without my spouse reading the book or knowing that I was reading it-because it changed me and how I see my marriage as a method to honor, serve, worship and draw closer to my private Savior.

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    Sacred Marriage: What If God Designed Marriage to Make Us Holy More Than to Make Us Happy? review []  2020-1-22 22:42

    This book is amazing but it just didn't seem to hold my interest up throughout the book. But then again, I'm not an avid reader either. It did create you stop and examine yourself and your motives in your marriage. It also created you thing about how God views marriage versus how today's society looks at it and has cheapened its meaning to "what's in it for me." Overall it was a amazing book.

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    Sacred Marriage: What If God Designed Marriage to Make Us Holy More Than to Make Us Happy? review []  2020-1-22 22:42

    Very challenging and well written book. I have read a lot of marriage books, taught a lot of a lot of classes and Bible studies on marriage and spoke at a lot of conferences on marriage- best book I've ever read on marriage. Will be giving it as bonuses to my own married children, and to newlyweds. It is a unbelievable read that ANYONE who reads it will benefit from. It applies to married couples, but really focuses on living a Holy life. All committed Christians would learn a lot from reading this book. Excellent.

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    Sacred Marriage: What If God Designed Marriage to Make Us Holy More Than to Make Us Happy? review []  2020-1-22 22:42

    I started this book, and admittedly have not finished it (hopefully someday I will). Having only become a Christian recently and not really having a background where I'm familiar with scripture, this was a small bit too scripture-ally based for my tastes. I did have fun it, but it just wasn't one of those books that you "just can't place down." Unfortunately I place it down and haven't picked it back up.

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    Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us review [Book]  2019-12-6 18:3

    Author, does a nice job explaining how algae influenced life on earth through the millennia up to this minute. Although a bit pedantic, she explains how algae nurture us puny humans and may solve some of our most perplexing challenges. If you are at all interested in global issues, this is a must-read. It was recently listed on Ira Flatow's science radio story (6/21/19, I think) . Anything he likes, you will like.

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    Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us review [Book]  2019-12-6 18:3

    Thought it an interesting subject, something fun to read. Turned into a very enjoyable read! I have read much of it while reading aloud to a couple of younger Grandsons. Of course, telling an eight-year-old you are reading a book about Slime is a sure starter !!

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    Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us review [Book]  2019-12-6 18:3

    Ordinarily a book dealing with the natural sciences has a mind-numbing result on me, but Ruth Kassinger’s Slime is no dry textbook. It is a charming and amusing read, as well as an informative tale about algae’s foundational role in our lives, its beneficial effects and prospects, as well as some baneful ones. This is not the work of an armchair scientist. Kassinger is a plucky globe-trotter, visiting out-of-the-way and physically (but never personally) inhospitable environments where people are putting algae to use in ways that will surprise you, and that may benefit us for a lot of years to come.

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    Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us review [Book]  2019-12-6 18:3

    I saw the review in a scientific journal and I thought it might be a fun read. It really was. Totally enjoyable. Not terribly advanced in terms of biology, but I found the content and especially the interviews with people in the 'algae business' quite educational. Highly recommended.

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    Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us review [Book]  2019-12-6 18:3

    I chose this book for my high school sophomore science book club based on a few references to it on podcasts. I was not sorry. Although the book covers a lot of serious science subjects, the material is presented in an interesting and engaging manner. I have had several lively discussions with my students, who are learning a lot of necessary facts- not only about living organisms they have not thought much about before, but also about the impacts of climate change and population growth on that life. The book also addresses technologies involving these organisms that may play a key role in our future comfort and survival. I will recommend this to colleagues, mates and students.

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    Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us review [Book]  2019-12-6 18:3

    Before reading this book I'd never given much thought to algae except to hate it. Now I feel like I should bend down and whisper "Thank You" to every occurance of it I encounter. All hail pond scum!

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    Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us review [Book]  2019-12-6 18:3

    This book really has it all for those interested in how algae fit into the geosciences, environmental sciences and even engineering. Kassinger has a talent for presenting a range of content like the origins of life, sustainable meal sources and energy in a manner that is easily intellectually digestible. Not to mention some amazing info on algae as an option for fine dining.

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    Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us review [Book]  2019-12-6 18:3

    This was a quick and enjoyable read. The author hops all over the globe to interview people who are harvesting, raising, processing, and engineering algae for a host of necessary uses, some of which could have a measurable impact in slowing climate change.

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    Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us review [Book]  2019-12-6 18:3

    fabulous job Ruth! A true page turner! I just got the book today so I think it will be a late night! I can't place it down! Have the yellow highlighter here and I am getting my 'geek on'! Love it!

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    Slime: How Algae Created Us, Plague Us, and Just Might Save Us review [Book]  2019-12-6 18:3

    Ruth Kassinger at her best! She still manages to trick me into learning the science I missed in school. Fascinating what diving into slime can teach us!

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    They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us review []  2020-1-8 19:9

    This is a book that everyone should read. I am a 70-year-old liberal white woman, and the things I should have known but didn't are sprinkled throughout this book. There's a lot of talk about rap and hip-hop in here, and I know small about it, but that doesn't matter. The essays about melody speak to so a lot of other things that are necessary that I couldn't place it down. I intend to give it as bonuses to some people whom I feel need it the most.

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    They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us review []  2020-1-8 19:9

    I first discovered Abdurraqib's work via his twitter feed. I was thrilled to be able to purchase a volume of his essays to read in print, a lot of of which predate my discovery of his work online. This book is FULL of essays and I really believe there is something for everyone in here. The breadth of Abdurraquib's tastes, interests, and insights is truly remarkable. The essays about my own private favorites like Serena Williams and Carly Rae Jepsen still managed to surprise me, and I search myself nodding along to essays about artists I don't even listen to. To categorize this as a book of melody criticism is both accurate and inadequate. Abdurraqib uses melody as a vantage point through which to examine and interrogate the globe he lives in, and I continue to be inspired by how deeply he feels both the melody and that world. Anyone who reads this book is fortunate to have the possibility to see the globe through his eyes and to feel it through his words.

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    They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us review []  2020-1-8 19:9

    This was one of my very favorite books of 2017, and it's the one that's stayed with me the most as I live, work, drive, and rest in Columbus, Ohio. The essays evoke and make this put while offering so much to readers outside of it: essays bringing together the private and the critical (and showing us the ways in which they are the same) through locating melody in put and so, I love this book as an object. The layout and cover are stunning--Two Dollar Radio makes gorgeous books. You will wish to have and keep this one.

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    They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us review []  2020-1-8 19:9

    Amazing essays. The writer’s method of weaving autobiography into his melody essays (on everyone from The Weeknd to My Chemical Romance) appeals to me greatly—isn’t that how we process music? through the lens of our own experience?—and the more strictly autobiographical essays are no less compelling. “My First Police Stop” is an especially poignant acc of the first in a series of bogus police stops would create Abdurraqib feel. So there are searing meditations on being black in America, but this pleasingly restless collection aims to offer that and much more. Scream out to 2 Dollar Radio, the amazing little press who published this book and a lot of other beautifully designed indie gems in latest years.

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    They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us review []  2020-1-8 19:9

    How is it he can write essays about things I am not into that I cannot stop reading? The subject is not always up my alley, but the profound wisdom with which he examines the globe around him is amazing. His writing makes essays about Carly Rae Jepsen transcendent. I never ever thought I would say that! He is a definitive voice I will follow for the rest of his writing career.

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    They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us review []  2020-1-8 19:9

    This is probably the only book I’ve bought this year that was the effect of an intriguing cover photo capturing my eye, an interesting description on the flap, and then a risk taken on an author I’d never heard of before. It turned out to be maybe my favorite read so far this year. Abdurraqib’s essays meander artfully between commentary on music, autobiography, and robust feminist commentary on race, gender, (drifting far from) religion, and the contemporary state of affairs in the USA. With amazing sincerity and skill, he dances between seemingly disparate topics, making profound and unexpectedly meaningful connections. Beautifully, compellingly, and refreshingly written. A joy to read.

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    They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us review []  2020-1-8 19:9

    I never thought I would read an essay about Carly Rae Jepsen that felt profound, but along came this book. Abdurraquib has a method of zooming out on pop melody and pointing a critical eye toward its role in the zeitgeist. The cover is dope, the essays are personal, and I am desperately waiting for a crossover between Abdurraqib and Anthony Fantano so they can tell me exactly what to think about every album I listen to for the next 30 years of my life.

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    They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us review []  2020-1-8 19:9

    Raw and real. This book taught me about my privelege as a white woman, something I am always trying to be aware of. It was not written for me, but I still took away lessons from it.

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    They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us review []  2020-1-8 19:9

    Best method to read this poetically written book is to listen to the songs he focuses on in each chapter. Not only does it bring an added depth to his writing, but brings to life the artists and melody that got you through your life. I loved this book....

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    They Can't Kill Us Until They Kill Us review []  2020-1-8 19:9

    Hanif managed to combine a plethora of tirelessly crafted opinions on the method melody never dies & a culture lives on as well. His takes are deeply revelatory of himself in a method that opens itself up to view trauma in a new away. They are also an awesome display of resiliency that have concrete merit in an abstract way

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    The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Well-Being review []  2020-1-18 20:43

    “The Happiness Industry” by William Davies offers a thoughtful, passionate and strong critique of the capitalist state. Mr. Davies is a U.K.-based educator and social critic who spent five years writing this exceptionally well-researched book. I believe that everyone alarmed by the intrusions of capital into our private psyches will be empowered by this eye-opening Davies believes that Jeremy Bentham’s conceptualization of cash as a proximate measure of happiness set the scene for psychology and capitalism. The subsequent rise of consumerism has eviscerated the political subject: labor is endured merely to gain the cash important for purchasing happiness. Mr. Davies explains that a predatory yet increasingly sophisticated marketing industry has become maniacally focused on the consumer as an object of surveillance, manipulation and Davies contends that decades of Thatcher-style individualism has produced several generations of insecure workers who have internalized their precarious, impoverished circumstances. The pharmaceutical industry has gained enormously as the powerless seek relief from their depression through medication. An necessary takeaway from the author's lesson is that competitiveness and the management of happiness go hand in Davies discusses the exploitation of the individual’s social capital for marketing purposes, which he believes has steadily eroded private friendships and altruism. Problematically, the enormous quantity of data captured by government and industry have allowed the strong to manipulate individuals with precision; while few of us are capable of fully understanding the invidious forces that feed upon us. Mr. Davies believes people can war back only when it is admitted that unhappiness is the product of a coercive capitalist culture that has succeeded in beating down the working class. In fact, the author argues that the relative happiness of empowered workers in employee-owned companies suggests that economic and political rights are keys to achieving true happiness.I highly recommend this perfect book to everyone.

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    The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Well-Being review []  2020-1-18 20:43

    It is very fresh and I like it very much! highly recommend this store!

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    The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Well-Being review []  2020-1-18 20:43

    Very interesting and insightful look at our culture of happiness

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    The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Well-Being review []  2020-1-18 20:43

    To anyone who finds the culture of "work put well-being" disconcerting, and is interested in the myriad ways that people are being treated as a means rather than an end in different aspects of our society, read this book.

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    The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Well-Being review []  2020-1-18 20:43

    Will Davies is brilliant. The chapter on The Psychosomatic Worker alone--is worth the price of the hardback. I was fascinated, appalled,totally hooked from beginning to end. A true intellectual tour de force.

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    The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Well-Being review []  2020-1-18 20:43

    Fascinating history of how we "measure" happiness and then how we test to manipulate it to serve power interests.

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    The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Well-Being review []  2020-1-18 20:43

    This book is a philosophically rigorous investigation of the modern obsession with happiness.I had per-ordered the book, and I really wanted to like it more than I did. Truth be told, it was small dry.I think my problem was that I kept comparing it to Barbara Ehrenreich's "Bright Sided". That text is just told with more verve and it is more personalized to her her own life. Davies keeps the discourse mostly abstract so it covers the topic well, but doesn't have the story-teller's verve like Ehrenreich delivers. So if you haven't read that book, or have and are able to compartmentalize better than I can, you should like this book.

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    The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Well-Being review []  2020-1-18 20:43

    This is a remarkable tour through the painful evolution of behavioral economics, management consulting, advertising and psychiatry. It fills us with the realization that happiness has always been a factor (not necessarily respected, appreciated or understood) in numerous fields. Now suddenly, it is front and center as giant corporations focus on it, the better to obtain more out of employees and customers. Happiness has created it to the front burner of multinationals. Look out.Rather than deal with the causes, happiness consultants actually advise companies to search the unhappiest 10%, and lay them off for being unhappy, somehow inspiring everyone else to become “super engaged.” Obtain satisfied or obtain has come to the point where capitalism itself is under review: can measures of happiness replace shop pricing as the main measure of the economy? Davies cites the Davos conference, where the who’s who of capitalism now actively pursues this approach.Over a third of Westerners suffer from some sort of mental health problem, he says, usually undiagnosed. It leads to inactivity, non productivity, lower government revenues and higher costs as the unhappy tap government services. It may already reduce GDP by 3-4%. Now a far greater cost than crime, it’s expected to double in the next 20 years. It currently costs the American economy half a trillion ere is an undercurrent of cynicism throughout The Happiness Industry, as Davies relates crackpot theories and crackpot theorists. Then he comes clean with force: “Once social relationships can be viewed as medical and biological properties of the human body, they can become dragged into the limitless pursuit of self optimization that counts for happiness in the age of neoliberalism.” He says disempowerment is at the bottom of stress, anxiety, frustration and mental problems. Not knowing if you have adequate income or even work is the most stressful condition in society. And it is now a method of life. By promoting happiness, companies deflect these anxieties without addressing them. It is a power play over employees and customers. Companies wish everyone’s decisions to be predictable, so they frame everything to maximize that, creating a fresh normal for both happiness as a state of being, and for data e book takes a very dark turn, as happiness requires a surveillance society to work properly. How satisfied were you yesterday, Davies asks? We can tell you exactly by your tweets, fb posts, texts, pins and instagrams. Also your health-recording wristband. “They” no longer care what people say in surveys; raw data is far more is a fascinating turnaround for happiness, and well worth understanding, because it’s coming to company near and dear to you.David Wineberg

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    The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Well-Being review []  2020-1-18 20:43

    You probably don't know enough, yet, about all this data crunching going on. Is that fresh watch they just gifted you at work, really for your pleasure, or for theirs? They have us (pre)figured in so a lot of ways, it's frightening. War back, obtain healthy, and decide for yourself what healthy means.

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    The Happiness Industry: How the Government and Big Business Sold Us Well-Being review []  2020-1-18 20:43

    Amazing reading. Well written and informative.

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come From, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2019-12-28 18:24

    I just bought this book less than an hour ago (updated: I have now had the book for 24 hours). But I'm already running into problems. As an avid follower of anything that makes us human, I know I will have fun this book even despite the faults. Hippel is charming and very knowledgeable. He focuses on aspects of human evolution that other scholars ignore. The writing is engaging and crisp. But there are some scientifically painful moments and I will highlight them as I read. So, this review will be updated as I move e first true ouch comes right in the preface. It is there where Hippel is building his central ideas. But he does so in a fashion that strikes this reader as deceitful. In a section about the evolutionary roots of sharing and cooperation, Hippel talks about how chimps differ from humans in that they really have no rules at all when it comes to meal sharing. He writes: "chimps who only watch the hunt are just as likely to end up with a monkey snack as chimps who join the hunting party. Their fellow chimps create small or no distinction between slackers and helpers. In sharp contrast, even kids as young as four are attentive to who helps and who doesn’t." What!?!?? Everything I had ever read suggests the precise opposite. Nevertheless, I spent a half hour trying to search the evidence Hippel used to help this argument. Nothing to be found and his references aren't listed. I did, however, search considerable evidence to suggest that chimps do share meal based on social networks and rules – quite the opposite of Hippel's conclusion. In chimps meal sharing is based off of grooming relationships, barter, harassment, fear etc. Justice does matter. And it matters even in capuchins (as shown in a paper he does cite in his book). Yet, despite the deep academic consensus on this point, Hippel confidently cherry picks data (that I couldn't find) and states his claim in a method that sounds like it is a universally agreed upon conclusion. As such Hippel would either need to refute the other claims or at the least acknowledge they exist.Early into chapter one, Hippel is at it again. He writes about moments of his youth, how he and his mates would protect himself from hoards of dogs by throwing rocks. This is a fun observation and likely a human universal. But Hippel adds private nuance to this story. And h confidently leads the reader into his theoretical web with an anecdote that strikes me as false. Hippel mentions that when he was in a group or even just with his brother they would (by instinct?) defend themselves by hurling rocks at groups of attacking stray dogs, but as soon as Hippel was alone he would answer (again by instinct?) in a various fashion – running to the nearest tree and climbing up before the dogs could reach him. Recall that the title of the book is the "Social Leap" so Hippel needs to create clear distinctions between a lone human and a social human. And so he does this hear. But wow. This is not science. Nor is it even likely true. Like Hippel I've been in numerous scary situations with packs of dogs (once I was in Chile facing a package of fifty dogs running at me, fortunately they continued to run right by me) and the latest thing I have ever thought when I have seen dogs running at me is to turn and run for a tree. Dogs are so fast. The latest thing I've ever thought in those situations is to turn my back and run. Running away leads dogs to obtain even more aggressive. And even when alone, facing a lot of packs of dogs (as I did once late at night in Holland) like Hippel, I have merely pretended to reach down for a rock and the dogs turn in their tracks - precisely as Hippel describes. So, while its an interesting observation that Hippel makes, it feels entirely contrived, and certainly is based on nothing more than private anecdote – not quite the data one requires for scientific inquiry. At this scene in the book we need science and statistics not invention. Present us a study which shows that small boys run for the trees when they are alone and then stand their ground when they are in pairs. Otherwise risk alienating the ing forward we continue to run into more striking problems. Hippel pushes forward with his somewhat fishy notions of group selection – a subject that is not well supported by academics. And he does this using bogus data. On page 31 he writes about humans having evolved the sclera (the whites of our eyes) and how chimps don’t have them. This is just patently false. And I’ve posted a still from the latest documentary “Rise of the Fighter Apes” showing the chimp Pincer with eye whites precisely as they exist in humans. Worse, Hippel reaches far outside the evidence and claims that the sclera evolved for reasons of group selection. While this is an interesting guess, there is no evidence to back this up. And so once again he uses false info and then bundles that up in conjecture. Worse, this is further used to bolster his suspect ideas of group at said, I do agree with some of Hippel's stronger points. I really have fun how he underlines the fatalistic (not deterministic) nature of a lot of aspects of human evolution. He avoids the cliches of "proto-humans climbed downed the trees and took over the land." Instead he rightfully notes that proto-humans were likely victims of a lot of disasters. And so instead of us leaving the trees the trees left us. And he investigates the geological history to build this argument. This work is very satisfying. Further, he claims that cooperation is one of the most strong innovations of humanity – the Social Leap. It is just unfortunate that he appears to be building the evolution of cooperation on conjecture and perhaps even a fair amount of weed smoke.On page 28, he takes a deep dive into the work of Barbara Isaac who suggested in a paper from 1987 that stone throwing played a much more significant role in human evolution than scholars have noted. I suspect Isaac is right about this. But Isaac's writing is much more cautious. She is fast to point out how small data there is. And when she cites the work of historians she is careful to note the issues with the citations. Hippel grabs from her paper readily, using a lot of of her citations, but leaves out her caution. This is dangerous. Because as Hippel suggests in his dog story, stone throwing appears ideally suited for defense, but Hippel goes forward to suggest that it is a strong way for hunting as well. But the evidence for stone use in hunting is scant. And personally it just feels wrong. Even a amazing major league pitcher like Nolan Ryan or Roger Clemens would likely search hunting difficult by throwing stones.I reserve my red highlighter pen for suspect writing. I use blue for amazing stuff. I use yellow for interesting. And again, while Hippel delivers a fun book, where I have used both the blue and the yellow often, there is just far too much red to recommend this book at said, I am still very excited to continue reading and digging deeper into this book. He is a fun thinker and I have enjoyed his focus on Australopithecus and the transition to the savannah. This is very new such, I will continue adding to this review....stay tuned.

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come From, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2019-12-28 18:24

    I really, really enjoyed the Social Leap. The book makes a very interesting and persuasive case that much of what makes us uniquely human—our psychology, intelligence and what we search meaningful in our lives—can be traced to our evolutionary past, and especially to how our chimp-like ancestors created the transition from trees to the savannah six million years ago.Our ancestors were forced from the safety of trees on to the savannah in Africa, and this was very dangerous. There were larger, faster, stronger predators in the savannah and it was only because of several lucky accidents—including especially the fact that we learned to cooperate—that we came to dominate the savannah and, subsequently, every environment we moved ere is a lot of nuance and luck in our history and it is all told well in the Social Leap. We stood upright (became bipedal) and freed our hands to throw stones, create tools, and dominate larger creatures; we discovered fire which enabled us to release the nutrients in meal and grow our brains; we learned how to divide labor and specialize. The book describes all of this and much more in method that is readable, interesting and thought-provoking. Psychology studies are described clearly and simply—something I haven’t found all that often in books of this e Social Leap also explains much of our current psychology. Why we ruminate endlessly about other people and social situations, for example, and why we aren’t as individuals terribly innovative (except in social situations). The latest few chapters discuss what we can learn from evolutionary insights to improve our happiness and life satisfaction. And while I wasn’t persuaded by everything that is written about happiness, I do believe that though evolutionary insights may not be enough by themselves to inform a satisfied and productive life, they must be taken acc of or we risk kidding ourselves about what will create us truly ere are a lot of extremely interesting studies, theories and research described in the book. Some of my favorites:• We evolved to be upright and bipedal, which also enable us to throw stones. If you practice throwing stones, and especially if you throw stones in groups, you can be deadly, even versus much stronger and larger animals.• Our intelligence and complexity of thought came about not to solve natural issues like hunting prey, but to navigate the far more complicated and dynamic situations that effect interactions with other humans. Are others freeloading, are they plotting versus me, is my friend cheating, etc. Social dynamics are extremely complicated, rapidly changing, and it is only by developing very sophisticated thinking that we could cope with this challenge.• The white around our pupils is evidence that we evolved so that others can tell what we are looking at. This helps drive cooperation, and surprisingly, is not true, for example, of chimpanzees.• Much of what we do to become amazing at things—like sports or chess or whatever—is motivated by our need to more sexually beautiful than rivals.• We deceive ourselves in a lot of ways, such as how beautiful we are. This enables us to deceive others.• Leaders are more likely to become domineering, greedy, immoral and exploitative when resources can be ere is much, much more that I found deeply fascinating. And it is all clearly explained. This book gave me a lot of fresh perspectives on my behavior and thinking patterns, and is one of the best I have read in a long time.

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come From, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2019-12-28 18:24

    This was an awesome book. Professor Hippel brilliantly explains why we are how we are. It helped me understand my self better as a human re folks should read this!

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come From, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2019-12-28 18:24

    my brother liked it

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come From, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2019-12-28 18:24

    Wonderful book presented in a non-academic easy-to-read manner. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in evolution and psychology.

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come From, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2019-12-28 18:24

    An interesting perspective on what makes us human and how our psychology today was shaped by our earliest ancestors. A amazing read for anyone wanting to learn more about evolutionary psychology and explore the evolutionary basis for happiness in our modern lives.

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come From, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2019-12-28 18:24

    Includes lots of interesting facts about the history of humans that I didn't know about. Also provides insight into the method we evolved socially. Books is a excellent length, not too long not too short.

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come From, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2019-12-28 18:24

    I bought this after reading an excerpt in a magazine and I am glad I did. It is a well-written, truly enjoyable read.

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come From, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2019-12-28 18:24

    Loved

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come From, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2019-12-28 18:24

    a decent book for an introduction to the subjects but don't expect much in depth or of high academic quality

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come from, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2020-1-22 22:20

    I just bought this book less than an hour ago (updated: I have now had the book for 24 hours). But I'm already running into problems. As an avid follower of anything that makes us human, I know I will have fun this book even despite the faults. Hippel is charming and very knowledgeable. He focuses on aspects of human evolution that other scholars ignore. The writing is engaging and crisp. But there are some scientifically painful moments and I will highlight them as I read. So, this review will be updated as I move e first true ouch comes right in the preface. It is there where Hippel is building his central ideas. But he does so in a fashion that strikes this reader as deceitful. In a section about the evolutionary roots of sharing and cooperation, Hippel talks about how chimps differ from humans in that they really have no rules at all when it comes to meal sharing. He writes: "chimps who only watch the hunt are just as likely to end up with a monkey snack as chimps who join the hunting party. Their fellow chimps create small or no distinction between slackers and helpers. In sharp contrast, even kids as young as four are attentive to who helps and who doesn’t." What!?!?? Everything I had ever read suggests the precise opposite. Nevertheless, I spent a half hour trying to search the evidence Hippel used to help this argument. Nothing to be found and his references aren't listed. I did, however, search considerable evidence to suggest that chimps do share meal based on social networks and rules – quite the opposite of Hippel's conclusion. In chimps meal sharing is based off of grooming relationships, barter, harassment, fear etc. Justice does matter. And it matters even in capuchins (as shown in a paper he does cite in his book). Yet, despite the deep academic consensus on this point, Hippel confidently cherry picks data (that I couldn't find) and states his claim in a method that sounds like it is a universally agreed upon conclusion. As such Hippel would either need to refute the other claims or at the least acknowledge they exist.Early into chapter one, Hippel is at it again. He writes about moments of his youth, how he and his mates would protect himself from hoards of dogs by throwing rocks. This is a fun observation and likely a human universal. But Hippel adds private nuance to this story. And h confidently leads the reader into his theoretical web with an anecdote that strikes me as false. Hippel mentions that when he was in a group or even just with his brother they would (by instinct?) defend themselves by hurling rocks at groups of attacking stray dogs, but as soon as Hippel was alone he would answer (again by instinct?) in a various fashion – running to the nearest tree and climbing up before the dogs could reach him. Recall that the title of the book is the "Social Leap" so Hippel needs to create clear distinctions between a lone human and a social human. And so he does this hear. But wow. This is not science. Nor is it even likely true. Like Hippel I've been in numerous scary situations with packs of dogs (once I was in Chile facing a package of fifty dogs running at me, fortunately they continued to run right by me) and the latest thing I have ever thought when I have seen dogs running at me is to turn and run for a tree. Dogs are so fast. The latest thing I've ever thought in those situations is to turn my back and run. Running away leads dogs to obtain even more aggressive. And even when alone, facing a lot of packs of dogs (as I did once late at night in Holland) like Hippel, I have merely pretended to reach down for a rock and the dogs turn in their tracks - precisely as Hippel describes. So, while its an interesting observation that Hippel makes, it feels entirely contrived, and certainly is based on nothing more than private anecdote – not quite the data one requires for scientific inquiry. At this scene in the book we need science and statistics not invention. Present us a study which shows that small boys run for the trees when they are alone and then stand their ground when they are in pairs. Otherwise risk alienating the ing forward we continue to run into more striking problems. Hippel pushes forward with his somewhat fishy notions of group selection – a subject that is not well supported by academics. And he does this using bogus data. On page 31 he writes about humans having evolved the sclera (the whites of our eyes) and how chimps don’t have them. This is just patently false. And I’ve posted a still from the latest documentary “Rise of the Fighter Apes” showing the chimp Pincer with eye whites precisely as they exist in humans. Worse, Hippel reaches far outside the evidence and claims that the sclera evolved for reasons of group selection. While this is an interesting guess, there is no evidence to back this up. And so once again he uses false info and then bundles that up in conjecture. Worse, this is further used to bolster his suspect ideas of group at said, I do agree with some of Hippel's stronger points. I really have fun how he underlines the fatalistic (not deterministic) nature of a lot of aspects of human evolution. He avoids the cliches of "proto-humans climbed downed the trees and took over the land." Instead he rightfully notes that proto-humans were likely victims of a lot of disasters. And so instead of us leaving the trees the trees left us. And he investigates the geological history to build this argument. This work is very satisfying. Further, he claims that cooperation is one of the most strong innovations of humanity – the Social Leap. It is just unfortunate that he appears to be building the evolution of cooperation on conjecture and perhaps even a fair amount of weed smoke.On page 28, he takes a deep dive into the work of Barbara Isaac who suggested in a paper from 1987 that stone throwing played a much more significant role in human evolution than scholars have noted. I suspect Isaac is right about this. But Isaac's writing is much more cautious. She is fast to point out how small data there is. And when she cites the work of historians she is careful to note the issues with the citations. Hippel grabs from her paper readily, using a lot of of her citations, but leaves out her caution. This is dangerous. Because as Hippel suggests in his dog story, stone throwing appears ideally suited for defense, but Hippel goes forward to suggest that it is a strong way for hunting as well. But the evidence for stone use in hunting is scant. And personally it just feels wrong. Even a amazing major league pitcher like Nolan Ryan or Roger Clemens would likely search hunting difficult by throwing stones.I reserve my red highlighter pen for suspect writing. I use blue for amazing stuff. I use yellow for interesting. And again, while Hippel delivers a fun book, where I have used both the blue and the yellow often, there is just far too much red to recommend this book at said, I am still very excited to continue reading and digging deeper into this book. He is a fun thinker and I have enjoyed his focus on Australopithecus and the transition to the savannah. This is very new such, I will continue adding to this review....stay tuned.

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come from, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2020-1-22 22:20

    I really, really enjoyed the Social Leap. The book makes a very interesting and persuasive case that much of what makes us uniquely human—our psychology, intelligence and what we search meaningful in our lives—can be traced to our evolutionary past, and especially to how our chimp-like ancestors created the transition from trees to the savannah six million years ago.Our ancestors were forced from the safety of trees on to the savannah in Africa, and this was very dangerous. There were larger, faster, stronger predators in the savannah and it was only because of several lucky accidents—including especially the fact that we learned to cooperate—that we came to dominate the savannah and, subsequently, every environment we moved ere is a lot of nuance and luck in our history and it is all told well in the Social Leap. We stood upright (became bipedal) and freed our hands to throw stones, create tools, and dominate larger creatures; we discovered fire which enabled us to release the nutrients in meal and grow our brains; we learned how to divide labor and specialize. The book describes all of this and much more in method that is readable, interesting and thought-provoking. Psychology studies are described clearly and simply—something I haven’t found all that often in books of this e Social Leap also explains much of our current psychology. Why we ruminate endlessly about other people and social situations, for example, and why we aren’t as individuals terribly innovative (except in social situations). The latest few chapters discuss what we can learn from evolutionary insights to improve our happiness and life satisfaction. And while I wasn’t persuaded by everything that is written about happiness, I do believe that though evolutionary insights may not be enough by themselves to inform a satisfied and productive life, they must be taken acc of or we risk kidding ourselves about what will create us truly ere are a lot of extremely interesting studies, theories and research described in the book. Some of my favorites:• We evolved to be upright and bipedal, which also enable us to throw stones. If you practice throwing stones, and especially if you throw stones in groups, you can be deadly, even versus much stronger and larger animals.• Our intelligence and complexity of thought came about not to solve natural issues like hunting prey, but to navigate the far more complicated and dynamic situations that effect interactions with other humans. Are others freeloading, are they plotting versus me, is my friend cheating, etc. Social dynamics are extremely complicated, rapidly changing, and it is only by developing very sophisticated thinking that we could cope with this challenge.• The white around our pupils is evidence that we evolved so that others can tell what we are looking at. This helps drive cooperation, and surprisingly, is not true, for example, of chimpanzees.• Much of what we do to become amazing at things—like sports or chess or whatever—is motivated by our need to more sexually beautiful than rivals.• We deceive ourselves in a lot of ways, such as how beautiful we are. This enables us to deceive others.• Leaders are more likely to become domineering, greedy, immoral and exploitative when resources can be ere is much, much more that I found deeply fascinating. And it is all clearly explained. This book gave me a lot of fresh perspectives on my behavior and thinking patterns, and is one of the best I have read in a long time.

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come from, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2020-1-22 22:20

    This was an awesome book. Professor Hippel brilliantly explains why we are how we are. It helped me understand my self better as a human re folks should read this!

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come from, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2020-1-22 22:20

    my brother liked it

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come from, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2020-1-22 22:20

    Wonderful book presented in a non-academic easy-to-read manner. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in evolution and psychology.

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come from, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2020-1-22 22:20

    An interesting perspective on what makes us human and how our psychology today was shaped by our earliest ancestors. A amazing read for anyone wanting to learn more about evolutionary psychology and explore the evolutionary basis for happiness in our modern lives.

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come from, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2020-1-22 22:20

    Includes lots of interesting facts about the history of humans that I didn't know about. Also provides insight into the method we evolved socially. Books is a excellent length, not too long not too short.

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come from, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2020-1-22 22:20

    I bought this after reading an excerpt in a magazine and I am glad I did. It is a well-written, truly enjoyable read.

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come from, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2020-1-22 22:20

    Loved

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    The Social Leap: The New Evolutionary Science of Who We Are, Where We Come from, and What Makes Us Happy review []  2020-1-22 22:20

    a decent book for an introduction to the subjects but don't expect much in depth or of high academic quality

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    Us review []  2019-12-17 21:6

    Reading about relationships trying to survive after the first rush of passion can be hit or miss. Sarina Bowen & Elle Kennedy hit it out of the park with Us. I loved seeing Jamie and Wes trying to create life work together in spite of all the obstacles which come at a fresh relationship while people are trying to fit themselves together for the first time. I loved how natural and true things felt while I was reading their story's continuing adventures.Jamie was a guy I'd never imagine having to deal with depression only why shouldn't he? Depression isn't something isolated to only specific people. I've been clinically depressed most of my life regardless of my circumstances. It's not unfair to say a guy who wound up in a hospital twice in a row after having never really been sick a day in his life would feel down about it. He about broke my heart with how worthless he was feeling while he was trying to obtain better.I know those feels. Being sick sucks.Wes did break my heart a small with his casual dismissal of his father's callousness and his undying love for Jamie who he simply could not fix when he was sick. I understood his helplessness all too well. The people we love shouldn't ever obtain sick. We should be able to do it for them. It'd be easier that way. I loved his interviews and his attempts to bond with his team. I was so thrilled with how things fell together for him in the end so he was proven wrong about how poor it'd be to be "The First Out NHL Player" since sometimes? I just wish a satisfied ending even if it's not totally realistic.I feel as if Jamie and Wes are getting that forever-happy-ending which I was worried they wouldn't manage. It's been a amazing ride and I can't wait to read more in their universe even if their story is told at this point. I'd recommend this duet to anyone who loves a amazing romance, friends-to-lovers, or people who like a small realism in their fiction since life can be messy but it's the messy parts which often create it the most beautiful.

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    Us review []  2019-12-17 21:6

    Us is the sequel of Him. It is not a standalone, so you need to read Him ve months have passed since Jamie and Wes became a couple and are living together in Toronto. Wes is living his dream. He got his man, the guy he has loved since he was 13 years old, and is experiencing a unbelievable rookie year in the NHL. Their one huge issue is, they need to hide their relationship from the world. That was the plan after all, but some things are easier said than done.Jamie is in love with Wes and completely committed to making their relationship work, but hiding is something he is not familiar with. It is really messing with his head. When Blake, Wes’s teammate moves to their apartment building, things obtain a small more hectic because he’s always there, trying to hang out. Hiding the real nature of their relationship gets really hard, and Blake’s constant presence prevents them of spending quality time together as a couple, and they have to hide in their own home, too. Also, their travel schedules don’t always metimes love is not enough to create a relationship work, and all these unexpected complications are taking their toll on them. They will have to search a method to communicate and create things work until they are ready to be begin about their relationship, but sharing their fears and doubts can be really difficult, and things rarely go according to plan.I loved Us. It’s a unbelievable sequel to Him. Basically because you can never have too much Wesmie in your life. If anything, you’ll wish more. But it was excellent because when a story ends, you imagine they will live happily ever after, but relationships are hard. It was very interesting to see them as a couple, dealing with relationship problems. The method the story unfolds is perfect, the situations they have to go through, and the method they deal with them are realistic. Their feelings and thoughts are consistent with who they are, the Wes and Jamie we fell in love with. And then there’s Blake. Oh man, Blake! He is hilarious and such a sweetie. So over the top! In the end, it is a unbelievable book. I loved everything about always, the writing is exceptional. Elle Kennedy and Sarina Bowen should hold writing together because when they do, magic occurs.

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    Us review []  2019-12-17 21:6

    Ryan Wesley and Jamie Canning’s story continues in Us. At the end of Him, Wes and Jamie’s friendship turned into so much more. Now they are together as a couple.Wes is having a amazing year as a rookie in the NHL and Jamie is along for the ride, coaching a young adult/youth league in Toronto so they can be together. They’re together, but things are still hidden. Because of how well Wes’s year is going, coming out and having a large media thing isn’t what he wants. So for now, it’s staying quiet. And that’s not simple on Jamie.
There was a small bit of drama and conflict in this book, but I never once doubted the love that my boys had for each other. I love the two of them and their relationship. I love the emotion, the steam, and the method they are mates first. 

Elle Kennedy and Sarina Bowen really shine when writing together. Their styles compliment one another. I’ve adored both books in this series. And the audio. OMG I said it in my Him review, but it stands to be repeated- the audio for these books is INCREDIBLE! The narrator for Wes (Jacob Morgan) is everything! I love his narration for Wes. It’s just so great! This series is one you don’t wish to miss out on! I’m so satisfied I created the time to listen.

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    Us review []  2019-12-17 21:6

    Audiobook ReviewOverall: 5 starsNarration: 5+ starsStory: 5 starsAbsolutely loved it! #Wesmie FOREVER! I'm embarrassed that it took me this long to listen/read Us (especially since I've read both books in the spin off WAGS series), but it was everything I could have hoped for and more. Jacob Morgan and Teddy Hamilton are two of my very favorite narrators and they truly shine in this duet. They completely embody Wes and Jamie and bring a vulnerability and passion to both of these characters. Morgan is sinfully sexy as Ryan Wesley, but he also guts you with his wonderful performance. You can hear every quiver in his voice and the desperation and grief are almost palpable. Hamilton also gives a stellar performance as Jamie, portraying all the confusion, frustration, and anger so well as Jamie struggles to search his put in this fresh city, fresh job, and fresh relationship. There really couldn't have been two better narrators for this picks up beautiful much where Him left off and listeners/readers are able to witness the triumphs and struggles of this fresh couple. The happily every after is tested and it's the honest portrayal of these stumbles and missteps that create this story and its characters so endearing. I think everyone can relate to at least some of the fears and insecurities these two face and it only makes the story more powerful. Add in an awesome and hilarious cast of secondary characters (oh, Blakey I love you so!) and of course the ever wonderful Canning clan, and you have beautiful much a excellent book. I loved Ryan's teammates (green gingham forever!) and I already know that I will be doing a re-read/listen of Amazing Boy and Stay. There isn't much else I can say about the story that hasn't been said before, but this truly is such a unbelievable love story. This duet is worth a hundred credits! Don't miss it!

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    Us review []  2019-12-17 21:6

    I have some mixed feelings, but overall I really liked it. And I couldn’t place it down because I am so incredibly drawn to the relationship between Jamie and Wes. I’m fairly certain I would happily read 20 more books about these characters. But my first instinct is that it wasn’t *quite* as amazing as Him. Partly that's because I didn’t care for the ending (more on that below), so my final impression wasn’t as amazing as my feelings about it during the rest of the read.I loved that the story was a true evolution. The MCs had fresh challenges, and I especially appreciated that there was no angsty insecurity about each other’s feelings. They weren’t always totally confident in the relationship itself, understandable with what they were going through, but there was no annoying “does he really love me” bs when it was clear that had already been established.I really liked the plot, actually even better than in Him. Wes and Jamie are living together, closeted, in Toronto during Wes’ rookie season in the pros. The story was told well, including some real problems that this scenario would bring up — not just professionally, but also the strain on the Him, I felt Wes jump off the page more than Jamie, but in Us I felt the opposite. I REALLY dug the added depth to Jamie here… I loved seeing him imperfect, even though it was uncomfortable to be him sometimes as he dealt with the challenges in his life. And some (not all) of the SCs were also strong. Highlights were Blake, Jamie's mom, and the smaller heartwarming part of ere wasn’t as much sex as in book 1, but what was there was still hot, and this dial back also felt like the right evolution. They were not brand fresh to each other anymore, but they still had awesome chemistry, so things got all steamy from time to time. No complaints here. But the writers didn’t gratuitously force those scenes in, which would have ruined it. One of the things that created Him so hot was the depth of their history/relationship — but sans sappiness. It wasn’t ever JUST about the animal magnetism, and that conveyed here too.I was fine with the method the book ended from a storyline perspective, but I didn’t like the writing as much during the latest 10% or so. It felt phoned in, too cliche, too fake. Too much telling-not-showing, the magical appearance of all this extended help system, too much of everything falling into place.

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    Us review []  2019-12-17 21:6

    Updated for audiobook 06/19/2017 (and BEWARE this review includes some spoilers for HIM (Book 1):I've had the audio for this for a while, but haven't listened because 1. I was sort of disappointed in the story (my fault - see review below) and 2. I am not a huge fan of dual narration and getting multiple narrator hero voices for the same ever, I had bought this and it was sitting in my audio library mocking me, and I didn't have anything else to listen to that was grabbing my attention so I thought, "Why not?"And...I'm glad I did because I really enjoyed the narration. It didn't change the method I felt about the story overall, but I did have a amazing time listening.4 Stars for the audio!**~~**~~**~~**~~**~~**~~**~~**~~**~~**~~So, my initial disappointment in this story is entirely my own see, my interpretation of the end of HIM - oh wait, SPOILER ALERT if you haven't read HIM - turn away! - was that since Wes's coaches, squad owners, and PR guy knew about him being gay that he would be discreet around town, but be out with his teammates, etc. like he'd been in college. Not so the t only is Wes firmly in the closet to his teammates and the globe at large, but he's dragged not good Jamie into the closet with him. Jamie is not introduced as the love of Wes's life, as his partner, but rather his "roommate", and Wes is determined to hold his orientation and his relationship with Jamie under wraps until after his rookie season so the media doesn't create everything about his sex life, but focuses on his playing. And his playing is fantastic! He's having the kind of rookie year hockey players dream about and pray for. Professionally, things couldn't be looking better. But the pressure is ever show and the extended time away from Jamie is starting to chafe.Jamie, on the other hand, is having a hard time having moved to a various country and climate than what he's used to, being without his close knit family around, being alone most of the time as Wes is constantly on the road, and having to hide their relationship when Wes is home like Jamie is a dirty small secret that no one can know of by keeping their relationship entirely within the walls of their apartment, and to top it off, Jamie begins having a hard time at his job when another coach displays a seriously bigoted and racist l of this wouldn't be so hard except neither Jamie, nor Wes, is communicating with each other about what's event in their lives. They're basically just trying to obtain through the next few months of Wes's rookie season with the hope that it will all soon be over and they can stop hiding. But they aren't really talking to each other, and it's taking a true toll on their relationship.But you know the truth always comes out, and when it does it creates even more tension between the rsonally, I was frustrated by the first three-quarters of the story. Well, frustrated might be generous, to tell the truth I was p***ed. I felt like all the good, happy, warm feelings I had from HIM were washed away in this ocean of doubt, miscommunication, and unnecessary angst. It was only the final quarter of the story that got the boys back on track and got me back to my satisfied place.And all of that is completely my own fault. Because I built up a HEA at the end of HIM that wasn't reality and was then disappointed in the method it was turned around for US. That's not the book's fault. It's e reality of this story is it's really about a fresh relationship and a learning curve. The boys love each other just as much and they grow in their relationship, learning to communicate, and being there for one ough it didn't keep the same excitement and wonder for me that I had for HIM, in the end this follow-up has romance, sexy times, humor, some hurt/comfort, and more Jamie and Wes. And that's always a amazing thing.

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    Us review []  2019-12-17 21:6

    I liked Wes a small better in this installment of the Bowen/Kennedy hockey series. Amazing writing, one thing flows into another for the beleaguered partners-roommates-friends. The secondary characters were colorful, especially Blake, the good-natured but interfering teammate. He came across as a huge puppy. There was an incident where he assumed too much, though, and Wes could have said something. Even mere roommates hang out with each other, especially if they’ve been mates for a while. What the heck? That was aggravating for me as a reader.While sex is a thing, there was too much of it - practically every time these two touch, they end up having sex unless they’re angry at each other. Sure, they’re prime athletes in their twenties, but...yawn. Yeah, yawn. When I skim the sex scenes, it’s too much and I’m not feeling much emotion there. Mostly more of the same. So, decent story, when the sex hasn’t taken it over, and I like the characters.

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    Us review []  2019-12-17 21:6

    More Jamie, more Wes. How can you go wrong? Us is the direct sequel to Him, one of my favorite MM romance novels ever. With that high of a bar, there are so a lot of ways that Us could have been a disappointment, but in this case, thankfully, the authors did everything right this time too!The novel starts about six months after Wes and Jamie move in together in Toronto, and Wes is (naturally) having a rookie NHL season for the record books. As they planned, they're still keeping their relationship quiet until the end of the season so that Wes can be judged for his skills not his love life, but the decision is definitely taking its toll, and since when does anything ever go according to plan? One of Wes's teammates, Blake, moves into the same complex, and despite being a hard guy to hate, he's adding even more tension to Wes and Jamie's relationship just by being in proximity. No spoilers here, but suffice it to say that it isn't long before the carefully laid plans unravel general, I'm always apprehensive about direct sequels for a few reasons. One, my favorite part of a romance is all the firsts: the looks, the touches and kisses, the sex, the realization of love. If these are already done in the first book, that already makes any direct sequel begin on a bit of a downer for me. Two, direct sequels tend to exist to resolve a cliffhanger, and I truly despise cliffhangers in romance because they seem to be used as a method to break up a perfectly amazing 100K-word novel into multiple too-short novellas so the publishers can create more cash off the pieces. And three, there are just so a lot of ways the author can screw up the magic that existed in the original book.Looking at Us, I'll begin with the third point first. Thank God the authors did not screw up the chemistry between Jamie and Wes... I probably would have had to drive my semi up to Vermont and knock on every door in the state trying to search out why if they had. As far as problem #2, there was no cliffhanger in Him, and both books are amply long, so no issue here either. That, of course, leaves the first issue, and just like in a true relationship, there's not much you can do about it. Fortunately, Jamie and Wes are a believable couple, and the fresh pressures and situations the authors place their relationship in throughout this sequel are realistic (though the resolutions might be a touch on the really-best-case-scenario side, but it's a romance, so I can't really fault that), and they let for some unbelievable hero growth both individually and for them as a couple. Except for the (understandable) lack of firsts, this book hit all the right buttons for me: a chest full of warm fuzzies upon completion was a amazing method to go to bed afterwards.Overall, I loved Us, though just a teensy smidge less than Him, only because of what it can't have in it. And that's why I rate it only as a 4.5 stars instead of the full 5 that Him got. Even so, it's absolutely a must-read, but create sure you read them in order, because this book won't create sense without the back story.And as far as Blake is concerned, he gets the spot as my #2 favorite secondary hero in a romance of all time, behind Petey in J.F. Smith's Latakia. Blake is a total ham, but when things obtain rough, he's just perfect... can't support but love the guy! Though perhaps I should not refer to Blake as a secondary… the authors have already announced there will be a third story in this series, and this time it will be an MF spin-off featuring Blake. I can't wait!

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    Us review []  2019-12-17 21:6

    Us is a sequel to Him, one of my favorite reads latest year, which focused on two long-time mates discovering that there is much more than friendship in their future. I adored that story due to the development of the two main characters and how strong their romance was depicted. It also didn't damage that there was a sports theme which is definitely my , when I learned that there would be a sequel, I was excited and a small hesitant. I wanted to spend more time with Wes and Jamie, but I was worried about whether it could live up to the unbelievable Him. While Us didn't grab me as tightly as its prequel, I still found it to be entertaining and emotional. The authors do a amazing job of helping readers remember why we fell in love with Wes and Jamie in the first put and showed that getting that satisfied ending takes focuses on Wes and Jamie's lives in Toronto after college. Wes is in his rookie year as a professional hockey player while Jamie is a youth hockey coach. Due to Wes's position as a newbie to the league, it was decided that they would hold their relationship a secret from the public for just one year. Unfortunately, complications arise during this time that force them both to re-evaluate their situation and whether their romance can withstand it.I really liked the method that the story focused evenly on Wes and Jamie's problems. Wes is dealing with having a public persona that doesn't completely match his real self though he would like it to. He hates keeping Jamie a secret, can't wait to tell people the truth, but is also worried about how people will react. This situation is not helped when one of his teammates moves into the same building and decides that he will be Wes and Jamie's constant companion. On the other side, Jamie is dealing with the fact that his fresh coaching position isn't the dream he thought it would be. His squad is struggling and he begins to wonder if he is the reason. It also doesn't support that one of his colleagues has a tendency to spout off hateful, homophobic remarks at the drop of a hat.Even though Wes's problems are the more public, I felt like the authors created sure not to lessen the impact of Jamie's situation. These are two strong-willed people who are trying to figure out how to create a life together while still retaining their independence. Their relationship goes through major tests in this story and they both feel guilty about it. There are communication problems and, while that usually annoys me in romance, I understood the purpose here. Each of them is going through items and they don't wish to create that a huge deal so they just go through life trying to pretend everything is okay.I don't wish to say much more about Us to avoid spoilers, but I do wish to emphasize how much I enjoyed reading it. The characterization of Wes and Jamie was consistent with how they were depicted in the prequel and I felt like I learned even more about them. I admired how much they care for one another and there are a lot of scenes that showcase that even amid all the chaos. I really hope Sarina Bowen and Elle Kennedy will continue writing in this globe because I would love for more about these guys as well as Wes's annoying, but well-meaning teammate Blake.

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    Us review []  2019-12-17 21:6

    Us is a contemporary m/m romance novel by Sarina Bowen and Elle Kennedy. It’s the second book in their Him/Us duology. I listened to the Audible edition of Him earlier this year, but only recently got around to listening to e story picks up a couple of months after the happenings of Him. Jamie and Wes are living together in Toronto- Jamie works as a coach for an elite youth hockey team, and Wes is a rookie for the city’s NHL team. However, they are living as roommates because Wes isn’t ready to be an openly gay professional athlete. Their luxurious apartment is their sanctuary, but that changes when one of Wes’ boisterous teammates moves into the building. He wants to hang out all the time, and it’s becoming harder and harder for Wes and Jamie to hold their relationship a secret. Is this a sustainable plan for them or will it tear them apart?This was such a unbelievable book. When Jamie and Wes first realized that they were more than friends, they were working together at hockey camp. It’s a rather contained environment, so it’s interesting to see how they function as a couple in the true world. It isn’t working well for them because they can’t be together as a couple; the fear of being outed is a constant threat. It doesn’t support that Wes is often traveling with the hockey team, so they don’t even obtain to spend time together for days at a time. Jamie appears content to be working as a coach (versus playing on a team), so there aren’t any jealousy problems on that front, but he’s definitely frustrated. The frustration grows to resentment, and this serves as the crux of the conflict.I would absolutely recommend Us. Readers need to begin with Him to fully appreciate Jamie and Wes’ history together. There’s a nice blend of light moments and angst. Jamie and Wes have amazing chemistry, and their scenes together are very well done. As I mentioned, I listened to the Audible editions of both books in the duology. Narrators Teddy Hamilton and Jacob Morgan did a amazing job, and gave their characters a special voice. I’m looking forward to reading more from Bowen and Kennedy in the future!

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    The Joy of Movement: How exercise helps us find happiness, hope, connection, and courage review []  2020-1-8 18:53

    Amazing book

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    The Joy of Movement: How exercise helps us find happiness, hope, connection, and courage review []  2020-1-8 18:53

    WHAT THIS BOOK IS ABOUT: "The question of how physical activity contributes to human happiness is the central focus of this book. … As I investigated the a lot of links between movement and happiness, this book became, by necessity, an exploration of what is most human about us. It is the only method to understand the joys of movement. And perhaps more than anything else, what I was reminded of is that human happiness flourishes in community.”Well written. It didn’t actually obtain me off of the couch, though. For one thing, the author clearly sees the globe through her “movement” filter. As I read along, I was struck by two things. First, if I substituted the word “movement” for the word “writing”, in a lot of locations the sentence, the paragraph, the very idea would still work. Second, she is clearly an extrovert. The happiness she finds in movement within a community makes an introvert like me shudder. Nor do I consider movement and community to be that which is “most human about us”. I would think higher level thinking ought to factor in there TOM LINE: Amazing book and clearly a passion project for the author, but don’t expect it to obtain you moving.

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    The Joy of Movement: How exercise helps us find happiness, hope, connection, and courage review []  2020-1-8 18:53

    Really helped me reframe movement in my mind. WAY more than losing weight and having amazing heart health. Loved all the stories and cried a few times (happy tears!).

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    The Joy of Movement: How Exercise Helps Us Find Happiness, Hope, Connection, and Courage review []  2020-1-20 21:3

    WHAT THIS BOOK IS ABOUT: "The question of how physical activity contributes to human happiness is the central focus of this book. … As I investigated the a lot of links between movement and happiness, this book became, by necessity, an exploration of what is most human about us. It is the only method to understand the joys of movement. And perhaps more than anything else, what I was reminded of is that human happiness flourishes in community.”Well written. It didn’t actually obtain me off of the couch, though. For one thing, the author clearly sees the globe through her “movement” filter. As I read along, I was struck by two things. First, if I substituted the word “movement” for the word “writing”, in a lot of locations the sentence, the paragraph, the very idea would still work. Second, she is clearly an extrovert. The happiness she finds in movement within a community makes an introvert like me shudder. Nor do I consider movement and community to be that which is “most human about us”. I would think higher level thinking ought to factor in there TOM LINE: Amazing book and clearly a passion project for the author, but don’t expect it to obtain you moving.

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    The Joy of Movement: How Exercise Helps Us Find Happiness, Hope, Connection, and Courage review []  2020-1-20 21:3

    I had so a lot of "a ha!" moments reading this joyful book. It has helped me understand better why I feel stronger, not just physically but also mentally, emotionally and socially stronger too, when I am moving every day. I love that "movement" in this book doesn't mean only exercise in the traditional sense, but any time you obtain up and use your body purposefully and joyfully.I love the idea that you can obtain a "runner's high" by walking your dog - whatever moves you! This book has given me lots of fun and practical ideas for incorporating more moments of movement, and more moments of hope and connection, in my day.

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    The Joy of Movement: How Exercise Helps Us Find Happiness, Hope, Connection, and Courage review []  2020-1-20 21:3

    Amazing book

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    The Joy of Movement: How Exercise Helps Us Find Happiness, Hope, Connection, and Courage review []  2020-1-20 21:3

    Really helped me reframe movement in my mind. WAY more than losing weight and having amazing heart health. Loved all the stories and cried a few times (happy tears!).

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    Liked the concept so well I bought a satisfied journal to remind myself of all the satisfied moments in my life. Jennie's book gives everyone permission and direction on how to record the moments in life that are fleeting and could be forgotten unless recorded. And recorded in a fun, childlike freedom that retains the moments in a gleeful fashion. My stick figures, sign posts and squiggles re-enforce amazing times that I can return to again and again.

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    I loved this book! My favourite takeaway from the book was “You can even work on a satisfied journal as a family. Imagine raising the next generation as resilient thinkers. Your children will be able to note the positive in life as well as the is particularly stood out for me since I’ve struggled with how to support my children focus on the positive, if they had a poor day at school and are only focusing on the negative. Drawing our day together also gives us a easy method to connect as a family.

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    I have kept a journal since I was a teenager, but most of what I recorded in my journal was negative. Definitely not anything I would ever wish anyone to read. After reading Satisfied Journal Satisfied Life, my perspective on journals has changed. I now record positive things from my life. I even allow my daughter look at all the pages in my journal. It always brings a smile to her face, even though she sometimes chuckles at my drawings :-) If you have ever struggled with finding joy and happiness in your life, you NEED to read this book!

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    Unbelievable book. Fast read and such a amazing idea. Makes me feel like a child again. It also helps me to realize that when I have a poor day there are still things to be grateful for. I'm not an artist but it doesn't matter because this book is mine about my special life. You will love the book- such a fast and rewarding practice to do daily. Thank you Jennie!

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    This small book is a fast read that packs a huge punch. A reminder to take a few moments each day to see and record the amazing in a fun, non- threatening way. If you're looking for one easy thing to do to increase your gratitude and awareness of the amazing in each day, Jennie gives you exactly that. Satisfied journal, satisfied life. Because happiness is a choice.

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    I follow Jennie's blog and was so intrigued when she mentioned this book! Jennie walks you through the few steps it takes to begin a small journal to take note of the happy, small things in your e book helps us all to realize how simple it is to overlook the little things that create us satisfied in our everyday life. A amazing method to support a beginner or long time journalers search and record satisfied life moments to look back on. And, along the way, you'll start to message how seeking out and jotting down these moments changes the method you think about your day to day life, ultimately resulting in your own "happy life"!

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    Jennie Moraitis' goal with "Happy Journal, Satisfied Life" is to encourage people to record satisfied things in their lives. According to her, it is significant to recognize the little things. Furthermore, one does not have to be an artist to do this. A blank book and writing utensils are sufficient. In chapter 4 "How To Begin Your Own Journal" Jennie gives step-by-step instructions for the starting of a Satisfied Journal.I loved the book so much that I actually started to draw in my printed out advance copy.I have received the advance copy of "Happy Journal, Satisfied Life" as a PDF. I was under no obligation to offer a positive review.

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    You don't have to be an artist to have fun this book. I'm not much of a writer but found myself excited to sit down and draw out my day; happenings that created me smile throughout the day. Jennie does an perfect job at giving you step by step directions on how to obtain those photos onto paper. In a globe where everything seems so negative it's nice to sit back and look for the amazing and satisfied things that create you smile. I highly recommend this book to anyone who's willing to sit still for a few mins each day to draw out their thoughts and joys.

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    This was such a fun, positive, quick read. I'm not sure there's any better word to describe it than "happy." :)I struggle with perfectionism, so I love the author's emphasis on releasing the need for your satisfied journal to be excellent and instead embracing whatever it is that brings you joy. If you're looking for something to provide a small creative spark, I highly recommend you pick up this sweet, encouraging small book.

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    Happy Journal, Happy Life: How drawing your day ignites creativity, boosts gratitude, and skyrockets happiness. review [Book]  2017-11-7 18:2

    Love this book! As a mental health therapist, I am a huge supporter of focusing on the positive experiences we have in life. It can be so simple to obtain pulled into negativity if we aren't careful, and it can quickly become a habit.Happy Journal, Satisfied Life is a amazing tutorial in helping you move toward making happy-focus a habit the book. Be inspired. Begin a Satisfied Journal by yourself or with your family. You won't regret a shift to satisfied thinking!!

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    If you are reading this review, according to the cornucopia of research offered in this book, you are unlikely to be an iGen’er. “By 2015, one out of three high school seniors admitted they had not read any books for pleasure in the past year, three times as a lot of as in 1976.” While Professor Twenge cautions us not to evaluate some of her findings as amazing or bad, this, for me, is surely a bit a sexagenarian father of two daughters, aged 14 and 16, I desperately required and wanted to read this book. And I wasn’t disappointed. It is well written and provides a wealth of info and insight. Much of it, I found, reinforced my own observations of my daughters. In some cases, that allowed me to breathe a sigh of relief. At the very least, their habits that are the most various from my own at their age are not special to enge is careful up front to articulate the limitations of this type of statistical analysis. “Because the survey samples are nationally representative, they represent American young people as whole, not just an isolated group.” That larger group, the iGen’ers, are defined as those born from 1995 to 2012, a group of 74 million Americans that currently acc for 24% of the of the things I normally search limiting in this kind of huge data statistical analysis is that it chronicles attributes. But if a picture is worth a thousand words, a behavior is worth ten thousand pictures, and Professor Twenge clearly appreciates that. She doesn’t just show the data, she probes it.A few random thoughts occurred to me as I read it.I came of age at the height of the Vietnam War. When I was needed to register with Selective Service, the draft was still in put and college deferments, for amazing reason, had been eliminated. I vividly recall standing in my high school cafeteria at the age of 17 listening to the statewide announcement of our lottery draft numbers. The numbers were drawn by birth date and the official reading the numbers started the broadcast noting that the first 123 numbers drawn were almost certain to be drafted, the second 123 numbers may or may not be depending on need, and the latest 119 could rest easier. My birthday was drawn 124th. The birthday of my friend, who happened to be standing next to me, was drawn 3rd.I offer that only to suggest that there are certain historical happenings that support to define individuals, if not a generation. The risk of being sent to war in the jungle of Southeast Asia was one for me. That’s not to say that iGen’ers have not endured such historic events. It’s just to remind us that they e other observation that I had, which isn’t directly explored in the book, is the change not just in how we live, but where we live. I walked to school on my own starting in the fourth grade, street my bicycle everywhere, and spent nearly all of my waking hours with friends—with no adult supervision. People didn’t live in sub-divisions so much in those days. We lived in economically diverse neighborhoods. Urban sprawl and the socio-economic homogeneity of the suburban subdivision have both empowered and demanded certain changes in how our kids final observation has to do with the individualistic vs collective social norm. Professor Twenge writes, “…cultural individualism is connected to slower developmental speeds across both countries and time. Around the world, young adults grow up more slowly in individualistic countries than collectivist ones.”My family lived in China for nine years. For my daughters, it was during the period from age 5 until age 14, on average. China has a collective culture in the extreme and it was my observation that the kids matured very slowly, at least compared to my private experience as a Boomer. (I found out from this book that this is a global development.) Because of the collectivist culture, however, my wife and I were very lenient with the independence we allowed out daughters. At a restaurant, for example, we never hesitated to allow the kids go off and play on their own, out of our sight. (A children’s play zone is offered at virtually every restaurant.) Violent crime and attacks on kids are rare in China, but more importantly, we knew that everyone else at the restaurant, including the staff, would hold a close eye on the safety of the children. It’s just part of the collectivist mentality. They all feel responsible. My point being that I’m not sure the individualistic vs collectivist dimension isn’t a bit counter-intuitive when you obtain to the social e study does reinforce the far-reaching impact of technology. It comes with a lot of baggage. Social media is not social at all. It’s entertainment. And, for the most part, it’s not authentic. Selfies, for example, are always staged. Reminded me of The Jetsons, when they would always keep a mask of perfection in front of their face when talking on the video a lot of ways, I consider this book to be a launching pad rather than a conclusion. Professor Twenge has done a amazing job of starting the conversation. But it needs to continue. What is it about technology that has cast our kids in this way? Why do they think and behave the method they do? (Twenge has started that conversation in a lot of areas.) And what, as parents and members of the larger community, can we do to reinforce the amazing things (e.g., our kids are safer) and attack the negatives (e.g., suicide rates are up).Some of the developments are going to be a small tricky. Twenge points out, for example, that iGen’ers are overwhelmingly inclusive. In terms of the racism that is haunting our society today, that might suggest we just need to wait and the issue will be resolved. I don’t think so, and, to her credit, Twenge apparently agrees. A commitment to inclusion is not enough. We must do more.I also think it will take the village to address the iGen’ers overwhelming anxiety about their financial future. That is truly a issue for the business community and the government to solve. The implied social contract that existed between employer and employee when I started my career disappeared starting in the 80s. It isn’t coming back but we have to build some form of alternative. Technology and social evolution have taken away the safety net of self-sufficiency (i.e. the Thoreau model) and have left a void in its place. It’s a void that needs to be filled; or bridged, perhaps.I, therefore, go beyond the parents of iGen’ers and educators in recommending this book. We all need to read it because we all have a role to play, both for our children, our selves, and the future of our society.

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    Wow. This is the most comprehensive tutorial you will search on the culture and attitudes of iGen - those born between e author, writing in a clear, engaging, and easily understandable style, identifies 10 locations in which the iGen radically differs from their generational predecessors when they were the same age. These range from attidues toward work, religion, sex (more suprising than you might think), family, tolerance and lled from statistics gathered from 11 million people, the book tracks the changes in attitudes among young people in these locations starting from the 1970s and on. The most radical shift in attitudes has accured with the emergence of the iGen. While the author doesn't explicitly link the advent and ubiquity of smartphones to these cultural changes - she does frequently tip at it - there is small room for doubt that this is the is book is an perfect addition to the growing body of literature highlighting this issue, like Glow Kids, by Dr. Nicholas Kardaras; Irresistible, by Adam Alter; Reclaiming Conversation, by Sherry Turkle and The Huge Disconnect by Catherine Steiner-Adair (I highly recommend all of these books).This book should be needed reading for every parent and educator who wants to understand their kids and perhaps do something to reverse some of the more disturbing and frightening trends in their homes and communities.

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    This book makes you think What will society look like in 20 years - how will we answer to natural disasters who will volunteer?

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    iGen: Why Today's Super-Connected Kids Are Growing Up Less Rebellious, More Tolerant, Less Happy--and Completely Unprepared for Adulthood--and What That Means for the Rest of Us review [Book]  2017-10-14 18:4

    The book uses long-term generational surveys (I remember taking the 12th grade survey back in 1986!) to present how the generation born since 1995 have changed. Not only is the info incredibly interesting and compelling, it's vital to helping us understand the kids and young adults in our country. I highly recommend the book for parents, educators, and anyone else who works with young people.I also recommend the book for teens. My 17 year old picked it up and read several pages and plans to read more. I'm also sending the book to my college-aged daughter and hoping she will share it with the Residential Life office where she e book is based on hard data and filled with charts, but there are also anecdotes to humanize the numbers. Fast read and super interesting!!!

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