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    The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good []  2020-5-6 18:15

    I picked this up as a follow-up to Easterly's earlier "Elusive Quest for Growth". While the earlier work was a studied examination of the (in)effectiveness of development policies in the developing world, this one is more of a polemic on the idea of development as a means to eliminating poverty. Easterly's approach is more critical than constructive, but is engagingly written and presented. It is, however, only one side of the argument ("academic cat fight" is closer to the mark) over development, charity, investment, and poverty in developing nations. It really is a must-read for anyone with an interest in the field, but should be paired with related works for a more thorough examination of the topic. Paul Collier's "Bottom Billion" and Jeffrey Sachs' "End of Poverty" show alternative views that are equally worthy of consideration.

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    The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good []  2020-5-6 18:15

    In 2011, Eric Ries created a huge splash in Silicon Valley with his book “The Lean Startup: How Today's Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Make Radically Successful Businesses.” He defines “startup” rather loosely (“an organization dedicated to creating something fresh under conditions of extreme uncertainty”) and encourages organizations of all sizes to avoid creating elaborate business plans and instead work “to try their vision continuously, to adapt and adjust…” This is almost precisely the same argument created by NYU economist William Easterly in his controversial 2007 bestseller, “The White Man’s Burden: Why West’s Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Small Good,” which is a direct assault on traditional development economics, the very field he has dedicated his life to. For the past half century, he argues, development economics has been beholden to a “legend”, a legend he once very much believed in: That poverty traps constrain impoverished nations and these poverty traps can be overcome with a “Big Push” – heavy Western foreign aid packages and tops-down plans for eradicating poverty, disease, and illiteracy, while promoting different forms of economic is attempt at a huge fix – heavy programs of aid with lofty goals but small accountability – has been the globe of classically trained development economists, who he derisively dubs “The Planners.” They think they have the answers, he says, and rhetorically they have the advantage because they promise amazing things, such as “the end of poverty.” Reality, however, is much various according Easterly. There are no simple answers. “The only Huge Plan is to discontinue the Huge Plans,” he says. “The only Huge Respond is that there is no Huge Answer.” The promises of the Planners, such as his professional rival Jeffrey Sachs, “shows all the pretensions of utopian social engineering,” he writes rather caustically. Yet they flourish in a globe without feedback or accountability, and where huge plans and huge promises play well with politicians and celebrities. Nobody (especially those with no direction connection to the problems) wants to promote little but achievable objectives. They wish “to do something” – and do it big. Easterly claims that the West, perhaps innocently and unintentionally, has written itself into the character role in saving the uncivilized world. Indeed, he writes, “…the development expert…is the heir to the missionary and the colonial officer.”In contrast to the Planners, the author encourages those who wish to support to “think small”: the small answers that work and that can create a material, if not revolutionary, difference on the lives of the impoverished. He calls these people, mostly locally-based activists, “The Searchers.” They possess an entrepreneurial and experimentation mindset, and naturally embrace the iterative testing model promoted by Ries in “The Lean Begin Up.” They obtain regular feedback from the not good they serve and are held accountable for their work. They don’t promise to solve globe hunger, but they often create incremental yet substantive impact where they work. “The dynamism of the not good at the bottom,” he writes, “has much more potential than plans at the top.”The book is broken into four parts, each of varying interest and value. The first part, “Why planners cannot bring prosperity” is dedicated to undermining the theory of the “Big Push,” which Easterly writes is demonstrably false. He claims that “Statistically, countries with high aid are no more likely to take off than are those with low aid – contrary to the Huge Push idea.” Likewise, attempts to promote markets from the top down, as is often the case with IMF and Globe Bank-led structural reforms, ambitious schemes to promote capitalist growth that Easterly admittedly once believed in wholeheartedly, are doomed to failure. The same goes for top down efforts to promote democracy, although he sees democracy as necessary because it can supply the two things most necessary for meaningful reform: feedback and Part two, “Acting out the burden,” Easterly accentuates “The tragedy of poverty is that the poorest people in the globe have no or political power to motivate Searchers to address their desperate needs, while the rich can use their and power through well-developed markets and accountable bureaucracies to address theirs.” He highlights the insanity of the international development industry, which he likes to repeat has pumped $2.3 trillion (yes, “trillion”) into the developing globe since the end of Globe Battle II – and for what? He says. He cites Tanzania as a typical case study in development economics absurdity, as that country was forced to produce 2,400 reports and host over 1,000 donor visits in a single year. The author hammers home on his two main themes of feedback and accountability, noting what small input the not good actually have on the aid that they keep and that the Planners at the top are usually divorced from reality on the ground. Easterly writes that development aid is a classic “principle/agent” relationship, where the principle is a rich donor country and the agent is the aid agency. The actual target, the poor, are nowhere in the system of response. The principle wants to see huge results, and yet is in no position to check on the work and achievements. The agents are thus cloaked in a sort of invisibility – and it’s under this invisibility, the author claims, that the Planners take over. The Planners thrive in the dark, Easterly says; the Searchers in direct light. The Planners benefit from the fact that there are so a lot of aid agencies, all with very related missions, all supposedly coordinating efforts, yet no single entity is ultimately accountable for achieving results. The smaller and more focused an NGO’s mandate, the better. Or, as Easterly complains, “If the aid business were not so beguiled by utopian visions, it could address a more realistic set of issues for which it had evidence of a workable solution.”If the aid agencies have failed because their mandates are too broad, what about the IMF, which has the relatively narrow mission of promoting “trade and currency stability”? Easterly argues that the IMF suffers from not good data, a misplaced one-size-fits-all approach, and is all too willing to forgive loans. What should be done? Simple, Easterly says, focus the IMF on emerging markets only and reserve the real bottom billion for aid agencies, thus removing the politically unpopular conditionality that has marked IMF interventions over the past several rt 3, “The White Man’s Army,” is lengthy and the least insightful in the book. Easterly’s core message, as told through vignettes about Pakistan, the Congo, Sudan, India, and Palestine/Israel is that Western meddling with the Rest has been damaging, whether it was colonialism, de-colonialism or well-intentioned aid intervention. He further argues that US efforts to restructure societies via military force, either directly or through proxies, has all the hallmarks of utopian planner mentality, as suggested by case studies on Nicaragua, Angola and Haiti. In other words, neo-conservatives are the Right wing on “The Planner continuum”, with idealists like Sachs on the Part 4, “The Future,” Easterly argues that 60 years of Planners in control of the economic development agenda is enough. It is time to drop the utopian goals of eradicating poverty and transforming governments. “The Huge Goals of the Huge Plan distract everyone’s attention…” he writes. “The rich-country public has to live with making not good people’s lives better in a few concrete ways that aid agencies can actually achieve.” Even worse, he writes, “The Planners’ response to failure of previous interventions [has been] to do even more intensive and comprehensive interventions.” It is time to empower the Searchers, those who probe and experiment their method to success with modest efforts to create individuals better off, even if only far as the aid agencies are concerned, Easterly recommends: 1) end the system of collective responsibility for multiple goals; 2) and instead encourage individual accountability for individual tasks; 3) promote aid agencies to specialize rather than having a lot of all pursue significant goals; and 4) employ independent auditors of aid activities. The central theme developed by the author throughout this book is that aid agencies need to be constantly experimenting and searching for modest interventions that work. And they must employ more on-the-ground learning with deeply embedded staff. Thus, Easterly encourages the idea of “development vouchers” that would empower local communities to obtain the aid they most need from the agencies that are most effective. Theoretically, those agencies that either don’t deliver value and/or don’t deliver as promised would be place out of business. It’s a compelling idea that Easterly nevertheless stresses is no panacea.Easterly writes with a certain punch, which I’m sure ruffled more than a few feathers not only with his arguments but with his style, which can be cynical and snarky. For instance, when looking to catalog the redeeming benefits of U.S. interventions over the past several decades, he cites an “Explosion of Vietnamese restaurants in the United States” for Vietnam, “Black Hawk Down was a amazing book and movie” for Somalia, and “Salvadoran refugees became housekeepers of desperate housewives” for El Salvador. He goes on to characterize U.S. Angolan ally Jonas Savimbi as “to democracy what Paris Hilton is to chastity.” Amusing commentary, for sure, although perhaps a bit misguided given the gravity of the topic closing, Easterly makes a compelling case to “go small” with development efforts and always seek feedback and accountability. He may not be on the Christmas card list of Bono and Angelina Jolie, but I’m afraid he is much more insightful and directionally correct than their hero, Jeffrey Sachs.

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    The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good []  2020-5-6 18:15

    Perfect response to The End of Poverty (Sachs). Info the importance of accountability and feedback in politico-economic systems. At this point, it's slightly out of date following the work of Not good Economics (Banerjee and Duflo) but has held up far better than The End of Poverty over the latest 15 years of development economics research.

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    The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good []  2020-5-6 18:15

    Today after spending so much on foreign aid for so small results, I think its fair that people look at the reasons why? If this book is correct, much of it is fraud. I would like to see some of these people brought in front of the court; they have wasted billions of dollars.I though a lot of of the arguments were carefully thought out and explained. I liked the graphs e writer makes some valid points about his Seekers (people who are looking locally for problems) and Planners (people far away with plans) and why the seekers are better. One of these points I could relate too as it happened to me. A street had in front of my work put a huge hole, so I rang the council up to obtain it fixed. They started to work the next day. Now I was thinking where would people in a lot of not good African countries call. Often they cannot as the street builder is far me points I think that might add to the discussion that I think the writer would agree is much of the reasons for the issues with aid though is that the Planners are generally not agents either. For example, a charity might be able to collect Y dollars for a fever and X dollars for fighting aids in some not good country. Now what is it supposed to do, ignore the X dollars for aids because the Y dollars are better spent. Another example might be the Australian government has a huge surplus of wheat now; a Planner could come along and ask for it for a not good country. Okay I admit rice might be better but rice is not on here wheat is.Another point I though is that seekers in not good countries in all likelihood have a related success rate to businesspeople in the West. Most start-up businesses fail, probably most Seekers do issue I did message of the book is about 3/4 of the way, he starts going on about what he believes are Western foreign interventions mistakes. I could disagree whether or not the US did intervene in a lot of of these countries a brutalization would still have occurred. In a lot of of these conflicts, the reason for invading had small to do with local but geopolitical reasons often they are not local issues but foreigner and its success/failure must be measured in these terms.

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    The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good []  2020-5-6 18:15

    Pity the Globe Bank economist. First he has to leave the Globe Bank (whether he leaves on his own acc or not is not specified in the book) for saying disturbing things that nobody wants to hear. He then finds asylum at Fresh York University, where he pursues his crusade in favor of rigorous independent evaluations of development programs. He sees his colleague Jeff Sachs from the UN obtain all the media attention (including the image ops with Angelina Jolie) for saying precisely the things that he, Bill Easterly, has repeatedly proved wrong (p.50). He finds solace in exposing the contradictions of his fellow Globe Bank economists who, after stating that giving an estimate of aid needs is pointless, nevertheless pursue to give such estimate (p.182). But he knows deep inside that, whatever bright arguments economists may give, people will always prefer to listen to a badly shaven rock star who declares that "something must be done; anything must be done, whether it works or not" in to "make poverty history." (p.17)William Easterly writes an poor lot about himself. Throughout the book, we are introduced to his extended family: his dog Millie (p.225), his three children (for whom the issue of attribution under asymmetric info can be illustrated by the boy farting in a crowded elevator, see p.172), his frontier ancestor (p.91) who engages a lawsuit versus George Washington over a piece of land (guess who wins, albeit three generations later). He sprinkles the chapters with snapshots from his life: growing up in Bowling Green, Ohio, on a diet of Jell-O (p.74); writing his PhD on a NSF scholarship (p.198); driving over bumpy streets from Ghana to Pakistan (p.31); sleeping under a twin blanket with his partner messing with the heating control device (p.168); feeding his children with a mix of overcooked spaghetti and Chinese deli (p.72); having the town council in Takoma Park, Maryland, fill potholes in front of his porch (p.166), etc, etc.But The White Man's Burden is by no method autobiographic. In fact, this is a serious essay about the foreign aid system or "why the West's efforts to aid the Rest have done so much ill and so small good," as the lengthy subtitle indicates. The dirty small secret that Easterly exposes is that rich countries have spent 2.3 trillion dollars over the years to spur development in not good countries, with surprisingly small results to present anwhile, every time a person starts paying attention to the issue, he writes a long report that invariably concludes with the need to double the existing amount of foreign aid. So the advisor to John F. Kennedy, Walt Rostow, called for doubling foreign aid back in 1960. Globe Bank president Robert McNamara also called for doubling it in 1973. The Globe Bank again called for doubling with the end of the Cold Battle and the "peace dividend" back in 1990. There was a lot of campaigning latest year by people like Jeffrey Sachs, Tony Blair and Gordon Brown for doubling foreign aid in 2005 and the G8 actually did agree to double foreign aid to Africa. And even George W. Bush is increasing US aid by 50 percent. Now a fifty percent increase seems to be less ambitious than a doubling of aid; but the White House staff explained to the author that the President thought 50 percent was double. So this actually does fit the e issue for Easterly is that aid debates are dominated by wishy-washy do-gooders that are not accountable for the promises they make, while the amazing doers know what works on the ground but cannot create their voices heard. He calls the firsts `Planners' and the second `Searchers'. In his own words:"In foreign aid, Planners announce amazing intentions but don't motivate anyone to carry them out; Searchers search things that work and obtain some reward. Planners raise expectations but take no responsibility for meeting them; Searchers accept responsibility for their actions. Planners determine what to supply; Searchers search out what is in demand. Planners apply global blueprints; Searchers adapt to local conditions. Planners at the top lack knowledge of the bottom; Searchers search out what the reality is at the bottom. Planners never hear whether the planned got what it needed; Searchers search out if the customer is satisfied.Which by the method reminds me of the old limerick:A planner is a gentle man,with neither sword nor pistol.He walks along most daintily,because his balls are ankly I was disappointed by the book and that is why I give it only three stars. It is a kind of Paradise Lost, a farewell to alms-giving by a former believer who broods over the loss of his illusions but very small in terms of workable alternatives. My sincere want is that he will come over his mourning and begin enjoying life again. And my practical tip is that next time he shares a heating blanket with a partner in a cold night, instead of fussing individually with the dual control device, talk to each other and work things out.

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    The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good []  2020-5-6 18:15

    According to the method most people think about it, poverty is a issue caused by lack of money. The respond is simple: teach people who are not good how to create money. If they don't have enough it must be because they're not intelligent enough to create it, so they need to listen to us while we give them the solution. That isn't a very fair characterisation of foreign aid, but there are often overtones of superiority in the method aid is provided.William Easterly, professor of economics at Fresh York State University, explains why foreign aid has been so unsuccessful in this book. According to Easterly, there are two types of foreign aid workers: Planners and Searchers. Planners hold coming up with utopian plans which don't work, whereas Searchers hold looking for little ways to create a positive difference. Unfortunately, the aid globe is dominated by Planners.Easterly's views are quite controversial, and they are obviously unpopular with the people who bear the brunt of his criticism. It is very difficult in this argument to know who is right, but judging from the responses of bloggers to his ideas, Easterly's ideas are getting the upper hand. The book is a very entertaining and thought-provoking read, one of the best that I have read this year.

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    The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good []  2020-5-6 18:15

    The author is the most risky type of writer to challenge the establishment. Not only does he have a passion of reforming international aid, but his sixteen years working for the Globe Bank, means that he knows the true system, inside and out. He is not just an ivory turret academic; he has been there and done e author challenges the immense organizations cultures who, despite the best intentions, have managed to do small amazing despite spending billions of dollars of foreign aid. He is very critical of Western advisors, especially economists, who claim their magic formulas can fix any economy from Asia, to Russia, to Africa. The author, like a lot of foreign aid experts, gets sidetracked into the goal of democracy and gets the concepts of economic assistance and democratic progress all mixed up. If fixing the economies of Africa is not tough enough, the attempts to create them democracies at the same time is flat out foolish.I feel like I really got a first hand look into the mindset of the international aid community. The only fault is that the author really does not any amazing ways to fix the problem. Most of the book is attacking the current system. He does promote micro-lending, but his best example is when the Globe Bank Mexican parents to hold their children in school. I am not sure that is the type of policy you wish to highlight to the American people. Paying people to force their kids to attend school is not going to create a developing country into Sweden. Despite the lack of a true respond to foreign aid, the book is worth reading for the insiders views of the foreign aid empires.

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    The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good []  2020-5-6 18:15

    I have been a self-described Easterly fangirl since reading his perfect book The Elusive Quest for Growth. In that book, he had managed to be precise, supported, readable, humane and funny-- all at the same time. In the globe of reading about development economics, this was no mean feat.I had known that this book was out for a while, but had only gotten around to reading it after seeing Easterly here in Amsterdam. He was debating Jan Pronk about what he calls the difference between Planner- and Searcher-based methods of developmental aid. Planners, in his terms, prefer the sweeping top-down approaches to poverty eradication-- all governed by a central committee somewhere else. Searchers adopt a more piecemeal approach to solutions, looking from the bottom up without benefit (or as much benefit) from Utopian ideals. It was a very interesting debate. The audience was full of folks working in different NGOs and developmental organization. It inspired me enough to go ahead and The White Man's e arguments that Easterly create feel so intuitively correct that they create me suspicious. The bottom line for him seems to be that true situations are individual, and solutions cannot be extrapolated from overriding principles. He is savage towards the unrealistic thinking of the neo-imperialists and unsparing of a lot of of the political sacred cows. He points out that given limited resources, tradeoffs do have to be made. Too a lot of people forget that even given unlimited funding (which is far from the case), resources can still be scarce-- attention, will power, distribution infrastructure, etc. He also says that if goals in aid programs are failing, then throwing more at them will not help.I think that Easterly's stand is often miscontrued based on the latest point. I have heard detractors say that he is arguing towards limiting aid to the needy poor. There is no substantiation of that-- at least not in his books or in the lecture I attended. Instead, what he argues is that if unrealistic goals and cumbersome structures prevent aid from reaching the poorest, then adding more on top of the pile will not fix the problem. For any experienced project managers out there, this is going to feel very "right". Easterly is not calling for less spending; he is calling for more sensible spending. He is calling for accountability, practicality, focus and honest evaluation. These are things that should be self-evident, but are apparently very difficult to achieve. He asks the very disturbing question whether the developed countries are more interested in their private ideology in the form of a Utopian vision than they are interested in achieving true change on the ground where it is required the most.Other subjects contain examples of successful "Searcher" tactics for bringing change to the life of the poor; historical numbers looking at the result of aid on growth; a discussion of the various aid agencies and their limitations; and some thinking about the role (or lack of one) in local governments when it comes to development e White Man's Burden is, as The Elusive Quest for Growth, precise, supported, readable, humane and funny. I think that it is in a lot of respects a stronger book as it better integrates the stories of the not good with the structure. There are a lot of fascinating pointers for further reading. I would have appreciated an annotated bibliography instead of just pulling references from the notes, but I guess that you cannot have everything that you wish in a single book. Recommended reading.

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    The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good []  2020-5-6 18:15

    I highly reccommend this book to anyone interested in understanding the globe as it is. Economic, political, and historic factors create the globe we live in, with the sharp contrasts inside and inbetween countries. Easterly efficiently describes why such constrasts exist, and what can be done to reduce inequality, at several levels (e.g. national policies, political programs, local development). For anyone interested in social development, or just in knowing why some people don't have meal in their tables everyday, three times a ke yourself conscious of the globe you live in, and, even better, take action to modify reality.

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    The White Man's Burden: Why the West's Efforts to Aid the Rest Have Done So Much Ill and So Little Good []  2020-5-6 18:15

    William Easterly's book "The White Man's Burden" is a fascinating and engaging read about the reasons why the efforts of a lot of well meaning aid organizations have done so small to war poverty throughout the developing world. The book however sounds like it wants to be two different, yet interconnected books. The first two-thirds of the book show a very detailed if long winded view of why the huge goals of Planners at the UN, Globe Bank and other aid organizations in the Western globe fail to improve the poor. Some of these reasons include: putting in the hands of poor governments that are corrupt and will use the aid to line their own pockets, imposing Western solutions on societies where they are in incompatible, and the broadness/impossibility of the utopian goals e latest third of the book becomes a critique of colonialism and Western particularly American interventions through both aid and military means. Although I enjoyed the section, it felt like it was the foundation for another book on the legacies of colonialism and military intervention by Western powers into the developing world. I understood the point that he was generally making that military intervention and Western help for dictators has undermined our efforts to do larger scale amazing within the developing world. However, the linkage between the two ideas required to shored up a small bit more instead of here are a few case studies and these present that military interventions have done more to damage those we seek to support [even though there's truth in the statement.] What I might have done is write two books because the link between the two parts could've been better stated.

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    A World of Three Zeros: The New Economics of Zero Poverty, Zero Unemployment, and Zero Net Carbon Emissions [Book]  2017-10-18 18:1

    Zero poverty, zero unemployment and zero carbon emissions achieved via social entrepreneurship and economics based on true human motives instead of the selfish greed assumed to be our sole motivation by neoclassical, capitalist, mainstream economics. And microlending to not good women as a strong tool. But I think without two more "zeros", zero population growth and zero globe economic growth (implying a need for redistribution as well), the three goals for poverty, unemployment and carbon emissions will remain impossible. A fast look at globe bank data shows that despite fertility falling from 6.7 children/woman to 2.1 (probably close to replacement), Bangladesh's population still grew faster in 2015 (1.8 million) than it did in 1960 (1.4 million). Population grew from 48 million in 1960 to 161 million in 2015, and land zone is decreasing because of rising sea levels. And CO2 emissions per dollar of GDP doubled in the past decade as Bangladesh modernized. The book mentions that a meter of sea level rise will displace 18 million in Bangladesh. The globe will have to downsize human population and economic output in to remain habitable. So the three zeros are good, five zeros would be better and let for a feasible path to ending poverty and keeping climate stable. The book's failing is that it continues to assume the human enterprise can grow on a planet with shrinking ability to help humans.

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    A World of Three Zeros: The New Economics of Zero Poverty, Zero Unemployment, and Zero Net Carbon Emissions [Book]  2017-10-18 18:1

    This is an astute analysis of present-day world, including its economic and political challenges that stem from ever-growing income inequality. In addition to a well-presented, copiously referenced issue analysis, the author equally eloquently proposes viable solutions that keep the promise to empower readers, especially youth, toward building a better life for themselves - and through that, a better globe for us all.

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    Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning []  2020-1-29 8:50

    Nice memoir. In the end, the respond is yes, you can learn a fresh instrument as an adult, however, having a sabbatical of a year or more (as the author does) in which to learn, practice and jam with experts greatly increases your likelihood of success.

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    Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning []  2020-1-29 8:50

    The author shares a lot of interesting info about learning music. The science behind it. His private journey. Stories of other musicians experiences with learning guitar. Guitar teachers, etc. However, about halfway through, I became quite bored. Unfortunately, a lot of the chapters read like filler. Too esoteric to hold me interested. For example, his experience at guitar camp was very fun to read! I would have enjoyed reading more cool anecdotes like this, and fewer about brain synapses and singing.If you have fun the science behind learning an instrument, then you may have fun this book

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    Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning []  2020-1-29 8:50

    As someone who is just now trying to learn the bass in his mid-60s, this is a fun and informative read. First 30 or 40 pages are excellent. What I thought was most interesting was contained in those initial chapters. Why is it so damn hard to learn? This explains it. But answer, as in response to how one gets to Carnegie Hall; practice, practice, practice.

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    Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning []  2020-1-29 8:50

    This basically is a book chronicling one person's journey to becoming musical at an advanced age. It is a very interesting read, and spends a lot of ink describing some of the science of the brain's processing sound and similar topics. It touches on some other things like the history of music, but mostly not in a very deep way. It was meant to be a fairly short and fast read. It was interesting and informative, but it definitely does not teach you how to play a guitar. What it is, to me, is motivation. This book records one man's journey toward becoming a amazing guitarist and his thoughts and reflections along the way. It has a lot of interesting bits of info about different musicians peppered throughout the book that did add quite a bit of interest.

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    Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning []  2020-1-29 8:50

    I picked up the guitar at the age of 40… I questioned if I'd be able to learn it or not and I basically told myself that I'd have to stick with it for a year before giving up. I bought a guitar and place in that year and at the end it started to sound like something and I've kept with it and it's been rewarding… But it raised that question in me of, can I do this and how difficult is it going to , I stumbled on this book about five years later and the author went through the same type of experience but he questioned deeper and from a lot of other angles. Not only was he going to give it a go at learning guitar but he was going to study the how and why if it was really possible to teach an old dog fresh tricks. (I'd read glad wells outliers, so was familiar with the 10,000 hour concept and that whole line of questioning, but this guy was asking about it for older folks and how much was possible once you weren't a child anymore) I thought it would be an interesting , the author starts on this journey and takes you along for the ride. He talks about going to guitar camp, interviewing musicians, his learning style and how he progresses, what works and what doesn't…. He ends up in a band at camp with children and they go after some primary song writing and performance goals and what that dynamic is like… I found the book really interesting because I'd been through some of what he'd experienced and also in trying to respond the questions of how to obtain better at something, which is something anyone can apply to anything they dare to learn.

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    Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning []  2020-1-29 8:50

    I have fun this book very much. I can relate to what the author went through because I picked up a guitar later in life, at age 20, after always being told that I wasn't musical and that I was tone deaf. I went through a lot of of the same things that the author went through. I really cracked up when he talked about the difficulty of learning the F chord, and being confused by the duplication of notes on the guitar neck. (I went through all of that too). Currently I obtain to play music, and I have recorded two CDs of my own material. If "Guitar Zero" had been available when I started my journey years ago it would have saved me a lot of time and headaches. I would recommend it to any beginner who needs to search the shortcuts. One zone Marcus delves into is an zone that I never thought about; the part of our brain that we use when playing music, and the fact that there really is no "musical" part of the brain. It's not something we need to know to be a amazing guitar player, but it's interesting.

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    Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning []  2020-1-29 8:50

    When I first saw this book on Amazon, I was hesitant to it because it only had 3 1/2 stars. (Most books I read are 4+)I dug deeper into the reviews to see that people expected something different. I decided to give it a shot anyway. And, after purchasing and reading the book, the description seem to match the e story is arched around Dr. Marcus's journey to learn guitar at an advanced age, 38. He discusses the benefit as well as the disadvantages of melody learning later in life and how it effected his quest to learn to play guitar.I enjoyed the studies and theories that were shared. I will be looking for more books like this that mix psychology, learning methods, and music. Well done.

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    Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning []  2020-1-29 8:50

    I got this book because I’m a 60 yr-old trying to teach myself bass guitar. I was hoping for more detail and tactics for older people learning a fresh instrument but found mostly information on the author’s relationships and about studies on learning. Still, it’s worth a read.

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    Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning []  2020-1-29 8:50

    A charming story by a neuroscientist who gives a blow by blow of his midlife attempt to become a guitarist from scratch. The story is interspersed with mini-lectures on melody history, melody theory, melody education, and (most thoroughly) melody and the brain. It proceeds with a light touch, but covers some massive material. Not everything is at the level that a professional musicologist would like (especially the fast overview of 1000 years of melody history), but almost everyone will learn something.

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    Guitar Zero: The New Musician and the Science of Learning []  2020-1-29 8:50

    I enjoyed this book immensely, both as a guitarist and a melody educator. Gary Marcus sheds a lot of light on the learning process, especially in regard to musical instruments. It validated much of what I've intuited as a teacher but have never been able to articulate, and also opened a few doors. It's very readable - I don't have a powerful science background, but he kept everything in layman's terms, which I appreciated! I recommend this book to my adult students, who frequently have preconceptions about learning an instrument. This is fascinating reading for any musician, teacher, or anyone in the process of learning a musical instrument (although I expect it applies to general learning, as well)!

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    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-2-1 9:46

    Unfortunately this very nice, hardback book was thrown into a box too huge for it, without any padding. Entire sections of pages were bent back. have placed it under a lot of massive books to straighten. Next time,I suggest using massive duty shipping envelopes or using packing material to protect these nice books. Incredibly information, very well loved text among PICU nurses.

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  • 0

    Useful review?

    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-2-1 9:46

    amazing reference book

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    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-2-1 9:46

    Very helpful for my daughter! Thank you!

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    Useful review?

    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-2-1 9:46

    This is a rare search - it is what a nursing textbook should be! Tons of the best pediatric critical care MD's, RN's, and NP's all collaborating to make an outstanding text. Far too often, nursing education neglects teaching the science behind nursing care. This book assumes nurses are capable of learning medicine, biology, biochemistry, and pharmacology, and it assumes that knowledge of these subjects is critical to providing the best care. This book requires more mental effort than a quick-and-dirty how-to manual, but you will really know why you're doing what you're doing. And that means everything to your practice and your patients! This book is a standard-setter for the PICU. I'm hoping it will inspire more collaborative texts and journals!

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    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-2-1 9:46

    Liked the simple to read format.

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    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-2-1 9:46

    This book is amazing. Everything a PICU nurse needs to know. Covers in amazing detail pathophysiology and nursing care in intensive situations. I never write reviews but I had to because this book is so good. It covers pharm, picu procedures, ecmo, x-ray interpretation, and a lot of other things that will create your PICU life easier. Very accurate info and probably the PICU bible for CCRN and nursing practice.

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    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-2-1 9:46

    Comprehensive book detailing the diseases of chronically ill kids broken down into understandable text. Highly suggest for those fresh to the field and old to brush up on certain diagnoses!

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    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-2-1 9:46

    Very amazing reference for working with medically fragile children.

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    Lung Ultrasound in the Critically Ill: The BLUE Protocol []  2020-7-6 18:34

    A "must have" book for those who love lung ultrasound.

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    Lung Ultrasound in the Critically Ill: The BLUE Protocol []  2020-7-6 18:34

    It is awesome !!!!!!!

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    Lung Ultrasound in the Critically Ill: The BLUE Protocol []  2020-7-6 18:34

    Absolutely great. A must have for anyone who practices lung ultrasound.

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    King of the Mild Frontier: An Ill-Advised Autobiography []  2020-1-26 22:56

    Checked this out from the library a lot of years ago and remember sitting in the stands at my kid's swim practice hysterically laughing out loud and all the parents wondering in what shape or form I had lost my mind along with my social decorum. Don't know what had this book on my mind again but this time I'm owning the book and keeping it forever.

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    King of the Mild Frontier: An Ill-Advised Autobiography []  2020-1-26 22:56

    All of Chris Crutcher's books I have read proceed from the life experiences of the characters in his professional life...I thought. His own young life clearly influenced his writing equally.

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    King of the Mild Frontier: An Ill-Advised Autobiography []  2020-1-26 22:56

    I am a high school English teacher working with struggling readers. I read Deadline to the class and loved it. I had read Whale Talk and loved it to so I "dove" in to Crutcher's books. This book gives you all the background on all the other books. It makes reading all the other books so much easier to understand and makes you go "Oh ... I understand now." Crutcher is a genius when writing for teens and from the teen experience ... Read anything he writes ... Note ... he does use typical teenage language which a lot of may search offensive.

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    So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood, and What Parents Can Do to Protect Their Kids []  2020-5-15 18:39

    I cannot be a an unbiased reviewer since I have known one of the authors for a lot of years.I bought the book because I am very concerned with the early sexualization of very young kids in our is cannot lead to any positive outcome. In addition the issues faced by young girls in trying to measure up to media standards must be overwhelming for many. I believe youth pregnancies are a direct effect of this stilted representation of beauty to young e book addresses these problems effectively and its calm and concerned tone are refreshing and instructive for all concerned, especially parents.

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    So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood, and What Parents Can Do to Protect Their Kids []  2020-5-15 18:39

    Useful book, definitely an eye opener, recommended for all parents. It talks more about the examples and cases rather than give hints on how to resolve it. However, it definitely makes you feel less alone with your issues and gives you insight on how not only parents view those issues but how the kids perceive our globe from their angle so we can better understand them.

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    So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood, and What Parents Can Do to Protect Their Kids []  2020-5-15 18:39

    I am so glad I purchased this book. I am in the field of health and I focus on how the media affects youth, which is what this book is all about. One of the authors is the creator of the Killing Me Softly video that shows how commercials and ads affect women's self esteem, and together with the other author, they have made a very informational book for parents on what to do when even your 5 year old is talking about sex.

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    So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood, and What Parents Can Do to Protect Their Kids []  2020-5-15 18:39

    Perfect read for every parent! Contains ways to communicate w all ages of kids about sex. A handbook all parents should own

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    So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood, and What Parents Can Do to Protect Their Kids []  2020-5-15 18:39

    Was recommended by a professor of mine and I found it to be so informative and provided such shocking information. Would recommend!

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    So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood, and What Parents Can Do to Protect Their Kids []  2020-5-15 18:39

    all parents and guardians of kids should read this.

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    So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood, and What Parents Can Do to Protect Their Kids []  2020-5-15 18:39

    This was a bonus for my daughter as she has 3 young girls; one is in the tween yrs., so she was delighted to keep this as the globe becomes more complicated for knowing what to do or not to do when dealing with the examples young celebrities are setting for our children. I would recommend this or any reading material to tutorial parents as to how our kids should dress, watch on tv, melody they listen to. Our kids are growing up too soon!!!

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    King of the Mild Frontier: An Ill-Advised Autobiography []  2020-1-26 22:56

    I cannot praise this book enough. It was an absolute enjoyable ever, it is not for the faint of heart. There are situations that create you cringe and quite a bit of profanity and reference. If you cannot talk about or swear in your classroom (in a professional way), I do not recommend is amazing to have in any library!This is a unbelievable read!

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    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child - E-Book (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-1-22 19:44

    Liked the simple to read format.

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    So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood, and What Parents Can Do to Protect Their Kids []  2020-5-15 18:39

    I bought and read this book because of work. I work with grandparents raising their grandchildren in Palm Beach County, Florida and they are struggling with raising kids again after so a lot of years.

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    So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood, and What Parents Can Do to Protect Their Kids []  2020-5-15 18:39

    Angeles Arrien (author of The Four-Fold Way) once said, "When we lose touch with our inner wisdom, we abnormalize the normal and normalize the abnormal." What was considered crazy, disgusting, or taboo yesterday could become status quo, even necessary, tomorrow--if we aren't paying close attention to our own internal guidance system. But that's not so simple to do anymore. Today's commercialized culture pushes limits for shop share and bombards with mass-delivered influential, often aberrant messages--making it increasingly difficult for moms and dads to function from their "wise selves."An extremely disturbing trend is the counterfeit culture's sexualization of children. From early childhood through adolescence today's children are bombarded with negative gender photos and skewed messages about sexuality. Twenty years ago, for instance, when I was raising my children, it would have been unheard of, even unspeakable, for manufacturers to shop thongs for seven year-old girls. Yet today, crazy as it is, that's what's happening. So Sexy So Soon provides a lot of other equally distressing examples of how our innocents are now just cogs in the "sex sells" marketing wheel. The impact is profound. So Sexy So Soon demonstrates the critical urgency of the problem and beautifully articulates what can be done about it by parents and by all of us working together to stop this insidious form of kid abuse. (The authors remind us that the thong is the stripper's clothing of choice, in case we have forgotten.)Diane Levin ([...]) is professor of education at Wheelock College and has been involved in training early childhood specialists for more than twenty-five years. She has worked extensively in the field of media-related issues, and is an internationally recognized expert on the effects of violence, media, and commercial culture on children, and speaks often on these subjects. She is the author or co-author of seven books including Remote Control Childhood? and The Battle Play Dilemma. Jean Kilbourne ([...] a Senior Scholar at the Wellesley Centers for Women is internationally recognized for her pioneering work on the photo of women in advertising. A famous lecturer, The Fresh York Times Magazine named her one of the three most famous speakers on college campuses. She has produced award-winning films, including the Killing Us Softly series and is the author of Can't Buy My Love: How Advertising Changes the Method We Think and Feel.Either one of these remarkable women could have alone written So Sexy So Soon. I'm glad they decided to squad up, instead. The combined wealth of each of their backgrounds and expertise bring a rich tapestry of ideas, examples, and suggestions. The ultimate power of the book is their compelling united voice--not only as specialists pioneering this work, but also as mothers. By sharing parenting examples of their own fears, questions, and successes, (We even obtain treated to a piece on what parents of teens need to do by Jean's then twenty-year old daughter, Claudia) they give us hope. It's nice to know we are not alone in the trenches--even experts don't have all the answers. Yet, if we do a few things right--like hold connected to our children and our love for them, lots can work out well. Even experts obtain admitting that this is a complex problem with no fast fixes and by giving practical "how tos" the authors provide both a thoughtful analysis of the issue as well as an effective action handbook. The comprehensive resources they've gathered are well- selected seminal books and organizations. There is something for everyone here. So Sexy So Soon will serve useful well beyond its copyright date because of the thorough research, practical activities, and fine ginning with a discussion of what is normal and what is not normal, Levin and Kilbourne lay out the problem of sex, sexualized kids and teens, along with the objectification this brings, linking the sexualization to consumerism clearly:"But in commercial culture has far more to do with trivializing and objectifying than with promoting it, more to do with consuming than connecting. The issue is not that as portrayed in the media is sinful, but that it is synthetic and cynical. The exploitation of our children's sexuality is in a lot of ways designed to promote consumerism, not just in childhood but throughout their lives." (p. 9)Chapter 3 gives necessary guidelines about how young kids are likely to think about photos based on their scene of development. This is an extremely helpful tool, especially since it is coupled with a discussion of the key concepts that parents need to effectively address the problem. "Children are learning lessons from today's sexualized environment that can undermine the very foundations they need in to grow up to be capable of having caring relationships of any kind, including those relationships in which plays a role." (p. 71) Much useful info is given for teens, too. What happens when the sexualized kid enters adolescence? Levin and Kilbourne allow you know. Parents may be shocked by some of the information. I doubt, for instance, if a lot of moms and dads realize just how accessible stars are to their children through Internet marketing. "Lauren Phoenix, star of scores of films...sells tube socks to teens in American Apparel ads, and queen Jenna Jameson has launched her own fashion line." (p. 143)The "clash of cultures" between what parents what for their children--the family culture--and what the commercial culture actually pushes to their children, forms a backdrop for So Sexy So Soon. The authors know that it is parents, as well as their kids that suffer because of this. "In a 2002 survey of parents of five-to-seventeen year olds, almost half reported that their largest challenge was trying to protect their kids from the negative influences of the outside world." (p. 75)Levin and Kilbourne give a lot of examples of struggles to understand and mitigate the commercial culture's influences on kids and teens--examples any modern-day parent or teacher can relate to. Several of the examples are given in detail. In these the reader has the opportunity to journey with the parent (or pull her hair out with the parent) as he or she struggles to figure out how to answer to a small girl crying because she "is too fat," for instance. In addition to providing parental dilemmas, the authors give explicit examples of how to talk to kids about these issues; what to attention to while we are listening to our kid talk about these issues; and necessary questions to ask and apter 6 focuses on "the power of connecting deeply with children," and gives sentence-by-sentence dialogue with the mother and the small girl who thinks she is too fat, alongside a commentary by the authors with explanations for the suggestions given. If you don't have a lot of time, you could begin the book here. There are other perfect examples given in Chapter 6 as well. These present the potential responsiveness of kids when we relate to them and the elimination of parental fear when we understand how our kids are thinking about potentially contentious issues. The book demonstrates that listening deeply, asking non-judgmental questions; keeping a clear head; and finding out all the facts--go a long method to supporting our children's healthy development while lessening possible negative e authors conclude by calling us to obtain involved in "creating a fresh cultural environment" with twelve perfect and do-able choices. Obviously, we cannot allow commercialized sexualization of kids become normalized. Levin and Kilbourne quote Cordelia Anderson, who reminds us, "`once something becomes normalized, it becomes the wallpaper of our existence--we don't see it, we accept it as just the method it is and we are numbed to seeing any ill effects or taking action to change it,'" (p. 178) So Sexy So Soon motivates us to productive action on behalf of our children, de-numbing our society in the process.

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    So Sexy So Soon: The New Sexualized Childhood, and What Parents Can Do to Protect Their Kids []  2020-5-15 18:39

    This is the excellent book for parents who are raising young girls. It talks about how our girls are growing up to quick in our society.

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    Useful review?

    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child - E-Book (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-1-22 19:44

    Unfortunately this very nice, hardback book was thrown into a box too huge for it, without any padding. Entire sections of pages were bent back. have placed it under a lot of massive books to straighten. Next time,I suggest using massive duty shipping envelopes or using packing material to protect these nice books. Incredibly information, very well loved text among PICU nurses.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child - E-Book (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-1-22 19:44

    This book is amazing. Everything a PICU nurse needs to know. Covers in amazing detail pathophysiology and nursing care in intensive situations. I never write reviews but I had to because this book is so good. It covers pharm, picu procedures, ecmo, x-ray interpretation, and a lot of other things that will create your PICU life easier. Very accurate info and probably the PICU bible for CCRN and nursing practice.

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child - E-Book (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-1-22 19:45

    This is a rare search - it is what a nursing textbook should be! Tons of the best pediatric critical care MD's, RN's, and NP's all collaborating to make an outstanding text. Far too often, nursing education neglects teaching the science behind nursing care. This book assumes nurses are capable of learning medicine, biology, biochemistry, and pharmacology, and it assumes that knowledge of these subjects is critical to providing the best care. This book requires more mental effort than a quick-and-dirty how-to manual, but you will really know why you're doing what you're doing. And that means everything to your practice and your patients! This book is a standard-setter for the PICU. I'm hoping it will inspire more collaborative texts and journals!

    0  


  • 0

    Useful review?

    ECG Interpretation in the Critically Ill Dog and Cat []  2020-2-1 10:6

    The key to ECG interpretation is pattern recognition, and pattern recognition is developed the same method as any skill - through ry easy-to-read book.Yonatan Cohen, Israel

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    King of the Mild Frontier: An Ill-Advised Autobiography []  2020-1-26 22:56

    This is one of my all time favorite books. Although Chris Crutcher is mainly popular for his young adult fiction, this is a memoir about growing up in Cascade, Idaho, and is truly one of the funniest books I have ever read. The stories will stay with you forever.

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    King of the Mild Frontier: An Ill-Advised Autobiography []  2020-1-26 22:56

    If you're looking for a book that will create you laugh, touch your heart, and bring forth the nostalgia of previous generations, this is the book. Chris Crutcher is an awesome storyteller, and his autobiography is perhaps his greatest work. If you have read any of his fiction, you'll search pieces of his inspirations here, rooted in true life. My whole family ended up reading and enjoying this book.

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    King of the Mild Frontier: An Ill-Advised Autobiography []  2020-1-26 22:56

    Every one of us has had some kind of Chris Crutcher experience, and we've known children like him. His story is the story of being a kid in an adult globe at a time in your life before you realize that they don't have the answers to life any more than you do.

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    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child - E-Book (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-1-22 19:44

    Very amazing reference for working with medically fragile children.

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    King of the Mild Frontier: An Ill-Advised Autobiography []  2020-1-26 22:56

    Having briefly met the author I enjoyed this book immensely. Mr. Crutches bared his soul, sharing life experiences in an entertaining way. I will a paperback to give my son who faces a lot of of the same challenges.

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    King of the Mild Frontier: An Ill-Advised Autobiography []  2020-1-26 22:56

    Chris Crutcher's autobiography gives the reader some idea how he became a write with a sense of humor and the ability to have compassion for his characters.

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    King of the Mild Frontier: An Ill-Advised Autobiography []  2020-1-26 22:56

    a amazing read, created me think my life isnt all that weird

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    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child - E-Book (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-1-22 19:44

    Very helpful for my daughter! Thank you!

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    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child - E-Book (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-1-22 19:45

    amazing reference book

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    Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child - E-Book (Hazinski, Nursing Care of the Critically Ill Child) []  2020-1-22 19:44

    Comprehensive book detailing the diseases of chronically ill kids broken down into understandable text. Highly suggest for those fresh to the field and old to brush up on certain diagnoses!

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    The Sky So Heavy []  2020-2-11 18:50

    Australian Teenagers facing the ultimate fear of starving to death and a nuclear winter with literary references to classic novel "Heart of Darkeness" - gripping, raw and interesting context being Blue Mts, Western Sydney and Eastern Sydney...

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    The Best ...So Far []  2020-8-31 19:9

    Like Karen Carpenter,there will be no other like Anne Murray to imitate her attractive voice.(which ironically started @ the same time)After I heard the "bird song" as she would refer to it (which launched her USA career) twice in a week,I had to obtain this e covered so a lot of other artists songs making them her own which seemed to create them better even to the original artists or she just like the song so much(Day Dream Believer)Though she no longer sings publicly these songs live neration X and their off spring could learn a thing or two for small of their songs will have the lasting power our generation grew up with.

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    The Best ...So Far []  2020-8-31 19:9

    Its a classic to add to a larger playlist -for those Sunday afternoons. I miss words sung yet so properly pronounced.

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    The Sky So Heavy []  2020-2-11 18:50

    Loved this book and struggled to place it down - action packed, suspenseful with really captivating characters. I especially enjoyed the descriptions of locations I recognised from Sydney/the Blue Mountains and the method it thought-provokingly explored themes including asylum seekers, spirituality, friendship etc. Looking forward to her next book.

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    The Sky So Heavy []  2020-2-11 18:50

    I loved this book from beginning to is a tough story set in the Blue Mountains - Fresh South Wales is plunged into a nuclear winter and Fin and his brother have to test to survive within the disaster. Their parents are gone, a blackout, electricity is gone, snow is falling, the apocalypse is coming closer and both have to struggle to search their method out of their hometown to reach Sydney.I could not stop from reading, I was so absorbed in this enthralling dystopian novel. I loved the characters; not always political correct, but amazing and intriguing teens fighting for survival. I had my own film in my mind while reading and can really recommend the books to everybody who wants to read an exciting, but dark novel.

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    The Best ...So Far []  2020-8-31 19:9

    I have always loved Anne Murray’s attractive alto voice. This is one of the best compilations I’ve bought yet.I love it!!!♥️

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    The Sky So Heavy []  2020-2-11 18:50

    This story grips you from the beginning and it's hard to resist reading it in one sitting! The characters are real to life and interesting. I particularly admire the method Zorn manages to have her characters debating huge problems and differing globe views in the midst of a suspenseful adventure.A book that the target audience will have fun as well as being a catalyst for thinking through bigger problems in life.

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    The Best ...So Far []  2020-8-31 19:9

    Still love Anne Murray after all these years. My ultimate favorite song on this album is “Could I have this dance”. It was the song played in Urban cowboy”.

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    The Best ...So Far []  2020-8-31 19:9

    Unbelievable melody collection of Anne Murray. Endless enjoyment of timeless classics. Can never obtain enough of listening to one of the world's most exceptional melody artists of all time. Very satisfied with this purchase. Thank you Amazon.

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    So Dark the Night [Movie]  2017-10-13 21:51

    Le Cheval Noir. So Dark the Night is directed by Joseph H. Lewis and written by Dwight V. Babcock, Martin Berkeley and Aubrey Wisberg. It stars Steven Geray, Micheline Cheirel, Eugene Borden, Ann Codee and Egon Brecher. Melody is by Hugo Friedhofer and cinematography by Burnett Guffey. Henri Cassin (Geray) is a well regarded Parisian detective who while on a much earned vacation falls in love with innkeeper's daughter Nanette Michaud. However, with Nanette already having a boyfriend, and a tempestuous one at that, real love does not run smooth, especially when murder enters the fray and Cassin has to begin investigating the tricky case. It all begins so perky, with jolly music, smiling faces and brightly lighted compositions, so much so I had actually thought I had loaded the wrong movie to watch! Once Henri Cassin arrives at Le Cheval Noir (The Black Horse) in the rural city of St. Margot, however, the whole tone of the movie shifts into darker territory. The apple cart is well and truly turned upside down and different hero traits begin to come into play - with the different main players suddenly becoming an interesting bunch. Enter hunchbacked man, jealous guy, love sick chamber maid, weak parents et al... Joseph Lewis (My Name Is Julia Ross - Gun Crazy - The Huge Combo) does a top job in recreating a French city with what no doubt was a little budget, yet his greatest strengths here are his visual ticks, in how he manages to fill the picture with the requisite psychological discord that craftily haunts the edges of the frames until they be ready for maximum impact. In partnership with ace photographer Guffey, Lewis brings tilted angles and black shadowy shadings to this French hot-bed of lust and hero disintegration. He also has a nifty bent for filming scenes through windows and bars, while his filming of a rippled water reflection cast onto a character's face is as significant a metaphor as can be. Also note scenes involving a rocking chair, a dripping tap and a deft window splice sequence that signifies that the psychological walls are tumbling down. Something of a rare picture given that who the director is, this definitely is of interest to the movie noir loving crowd. The finale will not surprise too many, but it doesn't cop out by soaping the subject to hand. It also serves to present that the amazing Joseph H. Lewis could create a silk purse out of a sow's ear. 7/10 Now available as part of the Columbia Movie Noir Classics IV Collection.

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    The Sky So Heavy []  2020-2-11 18:50

    Very interesting, thought provoking look into what can happen when society breaks down to its bare survival instincts. Parts of this book haunt me days later, especially when people go out of the their method to perform common courtesies like holding begin a door, offering a woman a seat on the subway, or saying, "good bless you," when a stranger sneezes. This book makes you think, how a lot of of these people would test to slay you for your meal if our globe changed tomorrow. You definitely look at life through a various lens after reading, Sky So Heavy.

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    The Sky So Heavy []  2020-2-11 18:50

    Good, although haunting/depressing at times, storyline about a nuclear winter and the resultant devastation. At times the pace was a small slow; yet, that did not over-ride the reading experience. The christian sub-plot, as a christian myself, I feel.did not work, as the sub-plot an addition and not part of the story. The ending was slightly e book was a needed text for my son to read at school. In that respect I would have liked to see less violence and more focus on how to turn their situation around. Story reminds me of the film Red Dawn. I would highly recommend this book to adults, but am unsure whether teenagers, especially teenagers going through difficulties, should be reading this depressing/haunting tale.

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    The Sky So Heavy []  2020-2-11 18:50

    This book caught my attention from the beginning. I initially picked it up because it was short listed for The CBCA, read the first couple of pages because of the cover, and then knew I had no choice but to take it home to read the rest. With engaging characters, an awesome dance between the story and what a post-apocalypse Sydney would look like, and a run of stressful-situations that created me constantly ask 'what would I do', the novel is a cant-put-it-down from begin to finish. Literally. I started reading at 2pm and would have had it finished by 11:30 if the need for sleep hadn't overpowered me to demand I leave the latest chapter and a half for the following morning.I would have given The Sky So Massive 5 stars, but held off because of the massive language used throughout the novel. I appreciated the stress the characters are under, and see the hard-core swearing as serving a purpose. However, it frustrated me because I would love my thirteen year old to read it, I believe she would love it. And what a unbelievable book it would be to recommend for analyses and conversation starters in the classroom! But in amazing conscious I can't suggest such things, or that my young teen read a book with the level of swearing in it, which increases toward the end of the novel. I want Claire Azores had been able to search a method of getting the sentiments across without needing the explicit language.

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    The Sky So Heavy []  2020-2-11 18:50

    Most of you know me well enough now, that you know I don't read books in male POV, I created an exception for this book for a couple of reasons, one it is written by a fellow Australian and two It seemed related to Tomorrow when the battle began, which was my favourite e toughest question you could ask a reader like me is what is your favourite book? mostly because I read so a lot of and fall in love with so a lot of it is hard to pick a favourite. To be a favourite it has to invoke all my emotions, I shouldn't be able to place it down without a war or the opposite that I can't bring myself to [email protected]#$%! because I don't wish it to end. Most of all it needs to create me think long and hard after I finish reading, to take time to extract myself from the novel's e Sky so Massive by Claire Zorn ticked all these boxes, It is the most haunting, heartbreaking and at time heart stopping book I have ever read. I stumbled upon The Sky so Massive while doing my weekly stalk of publisher pages to see what fresh books were coming up, I was drawn immediately to the cover, while nothing flashy It portrays a desolate and scary picture of what appears to be children standing surrounded by bleakness. Straight away I required this book, Thankfully Penguin Australia were nice enough to send me a copy for Review.We meet Fin the protagonist while someone is screaming at him in another language pointing a gun to his head, a truly action packed begin to the novel, after a few flashbacks we search that Finn has been left in charge of his younger brother Max, after the globe goes to hell when someone sets of a Nuclear Bomb and plunges the globe into a nuclear winter. We follow Finn and Max as they struggle to survive, Finn gets a bit paranoid about the snow falling worried that it may be radioactive, This instinct keeps his brother alive while others around him begin to obtain sick and die. Meal becomes Scarce and the government abandons the people hoping to hold a select few alive, Finn Squads up with other teenage survivors as they set off in hope of finding Finns mother in Sydney who might be able to save aire Zorn is not afraid to obtain to the nitty-gritty and makes you question what could you do to survive, how far could you be pushed and could you abandon what you believe is right in to survive. I would never have thought about the government abandoning the majority of the population in a situation like this, how could someone in charge create that decision? to allow women, children, elderly and men die of starvation and radiation to hold just a few alive, how do you create the decision of who is worthy to live and who should is book like John Marsden's Tomorrow series really strike a chord for me, because here in Australia we think we are safe, we don't go looking for problem and we back up our allies when we are needed. To consider that a nuclear battle elsewhere in the globe would destroy so much for everyone, is terrifying, It leaves us, our small country trying to save itself or in the case of The sky so Massive everyone for themselves. Most dystopias I read are usually set in locations such as america or a created up-country after there were no more borders or countries left. Reading books that are set in your own country can really give you is is a brilliant piece of work that I would recommend to anyone who loves Apocalyptic tales of survival, especially Australian's as it hits so close to home. It is a Hauntingly attractive tale about survival and how resilient the human spirit can be confronted with the unspeakable.I cannot wait till the next book in the series.Favourite Quotes"isn't there some philosophy about how it's the arts that separate humans from animals?Really? I thought it was not eating our young."― Claire Zorn, The Sky So Heavy"It doesn't sound like a gunshot. But then if I've been shot in the head, my perception of these things is probably off."― Claire Zorn, The Sky So Heavy"Do you wish to walk for a bit? It's probably ridiculously dangerous, but YOLO and what not."― Claire Zorn, The Sky So

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    The Best ...So Far []  2020-8-31 19:9

    This is a amazing CD which contains 20 of Anne Murray's best songs! The sound is unbelievable and there is a amazing selection of songs. I highly recommend this product. Please tag if you search my review helpful. Thank you so much!

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    The Best ...So Far []  2020-8-31 19:9

    ANNE MURRAY'S VOICE IS FOREVER A POP CLASSIC. A VERY GOOD CD AND I RECOMMEND YOU BUY IT IF YOU ARE A ANNE MURRAY FAN LIKE ME.

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    The Sky So Heavy []  2020-2-11 18:50

    John Marsden's " When the Battle Began" reminds me of this story and was one of the few books my 14 year old son would read. I worried over the plight of the characters in this book. What would you do if abandoned, starved and threatened by others in the same predicament?Couldn't place it down.

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    The Best ...So Far []  2020-8-31 19:9

    I bought this specifically to obtain the song "Can I Have This Dance For The Rest Of My Life" for the wedding I place on for my mother so she and her fresh husband could have their first dance together as a married couple at their wedding reception. My mother had been a widow for 33 years. The man she married lived across the road with his wife of 48 years from my mother for 19 years. His wife died in Nov. 2013. My mother is 86 years old and Al is 88 years old. They fell in love & married Sept. 7, 2014. Although I bought this CD for that purpose I love the CD. The Melody and Ann Murray's Lovely voice.

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    The Best ...So Far []  2020-8-31 19:9

    Love her! The songs on this CD bring back some nice memories from my past when they were hits on the billboard charts.. Always loved her cover of the Beatles "You won't see me", and I am a major, major Beatles fan. My tip is it an enjoy!

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    The Best ...So Far []  2020-8-31 19:9

    Has most of the songs she created that I like.

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    The Zero-Point Universe []  2020-1-21 21:46

    This is truly a ground-breaking description of physics. Flemming starts from nothing and build to a grand explanation of the universe tying together disparate concepts in physics in a truly unified theory. What I found remarkable was the simplicity in his explanation of vacuum energy and the effects that charged particles have on virtual particles in the vacuum. This view of the vacuum results in the best explanation of the popular two slit experiment of quantum physics. Mainstream physicists explain away the behavior of the two slit experiment essentially as 'quantum magic'. By combining the idea of zeptons to the two slit experiment its almost completely obvious why the particles exhibit wavelike behavior as a effect of the polarized virtual particles in the vacuum proceeding the charged particle's movement in the vacuum. This is the best explanation for the wavelike behavior of particles in the two slit experiment ever presented. There will undoubtedly be a lot of friction from established physics from this discovery and the fallout might be quite huge since it adds an amazingly easy explanation of what is currently considered 'quantum magic'. The implications of this explanation may shake up the entire field of quantum physics. I highly recommend this book to anyone interested in quantum physics. This book will no doubt become a keystone for the future of physics.

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    The Zero-Point Universe []  2020-1-21 21:46

    A definitive, accessible explanation to how vacuum energy fluctuations work to make fundamental forces and gravity, explaining most of the major shortcomings of general relativity and the standard model. Accessible to a non-physicist even if you don't completely know standard model details, if you know what an electron is you can follow this book. Quite simply mind-blowing. This single theory also provides a consistent explanation of the force of gravity, something that still eludes those who religiously follow the Standard Model. If the rest of the physics globe gets over their phobia of universal fields, which seems to be event with Quantum Field Theory, I think they will eventually arrive at what Fleming presents here so well. The most necessary and persuasive example to me was how Fleming's theory solves the issues of the expanding universe and 'missing matter' (which is really additional force) holding huge galaxies ry well written, in a coherent manner where the author does the hard work to lay out the ideas.I always knew intuitively that the fanciful standard model particle interactions could not describe a true phenomena, they have no amazing explanation of the underlying mechanism. Fleming is focused on finding, and explaining, such underlying mechanisms throughout the book. He shows a deep and cogent expertise in the field and is very amazing at using historical examples from greats such as Einstein, Feynman, and Bohr to create a point.I ordered 5 copies to send to my physicist mates in the national e book also includes a comparison to general relativity explaining 10 tests that Flemings theory passes (in addition to Einsteins 4 tests), to puzzles for which general relativity has no of all, the theory is intuitive and easy to use, based on a fundamental particle with charges of two things known to exist already, matter and thing I [email protected]#$%! would contain is a discussion of how a Higgs boson fits into the theory, but considering the Higgs boson was 'found' after this book was written, I have no doubt Fleming will produce that in the future. He does explain how the vacuum energy fluctuations make mass (exactly what a Higgs boson supposedly explains), so it may end up that certain unstable combinations of these mass-creating energies make the Higgs boson, which is the current explanation of the Standard Model.Another amazing thing is that you can design experiments in a physics lab to confirm the matter force (see flywheel discussion in chapter 9).Overall this is an wonderful work by a physicist dedicated to integrity of the scientific method.

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    The Zero-Point Universe []  2020-1-21 21:46

    This is a unbelievable book that presents a fresh exciting and comprehensive fresh theory of Physics!!!! It is based on experimental data and theoretical analyses developed by a lot of physicists over the past 150 years. Although the primary info has been available to physicists, it has been mostly ignored until now when Fleming has compiled it as the basis of this fresh e basis of the work is the fact that the vacuum is not empty. Instead it is the Zero Point Universe (ZPU) that has a large energy density. It is comprised of zero-point energy vacuum fluctuations, which he calls Zeptons that are influenced by van der Waals forces and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle. It is the essence of the universe and everything in it-seen and e book explains the force fields including the powerful and weak nuclear forces, the particle-wave nature of the photon, why galaxies form spirals, what is causing the universe to expand, what controls the speed of light, what inertia is, what makes matter attract or repulse (the Electro-Matter force) and shows that mass does not warp space, the universe is flat and the missing matter in the universe is in the ZPU. Of course there is much is book is surprisingly simple to read and understand especially for a person with a technical background. In fact I read it almost like a novel at first because of the method it presents the history and descriptions of the experiments and the influences, happenings and reasons that the existence of the ZPU has been denied and its study and development prevented. As the story unfolded I kept thinking "why doesn't someone pick up on this?" On the technical side, the explanations and descriptions are clear. Some equations are presented and they are surprisingly simple to e book gives a lot of awesome conclusions that remove some long unanswered questions and will challenge a lot of long held beliefs. This will certainly be controversial. I can hardly wait to see the reaction of the physics establishment.

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    The Zero-Point Universe []  2020-1-21 21:46

    Definitely worth reading. Presents a fascinating alternative to the Standard Model of the universe and attempts to explain a lot of observations that are not understood using general and unique relativity.

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    The Zero-Point Universe []  2020-1-21 21:46

    Question: What is in the "space" between zeptons? In other words, what is the underlying structure that supports and creates zeptons?Answer: A possible solution could be that the aether is actually a continuum and all particles/forces are merely distortions (i.e. waves, solitons, etc) within this continuum....

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    The Zero-Point Universe []  2020-1-21 21:46

    This book is written for engineers and math experts, not the "common man". Can't judge it as I really can't reach it. I'm thinking of returning it...I got it because of the title.

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    Ill Communication []  2020-1-18 23:53

    This feedback is specific to the vinyl record. I have read a bunch of not good reviews on it, but the copy I just received was remastered perfectly without a skip or anything. It is amazing! So glad that I took a leap of faith and ignored the previous feedback I read. Maybe I just got lucky. I don't know. This is the bomb!!!

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    Ill Communication []  2020-1-18 23:53

    This is a nice 90s throwback that reminds me of high school but as a Beastie Boys fan, I must admit that Ill Communication has not aged as well as some of their other albums (Paul's Boutique, Check Your Head). It's a must have for any fan of the B-boys and any fan of mid 90s music.

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    Ill Communication []  2020-1-18 23:53

    As a whole this album really flows nicely, not every song is a hit here, but they all fit well together as a whole. Must haves like Sabotage, Root Down, and Sure Shot are in there along with some private favs of mine like Flute Loop and Shambala leading into Bodhisattva Vow. Finally got around to purchasing again since my original from back in the day was never returned and satisfied I did.

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    Ill Communication []  2020-1-18 23:53

    Old school

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    Ill Communication []  2020-1-18 23:53

    I've never been a Beastie Boys fan. I discovered Shambala while looking for an online copy of the old Three Dog Night tune. Beastie Boys Shambala hooked me, I had to hear more. Ill Communication didn't disappoint. I love the fusion-hop-acid-trip-jazz-rock-whatever-it-is they is is not the melody to listen to while having an anxiety attack. It is a montage of rapped lyrics, globe beats, rock and jazz, fusion, and trip-hop, a veritable assault on standardized categories and linear perceptions. Whatever you decide to call it (yeah, even "That ain't music, it's NOISE!"), the Beastie Boys have executed it well. This melody is skillfully created, magically blended, and flawlessly engineered.(If you'd like to discuss this CD or review in more depth, please on the "about me" link above and drop me an email. Thanks!)

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    Ill Communication []  2020-1-18 23:53

    As a child I had License to Ill, amazing album when you're 12 and a bunch of that items still stands up. I shared it with my son and he became an instant fan. So I bought Paul's Boutique... holy crap, what a GREAT album! My son and I listened to that one straight for weeks. So then, for Christmas, I got him Ill Communication, mainly because, well, Sabotage! That is just one of the all-time, [email protected]#$% tracks around. Sadly I was disappointed by the whole rest of the album. I'm sure this album marked a change, a milestone in hip hop and rap and in the Beastie Boys but it's a change I don't go for. Whereas each track on Paul's Boutique is special and has it's own hero and flavor (plus some beautiful miraculous beats), each track on here sounds like the other (minus Sabotage). The vocals are distorted on every track, can't figure out what they're saying and the beats are beautiful monotonous, sort of like most rap and hip hop these days.

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