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    clash of clans []  2020-5-11 22:47

    recommend amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing amazing

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    guns of glory []  2020-5-21 22:34
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    Just played Guns of Glory on a phone application via mistplay reviews. Played this one with amazing interest as on the mobile you got the impression of controlling your characters on the ground level, helping catch pick pockets etc etc. Like all mobile ads this was misleading. Don't obtain me wrong the android game itself was addictive and you can spend hours playing (If you play via mistplay you can earn a fair few Amazon vouchers), but yeah false advertising? Really? Unfortunately this is a huge pitfall a lot of android games like these fall into. For example you can expect a nice create your kitchen safe android game but instead you obtain something quite various (garden scapes see add for application and play game)

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    Spellbook of the Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:33

    I adored this book as I did the Accident Season. The characters are fun and relatable, the magic makes sense. Some mysteries remain which I always love in a book. I love that one of the main characters has a hearing aid!Also, the romance scenes are hot and just right!

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    Spellbook of the Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:33

    What a special story this was! Mystery, magic, suspense, betrayal, love, loss and friendship. So a lot of unexpected twists and turns kept me reading and wondering what will happen next. At times it was a true head trip. If I could I would rate it 10 stars! This book has a forever home on my bookcase right next to the author's debut book, The Accident Season.

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    Spellbook of the Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:33

    Amazing read. Fowley-Doyle is a amazing story teller. Loved the originality of the story, the description of the characters surroundings and the likeability of the characters. I did like the accident season a small more than the Spellbook of the lost and found, but still a amazing resd.

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    Spellbook of the Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:33

    I felt obliged to read & review this book because of 2 reasons:1. I won this book in a (thank you penguin teen)2. I'm buddy reading with a friendIf it weren't for these 2 reasons, I would actually DNF this book. I mean, life is short and there are plenty of books out there, etc. Anyway, I think this book might be something John Green would write if he decides to venture into magical realism. But I think he should just stick to contemporary. I think this is also what I think about this book. It would've been better if the author just wrote a contemporary novel (no spellbook, whatsoever).I guess, one of the issues is that it's kind of pretentious. There's a quote that reminds me of the cigarette metaphor in The Fault in Our Stars. Immediately, I knew this book was not for me. I felt that this quote came out of nowhere. Just useless banter while I wait for something to happen. Unfortunately, the pacing is slow so don't expect anything to happen within the first 100 aracters were unmemorable.I remembered telling my mate about the names, how they reminded me of ingredients to a spell. Turns out it was what the author was going for:It was predictable for my part. It's kind of funny but I'm still ltiple POVs did not support eitherSince the characters don't have striking personalities (flat characters) and their names sound like plants, it's hard to distinguish them from one another. If the chapters did not have their names on them, you won't be able to tell who's speaking. I couldn't connect to any hero in the story and they didn't create any impression on me.Even the parents were weird. The father is randomly reciting poetry and the mother is giving cryptic messages to her daughter. It's so hard to like this book because it's so silly (imo). I didn't have fun this reading so, I'm tired of constantly reading quotes/statements about lost and found thingsAnd I don't feel like typing those quotes here...Needless to say, this book was not for me.

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    Spellbook of the Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:33

    “Be careful what you want for; not all lost things should be found.”This book was honestly one huge mindwarp. But I kinda liked it. It’s gritty and seductive, with an air of mystery that made a perfectly surreal environment for the story. We follow Olive, and her best mate Rose, as they start to lose things after the town’s annual bonfire. They meet up with 3 mysterious teens, Hazel, Rowan, and Ivy, who have lost things of their own. The ragtag group begins to search diary pages from a girl named Laurel and an ancient spellbook that can recall lost things. Magic, mystery, and mayhem ensure in this seductive and enchanting ings I LikedThe various mate groups show in the story are all really fantastic. I loved how Olive, Rose, Hazel, Rowan, and Ivy’s story was paralleling Laurel, Ash, and Holly’s. I also loved the friendships between Olive & Rose, and Hazel, Rowan, & Ivy. The developed and established friendships created the entire squad up more enjoyable and ere was this surreal feeling atmosphere over the entire story. It made this serendipitous globe where everything happened and was interconnected. It really matched the topic matter and I liked the end of the story I was left with some unanswered questions, but I don’t think everything in this story required a clear answer. I like that I’m left wondering about some aspects of the story. It matched the mysterious nature ere was some LGBT+ rep, which I wasn’t expecting. Rose and Olive both identify as bisexual, and Hazel identifies as a lesbian. Olive is deaf in one ear, and uses a hearing aid. It was nice to obtain some representation for people who are hard of hearing. Rose is half-Indian, and confronts some racist slurs, which are quickly challenged. It was nice to see non-white characters in this Irish setting. More diverse representation us always a amazing thingThings I Didn’t LikeWhile I did have fun the overall surreal feeling, it did have this weightless quality that created it hard to connect with the characters in the beginning of the story. The magicalness was excellent for the mystery, but it did hold the story from being grounded for me.I found that in the beginning third of the book, the various POV chapters ran together for me; especially because we’re introduced to the three groups at roughly the same time. The various groups finding the other’s “lost things” also didn’t support differentiate the people.Ivy left a small bit of a poor taste in my mouth after a reveal that happened in the latest quarter of the book, and I didn’t really like her much after that. I know everyone in this book is selfish, but I felt like that she did went a small too far.Spellbook of the Lost and Found is a magically captivating read that draws you into a globe of loss, mystery, and endurance. The dynamics really shined, while I found the romances to be a small lackluster. This is my first book from Moïra Fowley-Doyle, but it definitely intrigues me enough to check out more of her work.I received this book from the publisher via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review.

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    Spellbook of the Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:33

    I really enjoyed this book. I tend to love fiction about magic and witches. It was even more fascinating because it's about things lost and things found. The end still leaves you thinking, there are some unanswered things, but I think that's a amazing thing. I would recommend this book to anyone who enjoys magic and reading.

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    Spellbook of the Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:33

    The story was great; really created me think. A bit dark, which I liked

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    Spellbook of the Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:33

    Spellbook of the Lost and Found is so beautifully crafted, that even though it read like a contemporary, I wanted to hold reading because this book is like one giant mystery after another.I will admit, at first I wasn’t completely feeling this book. Like I said, it did read like a contemporary. And while there’s absolutely nothing wrong with contemporary, I just wasn’t expecting that. It took me a while to “get into the groove” and to obtain all the characters straightened out.Spellbook of the Lost and Found is set in a little Irish city and follows 3 POV’s. Each POV has its own group of friends, all of whom have mysteriously lost or found e 3 POV’s:1) Laurel, with her mates Ash and Holly. Laurel and her mates set the story in motion. They’re the original founders of the spellbook and they place it to the test. They are the most mysterious group.2) Olive, with her mate Rose. They both end up blacking out at a bonfire. When they awaken, they realize they’ve lost most of their memories from the night before and a bunch of other items. Olive is extremely loyal and caring. I found myself relating to her a lot!3) Hazel, with her twin brother Rowan, and mate Ivy. They are squatters in an abandoned home, but their lifestyle draws in Olive and Rose. They are also quite mysterious, and they are desperate to search what they lost. Hazel is my favorite because of her powerful personality and sharp e spellbook ties all three of these groups together. I’m going to leave it at that. I don’t wish to spoil anything since this book is one giant mystery. However I’m going to list out the things I liked and e Good:• The rep. Olive is partially deaf, Rose is POC, and there is LGBTQ rep. I am always appreciative of authors who seamlessly contain these reps in books. It makes my heart happy.• The writing. What can I say? The writing is gorgeous. The author left behind so a lot of clues and breadcrumbs for us to follow. Honestly, I missed so many! I wish to go back just so I can pick up all the pieces I missed. I tabbed so a lot of lines that stuck out to me.• The setting. I’ve never been to Ireland but it is on my bucket list. The method the woods and city were described makes me wish to travel even more.• The "side" characters. What I loved the most was that the non-narrating characters played a major role in the plot. They weren’t just side characters who didn’t serve a purpose. They weren’t just there. Have you ever read a book where one “best friend” was just there to serve as the “jokester”, or the “@#$%!”? Well, you won’t have that with this book. They’re all intertwined e Bad:• The pacing. It starts out slow almost to the point where I’d have problem picking up the book again. It really took me a while to obtain myself into the story. But once I did, I was fully immersed.• The multitude of characters. Like I said before, it took me a while to obtain all the various groups straightened out. If you don’t like multiple POV books then this may not be your jam.Overall I was very pleasantly surprised by how much I ended up liking this book. The lyrical writing and mystery surrounding all the characters kept me intrigued until the very end.

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    Spellbook of the Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:33

    This book is amazing. So a lot of twists and turns. A truly amazing magical mystery.

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    Spellbook of the Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:33

    (4.5 stars)I received an ARC from Penguin Random House in exchange for an honest review.I was immediately attracted to this one because of the summary. I haven’t read a amazing suspenseful novel in a while, so I really wanted to obtain a keep of this one. Allow me tell you this. You don’t wish to place this book down. Every chapter leaves you with wanting more so it’s IMPOSSIBLE to place it down unless you fall asleep because you’ve been reading it for hours.We have three groups of people, so let’s begin with the first group.Olive and RoseThese girls are best friends, but things take a weird turn after Olive wakes up the morning after a party. She is missing a few strange items, but she doesn’t think too much of it until she realizes Rose is disappearing a lot. Eventually, Olive comes across Hazel, her twin Rowan and their mate Ivy. They live in an abandoned development and a boarded up fore I obtain to them, though, I wish to talk more about Olive and Rose. Sometimes I thought that Rose wasn’t really a amazing friend, but it’s evident later that they really are the best of friends. This whole plot line is just something that messes them up and makes them question certain things. I love their personalities, though. Olive does take some risks, but she still has a amazing head on her shoulders. Rose is kind of the opposite, but she still has a amazing heart for her friends. It’s like they really match well together. Also, I love the diversity: Rose is a (I think. Maybe a bit bisexual, but more for girls). Olive is bi-sexual. Go equality!Hazel, Ivy and RowanThis trio was certainly strange. I imagine them as kind of grunge-y with a touch of hipster. Definitely with Rowan, the guy who likes to wear fedoras with his thick glasses. They’re smokers and drinkers and really on their own. Well, Hazel and Rowan are. They have been away from their parents, especially their alcoholic mother for a month. They are worried that they will be found so they create sure their mate Ivy keeps their secret. They do have a mate in Mags, who owns the pub and is kind of...immortal? Maybe? I don’t know. She was a card, though. Rowan is definitely the mysterious guy, but he has a humorous bone. He’s kind of the sarcastic type, but he was sweet to Olive. He’s straight, Hazel is lesbian, and Ivy is straight, I believe. I didn’t obtain the bi-sexual or vibe from her since the beginning is all about her and Rowan together with Hazel getting urel, Ash, and HollyThese girls were the strangest out of all of them. I had a feeling that these three would never really meet the other children and they kind of do, but it’s not what you think. Laurel is like Olive. She has a straight head on her shoulders. Holly is more timid than the other girls. Ash is just...what a ride. She is kind of nuts and...I don’t know. Their friendship takes an...interesting turn when they meet Jude, a guy with long hair and what I believe to be puka shells around his neck. When he gets mixed into the bunch, I’m just going to say that I’m very surprised a threesome was not mixed into it all because the dude is a total manwhore with ALL THREE girls! Not at the same time, but again...I was surprised “at the same time” wasn’t incorporated into the story. , what are these “lost” and “found” items?Well, it turns out there really is a spellbook. It’s not some metaphor or something in the title. And the spell itself is beautiful dark. Hell, it requires blood and a crucifix. The spell is meant to return something that is lost and the person(s) performing it must spell out what they wish to be returned. However, for everything that is returned, something else must be lost from a stranger. It’s quite a mess and the things aren't too terrible. It’s trinkets, clothing, and...teeth. Yeah. Sometimes it’s a is whole spell turns things into some psychological horror film. Some of these girls begin seeing things: people trying to come at your from a lake, a dog jumping into a lake and never coming up, parents saying things that they never said, their mate being set on fire in a calm manner, etc.If you wish a better mental picture, I have a really poor one. Have you ever seen Family Guy? Do you know that episode where Brian takes some mushrooms and we see the scariest trip in cartoon history (maybe)? It reminded me of that. It’s totally psychological and it’s creepy when you picture this book in your head. If this was created into a film, it would be very creepy.Oh yeah. There’s a part that took me back to the Freddy Kruger movie from, like, 2009. It’s the part where we see Freddy running out of that warehouse on fire and there is a stage that is related in the book.I hope I didn’t scare you.I was surprised at the scenes laced in here. I mean, not surprised that they were in there the first place, but of how detailed it was. It wasn’t detailed like mommy porn, but it was detailed close to how Sarah J. Maas info her scenes and we all know about THAT. Wish more diversity? Lesbian action! I won't say who, though.(Can we count the supernatural-ish and crazy sights that aren’t really there as diversity?)This book isn’t scary where you wish to hide under your bed and never touch it again. This book was really good. There are so a lot of twists and turns and, when you think things are over, it’s not. It was kind of slow in certain points, but hardly the whole time. There were probably one or two chapters that were slow. Other than that, I really enjoyed reading this all the method through. The mental imagery is so powerful and I would love to see this be created into a film. It also reminded me of those urban legend films, but darker.

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    The Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 22:21

    I'm almost through reading this book and feel like I have visited Pompeii. Mary Beard, with out becoming dry or boring, contains wonderful info about what has been found in the remains of this ancient town and what it tells us about the people who lived there. I have always been fascinated by Pompeii and Roman archeology, and hoped to visit Pompeii some day. That may not happen, but this book has created me feel like I've been through the ruins with an perfect guide. A amazing extra Pompeii resource is Dr. Stephen Tuck's Teaching Company DVD lecture series on Pompeii. He contains a lot of photographs and videos.

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    The Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 22:21

    My own zone of research in forensic archaeology (which in this case focuses primarily on the physical effects of the Vesuvian surge clouds) has brought me up close and private with Pompeii and Herculaneum. Yet, even to someone who works professionally in the ruins, Mary Beard's unbelievable book has a lot of fresh lessons to teach."The Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found," has a rare quality of being accessible to an smart Junior High School student with an interest in the topic - yet, simultaneously it is so full of fresh info about individual homes and public buildings as to be endlessly fascinating even to professional scientists and classicists already quite familiar with the cities of Vesuvius.- - Charles Pellegrino

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    The Library of Lost and Found: A Novel []  2020-8-2 18:0

    Lovely characters, fun stories within story. For the forgotten kid in all of us. For those who like books about books, about libraries, and comfortable reads that are like comfort food.

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    The Library of Lost and Found: A Novel []  2020-8-2 18:0

    The book was well-written, with an original story that unfolded in a method that kept my interest.

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    The Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 22:21

    This is an exceptionally well-written and fascinating acc of the town of Pompeii. It covers a range of subjects from architecture to governance to meal to practices and contains numerous illustrations. I particularly like the method the author weighs the archaeological evidence with a healthy dose of skepticism. The book gives only brief descriptions of the 79CE eruption itself and the centuries of excavation starting in the 1700s. Rather, it is general introduction to Pompeiian life. Author Mary Beard received the 2019 J. Paul Getty Medal in honor of her extraordinary contributions to the practice, understanding, and help of the arts.

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    The Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 22:21

    Mary really knows her stuff. But even more, she knows how to tell it. I cannot recommend this enough if Roman history interests you.

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    The Library of Lost and Found: A Novel []  2020-8-2 18:0

    I devoured this book in a short period of time. At first I was a small irritated by the main hero who allow people walk all over her, however, things started to change for Martha when a book is left at the library for her. In the book are some stories that she had written as a kid and other stories that her beloved grandmother had told her. The book is inscribed to her with a date that is three years after her grandmother was supposed to have died. Martha decides to search out more about the book which is the beginning of her is book is the story of how secrets can poison a family and how love can turn things around. If you have fun quirky characters and satisfied endings, this is a amazing choice for your next read.

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    The Library of Lost and Found: A Novel []  2020-8-2 18:0

    A lovely story about finding yourself regardless of your past. Inspirational because I thought the author was writing about me. I too work in a library, and gave up my life to care for elderly parents. (Martha got away with 15 years, I was used for 36.) Like Martha, I search myself at an embarrassing age being afraid and apprehensive, and struggling to have the life experiences normal for a person over half my age. with nobody needing her at home, she, like I do, struggles to search a purpose. But if Martha can do it, so can I. Ms. Patrick has again written a attractive novel that touches the deepest parts of the soul. The reader will search him/her/theirself in each character, and will be hard pressed to place the book down without finishing it in one go. Please hold writing, Ms. Patrick. Your books touch me deeply.

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    The Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 22:21

    I bought this book about a month before a planned trip to southern Italy and a visit to Pompeii, so this is a review both of the book itself and the subsequence experience of visiting the actual e book is excellent. This isn't an dry academic treatise, but a beautifully written and very engaging acc of life in Roman times, as preserved in the provincial city of Pompeii. The introduction along makes it worth buying the book - it vividly describes what actually happened in 79 AD when Vesuvius blew, and how the city was subsequently looted, rediscovered, and bombed by the Allies in WWII. She debunks a lot of myths and explains all the @#$%s and erotica that so amused my daughters when they visited. Beard can be very funny.I visited Pompeii in summer, 2015, and Beard was a amazing guide. In the book she's careful not to be too critical of the state of preservation of Pompeii, but it's not hard to read between the lines, and the evidence when you visit is shocking. The city is falling apart - a lot of of the frescoes have faded completely, the wear-and-tear of millions of tourists is obvious, and a lot of buildings are visibly collapsing. Pompeii is still incredibly impressive, especially the side roads with their wheel rutted streets and elegant buildings, but the dilapidation is glaring. I'd plan to arrive as early as possible to avoid crowds, and to move away from the main entrance zone to better appreciate the size and scale of the town. We had a tutorial who'd been accompanying visitors for over 35 years (a tutorial is recommended, the city is confusing at ground-level).

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    The Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 22:21

    Amazing for those interested in the history of Pompeii. Prof. Mary Beard has a method of writing that draws people into the history she is presenting. She writes in a form that everyone, from professional to layman, can have fun and understand. This book is a gem and a must for any home library.

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    The Library of Lost and Found: A Novel []  2020-8-2 18:0

    This is a book for everyone who (1) loves books and libraries and (2) is one of those people who helps everyone at the expense of their own life. Martha is a librarian, but she is also the neighborhood helper, doing everything from repairing a papier mache dragon to polishing crystal chandeliers. But a mysterious "someone" leaves a book for her that bears a notice from her beloved grandmother who supposedly passed away three years prior to the date on the message. So there is a mystery to resolve as well as untangling Martha's life. This is a fast read, but it's satisfying.

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    The Library of Lost and Found: A Novel []  2020-8-2 18:0

    Everything I have read by Phaedra Patrick has kept me waiting for the next shoe to drop, so to speak. thank you fro another heartfelt and wonderfully animated book!

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    The Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 22:21

    This terrific and absorbing book discusses all aspects of life in Pompeii before the eruption in 79 CE. Beard synthesizes what we know of family life, making a living, entertainment, worship, ceremony, religion, civic life, an interested amateur, I have no basis for judging her conclusions, but I search them convincing if only because she is so cautious: she is skeptical about a lot of the claims created by other scholars based on what she says is scant or non-existent evidence. When she speculates, she makes explicit that is what she is doing, and when we don't know and can only guess, she says so clearly. Another reviewer was disappointed that she rejects some of the tales told by guides, but to me her insistence on relying only on the evidence or lack thereof is one of the amazing virtues of the e book is clearly written and entirely accessible to a non-scholar. Beard sometimes resorts to English demotic to amazing and occasionally shocking effect, both for translations and for her own observations. It is well-illustrated with both color plates and black-and-white illustrations placed in close proximity to the accompanying text and with helpful captions. (I wished on occasion that the illustrations were larger so that I could see better the detail she describes, and that cross-references to illustrations were by page number rather than illustration number.)In short, this book is among the very best famous histories (I don't intend that adjective to be denigrating, rather an acknowledgment of the book's broad appeal beyond academia) I've ever read.

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    The Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 22:21

    I only want I had read this book a month before visiting Pompeii, rather than a month after! Mary Beard does a remarkable job of presenting historical detail on the daily life in Pompeii without turning it dry. Loaded with images (sadly, most are in black-and white) to create descriptions more clear, she with the well-known as well as the esoteric. Thankfully, she does not modestly resort to euphemisms when describing some of the more ribald artwork or words discovered throughout the city. She presents as complete a picture of Pompeii life as the average reader would ever wish or need, working hard to delineate between fact, solid guess, and mere conjecture. My only complaint is the all-too-brief coverage given at the begin of the book on the actual info of the Vesuvius eruption and its effects on humans; also missing is info on the archeology processes at work over the past three centuries. But that can be left to other books and other writers.

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    The Library of Lost and Found: A Novel []  2020-8-2 18:0

    It would have been amazing if the author had picked a plot and stuck to it. First it was about a smart, lower class girl starting a detective agency. Then about the of WWI. Then about her experience in WWI. Then about her sleuthing, it just took to a lot of VERY LONG side trips. Finally I skipped to the latest three chapters, found out whodunnit (no surprise) and I won't be reading that author again. If she'd stuck to her premise and maybe created her origin story another book, it might have been good. I liked the hero at first, but by the end I was sick of it all.

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    The Library of Lost and Found: A Novel []  2020-8-2 18:0

    Scattered, long on prose, and the main hero had a severe woe is me complex. The author spent too much time on developing characters that ended up not being super necessary to the story, while neglecting those that actually were. I found the main hero too annoying and self pitying, with no backbone. Most of her misfortune has been brought on by herself.. The story was long on prose, short on depth.

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    The Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 22:21

    Better than a trip to crowded and hot Pompeii and I have been there 7 times in 30 years. I had to wait to truly understand for Mary Beard to write this book and with humor I'd like to add. Loved it and the author's unfiltered remarks.

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    The Fires of Vesuvius: Pompeii Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 22:21

    Before I traveled to Italy latest week, I wanted to search a amazing book on Pompeii, as I knew very small about it. Beard's book hit the spot. I was able to read the majority of it on the plane ride over, and it helped me to better understand the lifestyle of the people who lived there, who really were a slice of typical Roman life during the first century. It created me appreciate my visit much more, and though I never had a possibility to see a tenth of everything covered in this book (during my short visit), I am glad I had a possibility to read this. Very readable, is dry in some spots but overall it really keeps moving. And the subject is just fascinating. I recommend this for those who plan to visit this lost and found city.

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    The Library of Lost and Found: A Novel []  2020-8-2 18:0

    I wasn't sure if i would like the book when I began reading it. It was beautifully written, but I'm so weary of "poor pitiful me," and martyr-prone characters I could scream. However, I hung in chapter after chapter and am so glad I did. A various twist on finding one's "spine" assisted by wonderful, quirky, mysterious and, yes, obnoxious characters who become mates to not only the title hero but to the reader as well. A amazing read for a cozy weekend, and a amazing starting point for planning a Yorkshire seaside holiday. You'll wish to go discover to search the sea green dragon who lives in a cave on the coast. Thank you Ms Patrick for a lovely, lovely book!

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    The Library of Lost and Found: A Novel []  2020-8-2 18:0

    As a reader, I always have fun characters who love reading and books. The characters were all very believable, and some were familiar for their faults and foibles as well as their better natures.

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    The Found and the Lost: The Collected Novellas of Ursula K. Le Guin []  2020-3-30 19:56

    This is Le Guin, one of the best writers ever, period. Her works are masterful, and worth your ever, Saga Press appears to have been fairly sloppy in some of their approach, in ways that don't create sense. For example, there are odd gaps in what is included in this collection. Only 3 of the 4 intertwined novellas from "Four Ways to Forgiveness" are included, for example, with "Betrayals" left out. So you have what is actually an incomplete novel, and will have to go "Forgiveness" in to obtain the entire scope of Le Guin's story (with no audio-book on offer, btw). Balancing that is that her later novella placed on the same world, "Old Melody and the Slave Women" IS included, as it should be. A very puzzling and frustrating omission, nonetheless.I was under the impression that all novellas were included. And what a pure pleasure it would have been to be able to listen the complete audio-book of 'Four Ways to Forgiveness' as part of this collection!Also, "Buffalo Gals" and "The Matter of Seggri" were included in both this collection, and the Saga Press Le Guin short story collection, "The Unreal and the Real". This overlap again shows some sloppiness in determining what goes where, and deprives readers/buyers of extra material ('Betrayals' for example?) that could have been included in one or the other.Highly recommended, and worth buying of course!And what we really need is a multi-volume set of Complete Works, with accompanying audio books. That these aren't available for such an necessary writer is a crime in my opinion.

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    The Found and the Lost: The Collected Novellas of Ursula K. Le Guin []  2020-3-30 19:56

    There's probably no need for me to write this review since so a lot of people already love Ursula. But I have to say it anyway--I love her work. I feel like she raised me when I started reading her as a young adult. She was able to place words and stories to things I was living and feeling. When I go back and re-read her work, it's always something fresh because I've changed as a person in the meantime. Her work is very healing for me and it kindles hope during moments of darkness. This book is no different. At first I checked it out from the library, but then I bought a copy after reading it. Sometimes Ursula's work is the best medicine you can have.

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    The Found and the Lost: The Collected Novellas of Ursula K. Le Guin []  2020-3-30 19:56

    Carefully selected and arranged by the master herself. With some explanatory and biographical notes, but mostly just amazing stories. Recommended both as introduction to our generation’s best author, and as supplemental joy to those who have read her thoroughly and need some more.

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    The Found and the Lost: The Collected Novellas of Ursula K. Le Guin []  2020-3-30 19:56

    Overall a very amazing value (kindle edition) and the stories were all very good. Some overlap with the short story collection (Buffalo Gals and The matter of Seggri). There is a four story series on a slave holding planet and the revolutions that take put --Forgiveness Day, A Man of the People, A Woman's liberation, and Old Melody and the Slave Woman -- I recommend these be read in this order. Also the author seems to base the slave holding society on an English heritage model (UK, Canada, US, Australia etc). I am not sure her story would keep up in a more totalitarian model such as Mao's China or Stalin's Soviet Union. Never the less these are all very amazing stories that create you think. The other Novellas besides the six I mentioned already are Vaster than Empires and More Slow, Hernes, Another Story or a Fisherman of the Inland Sea, The finder, On the High Paradises Lost. These novellas introduce most of the concepts we see in Le Guin's other writings and novels -- though these seem to fill in and not repeat what is in the novels. I think this would be a amazing introduction to the authors writing style and subjects she covers. A major beef I have is that the author did not contain any introduction or short summary about the stories. She did this foe her recently released short story collection The Unreal and the True which is also a amazing buy. All in all I highly recommend this novella collection.

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    The Found and the Lost: The Collected Novellas of Ursula K. Le Guin []  2020-3-30 19:56

    These are some ways favorite shorter words of Le Guin a amazing introduction since it contains some of the earlier science-fiction as well as the later EarthSea Works.

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    The Found and the Lost: The Collected Novellas of Ursula K. Le Guin []  2020-3-30 19:56

    For a lot of years, I avoided Ursula LeGuin, on the mistaken assumption that she was essentially a fantasy author, by virtue of her Wizard of Earthsea novels. It was not until later that I discovered her science fiction work and grew to have fun it immensely. But LeGuin is not your prototypical science fiction (or it turns out, fantasy) author. She does not write zone opera, but instead focuses on hero development and human (or alien) interaction. You could label her work anthropological or sociological science fiction, with the fact that aliens, or zone travel, or wizards are involved, becoming almost is collection of thirteen novellas (very close to short stories) is a excellent example of her writing. There may have been a couple of duds (most particularly Hernes and to a lesser degree Buffalo Gals), but by and huge there is amazing items ur of the stories involve elements of her Hainish science fiction novels, featuring the planet Weres, where slavery is practiced. In this set of three stories, the reader is taken through a planetary and societal evolution in which slaves are first freed, only to see the women become cultural slaves. Again, only nominally science fiction, to the extent that we are dealing with an alien species in a various time and ree other stories are set in the author’s Earthsea world, and while I am not a huge fan of fantasy, like her science fiction, this fantasy is not massive handed with extreme magic and fire breathing dragons. There is magic and there are dragons, but they are very subtly exercised or only mentioned in passing. The story is in the characters and their e final story, Paradise Lost, is the best in my opinion. Perhaps the most “science fiction” of the lot, it is set on a multi-generational, multi-ethnic starship as it approaches its destination. The story is outstanding as the author explores the different tensions and societal developments that can emerge in an isolated population, five generations removed from any knowledge or empathy for the civilization that launched their voyage; an perfect ending to a very nice collection.

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    The Found and the Lost: The Collected Novellas of Ursula K. Le Guin []  2020-3-30 19:56

    This is a collection of Le Guin's novellas that meshes in nicely with the two volumes of shorter fiction (The true and the unreal) the Le Guin herself selected. Le Guin wrote unbelievable science fiction, fantasy and mainstream fiction and all genres are represented here. Her two main series - the science fiction Hainish stories and fantasy Earthsea stories each have multiple selections. There is also the magic realist 'Buffalo girls won't you come out tonight', the stand alone science fiction story Paradises lost, and (probably the least well known story here and the probably the one most likely to have been forgotten but not because it is a not good story) Hernes - the only mainstream story from the Searoad collection.Le Guin's amazing strengths are her attractive writing that is both poetic and simple to read at the same time, her interest in characters and society (especially when changing) and these strengths mean she can write only quibbles are why two stories published here (The matter of Seggri and Buffalo girls...) are also in The true and unreal volumes. There are also two stories not here that I would have thought were novellas - The word for globe is forest and The eye of the heron. The first has been been published as a volume in it's own right so that is probably acceptable but the second is in danger of becoming lost.

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    The Found and the Lost: The Collected Novellas of Ursula K. Le Guin []  2020-3-30 19:56

    I first heard of Ursula LeGuin when watching the movie, ‘Jane Austen Bookclub, when the young male actor who was interested in science fiction, suggested his female love interest read, Ursula LeGuin novels. It got me to thinking about Ursula LeGuin and my first book, ‘The Left Hand of Darkness’ then the ‘The Lathe of Heaven’ and have just finished ‘The Found and the Lost’. As you can see, I have fallen in love with her.

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    The Found and the Lost: The Collected Novellas of Ursula K. Le Guin []  2020-3-30 19:56

    This thanksgiving I'd like to give thanks for the existence of one of the most unbelievable women in Science Fiction.Ursula K. Le Guin. This collection of novellas is sure to blow your mind, over and over again. Everything Le Guin writes is ese stories package quite a punch, Every story is sure to send the reader into critical thinking mode, or hopeful thinking mode. This woman knows how to create you think, and it is evident that she has done a lot of deep thinking in her time.i especially have fun her stories on alien civilizations and customs. She has gone to very far lengths to understand a civilization that only exists in her mind, it astounds me.

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    The Found and the Lost: The Collected Novellas of Ursula K. Le Guin []  2020-3-30 19:56

    Ursula Le Guin, she's brilliant, and imaginative, and sensitive, and radical. Sometimes attractive prose, always quick moving plots with fair amount of complexity, challenging our notions of ourselves as human, as gendered, as separate from nature. I've read about 1/4 of this collection, it's got a lot of material in it, and in that sense it's also a bargain!

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    The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found []  2020-1-24 20:33

    This is a attractive book that takes even the lay reader perfectly in hand. In fact, most westerners ARE lay readers as we know so small about this period and the astounding creativity that it inspired. Most Americans thing near 1000 years was nearly a blank slate of nothing. We could not be more wrong. I just returned from Islamic Spain, and wished I had read this before hand. It will be my companion to Italy, Spain, and beyond.

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    The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found []  2020-1-24 20:33

    This is a gimmicky approach to writing history along the lines of Neil MacGregor’s “History of the Globe in 100 Objects,” but much more simplistic. The author concedes that the research performed for the book was performed to fill a huge hole in her own knowledge map rather than being her academic or professional competency. This book struck me as comparable to enterprising ex-pats that moved to an exotic, historic locale and set themselves up as tutorials for (other) tourists! If this is how you like your history served, then “The Map of Knowledge” is a book for you. For the rest of us, the title is quite presumptuous. It is about the preservation of science (such as it was at the time), but the author isn’t very scientific in her approach to the this vein, David Abulafia (in Literary Review) writes: “Moller is a lively guide, although like most tutorials she tends to exaggerate and often chooses the most exciting story rather than the most plausible one.” For example, she uncritically repeats as fact the 17th Century dramatic tale of al-Rahman’s flight from ruthless Abbasid killers to re-establish the Umayyad court in remote Andalusia of southern Spain. Abulafia continues, “her insistence that paper only began to be produced in Europe in the 14th century is contradicted by the vast amounts of paper documents in Italian archives from the century before. And finally, “judging from her notes and bibliography, she has often relied on quite superficial modern histories, which is surprising, as she has worked for the Bodleian Library, which possesses just about everything she would need to create this a deeper and more valuable book.”The author also acknowledges the Warburg Institute, which funded at least part of her research. The founder of the Warburg Institute ran in sufficiently high circles to know how the royal globe functioned (and by backward extrapolation, the Byzantine Empire), but that perspective is not evident in this book or another latest book produced under the auspices of that institute that I have read and reviewed. (See my Amazon review of, “How the Classics Created Shakespeare,” by Jonathan Bate.) “The Knowledge Map” comes across more like a college term paper. It provides only a superficial survey of scholars and their royal patrons over a 1,000 year span of Islamic civilization (when the Byzantine Empire still dominated Europe). The author admits that some of the Islamic scholars she features are merely names with no significant biography. Portions of this book even read like a religious tract, such as the discussion of al-Mansur (pp 56-64) and al-Rakhman (pp 91-97). The style of those sections is more fitting for a parochial school e author takes as her litmus try the preservation of three classical sources, Euclid (for geometry), Claudius Ptolemy (for astronomy) and Claudius Galen (for medicine). However, not much of these works passes for scientific knowledge these days. And far more knowledge of geometry, geography and astronomy was needed to build just one monument in pre-classical times, that being the Amazing Pyramid, and in an age when the physician of the gods, Thoth, was even said to raise the dead. Even in Medieval times, the rulers and high religious heads could draw upon any number of sources for the higher knowledge (beyond Euclid’s geometry) needed for their amazing building works, including gothic cathedrals, amazing mosques, palaces and a lot of other magnificent structures. The “map of knowledge” associated with those initiatives remains mysterious. For this reason, I personally search the current debate over the preservation and reappearance of the diverse sources of the Ottoman Piri Reis Map of 1510 (produced after the Fall of Constantinople to the Ottomans, and incorporating the detailed coastline of Antarctica) to be far more interesting and potentially revealing about a proposed “knowledge map” than Galan, Claudius Ptolemy and e author of “The Map of Knowledge” mentions, again quite uncritically, the strange 14 year delay in dealing with the Islamic Revolution by the sitting Byzantine emperor. She further passes uncritically over (p 69) a subsequent request to Byzantine emperor Constantine V for classical texts by his ostensible nemesis, the Islamic Caliph al-Mansur. Why would the Byzantine emperor grant such a thing? And why was Byzantium embroiled in an Islamic type reform (called the Iconoclasm Movement) at the very moment that Islam was being normalized as a major kingdom and dynasty? If we can’t respond that question, how can we hope to have enough insight to make a “map of knowledge” of the medieval world? We are still in the dark ages of writing that e royal family “owned the cattle on a thousand hills,” and could build a Fresh Jerusalem on any spot they saw fit. Baghdad (as its original name Madinat al-Salaam, “City of Peace,” itself suggests) was just one such location, perched as it were on a narrow strip of land between the Tigris and Euphrates. As the author notes (but yet again misses the deeper significance), it was as much a put for those who conducted commerce by sea as by land. It was planned and built to be a globe capital presided over by the international royal elites and not the descendants of humble Bedouin folk. Royal power was again showcased when a second magnificent Islamic Jerusalem was built for a renewed caliphate in southern Spain. And despite the labor and expense of its rapid construction, Madinat al-Zahra was largely dismantled in the following generation by a magnate known as al-Mansur. However, the author doesn’t seem to recognize the poetic ending of it being destroyed by someone with the same name as the builder of the first Islamic Jerusalem in Baghdad! Necessary clues are being overlooked e author, Violet Moller, begins her book by uncritically accepting a statement attributed to the physician Galen that the imperial rulers had no genuine interest in the refinement of knowledge. Galen was either unaware or objected to the practice of royal role playing in the classical tradition, and even by the Roman emperors that he himself served, namely Marcus Aurelius, Commodus and Severus. The very lives of these contemporary rulers were dedicated to keeping classical knowledge alive by assuming the natures and emulating the actions of the different members of the ancient pantheon upon which the classics were based. Certain of these “divine archetypes” pursued knowledge, wisdom and innovation (such Ptah/Iapetus and Ra/Prometheus), whereas others were more content with the enjoying the amazing life (such as Osiris/Dionysos) or even bent on domination and destruction (like Set/Apollo).The classics were not merely studied by the royal family in all generations, but something they acted out in detail upon the globe scene with each successive dynasty. One can certainly question the need for this, but not the enduring royal commitment to it. Violet Moller notes (p 4) that Domitian, a Roman emperor with one of the worst intellectual reputations, spared no expense in ensuring that libraries were resupplied as required with essential works. She fails to mention the technological wonders of Nero’s floating causeway across the Bay of Naples and Caligula’s Nemi ships. There was certainly an element of vanity to these projects, but the innovative spirit also can’t be e losing and recovery of lost knowledge is a very old stock theme in the ancient world. Examples contain the finding of a worm-eaten treatise of the Egyptian Memphite trilogy commemorated on the Shabaka Stone; the boasting by Assurbanipal of locating and even reading (interpreting/translating) texts for his renowned library that were said to originate from before the Amazing Flood; and the biblical chronicle of a revival based on the “chance discovery” of an old book of the Law by the priest burning was surprisingly a similar stock theme associated with the founding of a fresh age (such as the one ordered by Sargon the Amazing to tag the transition from Sumerian to Akkadian culture). However, royal persons would not eliminate anything that they considered truly irreplaceable. The so-called classics were a wide assortment of stories that preserved a relatively little amount of “sacred knowledge,” but expressed that knowledge in a multitude of various cultural contexts and scenarios. There was some danger that minor info of the Hermetic Corpus could go missing, but small risk that the essence of ancient tradition (rebranded as “classical knowledge”) would be irretrievably lost. It was too broadly encoded and dispersed for that to happen. It was an ancient form of “fault tolerance.” The potential for losing the Hermetic forest in a super-abundance of mythological trees would have been a greater concern.Every major revival of classical thinking depended upon an imperial covering, including and especially the ones that took put in the Age of Dar al-Islam. By the time Venice became a major player, the town was already firmly under the thumb of royal power, as the author herself admits. The royal family was opposed to personal collections of knowledge at certain locations and times, but not versus the idea of knowledge itself. Regardless, it isn’t too surprising (as the author notes) to search instances of scholars attempting to secret away their precious writings rather than having them seized, even for the purposes of placement in a public library. The royal family really couldn’t be trusted to act in their best interest, and centralized control over texts may have also slowed technological progress in the long run. Royal consent enjoyed by scholars on one day could be snatched violently away on the next. Certainly, the Technological Age we see today is at least partially due to the royal family’s loss of control. This would be a more interesting subject of research into the classics than the one pursued by this book.Until we have a much better handle on medieval power structures, books such as this one are almost pointless. Perhaps, there are people living today with close ties to modern day royalty that still understand how royal culture maintained a knowledge base … but they ain’t talking! In Academia, the study of history is so stove-piped that there may never be a genuine attempt to uncover the real links between Byzantine and Roman Europe and the contemporary Islamic Caliphates, much less the ebb and flow of scholarship and knowledge across their ever changing borders.

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    The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found []  2020-1-24 20:33

    This is a fairly fast interesting read for the general public. You don't need a background in math or science to have fun her sketches of the cities and people who kept ancient theories alive and extended them between the fall of Rome and the rise of the printing press.

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    The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found []  2020-1-24 20:33

    This well written and lively history focuses on the roughly 1000 year period from about 500 to 1500 AD, during which ideas from the classical eras of Greece and Rome were dispersed, found sanctuary and expansion in the glittering Islamic civilizations in the Middle East and Spain, and then eventually returned to their original homes and beyond in Renaissance Europe. This is Violet Moller's first published work, and it promises a career of solid scholarship presented in a clear and approachable style.I found Moller's geographical approach to her topic very appealing. She begins with the classical world, appropriately choosing Alexandria and its library as her cornerstone and then traces classical learning's dispersal in the aftermath of the collapse of Rome. Next she focuses on Muslim preservation and expansion of that classical learning with some attractive chapters describing Baghdad and Cordoba at their heights. As the Muslim empires declined and Christian Europe began to expand, Moller chooses Toledo, Salerno, Palermo, and Venice as her prime examples, then finishes with a short conclusion focusing on the ller writes clearly, using historical examples like Galen, Emir Rahman, al-Mansur, Gerard, Petrarch, and a lot of others to create her acc lively and approachable. The Map of Knowledge makes a fine introduction for those seeking to learn more about the complex, interwoven, and tolerant globe in which Muslims, Jews, and Christians traded and interacted, and in which the learning of the ancient globe was preserved and expanded.

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    The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found []  2020-1-24 20:33

    I have read a number of books about this era (500 AD to 1500) and listened to lectures about the era. The author's description is in line with the other authors and lecturers. I especially liked 2 things: The division of the book (and evolution of thought) by city. And the focus on astronomy, mathematics and medicine throughout the book. The book highlights that there are a lot of cultures that have contributed to the evolution of knowledge.

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    The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found []  2020-1-24 20:33

    The author takes you on a journey through a number of countries mostly in Europe and the Middle East following the trail of the work of 3 ancient Greeks - Euclid, Ptolemy and Galen. You visit a number of cities where scientists and translators copied the ancient texts, created notes in the margins, and translated the works from Greek to Arabic back to Greek, to Latin and then to the vernacular during the 1440s adn1500s primarily in Germany and Italy. You go from museums to monasteries to book sellers to personal homes following originals and copies of these ancient texts. You learn a lot along the way. Don't expect an simple read. Take time to pause and think about where these books have traveled and the changes they went through to bring them to use today. Most of us probably got introduced to Euclid in geometry courses in Middle School. But it's fascinating to also follow the works of Ptolemy and Galen and the impact they have had on our understanding of the stars/universe and of the body/flow of blood. What a legacy each of them have provided.

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    The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found []  2020-1-24 20:33

    Usually I have a hard time with non-fiction. I am the sort who reads introductions, prologues, prefaces, forwards, etc. I begin the book and read every word. With non-fiction I often fall into a trap where, if the preface validates my existing biases, I cheer! “I don’t need to read this esteemed work, I already know this.” And if not, “forget this hack, utter rubbish.”Map of Knowledge is comparable to me only to 1491 in non-fiction I have voraciously consumed after reading the introduction. Every page left me unable to pause before reading the next.

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    The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found []  2020-1-24 20:33

    While light in tone and intended for non-academics, The Map of Knowledge does carry a notice intended to respond some of the more necessary questions of today.Ostensibly the manuscript history of three works by Euclid, Galen and Ptolemy, Dr. Moller devotes most of the text to invoking the spirit of the cities responsible for handing down and adding to this tradition. These cities contain not only the well known ancient Alexandria and Renaissance Venice but also medieval Baghdad and Córdoba. Throughout the text, she finds the same characteristics predominating in regions of intellectual progress: cosmopolitanism, openness to immigration, exchange of ideas across various religions and cultures...all hallmarks of the modern roughout the narrative a second theme emerges with increasing vigor. The scientific and humanistic revolution which transpired in early modern Europe was partially due to the medieval societies of the Muslim and Hindu worlds. The Renaissance emphasis on a rebirth of culture not only slighted the genuine contributions of medieval Europe but also looked past the cultural importance of non-European peoples.A real history of modernity then would not draw a blank between the fall of Rome and Renaissance Italy but discuss the vibrant societies of Abbasid Mesopotamia and Andalusian Spain. Given that these were emblematic of the multiculturalism so beloved by modernity it seems that the author is suggesting a rewrite of the history of Western civilization that would reach related conclusions but arrive by a more circuitous route.I’m not a professional historian and cannot vouch for the accuracy of the author’s narrative. It is clearly meant to be not merely an erudite history but also a salvo in the culture wars. But the fact that an academic can translate this material into a famous work makes the book not less but more important. It will be interesting to see if a secondary literature develops around the claims of this book and if it has its desired result on how the history of Western civilization is taught.

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    The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found []  2020-1-24 20:33

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book! I'd often what happened during the dark ages and was delighted to learn about the transition of key pieces of knowledge to Muslim centers of knowledge and back to Western centers and the amazing minds who created it happen. About as close to a "real page turner" as I have ever read on history. Fascinating reading by amazing writer. Hope she will hold the press room busy with other explorations of the Oxford library!

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    The Map of Knowledge: A Thousand-Year History of How Classical Ideas Were Lost and Found []  2020-1-24 20:33

    Very interesting book, although I read it in bits & pieces. First, I read the chapter on Alexandria, then the latest chapter, 1500 & Beyond, then the Preface. Of course, I should have read the Preface first, but I'm fascinated by the libraries of Alexandria. If I could go back in time ...

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    Sunny's Nights: Lost and Found at a Bar on the Edge of the World [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    Beautifully written memoir -- funny, poignant, original. Sulton shares the story of an engaging individual with attractive finesse. A Fresh York story that will inspire you and may remind you that you once loved Fresh York, too, and the reasons that you did.

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    Sunny's Nights: Lost and Found at a Bar on the Edge of the World [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    This has to be one of the most enjoyable books that I have ever had the opportunity to read. Once I started, I could not place it down. I recommend this book unconditionally.

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    Patches Lost And Found [Book]  2018-1-12 18:1

    Not quite what i expected.

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    Patches Lost And Found [Book]  2018-1-12 18:1

    My wife uses these books in her first grade classroom and the children love them. Recommended for young or starting readers.

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    Lost and Found Sisters [Book]  2018-5-27 18:0

    Lost and Found Sisters(Wildstone book 1) by Jill ShalvisWow! I am lost for words. Lost and Found Sisters was beyond amazing. This was not your typical Jill Shalvis story. This had more than just romance. Jill Shalvis is one of my favorite authors and it is very clear to see why if you read her books. This was my first visit to Wildstone and I can safely say this will not be my latest visit. This is more than just romance. It is a story about love and friendship and endings and fresh beginnings and most of all family. Any book that makes you cry and laugh and your heart swoon is an amazing Lost and Found Sisters we meet several characters. We obtain to meet Quinn Wellers and Mick Hennessey and Tilly, Beth. Not to mention some amazing secondary characters like Carolyn, Lena, Boomer, Greta, Trinee, Cliff and Dylan. Lastly we obtain to meet Coop, Mick's dog.Mick Hennessey is a very sexy and hot yet sweet, patient and kindhearted man. He is in Wildstone to support his mother after his dads death. You explore he has a history with the town.Quinn Wellers is a powerful woman. Quinn also guarded. Her life has suffered a tragedy and ever since then she has been going through the motions and longing for something yet not sure just what. One day Quinn's life takes a drastic turn when she finds out she has a connection to a woman she barely knew. Her fresh discovery takes her on a trip to a city called Wildstone. This is where her story really begins to unravel in a positive obtain to meet Tilly. Tilly is Carolyn's teenage daughter. Tilly and Quinn soon explore a connection that brings them together. The journeys of self discovery that Tilly and Quinn and Mick go on are amazing. This book was just amazing. Jill Shalvis truly brought it in this Lost and Found Sisters I cried and laughed and my heart swooned. This story has all the elements that truly create a amazing book. This was a story about love lost and fresh love and family and endings and fresh beginnings. This was a sweet and heartfelt story packed full of all kinds of emotions. What struggles these characters are going through are realistic. I myself found I could relate to several various characters. This was just a truly amazing, sweet and very heartfelt story.I highly recommend this book. I give it a superb five star rating. Go ahead and grab this book I guarantee you will not regret it

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    Lost and Found Sisters [Book]  2018-5-27 18:0

    I've always loved Jill Shalvis and her quirky and fun contemporary romance this time her venture into Women's Fiction is just as good. Normally I would be skeptical with genre changes but since she is a go to I gave it a amazing old try. I knew from the blurb this one would tug some heartstrings. I've read my share of Women's Fiction and have a enjoyed a lot of them.Losing someone is never simple especially someone as close to you. It's not simple and you feel lost. Our heroine managed with her emotional distance and fake till you create it attitude. I liked Quinn, relatable in her fears and feelings. I totally obtain that uncertainty stepping out of your routine. I cheered her on as she took hesitant steps. She may stumble and falter along the method and that was the a learning curve. We all have a right to our emotions whatever they may be. It could obtain frustrating at times but it was realistic that way.What is lost can be found in the strangest funny ways. Her younger sister Tilly was a joy her inner dialogue and anecdotes at the chapters begin created this more fun and balanced out the other parts. As always Ms Shalvis has another champion of a character in Mick. He had his own items to with boils down to the same thing. Still a amazing solid sexy is always a tricky thing you go through ups and downs and you still love each other. Relationships are another thing that helps one grow and shape us throughout. From friendship, love, fresh experiences and to finding ourselves. It took a while for things to obtain there. I felt it dragged out too long for some parts that I felt unnecessary. But still a lovely story about e whimsical element to this book created it more likable to me. Wildstone sounds like an idyllic zone that I would wish to go to. I definitely wish to discover that city more and the other books in shop for this series. No doubt a amazing begin to a fresh series.

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    Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:27

    I wanted to love this book because OSC is one of my favorite authors, and because it takes put near Greensboro where I live. But unfortunately this small novel has some hard things to overlook:1. The dialog is too clever to be believable, even from highly smart people. Nobody talks the method these characters talk, and the book is mostly dialog.2. The main hero is extremely smart, can think through complicated scenarios and figure almost anything out, yet at a critical point when his life is on the line, he forgets he has a cellphone in his pocket. And his Dad does not have a cellphone either because he is too poor. What? Even homeless people have smartphones these days. The main characters are supposed to be in peril and can't call their cop mate because the Dad doesn't have a phone and the genius child forgets he borrowed one he used an hour ago and it's sitting in his pocket? I couldn't swallow that one.3. Since most of the book is witty banter, it lacks description. I don't know enough of how the characters look, or how they sound, or what the locations look like (except the parts that are set around Greensboro, I live there).Nice premise (kid who finds lost things and knows who they belong to) but I think this is far from OSC's best work.

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    Harlem: Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 0:20

    'Very Informative.....I reside in Harlem - Graham Court......love the history'

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    Harlem: Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 0:20

    My book arrived in a timely manner. It was in excellant condition. Hold up this kind of customer service.

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    Pompeii: Lost and Found []  2020-1-16 8:40

    I bought this book for my 9-year-old son. They had been talking about Pompeii in science class, and he wanted to read more about it. He really enjoyed the book! It was simple for him to read, and it left him wanting to read more.

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    Pompeii: Lost and Found []  2020-1-16 8:40

    Just perfect!

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    Pompeii: Lost and Found []  2020-1-16 8:40

    This is a nicely-illustrated (fresco painting style pictures) picture book depicting the history of the city of Pompeii and its destruction via volcanic eruption. The book is huge size with pictures each page, medium amount of text, thus appealing and not overwhelming to early elementary students. I used it with a 2nd grader, who was easily able to read it independently. The content was realistic without being overly explicit to those children who may be sensitive to content regarding death of people and animals. It does not gloss over the fact that a lot of died, but does it considerately, I thought. The whole book is framed by describing the archeological discovery of the town, which helps the kids understand it occurred far in the past, and it was true (not just a fictional storybook).

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    Sunny's Nights: Lost and Found at a Bar on the Edge of the World [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    Late in the winter of 1995, at the age of 27, Tim Sultan took a wrong turn on the method home and accidentally ended up in Red Hook, a squalid risky corner of Fresh York with a forbidding reputation. He comes across a bar with no sign, no listing in the phone book, and no name, and enters into a various world. He would later come to know that this moment marked a turning point in his life, perhaps a transition that he had been searching for all along. Sunny was the proprietor of this establishment, inherited from his father, and only opened once a week on Friday nights. The inventory of alcohol was limited, and Sunny didn't even know how to mix a cocktail anyway. When he learned that without a business license or liquor license he could obtain in legal trouble, he switched to a system of chits and donations from his "guests".Tim finds himself coming to the bar every week, and eventually takes a shift behind the bar, though he too has no bartending experience. Stories emerge of Sunny's history which is intertwined with the deep blue-collar history of Red Hook and environs. Nearly every adult male who live in this corner of Red Hook could be considered an alcoholic; though Sunny drank non-stop, he never seemed to be drunk. Sunny told elaborate discursive histories of his past and loved to eulogize his forebears. Sunny belonged to a vanishing breed of barstool storyteller; he was the bard of Red Hook, and the visitors to his bar were his audience. He was also somewhat of a philosopher and therapist; he knew just what to say to calm an mad patron, defuse an argument or pacify a violent drunk. When you entered Sunny's bar, you left your occupation at the door; no one cared what you did or where you came from. People similar to each other as people, not as titles or nny and Tim shared some excursions and pranks, one of which almost ended tragically when their little boat sank in the harbor. Sunny always drew attention to himself, though he was bohemian, disheveled and looked like a castaway. No one ever forgot meeting him, which he found annoying, because of course, he couldn't remember all the people who remembered him. As the book progressed, we learned more of Sunny's private history, his failed marriages and abandoned children, and eventually of his encroaching illnesses. Over time, as Red Hook was rediscovered and gentrified, its gritty past receded and its appeal to the likes of Tim and the other attendees of Sunny's bar faded.I have been to Red Hook exactly once, briefly - when the Queen Mary 2 berthed at the end of our Atlantic crossing. What small we knew of Red Hook was that it is a put one should quickly obtain away from. But the gritty, albeit romanticized ver of Red Hook in "Sunny's Nights" bears some exploration, if only to search the type of bar that draws people back week after week, year after year. Don't we all yearn for such a gathering put in our lives?I really enjoyed the book up until the final chapters where the narrative appeared to lose steam and just sort of limped to a conclusion.

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    Sunny's Nights: Lost and Found at a Bar on the Edge of the World [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    Amazing story. Amazing stories. Amazing book.

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    Sunny's Nights: Lost and Found at a Bar on the Edge of the World [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    Anyone who's ever place a quarter in a juke box will relish the bizarre exploits of Sunny who opens his ancient saloon only once a week on Friday nights. Red Hook in Brooklyn is a neighborhood of savage lore teeming with a parade of lovable eccentrics who define urban legend. Tim Sultan has captivated whiskey brains with gusto and fervor. Having spent a hall a century or so toiling and listening to genuine psychos as they gargled small brown guys with innocent abandon, Sultan has clearly nailed it.What can ya say? Cheers, I guess!

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    Cadillac V-16s Lost and Found: Tracing the Histories of the 1930s Classics []  2020-1-27 19:8

    My husband loves this book!

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    Sunny's Nights: Lost and Found at a Bar on the Edge of the World [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    This book appealed to me on so a lot of levels - I loved the history of Red Hook, loved reading about how Red Hook is so revered by those who live there, loved Sunny & his bar, and loved the friendship that developed between Sunny & Tim Sultan. I was initially taken with the idea of this book and had marked it to read before it was ever released, but was almost place off reading it by a few reviews purporting that the author focused too much about himself and digressed overmuch - that just goes to present that all reviews can't be trusted and you actually CAN judge a book by its cover. This was a delightful read, I'm so glad I took the time - would highly recommend for anyone who loves Brooklyn, loves reading about how things were "back in the day," and isn't a die-hard fan of gentrification. Thank you, Mr. Sultan, for sharing Sunny & your very special experience in Red Hook with the rest of us.

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    Sunny's Nights: Lost and Found at a Bar on the Edge of the World [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    I couldn't place it down. Thanks for this. Amazon needs twelve more words. Sigh. Why, when those suffice? Truly thanks

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    Sunny's Nights: Lost and Found at a Bar on the Edge of the World [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    This book was such a joy to read - simply gorgeous writing, richly drawn history, compelling hero portrayal, and anecdotes both hilarious and heartbreaking...it will create you feel like you're right there in Sunny's (or at least, like you want you were!)

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    Cadillac V-16s Lost and Found: Tracing the Histories of the 1930s Classics []  2020-1-27 19:8

    Amazing stories about the v-16 Cadillac's.

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    Sunny's Nights: Lost and Found at a Bar on the Edge of the World [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    I love bars with camaraderie and character. They never were common in my experience and their number has been steadily dwindling towards extinction. I would have loved Sunny's in the Red Hook section of Brooklyn, at least as it once existed. When the author Tim Sultan stumbled on it around 1996, Sunny's was in a forlorn redbrick building in a desolate once-industrial zone of Red Hook hard by Fresh York Harbor, on a cobblestone street, with a sign that contained only three letters -- "BAR"; it was begin only on Friday nights, there was no beer on tap (only bottles), an honor system was in result under which, before leaving the bar, a customer declared how a lot of drinks he had ordered and then donated three dollars for each (whether whiskey, beer, or wine), there was a group of regular patrons and a mélange of off-beat, amateur live entertainment . . . and it operated with no liquor license, no business license, no insurance, no certificate of occupancy, no permits at all.I also would have loved Sunny, the man who owned and operated the bar. His full name was Antonio Raffaele Balzano. His grandfather, an immigrant from Calabria, had opened the bar in 1920 (the same year that Prohibition began, but with this particular establishment that was an irrelevant coincidence). Sunny was born there in 1934, grew up in Red Hook when it was home to the Gallo brothers and other two-bit but deadly Mafioso-types, went away for a couple decades, became a painter and actor, and in 1978 returned to home and family. After his father and his uncle died, Sunny took over the bar and operated it in his inimitable style and on his own ter serendipitously discovering the bar, author Sultan quickly created mates with Sunny and became an unpaid, volunteer bartender. In SUNNY'S NIGHTS, Sultan tells the stories of Sunny's the bar and Sunny Balzano the man. Both stories are quite interesting. Sunny's the bar evolves over the sixteen years Sultan worked there, as does Red Hook -- for the worse, by Sultan's lights. And Sunny Balzano ages, so that by the end of the book he is a shell of his former self, for the most part a recluse in his apartment above the bar. (By the way, he died in March 2016.)By no means, however, is the book a downer. Both it and Sunny embody a joie de vivre that is contagious. Best of all, Sunny was a philosopher of life (one of the regulars called him "the philosopher king") who had a remarkable method with words, and SUNNY'S NIGHTS preserves much of Sunny's wit and wisdom. One of my favorites: "It's funny how all these memories become buoyant and bob on your consciousness. You catch them before they sink again."Moreover, Sultan himself can be an astute observer of life and society. Here he addresses two of the reasons that the bars from my relative youth have disappeared: "I first came to Sunny's near the end of two * * * eras--the final years of the conventional telephone and of the barroom smoker. The passing of both has changed all bars. The ouster of the landline phone by the handheld, smart dozens has led the solitary drinker to look for company in the glow of a miniature screen instead of their neighboring barstool. Bar bets, too, have suffered as there now is an instant resolution to all disputes of the trivial kind. The proscription on smoking in Fresh York Town bars has changed the view, the smell, the sensation of being in a bar * * *."

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    Sunny's Nights: Lost and Found at a Bar on the Edge of the World [Book]  2018-2-19 18:0

    Wonderfully well written. Highly recommended.

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    Cadillac V-16s Lost and Found: Tracing the Histories of the 1930s Classics []  2020-1-27 19:8

    Similar to The History of my Historic House, Unbelievable Addition to the History.

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    Patches Lost And Found [Book]  2018-1-12 18:1

    Gave as birthday bonus to my 4 yr. old niece. She sat down immediately to read it with her grandmother. Thoroughly enjoyed it.

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    Patches Lost And Found [Book]  2018-1-12 18:1

    Amazing book for Writer's Workshop, and for encouraging hesitant writers.

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    Lost and Found Sisters [Book]  2018-5-27 18:0

    Don't you just love finding the exact right book to read at just the right moment? I love Jill Shalvis' writing style. She's hysterically funny, irreverent, sexy, yet her stories creep up on you and catch you right in the feels when you're least expecting it.Quinn Weller is a sous-chef at a famous L.A. restaurant and she would tell you if you asked her that she loved her job. She has parents that adore her and an on again-off again boyfriend that she's known her whole life. Everything's perfect, right? Not quite. Two years ago her beloved younger sister was killed in a stupid vehicle accident and she's felt frozen and in limbo since morning she's at her favorite coffee when she's approached by a stranger who tells her news that turns her whole life upside down. She heads to Wildstone, California - a little coastal community north of L.A. - to test to create some sense of her fresh Shalvis always does such a amazing job developing her characters. I feel I would know them instantly if I ever met them - teenagers, a hot, sizzling man, a lovable dog, a not-so-lovable cat, and a whole city full of quirky characters.I loved this story. In fact it might be my favorite of all Shalvis' books and that covers a lot of territory. It's the first in a series about Wildstone and I'm already looking forward to returning there.

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    Harlem: Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 0:20

    10/24/17A breathtakingly attractive book. Exactly what I was looking for to learn more about Harlem’s architecture. The text is very informative also. I love it.

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    Harlem: Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 0:20

    The book is amazing largely because of the images and detailed info about the houses built in Harlem back in the 1850s. I mainly bought the book because my great-grandfather's house, The Fink House mentioned and hopefully featured in it. After looking through the book, only brief references to him were created on page 68 and 152. His house did appear on the book jacket, which was wonderful--but I though more description would follow inside. In a description of the book that I found online, it actually showed info of the roof of his house, which I thought would be in the book.

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    Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:27

    In most ways, this novel was unlike the Ender series. However, the hero development, the gripping story, and Card’s ability to endear hiss characters to you, created this one of the quickest reads I’ve had in a long time. I simply couldn’t place it down, and I was disappointed that the story ended. I hope this will turn into the first volume of a series!

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    Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:27

    OSC is a master of hero development and Ezekiel is no exception! Card’s wordplay is so smart and aided by the characters’ use of sarcasm and irony. I hope Shank’s hero continues in future Ezekiel books (I expect it will, but there’s so much yet to be seen in his interaction/friendship with our protagonist).

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    Pompeii: Lost and Found []  2020-1-16 8:40

    Grandson loves the book

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    Patches Lost And Found [Book]  2018-1-12 18:1

    A+

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    Lost and Found Sisters [Book]  2018-5-27 18:0

    When one of your very favourite authors announces she’s going to write something a small different, do you:A) Bounce up and down and do a fist bump in the air because she is releasing something new?B) Cry and shout - Why…why…why…would you do this to me? I don’t like change. Why change a amazing thing? Please tell me the character doesn’t die/the heroine doesn’t die? It’s not an apocalyptic/time travel/alien invasion story, is it?-OR-C) Well, OK. I’ll give it a go.Well, to be honest, I kind of did all three when I found out that Jill Shalvis was writing her first Women’s Fiction. Now, here is where I admit that I’m a bit of a dag. I should have done the intelligent thing and looked up the definition of women’s fiction. For some silly reason, I thought it was going to be all…women rule the world, work is my focus and if I’m satisfied in my career – I’m satisfied in my life. Now, THERE IS ABSOLUTELY NOTHING WRONG WITH ANY OF THESE THINGS!! I hope I’ve created that loud and clear enough. I, myself, read romance for a reason. I love LOVE. My greatest accomplishment in my life is loving my husband and having two unbelievable sons. Yeah, I work, I’ve had careers and opportunities, but for me, they are nothing compared to my family. So, when I read contemporary, I wish something I can relate to. To me, romance stories are that small zone in time when love becomes the focus and life/duties take a backseat.Anyways…after finishing Lost and Found Sisters I looked up the definition of Women’s Fiction. This article says it in a method I completely understood and could relate to. If like me, you’re a small unclear of the differences between Romance and Women’s Fiction, I suggest you check out this I started reading Lost and Found Sisters looking for the differences. At first, I thought a major difference was that it was a lot more serious. As I went further through the book, I got an AHHA moment when we got to the sexy times. So, women’s fiction means we chop back on the rubbing and grinding and just present the connection in the intimate scenes. Then at 6:30 am I had an epiphany. *Oh, women’s fiction is about life and relationships.* It wasn’t just about him and her getting it on (or what leads up to that), it was about a woman leading her life and managing her relationships with everyone.I GET IT!! I REALLY, REALLY GET IT!!I honestly thought this would be a obtain in and obtain it done read and admit to a small hesitancy in starting. I had a *Sure, Jill Shalvis, give it your best shot trying to convert me from romance to women’s fiction…* mentality.Well, I’m converted. I can now proudly say that I read romance -AND- women’s fiction…maybe I should stipulate that at this particular time, I read Jill Shalvis’s women’s , I loved Lost and Found Sisters. I loved the emotions and feelings generated seeing Quinn (the heroine) grow and form fresh relationships. It wasn’t an simple journey watching her hesitate to take a risk or step out of her comfort zone. I could relate to her hesitations as I have felt those same hesitations myself. Who wants to create mistakes or be rejected?There were a couple of things that really created this book shine. Mick, the hero, is AWESOME!! Tilly, Quinn’s small sister, has these small quotes from her journal at the begin of each chapter. I got to a scene where I was reading them out to my husband. They were so relatable and funny. I would suggest buying this book for those alone…well, maybe not those alone, but they really enhanced the excellentness of the story. I loved Wildstone and wish to visit the small town. Actually, I wish to live in Wildstone…if it was true and maybe in Australia.Lost and Found Sisters is about trusting your instincts, being real to yourself and opening up to fresh experiences. There is a lot of love, laughs and connections that we see begin and then grow. Relationships are not just the romantic kind and this story helped me to appreciate that all relationships support to mould our lives and search rry, this was a very rambling review. I loved Lost and Found Sisters and I can’t wait for more in the Wildstone series. Jill Shalvis, in my eyes you can do no wrong and this story is proof…that is, unless you decided to write a story where you slay off all the characters and create it an apocalyptic/time travel/alien invasion story.

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    Lost and Found Sisters [Book]  2018-5-27 18:0

    Quinn Wellers' is about to undergo a huge change in her life and we're going along for the ride.2 years after the death of her beloved sister, Quinns' life is up-ended by a family secret that leaves her at a cross roads. She's been living on auto-pilot, but now she's faced with opening up her closed off heart to accept a fresh reality. Over the course of a few weeks, she discovers opportunities for love, friendship and sisterhood.Quinn finds herself taking a trip north from LA to Wildstone. This action brings into her life Mick Hennesey and Tilly Adams, along with a plethora of townies that interfere (both amazing and bad) in her plan to return to LA. While Quinn is developing a mates w/ benefits relationship with the dreamboat Mick, it's Tilly and her welfare that advances her connection to Wildstone. Tilly is well, at the heart of the story. Our first clues about her personality are found in the chapter titles or the “The Mixed-Up Files of Tilly Adams’s Journal”. Tilly is a spunky 15 year old girl experiencing a large upheaval too. Quinn and Tilly have much in common, feeling metaphorically deserted, feeling that no one in their pasts can really understand what they are experiencing and the decisions they face.Lost and Found Sisters is a truly delightful story about a woman at a turning point. She makes some amazing and poor decisions as she reconciles who she thought she was with who she's become. Jill's writing is always impeccable and engaging. Her stories are well plotted and her characters lively, and this book is no different. Already a huge fan of Jill Shalvis', this heartfelt story is very touching and reaffimed my appreciation of her storytelling.

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    Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:27

    While I waited for my copy of "Lost and Found" to arrive, I decided to read some of the reviews here on Amazon. I was surprised to see a few reviews that said the book was good, but the dialogue was too witty or snappy and felt forced. Other reviews mentioned that the story goes to "dark" places, so they couldn't figure out if it was supposed to be a Young Adult novel or just regular adult ter reading the book, I can say that those criticisms are slightly valid, but not enough to in any method create the book bad. Yes, the characters speak in a more clever method than most people I've met in the true world. But... I do know people who speak like this. They are usually very bright and just interact with the globe differently. And yes, the book does speak about dark, mature subjects a bit past the halfway point. I wouldn't read this book to my daughters (ages 8, 9, and 13) because it might freak them out. But... as an adult reader, I knew that the subjects brought up are actually true and these things happen in true life. Card didn't create up something horrific to be scandalous - he picked a real-world subject and added it to his story. So I didn't ter saying all of that, how is the book? It's good! It isn't quite as engaging as some of Card's other books, but only because it is smaller in scale and scope. The Ender saga (which is up to approximately 12 books by now) feels important. The themes, moral dilemmas, and human interactions all have weight to them because of how epic the story is."Lost and Found" has a bit of adventure and danger, but it is much more grounded. It is focused on (almost) regular humans living their lives in contemporary times. So it is a touch lighter, a touch simpler than some of Card's other books.Having said that, I thoroughly enjoyed the book from beginning to end and would love to search out more about micropowers and just how inane they might be. The world-building is amazing enough to create me crave latest note: the micropowers discussed actually *do* relate to the Ender saga, because they seem to be based (intentionally or not) on philotic rays. The main hero can "feel" a connection between lost stuff and their owners. Another hero can "feel" where spiders are. And one can "feel" other peoples' navels. It instantly reminded me of the ansible, the hive queen, and philotic webs. So that's something.

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    Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:27

    I really enjoyed reading Orson Scott Cards fresh book. The method he develops his characters makes me feel like i know them and in the case here that I would like to meet them.I realize I have fun the pithy conversation that his characters often have together. It draws me in and I begin thinking what I would say if I were e idea of micro powers is interesting and relatable because we do have talents and abilities that could qualify as the case of the main character, if you were so inclined you could compare his micro power to how the Holy Spirit works. Of course, no religion is taught here, just a amazing idea with smart characters.

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    Lost and Found []  2020-1-14 19:27

    The Premise for this book was great. This is a globe in which definitive, verifiable and demonstrable powers or talents exist. They are limited in scope and power, but they are unquestionably true and throughout the first half of the book, it was fun to watch the main hero discover the extent of his micro-power and learn how to create better use of it. I would read more books based in this “world” if they were better written. That’s the true issue with this book. The writing was not what one would expect from an author with a history like Orson Scott Card. The book started off strong, after the first 100 pages or so, It really went downhill fast.***Hints and Potential Spoilers follow***The situation with Beth’s mother was ridiculous. The zone of the second kidnap victim was really poorly thought out and created no logical sense beyond the fact that it set up the “action” for the rescue scene. All of the interactions between Ezekiel and beautiful much every adult in the book was about as unrealistic as I’ve ever experienced in true life or the written word. The method this book was written, Ezekiel’s power wasn’t finding lost things and returning them to their owner. His true power was to place out an aura that created every person he ever met instantly distrust and dislike him while simultaneously making him 100% immune to any consequences of his mouthing off to authority figures that really should have place him in his place. (Yes, I obtain the backstory. He’s been dealing with it for years and he’s adjusted to cope with harassment, but it comes off as completely one sided in the book.) And then there’s the constant justification and explaining of everything anyone does or says throughout the book. Card will introduce an idea like “Beth can’t be fostered by Ezekiel and his Dad because it would be inappropriate because…” Ok. That’s reasonable. Ezekiel and his Dad will explain it to each other. Then they’ll explain it to Beth. And then Beth will explain it to them with a few extra justifications and “What If’s”. Then they’ll explain how the Lawyer would explain it to Kid Protective Services. Then someone will have to explain it to Shank. Then it will come up again with the kidnapped children parents. This is just one of a lot of MANY examples throughout the book. Why he can’t search people because they always know where they are is explained at least 12 times. He’s being shunned because everyone thinks he’s a thief is explained at least 18 times. Beth is little for her age. I obtain it. You don’t need to explain it to the guidance counselor, the principal, each individual at the micropowers meeting, the cop, the kidnapped children parents, and everyone else introduced as an individual or group anywhere in the book. Don’t even obtain me started on the children and their McDonalds trip. At that point the book was reading like a stream of consciousness writing exercise and Card was just putting to paper whatever came to mind without any sort of plan or summary, what we ended up with seemed like a poorly edited second draft of an idea that could have been a really amazing short story, but definitely wasn’t ready to be a novel. I’m leaving this as a 2 star review because I do respect the author and I really like the ideas behind the book. I just think it could have been a much better book if it was given the time and effort it deserved.

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    Harlem: Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 0:20

    As a Harlem resident I am immensely proud of the buildings I walk past everyday. I am also very curious about them. Harlem Lost and Found speaks not only to their appearance but to the story behind them. This is a book I can go back to often and not one that will sit on the shelf rarely opened.

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    Harlem: Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 0:20

    Was shipped promptly and as owe specs

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    Harlem: Lost and Found []  2020-1-22 0:20

    Harlem Lost and Found (Architectural and Social History, 1765-1915), Michael Henry Adams�s recently released volume on the architectural, social, and cultural history of Harlem, is a visual feast. With beautifully reproduced etchings and engravings, crisp black and white images and brilliant color photographs by Paul Rocheleau, Adams presents Harlem�s past and show architectural splendor. He sets a lofty goal for himself � �to put Harlem�s architecture in a context of history and people, living and dead, not only building and past residents but also those who preserve, cherish, and restore what has been built� � and, visually, he ams has an architect�s eye and, seemingly, a photographic memory that allows him to correlate examples of architectural styles and trends, even when the examples are blocks, neighborhoods, or, in a few cases, boroughs apart. Given the sheer number of structures in Harlem, this is no mean feat. The descriptive, concise prose that accompanies the pictures is engaging and, on the surface, sounds authoritative. Adams is at his best when developing broad architectural themes � his basic one being that neighborhoods evolve, socioeconomic and ethnic groups come and go, but architecture provides an anchor; it is a link with the past that, when lovingly preserved, becomes a bridge to the future. In the specifics of examples and historic detail, however, Adams is often careless. Sometimes, the effect is a minor inconsistency from one section of the book to another; other times, however, the resulting inaccuracies mar the credibility of a book that professes to be history. �There was a amazing of material to consider, and behind nearly every fact included lies a host of stories untold.� writes Adams at the onset, �In some cases, memory or notation of sources has been less than perfect; any resultant errors are my own.� Amiable though that disclaimer might be, it does not excuse lax ams has an expansive view of Harlem that extends to descriptions of buildings in Washington Heights as well as thumbnail sketches of forgotten locations such as Carmansville, Minniesland, and Audubon Park. Therein lies a problem. Although early Fresh Yorkers referred to the zone north of Harlem as Harlem Heights, that name fell out of use well before the decades that form the heart of Adams�s book. The present-day southern border of Washington Heights is 155th Road and has been since its inception more than 140 year ago. That boundary has appeared on town maps for decades and determines, among other things, voting districts and police precincts. Although blurred names and boundaries may seem negligible, they exaggerate Harlem�s geographical and cultural reach, which is not important � as the portions of the book that are devoted to the true Harlem clearly prove. Further, this exaggeration denies the annexed neighborhoods the individuality their respective histories have earned them.While architectural trends north of 155th Road may serve to illustrate some of Adam�s themes, these neighborhoods did not share a social or cultural history with Harlem, much less with each other. The working-class and transient population that occupied row houses in 19th Century Carmansville (clustered around Amsterdam Avenue, to the east of Broadway) had small in common with the upper-middle class families who owned huge houses surrounded by cultivated gardens in Audubon Park (to the west of Broadway). Although Minniesland and Aububon Park were various names for the same zone � the former from approximately 1841 to the early 1850s and the latter from about then until approximately 1910 � Adams leaves the reader with the impression that they were two various tention to detail does not seem to a basic concern when Adams, admittedly a amazing storyteller, recounts history. He incorrectly identifies the major owner of Audubon Park (it was George Blake Grinnell, not Jesse Benedict), confuses two Grinnells (the older was George Blake, the younger George Bird), and attributes one of Madame Audubon�s houses to Vaux & Withers (who may have enlarged it decades after it was built). In more latest history, he incorrectly puts The Grinnell (an apartment building in Washington Heights) in Harlem, incorrectly states its date of co-oping, and grossly exaggerates an apartment sale-price there in 2000.A beautifully produced book with an expensive cover carries a certain amount of authority simply because it looks impressive. Through his inattention to detail, Adams undermines his own authority and prevents this book from being the definitive history it could have been. That said, this book is a superb pictorial survey of upper Manhattan, and deserves a put in every Fresh York-o-phile�s library.

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    Pompeii: Lost and Found []  2020-1-16 8:40

    my kid loved it

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    Pompeii: Lost and Found []  2020-1-16 8:40

    Pompeii Lost and Found is a nonfiction picture book for kids in grade 4 and up. It begins with an explanation of the devastation of Pompeii by the volcanic explosion of Mount Vesuvius. The book leads us through the archaeological discoveries of an entombed city. It explains the artifacts and what they mean with regard to the life of the historic city. There is just enough info at each page to pull the reader through the book. It is written in a style sure to intrigue all readers and is filled with juicy tidbits such as, “They’ve also found graffiti written about gladiators, such as ‘Celadus, glory of the girls, heartthrob of the girls.’”Bonnie Christensen’s awesome illustrations given air of authenticity to the book. She adapts the style of her art to the topic matter once again by creating genuinely frescoes to tell the story of Pompeii. In Italy, the artist learned how to paint pure pigment mixed with water on wet plaster, like the ancient Romans, creating a fresco. She explains the process in a note at the end of the book. As we turn the pages, it feels as though we have walked into an ancient city. The texture of the frescoes is authentic and ildren, and adults, of all ages will learn from and have fun this exceptional book. Highly nd more children's book reviews at [...]

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    Pompeii: Lost and Found []  2020-1-16 8:40

    Since we have been fortunate to having visited Pompeii the book helps hold the memories alive.

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    Patches Lost And Found [Book]  2018-1-12 18:1

    A amazing book for kids who have problem getting started with writing.

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    Patches Lost And Found [Book]  2018-1-12 18:1

    Totally satisfied!

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    Patches Lost And Found [Book]  2018-1-12 18:1

    Amazing book for writing.

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    Lost and Found Sisters [Book]  2018-5-27 18:0

    I can always count on Jill Shalvis to give me a story that will hold me engaged from beginning to end and Lost and Found Sisters kept me turning the pages.Quinn has been going through the motions of her life as she grieves her sister Beth's death. She's lost her best friend. Her love life took a hit too and she's no longer seeing the family mate everyone thinks she's going to marry. Emotionally it's been easier for Quinn to shut en she receives some devastating news that upends everything she knew about her family. She has no choice but to figure out the truth of her life and the past she's just finding out about in the little California city of Wildstone. What she doesn't know is that Wildstone is her ere are a lot of fresh revelations when she reaches the small town, such as the cafe that is now hers and fresh relatives that are as nervous about her as she is about them. And then there's Mick, the man who has managed to wake up parts of Quinn she though long dead and gone. With her future up for grabs, Quinn has quite a few decisions to create that are complicated by where she has been and where she wants to go.I beautiful much devoured this story in a day. It was so simple to obtain involved in this story, the characters, and the city of Wildstone which deserves a scream out for anchoring this story its little city life and livelihood. Quinn's life continues to have fresh revelations and she takes it all in stride. Even though she's torn between returning to her old life in LA and the connection she feels to Wildstone, she handles it all as best she can and I loved her resiliency.While Lost and Found sisters is labeled as women's fiction and much of the joy in this book relates to Quinn finding her way, there's a lovely romance between Quinn and Mick, a former local now living in San Francisco. There's a spark between Mick and Quinn from the begin that grows throughout the book as Quinn processes the changes in her life and makes decisions on her future.I loved everything about this story, from Quinn's finding her method to the other lives she touches in Wildstone. There's a lot of love in this book and it comes at you from a lot of various directions. Lost and Found Sisters also celebrates little city life, from everyone being in your business to the difficulties of maintaining growth and viability. There's a lot to this story that enriches it and it's done is a very subtle manner which I loved.Lost and Found Sisters is a attractive second possibility story that created my heart feel satisfied and I'm looking forward to more stories from Wildstone. Definitely recommended.

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    Lost and Found Sisters [Book]  2018-5-27 18:0

    Sous-chef Quinn Weller is just living day to day after losing her sister in a devastating vehicle accident. She has a amazing if demanding job in the hottest restaurants in Los Angeles, a somewhat of a boyfriend determined to obtain her to his thinking of being married and she seems to be on the quick track to having the excellent life. Except Quinn is lost and feels empty, not knowing why. Until a lawyer finds her and delivers a bombshell: she is the heir to an inheritance in a put called Wildstone, California. Shocked and feeling like her life has been a lie, Quinn picks up and goes to Wildstone, expecting to take over a house or something. What she finds is a little city where gossip is the norm, people are friendly and the easy pleasures begin to grow on her. But when she finds out the second portion of her inheritance, a sister she never knew she had. Can two wildly various people obtain through the loss of a life, of a person to see that they need one another? Can Quinn search it in her heart to allow herself be loved by not just her new-found sister but also by the city of Wildstone?Wow is all I can say after reading Jill Shalvis’s fresh book, LOST AND FOUND SISTERS. It’s a unbelievable tale of a woman floundering after a major loss, just going through the motions and not moving forward. Quinn is stuck in life so to speak. I loved this book so much because it delivers unbelievable characters that are quirky, intriguing and downright enjoyable. You got Quinn, who is struggling with all the bombshells going off around her and then there is Tilly, a teenager who lost her only parent, finds herself with a sister she didn’t know she had and uncertainty in where her put is in life. These two stole my heart right off the bat and kept it even after the latest page is read. I loved Quinn and Tilly so much. They are delightful, entertaining even as Tilly tries to one-up Quinn and their unconventional relationship gets stronger even as these two test to forge a bond, a bond that happens even as both test to avoid it. I loved the scenes with Quinn trying to parent Tilly, of finding her put in the city of Wildstone and starting to move forward in life with cutie, Mick, a man determined to have nothing to do with Wildstone, yet finds himself there a lot. These three are just the hint of the delightful cast of characters that create up LOST AND FOUND SISTERS and I truly loved each of them. They had me laughing over their quips and comments, sighing as they delivered some of the best snarky comments I have read lately and kept me glued to the book till the very end.LOST AND FOUND SISTERS is more about one woman finding her put in this world, moving forward after a major loss in her life but also about forgiveness, desire to be loved and cherished and above all, finding their put where they belong, be it in a little city like Wildstone or huge town like Los Angeles. Ms. Shalvis delivers a heartfelt read that will take you on a journey that is plain awesome and delightful. I for one want I could visit Wildstone just to meet these awesome people, have a cup of coffee at Caro’s Café and search out all the gossip. Ms. Shalvis is a talented writer who hits it out of the park in her first women’s fiction book, LOST AND FOUND SISTERS and I, for one, can’t wait to see if this author will return to Wildstone, California for more stories.If you have fun a story full of complex and wildly entertaining characters set in a little city that is just as fascinating then you need to check this book out and maybe fall in love with this author’s writing. I look forward to seeing where she goes from is is an objective review and not an endorsement

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